National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for heavy ion collider

  1. COMMISSIONING OF THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; AHRENS,L.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,M.; BAI,M.; CAMERON,P.; CARDONA,J.; CONNOLLY,R.; ET AL; TSOUPAS,N.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    This report describes in detail steps performed in bringing the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) from the commissioning into the operational stage when collisions between 60 bunches of fully striped gold ions, were routinely provided. Corrections of the few power supplies connections by the beam measurements are described. Beam lifetime improvements at injection, along the acceleration are shown. The beam diagnostic results; like Schottky detector, beam profile monitor, beam position monitors, tune meter and others, are shown [1].

  2. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) physics overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruan, L.J.; Ruan, L.; n /a

    2010-02-08

    The results from data taken during the last several years at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be reviewed in the paper. Several selected topics that further our understanding of constituent quark scaling, jet quenching and color screening effect of heavy quarkonia in the hot dense medium will be presented. Detector upgrades will further probe the properties of Quark Gluon Plasma. Future measurements with upgraded detectors will be presented. The discovery perspectives from future measurements will also be discussed.

  3. Observation of snake resonances at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Alessi, J.; et al

    2010-09-27

    The Siberian snakes are powerful tools in preserving polarization in high energy accelerators has been demonstrated at the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the Siberian snakes also introduce a new set of depolarization resonances, i.e. snake resonances as first discovered by Lee and Tepikian. The intrinsic spin resonances above 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV which raises the challenge to preserve the polarization up to 250 GeV. In 2009, polarized protons collided for the first time at the RHIC design store energy of 250 GeV. This paper presents the experimental measurements of snake resonances at RHIC. The plan for avoiding these resonances is also presented.

  4. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Project Development Isotope Program Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown

  5. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  6. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, R.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Jowett, J.M.; Fischer, W.

    2010-09-07

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon {sup 197}Au{sup 79}+ beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future {sup 208}Pb+{sup 82+} beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  7. The Multi-Purpose Detector for NICA heavy-Ion Collider at JINR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogachevsky, O. V.

    2012-05-15

    The Multi-Purpose Detector (MPD) is designed to study heavy-ion collisions at the Nuclotron-based heavy Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) at JINR, Dubna. Its main components located inside a superconducting solenoid are a tracking system composed of a silicon microstrip vertex detector followed by a large volume time-projection chamber, a time-of-flight system for particle identification and a barrel electromagnetic calorimeter. A zero degree hadron calorimeter is designed specifically to measure the energy of spectators. In this paper, all parts of the apparatus are described and their tracking and particle identification parameters are discussed in some detail.

  8. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2010-01-08

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  9. Vector meson production in coherent hadronic interactions: Update on predictions for energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncalves, V. P.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2011-07-15

    In this Rapid Communication we update our predictions for the photoproduction of vector mesons in coherent pp and AA collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies using the color dipole approach and the Color Glass Condensate formalism. In particular, we present our predictions for the first run of the LHC at half energy and for the rapidity dependence of the ratio between the J/{Psi} and {rho} cross sections at RHIC energies.

  10. Measurements of {phi} meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Kent State Univ.; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physics Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, and in p+p and d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) {phi} meson transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra in central Au+Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the p{sub T} spectra from p+p, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high p{sub T} and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant {phi}/K{sup -} yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality, and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {Omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T} {approx} 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au+Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

  11. Measurements of {phi} meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.

    2009-06-15

    We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi}{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4,130, and 200 GeV, and in p+p and d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y|<0.5) {phi} meson transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra in central Au+Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the p{sub T} spectra from p+p, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high p{sub T} and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant {phi}/K{sup -} yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality, and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T}{approx}4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au+Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

  12. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  13. v{sub 4} from ideal and viscous hydrodynamic simulations of nuclear collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luzum, Matthew; Gombeaud, Clement; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2010-05-15

    We compute v{sub 4}/(v{sub 2}){sup 2} in ideal and viscous hydrodynamics. We investigate its sensitivity to details of the hydrodynamic model and compare the results to experimental data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Whereas v{sub 2} has a significant sensitivity only to initial eccentricity and viscosity while being insensitive to freeze-out temperature, we find that v{sub 4}/(v{sub 2}){sup 2} is quite insensitive to initial eccentricity. On the other hand, it can still be sensitive to shear viscosity in addition to freeze-out temperature, although viscous effects do not universally increase v{sub 4}/(v{sub 2}){sup 2} as originally predicted. Consistent with data, we find no dependence on particle species. We also make a prediction for v{sub 4}/(v{sub 2}){sup 2} in heavy ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  14. Photoproduction of {rho}{sup 0} mesons in ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncalves, V. P.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2009-11-15

    We investigate the photoproduction of {rho} mesons in ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies in the dipole approach and within two phenomenological models based on the color glass condensate (CGC) formalism. We estimate the integrated cross section and rapidity distribution for meson production and compare our predictions with the data from the STAR Collaboration. In particular, we demonstrate that the total cross section at RHIC is strongly dependent on the energy behavior of the dipole-target cross section at low energies, which is not well determined in the dipole approach. In contrast, the predictions at midrapidities at RHIC and in the full rapidity at LHC are under theoretical control and can be used to test QCD dynamics at high energies.

  15. Operational head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Costanzo, M.; Hock, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; et al

    2015-12-23

    Head-on beam-beam compensation has been implemented in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in order to increase the luminosity delivered to the experiments. We discuss the principle of combining a lattice for resonance driving term compensation and an electron lens for tune spread compensation. We describe the electron lens technology and its operational use. As of this date the implemented compensation scheme approximately doubled the peak and average luminosities.

  16. The Smallest Drops of the Hottest Matter? New Investigations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (493rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sickles, Anne

    2014-03-19

    Pool sharks at the billiards hall know that sometimes you aim to rocket the cue ball for a head-on collision, and other times, a mere glance will do. Physicists need to know more than a thing or two about collision geometry too, as they sift through data from the billions of ions that smash together at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Determining whether ions crash head-on or just glance is crucial for the physicists analyzing data to study quark-gluon plasmathe ultra-hot, "perfect" liquid of quarks and gluons that existed more than 13 billion years ago, before the first protons and neutrons formed. For these physicists, collision geometry data provides insights about quark-gluon plasma's extremely low viscosity and other unusual properties, which are essential for understanding more about the "strong force" that holds together the nucleus, protons, and neutrons of every atom in the universe. Dr. Sickles explains how physicists use data collected at house-sized detectors like PHENIX and STAR to determine what happens before, during, and after individual particle collisions among billions at RHIC. She also explains how the ability to collide different "species" of nuclei at RHICincluding protons and gold ions today and possibly more with a proposed future electron-ion collider upgrade (eRHIC)enables physicists to probe deeper into the mysteries of quark-gluon plasma and the strong force.

  17. Strange quark suppression and strange hadron production in pp collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long Haiyan; Feng Shengqin; Zhou Daimei; Yan Yuliang; Ma Hailiang; Sa Benhao

    2011-09-15

    The parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE based on PYTHIA is utilized to systematically investigate strange particle production in pp collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Globally speaking, the PACIAE results of the strange particle rapidity density at midrapidity and the transverse momentum distribution are better than those of PYTHIA (default) in comparison with STAR and ALICE experimental data. This may represent the importance of the parton and hadron rescatterings, as well as the reduction mechanism of strange quark suppression, added in the PACIAE model. The K/{pi} ratios as a function of reaction energy in pp collisions from CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) to LHC energies are also analyzed in this paper.

  18. Azimuthally sensitive femtoscopy in hydrodynamics with statistical hadronization from the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisiel, Adam; Broniowski, Wojciech; Florkowski, Wojciech; Chojnacki, Mikolaj

    2009-01-15

    Azimuthally sensitive femtoscopy for heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is explored within the approach consisting of the hydrodynamics of perfect fluid followed by statistical hadronization. It is found that for the RHIC initial conditions, employing the Gaussian shape of the initial energy density, the very same framework that reproduces the standard soft observables [including the transverse-momentum spectra, the elliptic flow, and the azimuthally averaged Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii] leads to a proper description of the azimuthally sensitive femtoscopic observables; we find that the azimuthal variation of the side and out HBT radii as well as out-side cross term are very well reproduced for all centralities. Concerning the dependence of the femtoscopic parameters on k{sub T} we find that it is very well reproduced. The model is then extrapolated to the LHC energy. We predict the overall moderate growth of the HBT radii and the decrease of their azimuthal oscillations. Such effects are naturally caused by longer evolution times. In addition, we discuss in detail the space-time patterns of particle emission. We show that they are quite complex and argue that the overall shape seen by the femtoscopic methods cannot be easily disentangled on the basis of simple-minded arguments.

  19. Constraining the viscous freeze-out distribution function with data obtained at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luzum, Matthew; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the form of the viscous correction to the equilibrium distribution function in the context of a Cooper-Frye freeze-out prescription for viscous hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic heavy ion collisions. The standard quadratic ansatz used by all groups for the case of shear viscosity is found to be disfavored by experimental data for v{sub 4}/(v{sub 2}){sup 2} at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and is unlikely to be correct for the hadron resonance gas present at freeze-out. Instead, data for v{sub 2}(p{sub t}) along with v{sub 4}/(v{sub 2}){sup 2} favor a momentum dependence between linear and quadratic.

  20. Bulk matter evolution and extraction of jet transport parameters in heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xiaofang; Greiner, Carsten; Wang Enke; Wang Xinnian; Xu Zhe

    2010-06-15

    Within the picture of jet quenching induced by multiple parton scattering and gluon bremsstrahlung, medium modification of parton fragmentation functions and therefore the suppression of large transverse-momentum hadron spectra are controlled by both the value and the space-time profile of the jet transport parameter along the jet propagation path. Experimental data on single-hadron suppression in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energy are analyzed within the higher-twist (HT) approach to the medium-modified fragmentation functions and the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD parton model. Assuming that the jet transport parameter q is proportional to the particle number density in both quark gluon plasma (QGP) and hadronic phase, experimental data on jet quenching in deeply inelastic scattering off nuclear targets can provide guidance on q{sub h} in the hot hadronic matter. One can then study the dependence of the extracted initial value of jet-quenching parameter q{sub 0} at initial time tau{sub 0} on the bulk medium evolution. Effects of transverse expansion, radial flow, phase transition, and nonequilibrium evolution are examined. The extracted values are found to vary from q{sub 0}tau{sub 0}=0.54 GeV{sup 2} in the (1+3)d ideal hydrodynamic model to 0.96 GeV{sup 2} in a cascade model, with the main differences coming from the initial nonequilibrium evolution and the later hadronic evolution. The overall contribution to jet quenching from the hadronic phase, about 22%-44%, is found to be significant. Therefore, a realistic description of the early nonequilibrium parton evolution and later hadronic interaction will be critical for accurate extraction of the jet transport parameter in the strongly interacting QGP phase in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  1. Fourth workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatyga, M.; Moskowitz, B.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: physics at RHIC; flavor flow from quark-gluon plasma; space-time quark-gluon cascade; jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions; parton distributions in hard nuclear collisions; experimental working groups, two-arm electron/photon spectrometer collaboration; total and elastic pp cross sections; a 4{pi} tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer; hadron spectroscopy; efficiency and background simulations for J/{psi} detection in the RHIC dimuon experiment; the collision regions beam crossing geometries; Monte Carlo simulations of interactions and detectors; proton-nucleus interactions; the physics of strong electromagnetic fields in collisions of relativistic heavy ions; a real time expert system for experimental high energy/nuclear physics; the development of silicon multiplicity detectors; a pad readout detector for CRID/tracking; RHIC TPC R D progress and goals; development of analog memories for RHIC detector front-end electronic systems; calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment; construction of a highly segmented high resolution TOF system; progress report on a fast, particle-identifying trigger based on ring-imaging and highly integrated electronics for a TPC detector.

  2. Effects of momentum conservation and flow on angular correlations observed in experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Scott; Schlichting, Soeren; Gavin, Sean

    2011-08-15

    Correlations of azimuthal angles observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have gained great attention due to the prospect of identifying fluctuations of parity-odd regions in the field sector of QCD. Whereas the observable of interest related to parity fluctuations involves subtracting opposite-sign from same-sign correlations, the STAR collaboration reported the same-sign and opposite-sign correlations separately. It is shown here how momentum conservation combined with collective elliptic flow contributes significantly to this class of correlations, although not to the difference between the opposite- and same-sign observables. The effects are modeled with a crude simulation of a pion gas. Although the simulation reproduces the scale of the correlation, the centrality dependence is found to be sufficiently different in character to suggest additional considerations beyond those present in the pion gas simulation presented here.

  3. System-Size Independence of Directed Flow Measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.

    2008-12-19

    We measure directed flow (v{sub 1}) for charged particles in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}), transverse momentum (p{sub t}), and collision centrality, based on data from the STAR experiment. We find that the directed flow depends on the incident energy but, contrary to all available model implementations, not on the size of the colliding system at a given centrality. We extend the validity of the limiting fragmentation concept to v{sub 1} in different collision systems, and investigate possible explanations for the observed sign change in v{sub 1}(p{sub t})

  4. Tomography of quark gluon plasma at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gossiaux, P. B.; Bierkandt, R.; Aichelin, J.

    2009-04-15

    Using the recently published model [Gossiaux and Aichelin, Phys. Rev. C 78, 014904 (2008)] for the collisional energy loss of heavy quarks in a quark gluon plasma (QGP), based on perturbative QCD (pQCD) with a running coupling constant, we study the interaction between heavy quarks and plasma particles in detail. We discuss correlations between the simultaneously produced c and c quarks, study how central collisions can be experimentally selected, predict observable correlations, and extend our model to the energy domain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We finally compare the predictions of our model with that of other approaches such as anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT)

  5. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji; Aronson, Samuel H.; Young, Glenn R.; Paffrath, Leo

    1993-01-29

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

  6. Jet energy loss, photon production, and photon-hadron correlations at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin Guangyou; Ruppert, Joerg; Gale, Charles; Jeon, Sangyong; Moore, Guy D.

    2009-11-15

    Jet energy loss, photon production, and photon-hadron correlations are studied together at high transverse momentum in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies. The modification of hard jets traversing a hot and dense nuclear medium is evaluated by consistently taking into account induced gluon radiation and elastic collisions. The production of high-transverse-momentum photons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC is calculated by incorporating a complete set of photon-production channels. Comparison with experimental photon production and photon-hadron correlation data is performed, using a (3+1)-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic description of the thermalized medium created in these collisions. Our results demonstrate that the interaction between the hard jets and the soft medium is important for the study of photon production and of photon-hadron correlation at RHIC.

  7. QCD Factorization for heavy quarkonium production at collider...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: QCD Factorization for heavy quarkonium production at collider energies In this talk, I briefly review several models of the heavy quarkonium production at collider energies, ...

  8. Conservation laws and multiplicity evolution of spectra at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chajecki, Zbigniew; Lisa, Mike

    2009-03-15

    Transverse momentum distributions in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions carry considerable information about the dynamics of the hot system produced. Direct comparison with the same spectra from p+p collisions has proved invaluable in identifying novel features associated with the larger system, in particular, the 'jet quenching' at high momentum and the apparently much stronger collective flow dominating the spectral shape at low momentum. We point out possible hazards of ignoring conservation laws in the comparison of high- and low-multiplicity final states. We argue that the effects of energy and momentum conservation actually dominate many of the observed systematics, and that p+p collisions may be much more similar to heavy ion collisions than generally thought.

  9. Dynamical heavy-quark recombination and the nonphotonic single-electron puzzle at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Magnin, J.; Montano, Luis Manuel; Sanchez, G. Toledo

    2009-12-15

    We show that the single, nonphotonic electron nuclear modification factor R{sub AA}{sup e} is affected by the thermal enhancement of the heavy-baryon-to-heavy-meson ratio in relativistic heavy-ion collisions with respect to proton-proton collisions. We make use of the dynamical quark recombination model to compute such a ratio and show that this produces a sizable suppression factor for R{sub AA}{sup e} at intermediate transverse momenta. We argue that this suppression factor needs to be considered, in addition to the energy loss contribution, in calculations of R{sub AA}{sup e}.

  10. Early anisotropic hydrodynamics and thermalization and Hanbury-Brown-Twiss puzzles in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Florkowski, Wojciech

    2010-08-15

    We address the problem of whether the early thermalization and Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) puzzles in relativistic heavy-ion collisions may be solved by the assumption that the early dynamics of the produced matter is locally anisotropic. The hybrid model describing the purely transverse hydrodynamic evolution followed by the perfect-fluid hydrodynamic stage is constructed. The transition from the transverse to perfect-fluid hydrodynamics is described by the Landau matching conditions applied at a fixed proper time {tau}{sub tr}. The global fit to the RHIC data reproduces the soft hadronic observables (the pion, kaon, and the proton spectra, the pion and kaon elliptic flow, and the pion HBT radii) with the accuracy of about 20%. These results indicate that the assumption of the very fast thermalization may be relaxed. In addition, the presented model suggests that a large part of the inconsistencies between the theoretical and experimental HBT results may be removed.

  11. THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) CRYOGENIC SYSTEM AT BNL: REVIEW OF THE MODIFICATIONS AND UPGRADES SINCE 2002 AND PLANNED IMPROVEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THAN,Y.R.; TUOZZOLO, J.; SIDI-YAKHLEF, A.; GANNI, V.; KNUDSEN, P.; ARENIUS, D.

    2007-07-16

    Brookhaven National Laboratory continues its multi-year program to improve the operational efficiency, reliability, and stability of the cryogenic system which also resulted in improved beam availability of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper summarizes the work and changes made after each phase over the past four years to the present, as well as proposed future improvements. Power usage dropped from an initial 9.4 MW to the present 5.1 MW and is expected to drop below 5 MW after the completion of the remaining proposed improvements. The work proceeded in phases by balancing the Collider's schedule of operation, time required for the modifications and budget constraints. The main changes include process control, compressor oil removal and management, elimination of the use of cold compressors and two liquid helium storage tanks, insulation of the third liquid helium storage tank, compressor bypass flow reduction and the addition of a load turbine (Joule-Thompson expander) with associated heat exchangers at the cold end of the plant. Also, liquid helium pumps used for forced circulation of the sub-cooled helium through the magnet loops were eliminated by an accelerator supply flow reconfiguration. Planned future upgrades include the resizing of expanders 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies.

  12. Charge conservation at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and contributions to local parity violation observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlichting, Soeren; Pratt, Scott

    2011-01-15

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions provide laboratory environments from which one can study the creation of a novel state of matter, the quark-gluon plasma. The existence of such a state is postulated to alter the mechanism and evolution of charge production, which then becomes manifest in charge correlations. We study the separation of balancing charges at kinetic freeze-out by analyzing recent results on balancing charge correlations for Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. We find that in central collisions, the spatial points from which balancing charges are emitted are characterized by smaller relative angles. These results are consistent with the expectation that charge production occurred later in the collision, as would be expected for delayed hadronization. An alternative explanation would be that the charges were produced early, perhaps with a different mechanism where the charge production mechanism was altered from string breaking which tends to separate the charges in relative rapidity. The alternative explanation would also rely on the diffusion of charges being small. In addition we calculate the contributions from charge-balance correlations to STAR's local parity violation observable. We find that local charge conservation, when combined with elliptic flow, explains the bulk of STAR's measurement.

  13. Medium-modified jets and initial state fluctuations as sources of charge correlations measured at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, Hannah; Bass, Steffen A.; Renk, Thorsten

    2011-01-15

    We investigate the contribution of medium-modified jets and initial state fluctuations to the asymmetry in charged-particle production with respect to the reaction plane. This asymmetry has been suggested as a compelling signature for the chiral magnetic effect in QCD and makes the study of conventional scenarios for the creation of such charged-particle multiplicity fluctuations a timely endeavor. The different path-length combinations of jets through the medium in noncentral heavy ion collisions result in finite correlations of like and different charged particles emitted in the different hemispheres. Our calculation is based on the combination of jet events from Yet another Jet Energy-Loss Model (YaJEM) and a bulk-medium evolution. It is found that the jet production probabilities are too small to observe this effect. The influence of initial state fluctuations on this observable is explored by using an event-by-event (3+1)-dimensional hybrid approach that is based on Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) with an ideal hydrodynamic evolution. In this calculation, momentum conservation and elliptic flow are explicitly taken into account. The asymmetries in the initial state are translated to a final state momentum asymmetry by the hydrodynamic flow profile. Dependent on the size of the initial state fluctuations, the resulting charged-particle asymmetries are in qualitative agreement with the preliminary STAR (solenoid tracker at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) results. The multiparticle correlation as proposed by the PHENIX Collaboration can, in principle, be used to disentangle the different contributions, however, in practice, is affected substantially by the procedure to subtract trivial resonance decay contributions.

  14. QCD Factorization for heavy quarkonium production at collider energies

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect QCD Factorization for heavy quarkonium production at collider energies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: QCD Factorization for heavy quarkonium production at collider energies In this talk, I briefly review several models of the heavy quarkonium production at collider energies, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models. Authors: Qiu Jianwei [1] ; Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

  15. Kaon and pion femtoscopy at the highest energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in a hydrokinetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpenko, Iu. A.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.

    2010-05-15

    The hydrokinetic approach that incorporates hydrodynamic expansion of the systems formed in A+A collisions and their dynamical decoupling is applied to restore the initial conditions and space-time picture of the matter evolution in central Au+Au collisions at the top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energy. The analysis is based on the detailed reproduction of the pion and kaon momentum spectra and femtoscopic data in whole interval of the transverse momenta studied by both the STAR and the PHENIX collaborations. The fitting procedure utilizes the two parameters: the maximal energy density at supposed thermalization time 1 fm/c and the strength of the prethermal flows developed to this time. The quark-gluon plasma and hadronic gas is supposed to be in complete local equilibrium above the chemical freeze-out temperature T{sub ch}=165 MeV with the equation of states (EoS) at high temperatures as in the lattice QCD. Below T{sub ch} the EoS in the expanding and gradually decoupling fluid depends on the composition of the hadron-resonance gas at each space-time point and accounts for decays of resonances into the nonequilibrated medium. A good description of the pion and kaon transverse momentum spectra and interferometry radii is reached at both used initial energy density profiles motivated by the Glauber and color glass condensate models, however, at different initial energy densities. The discussion as for the approximate pion and kaon m{sub T} scaling for the interferometry radii is based on a comparison of the emission functions for these particles.

  16. Breaking of the number-of-constituent-quark scaling for identified-particle elliptic flow as a signal of phase change in low-energy data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, J.; Jin, F.; Zhang, S.; Chen, J. H.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Ma, G. L.; Zhong, C.

    2009-06-15

    We argue that measurements of identified-particle elliptic flow in a wide energy range could shed light on the possible phase change in high-energy heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). When the hadronization process is dominated by quark coalescence, the number-of-constituent-quark (NCQ) scaling for the identified-particle elliptic flow can serve as a probe for studying the strong interacting partonic matter. In the upcoming RHIC low-energy runs, the NCQ scaling behavior may be broken because of the change of the effective degrees of freedom of the hot dense matter, which corresponds to the transition from the dominant partonic phase to the dominant hadronic phase. A multiphase transport model is used to present the dependence of NCQ scaling behavior on the different hadronization mechanisms.

  17. Ion polarization in the MEIC figure-8 ion collider ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, Y. Zhang, P. Chevtsov, A.M. Kondratenko, M.A. Kondratenko, Yu.N. Filatov

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear physics program envisaged at the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) currently being developed at the Jefferson Lab calls for collisions of 3-11 GeV/c longitudinally polarized electrons and 20-100 GeV/c, in equivalent proton momentum, longitudinally/ transversely polarized protons/ deuterons/ light ions. We present a scheme that provides the required ion polarization arrangement in the MEIC's ion collider ring.

  18. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS Experimental Determination of the Symmetry Energy of a Low Density Nuclear Gas ...II-1 S....

  19. Characterizing Heavy Ion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Ion Reactions in the 1980's Is there Treasure at the end of the Rainbow? & What happens and how do different modes compete? John Schiffer One of the three research areas for ATLAS, as stated in a 1984 document to Congress: Are there some new marvelous symmetries, hidden in resonances in heavier nuclei, beyond 12 C+ 12 C and its immediate vicinity? (s.c. linac work, pre-ATLAS) Other attempts to chase the rainbow 180 o elastic scattering of 12 C on 40 Ca shows structure Fusion of 16 O on

  20. Significant in-medium {eta}{sup '} mass reduction in {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vertesi, R.; Sziklai, J.; Csoergo, T.

    2011-05-15

    In high-energy heavy ion collisions a hot and dense medium is formed, where the U{sub A}(1) or chiral symmetry may temporarily be restored. As a consequence, the mass of the {eta}{sup '}(958) mesons may be reduced to its quark model value, and the abundance of {eta}{sup '} mesons at low p{sub T} may be enhanced by more than a factor of 10. The intercept parameter {lambda}{sub *} of the charged pion Bose Einstein correlations provides a sensitive observable of the possibly enhanced {eta}{sup '} abundance. We have analyzed {lambda}{sub *}(m{sub T}) data from {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}})=200 GeV central Au+Au reactions measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using extensive Monte Carlo simulations based on six popular models for hadronic multiplicities. Based on the combined STAR and PHENIX data set, and on various systematic investigations of resonance multiplicities and model parameters, we conclude that in {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}})=200 GeV central Au+Au reactions the mass of the {eta}{sup '} meson is reduced by {Delta}m{sub {eta}}{sup '*}>200 MeV, at the 99.9% confidence level in the considered model class. Such a significant {eta}{sup '} mass modification may indicate the restoration of the U{sub A}(1) symmetry in a hot and dense hadronic matter and the return of the ninth ''prodigal'' Goldstone boson. A similar analysis of NA44 S+Pb data at top CERN Super Proton Synchroton (SPS) energies showed no significant in-medium {eta}{sup '} mass modification.

  1. Heavy Ions - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Ions Heavy ions used at the BASE Facility are accelerated in the form of "cocktails," named because of the fact that several heavy ions with the same mass-to-charge ratio are sent into the Cyclotron, which accelerates the ions while acting as a precision mass separator. The Control Room Operator then uses Cyclotron frequency to select only the desired ion, a process that takes about 2 minutes. We provide four standard cocktails: 4.5, 10, 16, and 30 MeV/nucleon. Depending on the

  2. Centrality-dependent direct photon p{sub t} spectra in Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Fuming; Zhu Yan; Hirano, Tetsufumi; Werner, Klaus

    2009-01-15

    We calculate the centrality dependence of transverse momentum (p{sub t}) spectra for direct photons in Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV, based on a realistic data-constrained (3+1)-dimensional hydrodynamic description of the expanding hot and dense matter, a reasonable treatment of the propagation of partons and their energy loss in the fluid, and a systematic study of the main sources of direct photons. The resultant p{sub t} spectra agree with recent PHENIX data in a broad p{sub t} range. The competition among the different direct photon sources is investigated at various centralities. Parton energy loss in the plasma is considered for photons from fragmentation and jet-photon conversion, which causes about 40% decrease in the total contribution. In the high p{sub t} region, the observed R{sub AA} of photons is centrality independent at the accuracy of 5% based on a realistic treatment of energy loss. We also link the different behavior of R{sub AA} for central and peripheral collisions, in the low p{sub t} region, to the fact that the plasma in central collisions is hotter than that in peripheral ones.

  3. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolmogorov, A. Stupishin, N.; Atoian, G.; Ritter, J.; Zelenski, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk

    2014-02-15

    The RHIC polarized H{sup ?} ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H{sub 2} gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ?0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce geometrical beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  4. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very beginning, the design studies at Jefferson Lab have focused on achieving high collider performance, particularly ultrahigh luminosities up to 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} per detector with large acceptance, while maintaining high polarization for both the electron and light-ion beams. These are the two key performance requirements of a future electron-ion collider facility as articulated by the NSAC Long Range Plan. In MEIC, a new ion complex is designed specifically to deliver ion beams that match the high bunch repetition and highly polarized electron beam from CEBAF. During the last two years, both development of the science case and optimization of the machine design point toward a medium-energy electron-ion collider as the topmost goal for Jefferson Lab. The MEIC, with relatively compact collider rings, can deliver a luminosity above 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy up to 65 GeV. It offers an electron energy up to 11 GeV, a proton energy up to 100 GeV, and corresponding energies per nucleon for heavy ions with the same magnetic rigidity. This design choice balances the scope of the science program, collider capabilities, accelerator technology innovation, and total project cost. An energy upgrade could be implemented in the future by adding two large collider rings housed in another large tunnel to push the center-of-mass energy up to or exceeding 140 GeV. After careful consideration of an alternative electron energy recovery linac on ion storage ring approach, a ring-ring collider scenario at high bunch repetition frequency was found to offer fully competitive performance while eliminating the uncertainties of challenging R&D on ampere-class polarized electron sources and many-pass energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). The essential new elements of an MEIC facility at Jefferson Lab are an electron storage ring and an entirely new, modern ion acceleration and storage complex. For the high-current electron collider ring, the upgraded 12 GeV CEBAF SRF linac will serve as a full-energy injector, and, if needed, provide top-off refilling. The CEBAF fixed-target nuclear physics program can be simultaneously operated since the filling time of the electron ring is very short. The ion complex for MEIC consists of sources for polarized light ions and unpolarized light to heavy ions, an SRF ion linac with proton energy up to 280 MeV, a 3 GeV prebooster synchrotron, a large booster synchrotron for proton energy up to 20 GeV, and a medium-energy collider ring with energy up to 100 GeV. The ion complex can accelerate other species of ions with corresponding energies at each accelerating stage. There are three collision points planned for MEIC. Two of them are for collisions with medium-energy ions; the third is for low energy ion beams stored in a dedicated low-energy compact storage ring, as a possible follow-on project.

  5. Colliding Nuclei at High Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains what happens when atomic nucleii travelling at close to the speed of light smash together in Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  6. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design We present an update on the design of the ion...

  7. Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remsberg, L.P.

    1992-11-01

    The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

  8. Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remsberg, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

  9. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2013-01-01

    We review a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements aremore »compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  10. The Design of a Large Booster Ring for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Nissen, Todd Satogata, Yuhong Zhang

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present the current design of the large booster ring for the Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab. The booster ring takes 3 GeV protons or ions of equivalent rigidity from a pre-booster ring, and accelerates them to 20 GeV for protons or equivalent energy for light to heavy ions before sending them to the ion collider ring. The present design calls for a figure-8 shape of the ring for superior preservation of ion polarization. The ring is made of warm magnets and shares a tunnel with the two collider rings. Acceleration is achieved by warm RF systems. The linear optics has been designed with the transition energy above the highest beam energy in the ring so crossing of transition energy will be avoided. Preliminary beam dynamics studies including chromaticity compensation are presented in this paper.

  11. Accelerator physics in ERL based polarized electron ion collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Yue

    2015-05-03

    This talk will present the current accelerator physics challenges and solutions in designing ERL-based polarized electron-hadron colliders, and illustrate them with examples from eRHIC and LHeC designs. These challenges include multi-pass ERL design, highly HOM-damped SRF linacs, cost effective FFAG arcs, suppression of kink instability due to beam-beam effect, and control of ion accumulation and fast ion instabilities.

  12. ERL BASED ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER ERHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LITVINENKO,V.N.; BEN-ZVI,I.; ANDERSON,D.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    In this paper we describe eRHIC design based on the RHIC hadron rings and 10-to-20 GeV energy recovery electron linac. RHIC requires a very large tunability range for c.m. energies while maintaining very high luminosity up to 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} per nucleon. The designs of this future polarized electron-hadron collider, eRHIC, based on a high current super-conducting energy-recovery linac (ERL) with energy of electrons up to 20 GeV, have a number of specific requirements on the ERL optics. Two of the most attractive features of this scheme are full spin transparency of the ERL at all operational energies and the capability to support up to four interaction points. We present two main layouts of the eRHIC, the expected beam and luminosity parameter, and discuss the potential limitation of its performance. Two of the most attractive features of this scheme are full spin transparency of the ERL at all operational energies and the capability to support up to four interaction points. We present two main layouts of the eRHIC, the expected beam and luminosity parameter, and discuss the potential limitation of its performance.

  13. From many body wee partons dynamics to perfect fluid: a standard model for heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venugopalan, R.

    2010-07-22

    We discuss a standard model of heavy ion collisions that has emerged both from experimental results of the RHIC program and associated theoretical developments. We comment briefly on the impact of early results of the LHC program on this picture. We consider how this standard model of heavy ion collisions could be solidified or falsified in future experiments at RHIC, the LHC and a future Electro-Ion Collider.

  14. Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large hadron Collider (LHC) proton-proton and heavy ion runs I at hand, this is the opportune time for a focused ...

  15. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab

  16. Heavy-quark production in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions within a partonic transport model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uphoff, Jan; Fochler, Oliver; Greiner, Carsten; Xu Zhe

    2010-10-15

    The production and space-time evolution of charm and bottom quarks in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are investigated with the partonic transport model BAMPS (Boltzmann approach of multiparton scatterings). Heavy quarks, produced in primary hard parton scatterings during nucleon-nucleon collisions, are sampled using the Monte Carlo event generator pythia or the leading-order minijet model in conjunction with the Glauber model, revealing a strong sensitivity on the parton distribution functions, scales, and heavy-quark mass. In a comprehensive study exploring different charm masses, K factors, and possible initial gluon conditions, secondary production and the evolution of heavy quarks are examined within a fully dynamic BAMPS simulation for central heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Although charm production in the quark-gluon plasma can be neglected at RHIC, it is significant at LHC but very sensitive to the initial conditions and the charm mass. Bottom production in the quark-gluon plasma, however, is negligible both at RHIC and LHC.

  17. THE ELECTRON ION COLLIDER. A HIGH LUMINOSITY PROBE OF THE PARTONIC SUBSTRUCTURE OF NUCLEONS AND NUCLEI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EDITED BY M.S. DAVIS

    2002-02-01

    By the end of this decade, the advancement of current and planned research into the fundamental structure of matter will require a new facility, the Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC will collide high-energy beams of polarized electrons from polarized protons and neutrons, and unpolarized beams of electrons off atomic nuclei with unprecedented intensity. Research at the EIC will lead to a detailed understanding of the structure of the proton, neutron, and atomic nuclei as described by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), the accepted theory of the strong interaction. The EIC will establish quantitative answers to important questions by delivering dramatically increased precision over existing and planned experiments and by providing completely new experimental capabilities. Indeed, the EIC will probe QCD in a manner not possible previously. This document presents the scientific case for the design, construction and operation of the EIC. While realization of the EIC requires a significant advance in the development of efficient means of producing powerful beams of energetic electrons, an important consideration for choosing the site of the EIC is the planned upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The upgrade planned for RHIC will fully meet the requirements for the ion beam for the EIC, providing a distinct advantage in terms of cost, schedule and the final operation.

  18. Progress in Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-09-01

    The progress of the field of Heavy Ion Fusion has been documented in the proceedings of the series of International Symposia that, in recent years, have occurred every second year. The latest of these conferences was hosted by Gesellshaft fuer Schwerionenforshung (GSI) in Darmstadt, West Germany, June 28-30, 1988. For this report, a few highlights from the conference are selected, stressing experimental progress and prospects for future advances. A little extra time is devoted to report on the developments at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is the center for most of the HIFAR program. The Director of the HIFAR program at LBL is Denis Keefe, who presented the HIF report at the last two of the meetings in this series, and in whose place the author is appearing now. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armesto, N; Borghini, N; Jeon, S; Wiedemann, U A; Abreu, S; Akkelin, V; Alam, J; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonuv, D; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Arsene, I C; Barnafoldi, G G; Barrette, J; Bauchle, B; Becattini, F; Betz, B; Bleicher, M; Bluhm, M; Boer, D; Bopp, F W; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Busza, W; Cacciari, M; Capella, A; Casalderrey-Solana, J; Chatterjee, R; Chen, L; Cleymans, J; Cole, B A; delValle, Z C; Csernai, L P; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; de Deus, J D; Ding, H; Djordjevic, M; Drescher, H; Dremin, I M; Dumitru, A; El, A; Engel, R; d'Enterria, D; Eskola, K J; Fai, G; Ferreiro, E G; Fries, R J; Frodermann, E; Fujii, H; Gale, C; Gelis, F; Goncalves, V P; Greco, V; Gyulassy, M; van Hees, H; Heinz, U; Honkanen, H; Horowitz, W A; Iancu, E; Ingelman, G; Jalilian-Marian, J; Jeon, S; Kaidalov, A B; Kampfer, B; Kang, Z; Karpenko, I A; Kestin, G; Kharzeev, D; Ko, C M; Koch, B; Kopeliovich, B; Kozlov, M; Kraus, I; Kuznetsova, I; Lee, S H; Lednicky, R; Letessier, J; Levin, E; Li, B; Lin, Z; Liu, H; Liu, W; Loizides, C; Lokhtin, I P; Machado, M T; Malinina, L V; Managadze, A M; Mangano, M L; Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C; Martinez, G; Milhano, J G; Mocsy, A; Molnar, D; Nardi, M; Nayak, J K; Niemi, H; Oeschler, H; Ollitrault, J; Paic, G; Pajares, C; Pantuev, V S; Papp, G; Peressounko, D; Petreczky, P; Petrushanko, S V; Piccinini, F; Pierog, T; Pirner, H J; Porteboeuf, S; Potashnikova, I; Qin, G Y; Qiu, J; Rafelski, J; Rajagopal, K; Ranft, J; Rapp, R; Rasanen, S S; Rathsman, J; Rau, P; Redlich, K; Renk, T; Rezaeian, A H; Rischke, D; Roesler, S; Ruppert, J; Ruuskanen, P V; Salgado, C A; Sapeta, S; Sarcevic, I; Sarkar, S; Sarycheva, L I; Schmidt, I; Shoski, A I; Sinha, B; Sinyukov, Y M; Snigirev, A M; Srivastava, D K; Stachel, J; Stasto, A; Stocker, H; Teplov, C Y; Thews, R L; Torrieri, G; Pop, V T; Triantafyllopoulos, D N; Tuchin, K L; Turbide, S; Tywoniuk, K; Utermann, A; Venugopalan, R; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Wang, E; Wang, X N; Werner, K; Wessels, E; Wheaton, S; Wicks, S; Wiedemann, U A; Wolschin, G; Xiao, B; Xu, Z; Yasui, S; Zabrodin, E; Zapp, K; Zhang, B

    2008-02-25

    In August 2006, the CERN Theory Unit announced to restructure its visitor program and to create a 'CERN Theory Institute', where 1-3 month long specific programs can take place. The first such Institute was held from 14 May to 10 June 2007, focusing on 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions'. It brought together close to 100 scientists working on the theory of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The aim of this workshop was to review and document the status of expectations and predictions for the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider LHC before its start. LHC will explore heavy ion collisions at {approx} 30 times higher center of mass energy than explored previously at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC. So, on the one hand, the charge of this workshop provided a natural forum for the exchange of the most recent ideas, and allowed to monitor how the understanding of heavy ion collisions has evolved in recent years with the data from RHIC, and with the preparation of the LHC experimental program. On the other hand, the workshop aimed at a documentation which helps to distinguish pre- from post-dictions. An analogous documentation of the 'Last Call for Predictions' [1] was prepared prior to the start of the heavy-ion program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC, and it proved useful in the subsequent discussion and interpretation of RHIC data. The present write-up is the documentation of predictions for the LHC heavy ion program, received or presented during the CERN TH Institute. The set-up of the CERN TH Institute allowed us to aim for the wide-most coverage of predictions. There were more than 100 presentations and discussions during the workshop. Moreover, those unable to attend could still participate by submitting predictions in written form during the workshop. This followed the spirit that everybody interested in making a prediction had the right to be heard. To arrive at a concise document, we required that each prediction should be summarized on at most two pages, and that predictions should be presented, whenever possible, in figures which display measurable quantities. Full model descriptions were not accepted--the authors were encouraged to indicate the relevant references for the interested reader. Participants had the possibility to submit multiple contributions on different topics, but it was part of the subsequent editing process to ensure that predictions on neighboring topics were merged wherever possible. The contributions summarized here are organized in several sections,--though some of them contain material related with more than one section--roughly by going from low transverse momentum to high transverse momentum and from abundant to rare measurements. In the low transverse momentum regime, we start with predictions on multiplicity distributions, azimuthal asymmetries in particle production and hadronic flavor observables, followed by correlation and fluctuation measurements. The contributions on hard probes at the LHC start with predictions for single inclusive high transverse momentum spectra, and jets, followed by heavy quark and quarkonium measurements, leptonic probes and photons. A final section 'Others' encompasses those predictions which do not fall naturally within one of the above-mentioned categories, or discuss the more speculative phenomena that may be explored at the LHC.

  20. Crab Crossing Schemes and Studies for Electron Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, Y. Derbenev, V. Morozov, A. Castilla, G.A. Krafft, B. Yunn, Y. Zhang, J.R. Delayen

    2011-09-01

    This report shows our progress in crab crossing consideration for future electron-ion collider envisioned at JLab. In this design phase, we are evaluating two crabbing schemes viz., the deflecting and dispersive. The mathematical formulations and lattice design for these schemes are discussed in this paper. Numerical simulations involving particle tracking through a realistic deflecting RF cavity and optics illustrate the desired crab tilt of 25 mrad for 1.35 MV. Evolution of beam propagation are shown which provides the physical insight of the crabbing phenomenon.

  1. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion ...

  2. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    current-dominated super-conducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region. Authors: Morozov, Vasiliy...

  3. Heavy Ion Reactions - Research - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Ion Reactions Fast and slow components of CsI #4 are plotted. Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium isotopes are visible. The availability of energetic, light- and heavy-ion beams from the K500 Superconducting Cyclotron provides many possibilities for exploring new aspects of nuclear behavior. Using a wide variety of projectiles and bombarding energies, we achieve a more detailed understanding of the dynamics of nuclear collisions, casting new light onto the temporal evolution of quantal systems

  4. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  5. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for heavy element production...II-1 P. K.Sahu, J. B. Natowitz, R. Wada, K. Hagel, T. Materna, Z. Chen, L. Qin, M. Barbui,...

  6. Ion Desorption Stability in Superconducting High Energy Physics Proton Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, W.C.

    1995-05-29

    In this paper we extend our previous analysis of cold beam tube vacuum in a superconducting proton collider to include ion desorption in addition to thermal desorption and synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption. The new ion desorption terms introduce the possibility of vacuum instability. This is similar to the classical room temperature case but now modified by the inclusion of ion desorption coefficients for cryosorbed (physisorbed) molecules which can greatly exceed the coefficients for tightly bound molecules. The sojourn time concept for physisorbed H{sub 2} is generalized to include photodesorption and ion desorption as well as the usually considered thermal desorption. The ion desorption rate is density dependent and divergent so at the onset of instability the sojourn time goes to zero. Experimental data are used to evaluate the H{sub 2} sojourn time for the conditions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the situation is found to be stable. The sojourn time is dominated by photodesorption for surface density s(H{sub 2}) less than a monolayer and by thermal deposition for s(H{sub 2}) greater than a monolayer. For a few percent of a monolayer, characteristic of a beam screen, the photodesorption rate exceeds ion desorption rate by more than two orders of magnitude. The photodesorption rate corresponds to a sojourn time of approximately 100 sec. The paper next turns to the evaluation of stability margins and inclusion of gases heavier than H{sub 2} (CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), where ion desorption introduces coupling between molecular species. Stability conditions are worked out for a simple cold beam tube, a cold beam tube pumped from the ends and a cold beam tube with a co-axial perforated beam screen. In each case a simple inequality for stability of a single component is replaced by a determinant that must be greater than zero for a gas mixture. The connection with the general theory of feedback stability is made and it is shown that the gains of the diagonal uncoupled feedback loops are first order in the ion desorption coefficients whereas the gains of the off diagonal coupled feedback loops are second and higher order. For this reason it turns out that in practical cases stability is dominated by the uncoupled diagonal elements and the inverse of the largest first order closed loop gain is a useful estimate of the margin of stability. In contrast to the case of a simple cold beam tube, the stability condition for a beam screen does not contain the desorption coefficient for physisorbed molecules, even when the screen temperature is low enough that there is a finite surface density of them on the screen surface. Consequently there does not appear to be any particular advantage to operating the beam screen at high enough temperature to avoid physisorption. Numerical estimates of ion desorption stability are given for a number of cases relevant to LHC and all of the ones likely to be encountered were found to be stable. The most important case, a I % transparency beam screen at {approx}4.2 K, was found to have a stability safety margin of approximately thirty determined by ion desorption of CO. Ion desorption of H{sub 2} is about a factor of eighty less stringent than CO. For these estimates the beam tube surface was assumed to be solvent cleaned but otherwise untreated, for example by a very high temperature vacuum bakeout or by glow discharge cleaning.

  7. Modeling Crabbing Dynamics in an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castilla, Alejandro; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Satogata, Todd J.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2015-09-01

    A local crabbing scheme requires ?/2 (mod ?) horizontal betatron phase advances from an interaction point (IP) to the crab cavities on each side of it. However, realistic phase advances generated by sets of quadrupoles, or Final Focusing Blocks (FFB), between the crab cavities located in the expanded beam regions and the IP differ slightly from ?/2. To understand the effect of crabbing on the beam dynamics in this case, a simple model of the optics of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) including local crabbing was developed using linear matrices and then studied numerically over multiple turns (1000 passes) of both electron and proton bunches. The same model was applied to both local and global crabbing schemes to determine the linear-order dynamical effects of the synchro-betatron coupling induced by crabbing.

  8. Design studies for the next generation electron ion colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal; Bogacz, Slawomir A.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2014-04-01

    The next generation Electron Ion Collider (EIC) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB) utilizes a figure-8 shaped ion and electron rings. EIC has the ability to preserve the ion polarization during acceleration, where the electron ring matches in footprint with a figure-8 ion ring. The electron ring is designed to deliver a highly polarized high luminous electron beam at interaction point (IP). The main challenges of the electron ring design are the chromaticity compensation and maintaining high beam polarization of 70% at all energies 311 GeV without introducing transverse orbital coupling before the IP. The very demanding detector design limits the minimum distance between the final focus quadrupole and the interaction point to 3.5 m which results in a large ? function inside the final focus quadrupoles leading to increased beam chromaticity. In this paper, we present a novel chromaticity compensation scheme that mitigates IP chromaticity by a compact chromaticity compensation section with multipole magnet components. In addition, a set of spin rotators are utilized to manipulate the polarization vector of the electron beam in order to preserve the beam polarization. The spin rotator solenoids introduce undesired coupling between the horizontal and vertical betatron motion of the beam. We introduce a compact and modular orbit decoupling insert that can fit in the limited space of the straight section in the figure-8 ring. We show a numerical study of the figure-8 ring design with the compact straight section, which includes the interaction region, chromaticity compensation section, and the spin rotators, the figure-8 design performance is evaluated with particle tracking.

  9. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  10. Design of Electron and Ion Crabbing Cavities for an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alejandro Castilla Loeza, Geoffrey Krafft, Jean Delayen

    2012-07-01

    Beyond the 12 GeV upgrade at the Jefferson Lab a Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) has been considered. In order to achieve the desired high luminosities at the Interaction Points (IP), the use of crabbing cavities is under study. In this work, we will present to-date designs of superconducting cavities, considered for crabbing both ion and electron bunches. A discussion of properties such as peak surface fields and higher-order mode separation will be presented. Keywords: super conducting, deflecting cavity, crab cavity.

  11. Probing the Quark Sea and Gluons: the Electron-Ion Collider Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolf Ent

    2012-04-01

    EIC is the generic name for the nuclear science-driven Electron-Ion Collider presently considered in the US. Such an EIC would be the worlds first polarized electron-proton collider, and the worlds first e-A collider. Very little remains known about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A large community effort to sharpen a compelling nuclear science case for an EIC occurred during a ten-week program taking place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle from September 13 to November 19, 2010. The critical capabilities of a stage-I EIC are a range in center-of-mass energies from 20 to 70 GeV and variable, full polarization of electrons and light ions (the latter both longitudinal and transverse), ion species up to A=200 or so, multiple interaction regions, and a high luminosity of about 10{sup 34} electron-nucleons per cm{sup 2} and per second. The physics program of such a stage-I EIC encompass inclusive measurements (ep/A{yields}e'+X), which require detection of the scattered lepon and/or the full scattered hadronic debris with high precision, semi-inclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+h+X), which require detection in coincidence with the scattered lepton of at least one (current or target region) hadron; and exclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+N'/A'+{gamma}/m), which require detection of all particles in the reaction. The main science themes of an EIC are to i) map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, ii) discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and (iii) understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. In addition, there are opportunities at an EIC for fundamental symmetry and nucleon structure measurements using the electroweak probe. To truly make headway to image the sea quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, the EIC needs high luminosity over a range of energies as more exclusive scattering probabilities are small, and any integrated detector/interaction region design needs to provide uniform coverage to detect spectator and diffractive products. This is because e-p and even more e-A colliders have a large fraction of their science related to what happens to the nucleon or ion beams. As a result, the philosophy of integration of complex detectors into an extended interaction region faces challenging constraints. Designs feature crossing angles between the protons or heavy ions during collisions with electrons, to remove potential problems for the detector induced by synchrotron radiation. Designs allocate quite some detector space before the final-focus ion quads, at the cost of luminosity, given that uniform detection coverage is a must for deep exclusive and diffractive processes. The integrated EIC detector/interaction region design at JLab focused on establishing full acceptance for such processes over a wide range of proton energies (20-100 GeV) with well achievable interaction region magnets. The detector design at BNL uses the higher ion beam energies to achieve good detection efficiency for instance for protons following a DVCS reaction, for proton beam energies starting from 100 GeV. Following a recommendation of the 2007 US Nuclear Science Long-Range Planning effort, the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics (DOE/NP) has allocated accelerator R&D funds to lay the foundation for a polarized EIC. BNL, in association with JLab and DOE/NP, has also established a generic detector R&D program to address the scientific requirements for measurements at a future EIC.

  12. Thermoacoustic imaging using heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claytor, T.N.; Tesmer, J.R.; Deemer, B.C.; Murphy, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    Ion beams have been used for surface modification, semiconductor device fabrication and for material analysis, which makes ion-material interactions of significant importance. Ion implantation will produce new compositions near the surface by ion mixing or directly by implanting desired ions. Ions exchange their energy to the host material as they travel into the material by several different processes. High energy ions ionize the host atoms before atomic collisions transfer the remaining momentum and stop the incident ion. As they penetrate the surface, the low energy ions ionize the host atoms, but also have a significantly large momentum transfer mechanism near the surface of the material. This leads to atoms, groups of atoms and electrons being ejected from the surface, which is the momentum transfer process of sputtering. This talk addresses the acoustic waves generated during ion implantation using modulated heavy ion beams. The mechanisms for elastic wave generation during ion implantation, in the regimes where sputtering is significant and where implantation is dominant and sputtering is negligible, has been studied. The role of momentum transfer and thermal energy production during ion implantation was compared to laser generated elastic waves in an opaque solid as a reference, since laser generated ultrasound has been extensively studied and is fairly well understood. The thermoelastic response dominated in both high and low ion energy regimes since, apparently, more energy is lost to thermal heat producing mechanisms than momentum transfer processes. The signal magnitude was found to vary almost linearly with incident energy as in the laser thermoelastic regime. The time delays for longitudinal and shear waves-were characteristic of those expected for a purely thermal heating source. The ion beams are intrinsically less sensitive to the albedo of the surface.

  13. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Ronald L. (La Grange, IL); Arnold, Richard C. (Chicago, IL)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  14. Charmonium production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Taesoo; Han, Kyong Chol; Ko, Che Ming

    2011-09-15

    Using the two-component model that includes charmonium production from both initial nucleon-nucleon hard scattering and regeneration in the produced quark-gluon plasma, we study J/{psi} production in heavy-ion collisions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For the expansion dynamics of produced hot dense matter, we use a schematic viscous hydrodynamic model with the specific shear viscosity in the quark-gluon plasma and the hadronic matter taken, respectively, to be two and ten times the lower bound of 1/4{pi} suggested by the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence. For the initial dissociation and the subsequent thermal decay of charmonia in the hot dense matter, we use the screened Cornell potential to describe the properties of charmonia and perturbative QCD to calculate their dissociation cross sections. Including regeneration of charmonia in the quark-gluon plasma via a kinetic equation with in-medium chamonium decay widths, we obtain a good description of measured J/{psi} nuclear modification factors in Pb + Pb collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=1.73 GeV at SPS and in Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV at RHIC. A reasonable description of the measured nuclear modification factor of high transverse momenta J/{psi} in Pb + Pb collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV at LHC is also obtained.

  15. Constraining the equation of state of superhadronic matter from heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pratt, Scott; Sorensen, Paul; Sangaline, Evan; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-19

    The equation of state of QCD matter for temperatures near and above the quark-hadron transition (~165 MeV) is inferred within a Bayesian framework through the comparison of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and from the Large Hadron Collider to theoretical models. State-of-the-art statistical techniques are applied to simultaneously analyze multiple classes of observables while varying 14 independent model parameters. Thus, the resulting posterior distribution over possible equations of state is consistent with results from lattice gauge theory.

  16. Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes. M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.

  17. RF System Requirements for a Medium-Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimmer, Robert A; Hannon, Fay E; Guo, Jiquan; Huang, Shichun; Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Wang, S

    2015-09-01

    JLab is studying options for a medium energy electron-ion collider that could fit on the JLab site and use CEBAF as a full-energy electron injector. A new ion source, linac and booster would be required, together with collider storage rings for the ions and electrons. In order to achieve the maximum luminosity these will be high current storage rings with many bunches. We present the high level RF system requirements for the storage rings, ion booster ring and high-energy ion beam cooling system, and describe the technology options under consideration to meet them. We also present options for staging that might reduce the initial capital cost while providing a smooth upgrade path to a higher final energy. The technologies under consideration may also be useful for other proposed storage ring colliders or ultimate light sources.

  18. Commissioning of the EBIS-based heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Binello, S.; Hoff, L.; Kondo, K.; Lambiase, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.; Morris, J.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Snydstrup, L.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Schempp, A.; Ratzinger, U.; Kanesue, T.

    2010-09-12

    The status is presented of the commissioning of a new heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This preinjector uses an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), and an RFQ and IH Linac, both operating at 100.625 MHz, to produce 2 MeV/u ions of any species for use, after further acceleration, at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Among the increased capabilities provided by this preinjector are the ability to produce ions of any species, and the ability to switch between multiple species in 1 second, to simultaneously meet the needs of both science programs. For initial setup, helium beam from EBIS was injected and circulated in the Booster synchrotron. Following this, accelerated Au{sup 32+} and Fe{sup 20+} beams were transported to the Booster injection point, fulfilling DOE requirements for project completion.

  19. A Radiographic Technique With Heavy Ion Microbeams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muscio, J.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Debray, M. E.; Valda, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Kesque, J. M.; Minsky, D. M.

    2007-02-12

    In this work, we introduce a new technique to perform densitometric and multielemental analysis of samples at the same time using a simple detector with heavy ion micro-beams. It consists in the simultaneous analysis of X-rays induced in the sample and in a secondary target arranged behind the specimen. The X-rays originated in the secondary target are attenuated when crossing the specimen producing a radiographic image with a monochromatic source.

  20. The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions (490th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenke, Bjoern

    2014-12-18

    The sun cant do it, but colossal machines like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe sure can. Quarks and gluons make up protons and neutrons found in the nucleus of every atom in the universe. At heavy ion colliders like RHIC and the LHC, scientists can create matter more than 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sunso hot that protons and neutrons melt into a plasma of quarks and gluons. The particle collisions and emerging quark-gluon plasma hold keys to understanding how these fundamental particles interact with each other, which helps explain how everything is held togetherfrom atomic nuclei to human beings to the biggest starshow all matter has mass, and what the universe looked like microseconds after the Big Bang. Dr. Schenke discusses theory that details the shape and structure of heavy ion collisions. He will also explain how this theory and data from experiments at RHIC and the LHC are being used to determine properties of the quark-gluon plasma.

  1. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public

  2. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Python in a Parallel Environment Dave Grote - LLNL & LBNL NUG2013 User Day Wednesday, February 15, 2013 Slide 2 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Outline * Why we use Python * How we use Python * Parallel Python with pyMPI * Our graphics model with Pygist * Parallel Python drawbacks and resolutions - Start up time - Static building * Conclusions Slide 3 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory 3

  3. Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    collisions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion collisions In this paper, we derive a critical condition for matter equilibration in heavy ion collisions using a holographic approach. Gravitational shock waves with infinite transverse extension are used to model an infinite nucleus. We construct the

  4. Design of the Proposed Low Energy Ion Collider Ring at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nissen, Edward W.; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    The polarized Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) envisioned at Jefferson Lab will cover a range of center-of-mass energies up to 65 GeV. The present MEIC design could also allow the accommodation of low energy electron-ion collisions (LEIC) for additional science reach. This paper presents the first design of the low energy ion collider ring which is converted from the large ion booster of MEIC. It can reach up to 25 GeV energy for protons and equivalent ion energies of the same magnetic rigidity. An interaction region and an electron cooler designed for MEIC are integrated into the low energy collider ring, in addition to other required new elements including crab cavities and ion spin rotators, for later reuse in MEIC itself. A pair of vertical chicanes which brings the low energy ion beams to the plane of the electron ring and back to the low energy ion ring are also part of the design.

  5. Can CP violation be observed in heavy-ion collisions?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I. B. Rudenko, A. S.

    2012-09-15

    We demonstrate that, at least at present, there is no convincing way to detect CP violation in heavy-ion collisions.

  6. Gated beam imager for heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahle, Larry; Hopkins, Harvey S.

    1998-12-10

    As part of the work building a small heavy-ion induction accelerator ring, or recirculator, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a diagnostic device measuring the four-dimensional transverse phase space of the beam in just a single pulse has been developed. This device, the Gated Beam Imager (GBI), consists of a thin plate filled with an array of 100-micron diameter holes and uses a Micro Channel Plate (MCP), a phosphor screen, and a CCD camera to image the beam particles that pass through the holes after they have drifted for a short distance. By time gating the MCP, the time evolution of the beam can also be measured, with each time step requiring a new pulse.

  7. Gated beam imager for heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahle, L.; Hopkins, H.S.

    1998-12-01

    As part of the work building a small heavy-ion induction accelerator ring, or recirculator, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a diagnostic device measuring the four-dimensional transverse phase space of the beam in just a single pulse has been developed. This device, the Gated Beam Imager (GBI), consists of a thin plate filled with an array of 100-micron diameter holes and uses a Micro Channel Plate (MCP), a phosphor screen, and a CCD camera to image the beam particles that pass through the holes after they have drifted for a short distance. By time gating the MCP, the time evolution of the beam can also be measured, with each time step requiring a new pulse. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS) IBA Table (HTML) | IBA Table (135KB GIF) | IBA Table (1.2MB PDF) | IBA Table (33MB TIF) | Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS) | Virtual Lab Tour (6MB) Description of Technique: HIBS is used to detect ultra-trace levels of heavy impurities on the surface of a Si wafer. HIBS has advantages over TXRF, including: Improved sensitivity for most elements Quantifying composition without standards Measurement on rough surfaces. HIBS is accomplished by

  9. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hammons, L.; Hao, Y.; Webb, S.; et al

    2011-08-09

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. The replacement cost of the RHIC facility is about two billion US dollars, and the eRHIC will fully take advantage and utilize this investment. We plan adding a polarized 5-30 GeV electron beam to collide with variety of species in the existing RHIC accelerator complex, from polarized protons with a top energy of 325 GeV, to heavy fully-striped ions with energies up to 130 GeV/u. Brookhaven's innovative design, is based on one of the RHIC's hadron rings and a multi-pass energy-recovery linac (ERL). Using the ERL as the electron accelerator assures high luminosity in the 10{sup 33}-10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range, and for the natural staging of eRHIC, with the ERL located inside the RHIC tunnel. The eRHIC will provide electron-hadron collisions in up to three interaction regions. We detail the eRHIC's performance in Section 2. Since first paper on eRHIC paper in 2000, its design underwent several iterations. Initially, the main eRHIC option (the so-called ring-ring, RR, design) was based on an electron ring, with the linac-ring (LR) option as a backup. In 2004, we published the detailed 'eRHIC 0th Order Design Report' including a cost-estimate for the RR design. After detailed studies, we found that an LR eRHIC has about a 10-fold higher luminosity than the RR. Since 2007, the LR, with its natural staging strategy and full transparency for polarized electrons, became the main choice for eRHIC. In 2009, we completed technical studies of the design and dynamics for MeRHIC with 3-pass 4 GeV ERL. We learned much from this evaluation, completed a bottom-up cost estimate for this $350M machine, but then shelved the design. In the same year, we turned again to considering the cost-effective, all-in-tunnel six-pass ERL for our design of the high-luminosity eRHIC. In it, electrons from the polarized pre-injector will be accelerated to their top energy by passing six times through two SRF linacs. After colliding with the hadron beam in up to three detectors, the e-beam will be decelerated by the same linacs and dumped. The six-pass magnetic system with small-gap magnets will be installed from the start. We will stage the electron energy from 5 GeV to 30 GeV stepwise by increasing the lengths of the SRF linacs. We discuss details of eRHIC's layout in Section 3. We considered several IR designs for eRHIC. The latest one, with a 10 mrad crossing angle and {beta}* = 5 cm, takes advantage of newly commissioned Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles. Section 4 details the eRHIC lattice and the IR layout. The current eRHIC design focuses on electron-hadron collisions. If justified by the EIC physics, we will add a 30 GeV polarized positron ring with full energy injection from eRHIC ERL. This addition to the eRHIC facility provide for positron-hadron collisions, but at a significantly lower luminosity than those attainable in the electron-hadron mode. As a novel high-luminosity EIC, eRHIC faces many technical challenges, such as generating 50 mA of polarized electron current. eRHIC also will employ coherent electron cooling (CeC) for the hadron beams. Staff at BNL, JLab, and MIT is pursuing vigorously an R&D program for resolving addressing these obstacles. In collaboration with Jlab, BNL plans experimentally to demonstrate CeC at the RHIC. We discuss the structure and the status of the eRHIC R&D in Section 5.

  10. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  11. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bock, R.; Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  12. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. ); Bangerter, R.O. ); Bock, R. ); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. )

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  13. Progress on the design of the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider at JLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, F.; Bogacz, A.; Brindza, P.; Camsonne, A.; Daly, E.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Douglas, D.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Grames, J.; Guo, J.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Jordan, K.; Kimber, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Michalski, T.; Morozov, V. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; /Jefferson Lab /Argonne /DESY /Moscow , Inst. Phys. Tech., Dolgoprydny /Dubna, JINR /Northern Illinois U. /Old Doominion U. /Novosibirsk, GOO Zaryad /SLAC /Texas A-M

    2015-07-14

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab is designed to provide high luminosity and high polarization needed to reach new frontiers in the exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches made possible by high-energy electron cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) can be easily preserved and manipulated due to the unique figure-8 shape of the collider rings. A fully consistent set of parameters have been developed considering the balance of machine performance, required technical development and cost. This paper reports recent progress on the MEIC accelerator design including electron and ion complexes, integrated interaction region design, figure-8-ring-based electron and ion polarization schemes, RF/SRF systems and ERL-based high-energy electron cooling. Luminosity performance is also presented for the MEIC baseline design.

  14. Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    collisions (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion collisions « Prev Next » Title: Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion collisions Authors: Lin, Shu ; Shuryak, Edward Publication Date: 2011-02-23 OSTI Identifier: 1099912 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998 Publisher:

  15. Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    collisions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion collisions Authors: Lin, Shu ; Shuryak, Edward Publication Date: 2011-02-23 OSTI Identifier: 1099912 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information:

  16. Viscous photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE PAGES Viscous photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions « Prev Next » Title: Viscous photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions Authors: Dion, Maxime ; Paquet, Jean-François ; Schenke, Björn ; Young, Clint ; Jeon, Sangyong ; Gale, Charles Publication Date: 2011-12-02 OSTI Identifier: 1098343 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review C Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 0556-2813 Publisher: American

  17. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the formation of quarkonium in nuclear medium as well as the strong interacting quark-gluon matter produced in heavy ion collisions; and heavy quarkonium properties from the first principle lattice calculations. The heavy quarkonium production at a future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) was also discussed at the meeting. The highlight of the meeting was the apparent success of the NRQCD approach at next-to-leading order in the description of the quarkonium production in proton-proton, electron-proton and electron positron collisions. Still many questions remain open in lattice calculations of in-medium quarkonium properties and in the area of cold nuclear matter effects.

  18. A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2008-10-01

    A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

  19. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  20. Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

  1. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Sandeep K. [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Goloubinoff, Pierre [Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Christen, Philipp [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: christen@bioc.uzh.ch

    2008-07-25

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  2. Tests of an RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity for an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castilla Loeza, Alejandro; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-12-01

    On the scheme of developing a medium energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab, we have designed a compact superconducting rf dipole cavity at 750 MHz to crab both electron and ion bunches and increase luminosities at the interaction points (IP) of the machine. Following the design optimization and characterization of the electromagnetic properties such as peak surface fields and shunt impedance, along with field nonuniformities, multipole components content, higher order modes (HOM) and multipacting, a prototype cavity was built by Niowave Inc. The 750 MHz prototype crab cavity has been tested at 4 K and is ready for re-testing at 4 K and 2 K at Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the detailed results of the rf tests performed on the 750 MHz crab cavity prototype.

  3. Investigation of the dynamics of gluon distributions in the production of heavy quarks and quarkonia at the LEP2 collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipatov, A. V.

    2006-09-15

    The inclusive production of heavy quarks and quarkonia in photon-photon collisions at the LEP2 collider is considered within the semihard (k{sub T}-factorization) QCD approach. The dependence of the total and differential cross sections for the production of heavy (c and b) quarks and D* and J/{psi} mesons on the choice of unintegrated gluon distribution is studied. The transition of a cc-bar charmed pair to observed J/{psi} mesons is described on the basis of the color-singlet model. The results of the calculations are compared with currently available experimental data obtained by the L3, OPAL, ALEPH, and DELPHI Collaborations. It is shown that the polarization properties of J/{psi} mesons at the LEP2 collider are sensitive to the behavior of unintegrated gluon distributions. This means that experimental investigations of the polarization properties of quarkonia in photon-photon collisions may provide a direct test of the dynamics of gluon distributions in the photon.

  4. Benchmarking Heavy Ion Transport Codes FLUKA, HETC-HEDS MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronningen, Reginald Martin; Remec, Igor; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.

    2013-06-07

    Powerful accelerators such as spallation neutron sources, muon-collider/neutrino facilities, and rare isotope beam facilities must be designed with the consideration that they handle the beam power reliably and safely, and they must be optimized to yield maximum performance relative to their design requirements. The simulation codes used for design purposes must produce reliable results. If not, component and facility designs can become costly, have limited lifetime and usefulness, and could even be unsafe. The objective of this proposal is to assess the performance of the currently available codes â?? PHITS, FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and HETC-HEDS â?? that could be used for design simulations involving heavy ion transport. We plan to access their performance by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data of benchmark quality. Quantitative knowledge of the biases and the uncertainties of the simulations is essential as this potentially impacts the safe, reliable and cost effective design of any future radioactive ion beam facility. Further benchmarking of heavy-ion transport codes was one of the actions recommended in the â??Report of the 2003 RIA R&D Workshop".

  5. Preliminary result of rapid solenoid for controlling heavy-ion beam parameters of laser ion source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Okamura, M.; Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Kanesue, T.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.

    2015-03-13

    To realize a heavy ion inertial fusion driver, we have studied a possibility of laser ion source (LIS). A LIS can provide high current high brightness heavy ion beams, however it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters. To overcome the issue, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The rapid ramping magnetic field could enhance limited time slice of the current and simultaneously the beam emittance changed accordingly. This approach may also useful to realize an ion source for HIF power plant.

  6. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  7. Heavy ion collisions and the pre-equilibrium exciton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betak, E.

    2012-10-20

    We present a feasible way to apply the pre-equilibrium exciton model in its masterequation formulation to heavy-ion induced reactions including spin variables. Emission of nucleons, {gamma}'s and also light clusters is included in our model.

  8. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  9. Heavy quarkonium production at collider energies: Partonic cross section and polarization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qiu, Jian -Wei; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Ma, Yan -Qing; Sterman, George

    2015-01-27

    We calculate the O(α³s) short-distance, QCD collinear-factorized coefficient functions for all partonic channels that include the production of a heavy quark pair at short distances. Thus, this provides the first power correction to the collinear-factorized inclusive hadronic production of heavy quarkonia at large transverse momentum, pT, including the full leading-order perturbative contributions to the production of heavy quark pairs in all color and spin states employed in NRQCD treatments of this process. We discuss the role of the first power correction in the production rates and the polarizations of heavy quarkonia in high-energy hadronic collisions. The consistency of QCD collinearmore » factorization and nonrelativistic QCD factorization applied to heavy quarkonium production is also discussed.« less

  10. Fate of the initial state perturbations in heavy ion collisions. II. Glauber fluctuations and sounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staig, Pilar; Shuryak, Edward

    2011-09-15

    Heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are well described by the (nearly ideal) hydrodynamics for average events. In the present paper we study initial state fluctuations appearing on an event-by-event basis and the propagation of perturbations induced by them. We found that (i) fluctuations of several of the lowest harmonics have comparable magnitudes and (ii) that at least all odd harmonics are correlated in phase, (iii) thus indicating the local nature of fluctuations. We argue that such local perturbations should be the source of the ''tiny bang,'' a pulse of sound propagating from it. We identify its two fundamental scales as (i) the ''sound horizon'' (analogous to the absolute ruler in cosmic microwave background and galaxy distributions) and (ii) the ''viscous horizon'' separating damped and undamped harmonics. We then qualitatively describe how one can determine them from the data and thus determine two fundamental parameters of the matter: the (average) speed of sound and viscosity. The rest of the paper explains how one can study mutual coherence of various harmonics. For that, one should go beyond the two-particle correlations to three (or more) particles. Mutual coherence is important for the picture of propagating sound waves.

  11. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  12. Time-of-flight heavy ion backscattering spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.

    1993-08-01

    A new time-of-flight (TOF) ion detection system for Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS) is described. Examples are also given of the use of the system for measuring low-level contamination on Si wafers. Currently, the TOF-HBIS system has a sensitivity of 1 {times} 10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2} for the heaviest of surface impurity atoms and a mass resolution capable of separating Fe from Cu. The sensitivity is expected to improve by an additional order of magnitude on a industrial TOF-HIBS system being constructed for SEMATECH.

  13. The heavy ion beam diagnostic for the tokamak ISTTOK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, J.A.C.; Malaquias, A.; Praxedes, A.; Toledo, W. van; Varandas, C.A.F. )

    1994-08-01

    In this paper the authors describe the heavy ion beam diagnostic for the tokamak ISTTOK, which has been designed to determine the temporal evolution of the plasma density, poloidal magnetic field and plasma potential profiles. This diagnostic makes use of a new type of high density caesium plasma source, a multiple cell detector and a fast data acquisition system. The authors describe the numerical code for trajectory and beam attenuation simulations, a method for the experimental determination of the poloidal field profile, the ion gun and the detection, control and data acquisition systems. Calibration tests and the first experimental results are presented.

  14. Calculation of cross sections for binary reactions between heavy ion projectiles and heavy actinide targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.; Hoffman, M.M.

    1990-11-01

    The computer program, described in this report, is identified as PWAVED5. It was developed to calculate cross sections for nucleon transfer reactions in low energy heavy ion bombardments. The objective was to calculate cross sections that agree with experimental results for ions of different charge and mass and to develop a predictive capability. It was undertaken because previous heavy ion calculations, for which programs were readily available, appeared to focus primarily on reactions resulting in compound nucleus formation and were not particularly applicable to calculations of binary reaction cross sections at low interaction energies. There are to principal areas in which this computation differs from several other partial wave calculations of heavy-ion reaction cross sections. First, this program is designed specifically to calculate cross sections for nucleon exchange interactions and to exclude interactions that are expected to result in fusion of the two nuclei. A second major difference in this calculation is the use of a statistical distribution to assign the total interaction cross section to individual final mass states.

  15. LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION IN HEAVY ION OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PTITSIN,V.; FISCHER,W.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-07

    In heavy ion operation the LHC interaction region at IP2 will have a low-{beta} optics for collisions. The dynamic aperture is therefore sensitive to magnetic field errors in the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. The authors investigate the effect of the magnetic field errors on the dynamic aperture and evaluate the effectiveness of local interaction region correctors. The dynamic aperture and the tune space are computed for different crossing angles.

  16. Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL |

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation / Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000

  17. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-08

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond.

  18. Unveiling the proton spin decomposition at a future electron-ion collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aschenauer, Elke C.; Sassot, Rodolfo; Stratmann, Marco

    2015-11-24

    We present a detailed assessment of how well a future electron-ion collider could constrain helicity parton distributions in the nucleon and, therefore, unveil the role of the intrinsic spin of quarks and gluons in the proton’s spin budget. Any remaining deficit in this decomposition will provide the best indirect constraint on the contribution due to the total orbital angular momenta of quarks and gluons. Specifically, all our studies are performed in the context of global QCD analyses based on realistic pseudodata and in the light of the most recent data obtained from polarized proton-proton collisions at BNL-RHIC that have providedmore » evidence for a significant gluon polarization in the accessible, albeit limited range of momentum fractions. We also present projections on what can be achieved on the gluon’s helicity distribution by the end of BNL-RHIC operations. As a result, all estimates of current and projected uncertainties are performed with the robust Lagrange multiplier technique.« less

  19. Unveiling the proton spin decomposition at a future electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschenauer, Elke C.; Sassot, Rodolfo; Stratmann, Marco

    2015-11-24

    We present a detailed assessment of how well a future electron-ion collider could constrain helicity parton distributions in the nucleon and, therefore, unveil the role of the intrinsic spin of quarks and gluons in the protons spin budget. Any remaining deficit in this decomposition will provide the best indirect constraint on the contribution due to the total orbital angular momenta of quarks and gluons. Specifically, all our studies are performed in the context of global QCD analyses based on realistic pseudodata and in the light of the most recent data obtained from polarized proton-proton collisions at BNL-RHIC that have provided evidence for a significant gluon polarization in the accessible, albeit limited range of momentum fractions. We also present projections on what can be achieved on the gluons helicity distribution by the end of BNL-RHIC operations. As a result, all estimates of current and projected uncertainties are performed with the robust Lagrange multiplier technique.

  20. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  1. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  2. Progress on the Los Alamos heavy-ion injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.C.; Riepe, K.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy-ion fusion using an induction linac requires injection of multiple high-current beams from a pulsed electrostatic accelerator at as high a voltage as practical. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a 16-beam, 2-MeV, pulsed electrostatic accelerator for Al/sup +/ ions. The ion source will use a pulsed metal vapor arc plasma. A biased grid will control plasma flux into the ion extraction region. This source has achieved a normalized emittance of epsilon/sub n/ < 3.10/sup -7/..pi..-m-rad with Al/sup +/ ions. An 800 kV Marx prototype with a laser fired diverter is being assembled. The ceramic accelerating column sections have been brazed and leak tested. Voltage hold off on a brazed sample was more than doubled by selective removal of the Ticusil braze fillet extending along the ceramic. A scaled test module held 250 kV for 50 ..mu..s, giving confidence that the full module can hold 175 kV per section. The pressure vessel should be received in June 1986. High-voltage testing of a 1 MV column will begin by early 1987.

  3. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1999-02-16

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  4. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, David P. (St. Petersburg, FL); Browning, James F. (Palm Harbour, FL)

    1998-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  5. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, David P. (St. Petersburg, FL); Browning, James F. (Palm Harbour, FL)

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  6. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1998-07-21

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high (n,f) reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  7. Superconducting focusing quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabbi, G.L.; Faltens, A.; Leitner, M.; Lietzke, A.; Seidl, P.; Barnard, J.; Lund, S.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Radovinsky, A.; Schultz, J.; Meinke, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is developing superconducting focusing magnets for both near-term experiments and future driver accelerators. In particular, single bore quadrupoles have been fabricated and tested for use in the High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The next steps involve the development of magnets for the planned Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) and the fabrication of the first prototype multi-beam focusing arrays for fusion driver accelerators. The status of the magnet R&D program is reported, including experimental requirements, design issues and test results.

  8. The Next Generation of Heavy Ion Sources (447th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2009-03-04

    Imagine if, by staying in your lane when driving on the expressway, you could help fight cancer or provide a new, clean energy source. You would clench the steering wheel with both hands and stay in your lane, right? Unlike driving on the expressway where you intentionally avoid hitting other cars, scientists sometimes work to steer particle beams into head-on collisions with other oncoming particle beams. However, the particles must be kept "in their lanes" for cleaner, more frequent collisions. Some scientists propose starting the whole process by using lasers to heat a fixed target as a way to get particles with higher charge, which are more steerable. These scientists believe the new methods could be used to develop particle beams for killing cancer cells or creating usable energy from fusion. Join Masahiro Okamura of Brookhaven's Collider-Accelerator Department for the 447th Brookhaven Lecture, titled "The Next Generation of Heavy Ion Sources." Okamura will explain how lasers can be used to create plasma, neutral mixtures of positive ions and negative electrons, from different materials, and how using this plasma leads to beams with higher charge states and currents. He will also discuss how this efficient, simpler method of producing particle beams might be used for cancer therapy, to develop new energy sources, or in synchrotrons.

  9. The Heavy Ion Fusion Program in the USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    2000-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established a new, larger inertial fusion energy program. To manage program growth, we have developed a new inertial fusion energy research and we have established a Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion. There has been significant technical progress. Improvements in target design have reduced the predicted energy requirements by approximately a factor of two. There have also been important experiments on chamber dynamics and other inertial fusion technologies. The accelerator program has completed a number of small-scale experiments. Experiments with driver-scale beams are being designed -- including experiments with driver-scale ion sources and injectors. Finally we are developing the technologies needed to build a major research facility known as the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE)

  10. Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    collisions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion collisions We estimate the energy density and the gluon distribution associated with the classical fields describing the early-time dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. In the McLerran-Venugopalan model, we first decompose the energy density into

  11. Modeling heavy ion ionization energy loss at low and intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakhno, I.L.; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    The needs of contemporary accelerator and space projects led to significant efforts made to include description of heavy ion interactions with matter in general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. This paper deals with an updated model of heavy ion ionization energy loss developed previously for the MARS code. The model agrees well with experimental data for various projectiles and targets including super-heavy ions in low-Z media.

  12. Revisiting heavy ion collisions under the influence of strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paoli, M. G. de; Menezes, D. P.

    2013-05-06

    The quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase refers to matter where quarks and gluons are believed to be deconfined and it probably takes place at temperatures of the order of 150 to 170 MeV. In large colliders around the world (RHIC/BNL, ALICE/CERN, GSI, etc), physicists are trying to convert hadronic matter at these order of temperatures into QGP by looking at non-central heavy ion collisions. Possible experiments towards this search are Au-Au collisions at RHIC/BNL and Pb-Pb collisions at SPS/CERN, where the hadron abundances and particle ratios are used in order to determine the temperature and baryonic chemical potential of the possibly present hadronic matter-QGP phase transition. The magnetic fields involved in heavy-ion collisions, although time dependent and short-lived, can reach intensities higher than the ones considered in magnetars, around 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} Gauss. In fact, the densities related to the chemical potentials obtained within the relativistic models framework developed in previous works are very low (of the order of 10{sup -3} fm{sup -3}). At these densities the nuclear interactions are indeed very small and this fact made us consider the possibility of free Fermi and Boson gases under the unfluence of strong magnetic fields. We investigate the effects of magnetic fields of the order of 10{sup 18}, 10{sup 19} and 10{sup 20} G through a {chi}{sup 2} fit to some data sets of the STAR experiment. Our results shown that a field of the order of 10{sup 19} G can produce a much better fit to the experimental data than the calculations without magnetic fields.

  13. Transport rates and momentum isotropization of gluon matter in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2007-08-15

    To describe momentum isotropization of gluon matter produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, the transport rate of gluon drift and the transport collision rates of elastic (gg{r_reversible}gg) as well as inelastic (gg{r_reversible}ggg) perturbative quantum chromodynamics- (pQCD) scattering processes are introduced and calculated within the kinetic parton cascade Boltzmann approach of multiparton scatterings (BAMPS), which simulates the space-time evolution of partons. We define isotropization as the development of an anisotropic system as it reaches isotropy. The inverse of the introduced total transport rate gives the correct time scale of the momentum isotropization. The contributions of the various scattering processes to the momentum isotropization can be separated into the transport collision rates. In contrast to the transport cross section, the transport collision rate has an indirect but correctly implemented relationship with the collision-angle distribution. Based on the calculated transport collision rates from BAMPS for central Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies, we show that pQCD gg{r_reversible}ggg bremsstrahlung processes isotropize the momentum five times more efficiently than elastic scatterings. The large efficiency of the bremsstrahlung stems mainly from its large momentum deflection. Due to kinematics, 2{yields}N (N>2) production processes allow more particles to become isotropic in momentum space and thus kinetically equilibrate more quickly than their back reactions or elastic scatterings. We also show that the relaxation time in the relaxation time approximation, which is often used, is strongly momentum dependent and thus cannot serve as a global quantity that describes kinetic equilibration.

  14. Modeling and Analysis of Ultra-Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, Steffen A

    2008-06-02

    This document contains the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-03ER41239: Modeling and Analysis of Ultra-Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

  15. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Yun Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-15

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 e?A of C{sup 5+} ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 ?*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 e?A of C{sup 5+} ion beam was got when work gas was CH{sub 4} while about 262 e?A of C{sup 5+} ion beam was obtained when work gas was C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  16. SYSTEMATIC STUDIES OF HEAVY ION COLLISIONS TO SEARCH FOR QUARK-GLUON PLASMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuqiang Wang

    2007-11-29

    This is the final technical report for DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator (OJI) Award, 'Systematic Studies of Heavy Ion Collisions to Search for Quark-Gluon Plasma', grant DE-FG02-02ER41219, Principal Investigator (PI) Fuqiang Wang. The research under the grant was divided into two phases. The first concentrated on systematic studies of soft hadron production at low transverse momentum (p{sub T}), in particular the production of (anti-)baryon and strangeness in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. The second concentrated on measurements of di-hadron and multi-hadron jet-correlations and investigations of medium response to jets. The research was conducted at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL with the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment. The total grant is $214,000. The grant established a PC farm solely used for this research. The PC farm consists of 8 nodes with a total of 16 CPUs and 3 disk servers of total 2 TB shared storage. The current balance of the grant is $19,985. The positive balance is because an initial purchase of $22,600 for the PC farm came out of the PI's start-up fund due to the lateness of the award. The PC farm is an integral part of the Purdue Physics Department's computer cluster. The grant supported two Ph.D. graduate students. Levente Molnar was supported from July 2002 to December 2003, and worked on soft hadron production. His thesis title is Systematics of Identified Particle Production in pp, d-Au and Au-Au Collisions at RHIC Energies. He graduated in 2006 and now is a Postdoctoral fellow at INFN Sezione di Bari, Italy working on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. Jason Ulery was supported from January 2004 to July 2007. His thesis title is Two- and Three-Particle Jet-Like Correlations. He defended his thesis in October 2007 and is moving to Frankfurt University, Germany to work on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The research by this grant resulted in 7 journal publications (2 PRL, 1 PLB, 1 PRC, 2 submitted and 1 in preparation), and 14 invited talks and 10 contributed talks at major conferences. These are listed at end of this report.

  17. Time-of-flight detector for heavy ion backscattering spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year laboratory directed research and development project to explore advanced concepts in Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS), undertaken with the goal of extending the sensitivity of this relatively new technique to levels unattainable by any other existing trace element surface analysis. Improvements in sensitivity are required for the application of HIBS to contamination control in the microelectronics industry. Tools with sensitivity approaching 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} are expected to be essential for enabling advanced IC production by the year 2000. During the project the authors developed a new analysis chamber with channeling goniometer and a prototype time-of-flight detector with a demonstrated sensitivity of {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} for Au on Si and {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 10} for Fe, and sufficient mass resolution to separate contributions from Fe and Cu.

  18. Multi Module Modeling of Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magas, V. K.; Csernai, L. P.; Keranen, A.; Manninen, J.; Strottman, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    Multi Module Model is required for the realistic and detailed description of an ultrarelativistic heavy ion reaction. We are working in the framework of such a model: initial stages are described by Effective String Rope Model with expanding final streaks; hydrodynamical approach is used for the intermediate stages. This paper is mainly devoted to Third Module - the one dealing with Freeze Out (FO). Two possibilities are discussed in details: (A) freeze out at the constant time hypersurface, where the statistical production model is used to describe post FO particle species; and (B) simultaneous hadronization and freeze out from supercooled QGP. For the last case the ALCOR-like algorithm for calculation of the post FO particle species is presented, due to the fact that these do not have time to reach chemical equilibrium.

  19. Beam imaging diagnostics for heavy ion beam fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Prost, L.; Ghiorso, W.

    2003-05-01

    We are developing techniques for imaging beams in heavy-ion beam fusion experiments in the HIF-VNL in 2 to 4 transverse dimensions. The beams in current experiments range in energy from 50 keV to 2 MeV, with beam current densities from <10 to 200 mA/cm{sup 2}, and pulse lengths of 4 to 20 {micro}s. The beam energy will range up to 10 MeV in near-future beam experiments. The imaging techniques, based on kapton films and optical scintillators, complement and, in some cases, may replace mechanical slit scanners. The kapton film images represent a time-integrated image on the film exposed to the beam. The optical scintillator utilizes glass and ceramic scintillator material imaged by a fast, image-intensified CCD-based camera. We will discuss the techniques, results, and plans for implementation of the diagnostics on the beam experiments.

  20. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion: Summary Report of the Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidl, P.A.; Barnard, J.J.

    2011-04-29

    The Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 23-26, 2011. The workshop began with plenary sessions to review the state of the art in HIF (heavy ion fusion), followed by parallel working groups, and concluded with a plenary session to review the results. There were five working groups: IFE (inertial fusion energy) targets, RF approach to HIF, induction accelerator approach to HIF, chamber and driver interface, ion sources and injectors.

  1. Electron Spin Rotation And Matching Scheme For ELIC, A High-Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogacz, A.; Chevtsov, P.; Derbenev, Y.; Krafft, G.; Zhang, Y.

    2009-08-04

    A unique design feature of a polarized Electron-Ion Collider (ELIC) based on CEBAF is its Figure-8 shaped storage rings for both electrons and ions, which significantly simplifies beam polarization maintenance and manipulation. The CEBAF accelerator is used as a full energy injector of polarized electron beams into the electron storage ring. While electron polarization is maintained vertical in arcs of the ring, a stable longitudinal spin at four collision points is achieved through vertical crossing bending magnets, solenoid spin rotators, and horizontal orbit bends. Spin matching technique needs to be implemented in order to enhance quantum self-polarization and minimize depolarization effects. In this paper, we also discuss several important issues related to the use of positron beams, radiative polarization and quantum depolarization effects, as well as spin in ELIC.

  2. Atomic nuclei decay modes by spontaneous emission of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M.; Sndulescu, A.; Greiner, W.

    1985-08-01

    The great majority of the known nuclides with Z>40, including the so-called stable nuclides, are metastable with respect to several modes of spontaneous superasymmetric splitting. A model extended from the fission theory of alpha decay allows one to estimate the lifetimes and the branching ratios relative to the alpha decay for these natural radioactivities. From a huge amount of systematic calculations it is concluded that the process should proceed with maximum intensity in the trans-lead nuclei, where the minimum lifetime is obtained from parent-emitted heavy ion combinations leading to a magic (/sup 208/Pb) or almost magic daughter nucleus. More than 140 nuclides with atomic number smaller than 25 are possible candidates to be emitted from heavy nuclei, with half-lives in the range of 10/sup 10/--10/sup 30/ s: /sup 5/He, /sup 8en-dash10/Be, /sup 11,12/B, /sup 12en-dash16/C, /sup 13en-dash17/N, /sup 15en-dash22/O, /sup 18en-dash23/F, /sup 20en-dash26/Ne, /sup 23en-dash28/Na, /sup 23en-dash30/Mg, /sup 27en-dash32/Al, /sup 28en-dash36/Si, /sup 31en-dash39/P, /sup 32en-dash42/S, /sup 35en-dash45/Cl, /sup 37en-dash47/Ar, /sup 40en-dash49/ K, . .Ca, /sup 44en-dash53/ Sc, /sup 46en-dash53/Ti, /sup 48en-dash54/V, and /sup 49en-dash55/ Cr. The shell structure and the pairing effects are clearly manifested in these new decay modes.

  3. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  4. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 ?m2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  5. A lower cost development path for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, W.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1993-05-19

    If two features of the inertial fusion process are exploited successfully, they can lead to significantly lower costs for demonstrating the feasibility of commercial electric power production from this source of energy. First, fusion capsule ignition and burn physics is independent of reaction chamber size and hydrodynamically-equivalent capsules can be designed to perform at small yield, exactly as they do at large yield. This means that an integrated test of all power plant components and feasibility tests of various reaction chamber concepts can be done at much smaller sizes (about 1--2 m first wall radius) and much lower powers (tens of MWs) than magnetic fusion development facilities such as ITER. Second, the driver, which is the most expensive component of currently conceived IFE development facilities, can be used to support more than one experiment target chamber/reactor (simultaneously and/or sequentially). These two factors lead to lower development facility costs, modular facilities, and the planning flexibility to spread costs over time or do several things in parallel and thus shorten the total time needed for development of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). In this paper the authors describe the general feature of a heavy ion fusion development plan that takes advantage of upgradable accelerators and the ability to test chambers and reactor systems at small scale in order to reduce development time and costs.

  6. Correlations between jet-quenching observables at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, J.; Horowitz, W.; Liao, J.

    2011-10-01

    Focusing on four types of correlation plots, R{sub AA} versus v{sub 2}, R{sub AA} versus I{sub AA}, I{sub AA} versus v{sub 2}{sup I{sub AA}}, and v{sub 2} versus v{sub 2}{sup I{sub AA}}, we demonstrate how the centrality dependence of correlations between multiple jet quenching observables provide valuable insight into the energy loss mechanism in a quark-gluon plasma. In particular, we find that a qualitative energy loss model gives a good description of R{sub AA} versus v{sub 2} only when we take {Delta}E-I{sup 3} and a medium geometry generated by a model of the color glass condensate. This same {Delta}E-I{sup 3} model also qualitatively describes the trigger p{sub T} dependence of R{sub AA} versus I{sub AA} data and makes novel predictions for the centrality dependence for this R{sub AA} versus I{sub AA} correlation. Current data suggest, albeit with extremely large uncertainty, that v{sub 2}{sup I{sub AA}} >> v{sub 2}, a correlation that is difficult to reproduce in current energy loss models.

  7. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.

    2009-02-06

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta}=1.37{+-}0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub perpendicular}.

  8. Correlations between jet-quenching observables at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia Jiangyong; Horowitz, W. A.; Liao Jinfeng

    2011-09-15

    Focusing on four types of correlation plots, R{sub AA} versus v{sub 2}, R{sub AA} versus I{sub AA}, I{sub AA} versus v{sub 2}{sup I{sub AA}}, and v{sub 2} versus v{sub 2}{sup I{sub AA}}, we demonstrate how the centrality dependence of correlations between multiple jet quenching observables provide valuable insight into the energy loss mechanism in a quark-gluon plasma. In particular, we find that a qualitative energy loss model gives a good description of R{sub AA} versus v{sub 2} only when we take {Delta}E{approx}l{sup 3} and a medium geometry generated by a model of the color glass condensate. This same {Delta}E{approx}l{sup 3} model also qualitatively describes the trigger p{sub T} dependence of R{sub AA} versus I{sub AA} data and makes novel predictions for the centrality dependence for this R{sub AA} versus I{sub AA} correlation. Current data suggest, albeit with extremely large uncertainty, that v{sub 2}{sup I{sub AA}}>>v{sub 2}, a correlation that is difficult to reproduce in current energy loss models.

  9. Indications of conical emission of charged hadrons at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06} (syst), independent of p.

  10. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic HeavyIon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2009-02-09

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au + Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub {perpendicular}}.

  11. Photon Production and Photon-Hadron Correlations in Relativistic Heavy Ion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Collisions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Photon Production and Photon-Hadron Correlations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Photon Production and Photon-Hadron Correlations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions We calculate the production of real photons in relativistic nuclear collisions at RHIC, consistently with the quenching of fast partons. We go beyond one-body observables, and evaluate photon-triggered fragmentation functions, in the

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    05 Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator (CT.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.05-3 Site Operations: Research and development with solvents. CT.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited amount of materials handled CT.05-3 Radioactive Materials

  13. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teaney, Derek; Yan Li

    2011-06-15

    We introduce a cumulant expansion to parametrize possible initial conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions. We show that the cumulant expansion converges and that it can systematically reproduce the results of Glauber type initial conditions. At third order in the gradient expansion the cumulants characterize the triangularity and the dipole asymmetry of the initial entropy distribution. We show that for midperipheral collisions the orientation angle of the dipole asymmetry {psi}{sub 1,3} has a 20% preference out of plane. This leads to a small net v{sub 1} out of plane. In peripheral and midcentral collisions the orientation angles {psi}{sub 1,3} and {psi}{sub 3,3} are strongly correlated, but this correlation disappears towards central collisions. We study the ideal hydrodynamic response to these cumulants and determine the associated v{sub 1}/{epsilon}{sub 1} and v{sub 3}/{epsilon}{sub 3} for a massless ideal gas equation of state. The space time development of v{sub 1} and v{sub 3} is clarified with figures. These figures show that v{sub 1} and v{sub 3} develop toward the edge of the nucleus, and consequently the final spectra are more sensitive to the viscous dynamics of freezeout. The hydrodynamic calculations for v{sub 3} are provisionally compared to Alver and Roland fit of STAR inclusive two-particle correlation functions. Finally, we propose to measure the v{sub 1} associated with the dipole asymmetry and the correlations between {psi}{sub 1,3} and {psi}{sub 3,3} by measuring a two-particle correlation with respect to the participant plane . The hydrodynamic prediction for this correlation function is several times larger than a correlation currently measured by the STAR collaboration . This experimental measurement would provide convincing evidence for the hydrodynamic and geometric interpretation of two-particle correlations at RHIC.

  14. Swift heavy ion irradiation of Pt nanocrystals: I. shape transformation and dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giulian, R.; Araujo, L.L.; Kluth, P.; Sprouster, D.J.; Schnohr, C.S.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C. (ANU)

    2014-09-24

    We report on the effects of swift heavy ion irradiation of embedded Pt nanocrystals (NCs), which change from spheres to prolate spheroids to rods upon irradiation. Using a broad range of ion irradiation energies and NC mean sizes we demonstrate that the elongation and dissolution processes are energy and size dependent, attaining comparable levels of shape transformation and dissolution upon a given energy density deposited in the matrix. The NC shape transformation remains operative despite discontinuous ion tracks in the matrix and exhibits a constant threshold size for elongation. In contrast, for ion irradiations in which the ion tracks are continuous, the threshold size for elongation is clearly energy dependent.

  15. Effects of Crab Cavities' Multipole Content in an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satogata, Todd J.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Delayen, Jean R.; Castillo, Alejandro

    2015-09-01

    The impact on the beam dynamics of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Colider (MEIC) due to the multipole content of the 750 MHz crab cavity was studied using thin multipole elements for 6D phase space particle tracking in ELEGANT. Target values of the sextupole component for the cavitys field expansion were used to perform preliminary studies on the proton beam stability when compared to the case of pure dipole content of the rf kicks. Finally, important effects on the beam sizes due to non-linear components of the crab cavities fields were identified and some criteria for their future study were proposed.

  16. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Sessler, A.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. ,

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of how to shield the detector and reduce the background are addressed in the Detector Chapter. Polarization of the muons allows many very interesting measurements which are discussed in the Physics Chapter. Unlike the electron collider in which the electron beam is highly polarized and the positron beam unpolarized, both muon beams may be partially polarized. It is necessary to select forward moving muons from the pion's decay and thus reduce the available number of muons and hence the luminosity. The necessary machine technology needed to achieve such a collider is discussed in the Option Chapter; at the moment it is not part of our point design, although such capability would almost certainly be incorporated into an actual device.

  17. Selected Topics in the Physics of Heavy Ion Collisions (1/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    In these lectures, I discuss some classes of measurements accessible in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. How can these observables be measured, to what extent can they be calculated, and what do they tell us about the dense mesoscopic system created during the collision? In the first lecture, I shall focus in particular on measurements that constrain the spatio-temporal picture of the collisions and that measure centrality, orientations and extensions. In the subsequent lectures, I then discuss on how classes of measurements allow one to characterize collective phenomena, and to what extent these measurements can constrain the properties of matter produced in heavy ion collisions.

  18. Event-by-Event Anisotropic Flow in Heavy-ion Collisions from Combined

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Yang-Mills and Viscous Fluid Dynamics (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Event-by-Event Anisotropic Flow in Heavy-ion Collisions from Combined Yang-Mills and Viscous Fluid Dynamics « Prev Next » Title: Event-by-Event Anisotropic Flow in Heavy-ion Collisions from Combined Yang-Mills and Viscous Fluid Dynamics Authors: Gale, Charles ; Jeon, Sangyong ; Schenke, Björn ; Tribedy, Prithwish ; Venugopalan, Raju Publication Date: 2013-01-02 OSTI Identifier: 1102628 Type: Publisher's Accepted

  19. Event-by-Event Anisotropic Flow in Heavy-ion Collisions from Combined

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Yang-Mills and Viscous Fluid Dynamics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Event-by-Event Anisotropic Flow in Heavy-ion Collisions from Combined Yang-Mills and Viscous Fluid Dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Event-by-Event Anisotropic Flow in Heavy-ion Collisions from Combined Yang-Mills and Viscous Fluid Dynamics Authors: Gale, Charles ; Jeon, Sangyong ; Schenke, Björn ; Tribedy, Prithwish ; Venugopalan, Raju Publication Date: 2013-01-02 OSTI Identifier: 1102628 Type:

  20. Fluctuations driven isotropization of the quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkelin, S. V.

    2008-07-15

    Averaged over ensemble of initial conditions kinetic transport equations of weakly coupled systems of quarks and gluons are derived. These equations account for the correlators of fluctuations of particles and classical gluon fields. The isotropization of particle momenta by field fluctuations at the early prethermal stage of matter evolution in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is discussed. Our results can be useful for understanding under what conditions isotropization of the quark-gluon plasma in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions can be reached within phenomenologically observed time scales.

  1. Estimation of Heavy Ion Densities From Linearly Polarized EMIC Waves At Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-02-24

    Linearly polarized EMIC waves are expected to concentrate at the location where their wave frequency satisfies the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance condition as the result of a mode conversion process. In this letter, we evaluate absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance in the Earth geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of helium and azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers in dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentration, it only occurs for a limited range of azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Our results suggest that, at L = 6.6, linearly polarized EMIC waves can be generated via mode conversion from the compressional waves near the crossover frequency. Consequently, the heavy ion concentration ratio can be estimated from observations of externally generated EMIC waves that have polarization.

  2. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  3. Design and characterization of a neutralized-transport experiment for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henestroza, E.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Greenway, W.G.; Logan, B.G.; MacGill, R.A.; Shuman, D.B.; Vanecek, D.L.; Waldron, W.L.; Sharp, W.M.; Houck, T.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Sefkow, A.B.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2004-03-14

    In heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the fusion chamber to hit millimeter-sized spots on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams in this final transport is essential for a heavy-ion fusion power plant to be economically competitive. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with particle-in-cell simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX). The experiment consists of three main sections, each with its own physics issues. The injector is designed to generate a very high-brightness, space-charge-dominated potassium beam while still allowing variable perveance by a beam aperturing technique. The magnetic-focusing section, consisting of four pulsed magnetic quadrupoles, permits the study of beam tuning, as well as the effects of phase space dilution due to higher-order nonlinear fields. In the final section, the converging ion beam exiting the magnetic section is transported through a drift region with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we discuss the design and characterization of the three sections in detail and present initial results from the experiment.

  4. Fourier harmonics of high-p{sub T} particles probing the fluctuating initial condition geometries in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betz, Barbara; Gyulassy, Miklos; Torrieri, Giorgio

    2011-08-15

    Second Fourier harmonics of jet quenching have been thoroughly explored in the literature and shown to be sensitive to the underlying jet path-length dependence of energy loss and the differences between the mean eccentricity predicted by Glauber and color glass condensate (CGC)/Kharzeev-Levin-Nardi (KLN) models of initial conditions. We compute the jet path-length dependence of energy-loss for higher azimuthal harmonics of jet-fragments in a generalized model of energy-loss for Relativistc Heavy Ion Collider energies and find, however, that even the high-p{sub T} second moment is most sensitive to the poorly known early time evolution during the first fm/c. Moreover, we demonstrate that higher-jet harmonics are remarkably insensitive to the initial conditions, while the different v{sub n}(N{sub part}) vs v{sub n}{sup I{sub AA}}(N{sub part}) correlations between the moments of monojet and dijet nuclear modifications factors remain a most sensitive probe to differentiate between Glauber and CGC/KLN initial state geometries of the strongly-coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

  5. 2011-2012 SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing residue cross section in 48Ca-induced reactions D. A. Mayorov, T. A. Werke, M. C. Alfonso, M. E. Bennett, and C. M. Folden III Characterization of a gas stopper for heavy element chemistry studies M. C. Alfonso, D. A. Mayorov, T. A. Werke, and C. M. Folden III Fabrication of lanthanide targets for nuclear reaction studies D. A. Mayorov, T. A. Werke, M. E. Bennett, and C. M. Folden III Excitation functions of 45Sc-induced reactions: towards future superheavy element synthesis

  6. Heavy ion beam induced charge transfer in Ar-Cs mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murnick, D.E.; Gernhauser, R.; Ulrich, A.; Krotz, W.; Wieser, J.

    1993-12-01

    In situ production of target ions in cold, dense matter by heavy ion collisions and subsequent selective charge transfer may provide an effective pumping scheme for heavy ion beam pumped lasers. Charge transfer from cesium atoms to doubly charged argon ions was used for selective population of 4d-levels in Ar II. The argon ions were produced in an argon-cesium gas target by a pulsed beam of 100 MeV {sup 32}S{sup 8+} ions from the Munich Tandem van de Graaff accelerator. The ion beam of 12 {times} 10{sup 6} ions/pulse had a pulse width of 2 ns and a repetition rate of 32 kHz. The argon pressure was typically 250 mbar. The cesium partial pressure was adjusted by heating the gas target, including a cesium reservoir, to temperatures between 250 and 500{degrees}C. Time resolved wavelength spectra showed large intensity increases corresponding to 4d {sup 4}D and 4d {sup 4}F to 4p transitions in Ar II in the ultraviolet wavelength region between 300 and 400 nm. This is interpreted as a resonant charge transfer of outer electrons of cesium to 4d levels in Ar II in Cs{sup 0} + Ar{sup 2+} collisions.

  7. {gamma} spectroscopy around doubly magic {sup 48}Ca by heavy-ion transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    {gamma} spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 48}Ca is performed by the heavy-ion transfer reaction {sup 48}Ca on {sup 64}Ni at 282 MeV, with the PRISMA-CLARA setup at Legnaro Laboratory. Angular distributions, polarizations and lifetimes analysis probe spin and parities of several excited states, shading lights on their configuration. In the one neutron transfer channels, {sup 49}Ca and {sup 47}Ca, states arising by coupling a single particle to the 3{sup -} phonon of {sup 48}Ca are observed, showing the robustness of nuclear collectivity in rather light systems. The work demonstrates the feasibility of complete in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy with heavy-ion transfer reactions and provides a method that can be further exploited in the future with heavy targets and radioactive beams.

  8. Experimental measurement of the 4-d transverse phase space map of a heavy ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, H S

    1997-12-01

    The development and employment of a new diagnostic instrument for characterizing intense, heavy ion beams is reported on. This instrument, the ''Gated Beam Imager'' or ''GBI'' was designed for use on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Heavy Ion Fusion Project's ''Small Recirculator'', an integrated, scaled physics experiment and engineering development project for studying the transport and control of intense heavy ion beams as inertial fusion drivers in the production of electric power. The GBI allows rapid measurement and calculation of a heavy ion beam's characteristics to include all the first and second moments of the transverse phase space distribution, transverse emittance, envelope parameters and beam centroid. The GBI, with appropriate gating produces a time history of the beam resulting in a 4-D phase-space and time ''map'' of the beam. A unique capability of the GBI over existing diagnostic instruments is its ability to measure the ''cross'' moments between the two transverse orthogonal directions. Non-zero ''cross'' moments in the alternating gradient lattice of the Small Recirculator are indicative of focusing element rotational misalignments contributing to beam emittance growth. This emittance growth, while having the same effect on the ability to focus a beam as emittance growth caused by non-linear effects, is in principle removable by an appropriate number of focusing elements. The instrument uses the pepperpot method of introducing a plate with many pinholes into the beam and observing the images of the resulting beamlets as they interact with a detector after an appropriate drift distance. In order to produce adequate optical signal and repeatability, the detector was chosen to be a microchannel plate (MCP) with a phosphor readout screen. The heavy ions in the pepperpot beamlets are stopped in the MCP's thin front metal anode and the resulting secondary electron signal is amplified and proximity-focused onto the phosphor while maintaining the spatial and intensity characteristics of the heavy ion beamlets. The MCP used in this manner is a sensitive, accurate, and long-lasting detector, resistant against signal degradation experienced by previous methods of intense heavy ion beam detection and imaging. The performance of the GBI was benchmarked against existing mechanical emittance diagnostics and the results of sophisticated beam transport numerical simulation codes to demonstrate its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. A method of beam correction to remove the effects of quadrupole focusing element rotational misalignments is proposed using data obtainable from a GBI. An optimizing code was written to determine the parameters of the correction system elements based on input from the GBI. The results of this code for the Small Recirculator beam are reported on.

  9. Heavy-ion transfer reactions at large internuclear distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, D.; Corradi, L.; Szilner, S.; Pollarolo, G.; Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Farnea, E.; Michelagnoli, C.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C. A.; Courtin, S.; Goasduff, A.; Haas, F.; Mijatovic, T.; Soic, N.; Grebosz, J.

    2012-10-20

    The transfer reaction for the {sup 116}Sn+{sup 60}Ni system has been studied using the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer at different bombarding energies from above to well below the Coulomb barrier. The experiment has been done in inverse kinematics and light target-like ions have been detected with PRISMA placed at very forward angles. Good mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy resolutions have been achieved. Sufficient statistics has been accumulated to extract angular distributions for different bombarding energies have been extracted and the response function of the spectrometer has been studied to correct for the aberration due to the transport of the ions in PRISMA. The comparison between the present case and the previously measured {sup 96}Zr+{sup 40}Ca system, superfluid and near closed shells nuclei, respectively, should significantly improve our understanding of nucleon-nucleon correlation properties in multinucleon transfer processes.

  10. Reorientation of the crystalline planes in confined single crystal nickel nanorods induced by heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Abha; Tyagi, Pawan K.; Rai, Padmnabh; Misra, D. S.; Ghatak, Jay; Satyam, P. V.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2006-08-28

    In a recent letter Tyagi et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 253110 (2005)] have reported the special orientation of nickel planes inside multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with respect to the tube axis. Heavy ion irradiation has been performed with 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} and 100 MeV Au{sup 7+} ions on these nickel filled MWCNTs at fluences ranging from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Ion-induced modifications have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The diffraction pattern and the lattice imaging showed the presence of ion-induced planar defects on the tube walls and completely amorphized encapsulated nickel nanorods. The results are discussed in terms of thermal spike model.

  11. OPTIMIZATION OF THE PARAMETERS IN THE RHIC SINGLE CRYSTAL HEAVY ION COLLIMATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BIRYUKOV,V.M.; CHESNOKOV,Y.A.; KOTOV,V.I.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; STEVENS,A.

    1999-03-29

    In the framework of the project to design and test a collimation system prototype using bent channeling crystal for cleaning of the RHIC heavy ion beam halo, we have studied the optimal length and bending angle of a silicon (110) single crystal proposed to be a primary element situated upstream of the traditional heavy amorphous collimator. Besides the matters of the channeling and collimation efficiency, we also looked into the impact the crystal may have on the non-channeled particles that go on circulating in the ring, so as to reduce the momentum offset of the particles scattered of the crystal.

  12. Ballistic protons in incoherent exclusive vector meson production as a measure of rare parton fluctuations at an electron-ion collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lappi, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Mantysaari, H.

    2015-02-25

    We argue that the proton multiplicities measured in Roman pot detectors at an electron ion collider can be used to determine centrality classes in incoherent diffractive scattering. Incoherent diffraction probes the fluctuations in the interaction strengths of multi-parton Fock states in the nuclear wavefunctions. In particular, the saturation scale that characterizes this multi-parton dynamics is significantly larger in central events relative to minimum bias events. As an application, we examine the centrality dependence of incoherent diffractive vector meson production. We identify an observable which is simultaneously very sensitive to centrality triggered parton fluctuations and insensitive to details of the model.

  13. Evolution of collectivity as a signal of quark gluon plasma formation in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Payal; Alam, Jan-e; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2011-08-15

    A measurement for studying the mass dependence of dilepton interferometry in relativistic heavy-ion collision experiments as a tool to characterize the quark gluon phase is proposed. In calculations involving dileptons, we show that the mass dependence of radii extracted from the virtual photon (dilepton) interferometry provide access to the development of collective flow with time. It is argued that the nonmonotonic variation of Hanbury Brown-Twiss radii with invariant mass of the lepton pairs signals the formation of quark gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions. Our proposal of experimentally measuring the ratio, R{sub out}/R{sub side} for dileptons can be used to estimate the average lifetimes of the partonic as well as the hadronic phases.

  14. The Heavy Ion Fusion Program in the U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bangerter, R.O.; Davidson, R.C.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Lindl, J.D.; Logan, B.G.; Meier, W.R.

    2000-10-03

    Inertial fusion energy research has enjoyed increased interest and funding. This has allowed expanded programs in target design, target fabrication, fusion chamber research, target injection and tracking, and accelerator research. The target design effort examines ways to minimize the beam power and energy and increase the allowable focal spot size while preserving target gain. Chamber research for heavy ion fusion emphasizes the use of thick liquid walls to serve as the coolant, breed tritium, and protect the structural wall from neutrons, photons, and other target products. Several small facilities are now operating to model fluid chamber dynamics. A facility to study target injection and tracking has been built and a second facility is being designed. Improved economics is an important goal of the accelerator research. The accelerator research is also directed toward the design of an Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE is being designed to accelerate ions to >100 MeV, enabling experiments in beam dynamics, focusing, and target physics. Activities leading to the IRE include ion source development and a High Current Experiment (HCX) designed to transport and accelerate a single beam of ions with a beam current of approximately 1 A, the initial current required for each beam of a fusion driver. In terms of theory, the program is developing a source-to-target numerical simulation capability. The goal of the entire program is to enable an informed decision about the promise of heavy ion fusion in about a decade.

  15. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) half-year report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; and final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target.

  16. Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation on bare and coated ZnS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, S. Hussain, A.M.P.; Ahmed, G.A.; Singh, F.; Avasthi, D.K.; Choudhury, A.

    2008-12-01

    The present study compares structural and optical modifications of bare and silica (SiO{sub 2}) coated ZnS quantum dots under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. Bare and silica coated ZnS quantum dots were prepared following an inexpensive chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as the dielectric host matrix. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of the samples show the formation of almost spherical ZnS quantum dots. The UV-Vis absorption spectra reveal blue shift relative to bulk material in absorption energy while photoluminescence (PL) spectra suggests that surface state and near band edge emissions are dominating in case of bare and coated samples, respectively. Swift heavy ion irradiation of the samples was carried out with 160 MeV Ni{sup 12+} ion beam with fluences 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Size enhancement of bare quantum dots after irradiation has been indicated in XRD and TEM analysis of the samples which has also been supported by optical absorption spectra. However similar investigations on irradiated coated quantum dots revealed little change in quantum dot size and emission. The present study thus shows that the coated ZnS quantum dots are stable upon SHI irradiation compared to the bare one.

  17. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, T. Sugimoto, S.; Sasai, K.; Hattori, T.

    2014-02-15

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz.

  18. Removal of heavy metal ions from oil shale beneficiation process water by ferrite process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhang, L.; Lamont, W.E.; Schultz, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    The ferrite process is an established technique for removing heavy metals from waste water. Because the process water resulting from oil shale beneficiation falls into the category of industrial waste water, it is anticipated that this process may turn out to be a potential viable treatment for oil shale beneficiation process water containing many heave metal ions. The process is chemoremedial because not only effluent water comply with quality standards, but harmful heavy metals are converted into a valuable, chemically stable by-product known as ferrite. These spinel ferrites have magnetic properties, and therefore can be use in applications such as magnetic marker, ferrofluid, microwave absorbing and scavenging material. Experimental results from this process are presented along with results of treatment technique such as sulfide precipitation.

  19. Removal of heavy metal ions from oil shale beneficiation process water by ferrite process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhang, L.; Lamont, W.E.; Schultz, C.W. . Mineral Resources Inst.)

    1991-01-01

    The ferrite process is an established technique for removing heavy metals from waste water. Because the process water resulting from oil shale beneficiation falls into the category of industrial waste water, it is anticipated that this process may turn out to be a potential viable treatment for oil shale beneficiation process water containing many heave metal ions. The process is chemoremedial because not only effluent water comply with quality standards, but harmful heavy metals are converted into a valuable, chemically stable by-product known as ferrite. These spinel ferrites have magnetic properties, and therefore can be use in applications such as magnetic marker, ferrofluid, microwave absorbing and scavenging material. Experimental results from this process are presented along with results of treatment technique such as sulfide precipitation.

  20. Event-shape fluctuations and flow correlations in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jia, Jiangyong

    2014-12-01

    I review recent measurements of a large set of flow observables associated with event-shape fluctuations and collective expansion in heavy ion collisions. First, these flow observables are classified and experiment methods are introduced. The experimental results for each type of observables are then presented and compared to theoretical calculations. A coherent picture of initial condition and collective flow based on linear and non-linear hydrodynamic responses is derived, which qualitatively describe most experimental results. I discuss new types of fluctuation measurements that can further our understanding of the event-shape fluctuations and collective expansion dynamics.

  1. Thermalization of color gauge fields in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwazaki, Aiichi [International Politics Economics, Nishogakusha University, Ohi Kashiwa Chiba 277-8585 (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    We discuss the quantum mechanical decay of the color magnetic field generated initially during high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The decay is caused by Nielsen-Olesen unstable modes and is accomplished possibly in a period <1 fm/c. We show that the decay products (i.e., incoherent gluons) may be thermalized in a sufficiently short period (<1 fm/c). The precise determination of the period is made by calculating the two-point function of the color magnetic field in a color glass condensate model.

  2. HIGH-POWER FFAG-BASED HEAVY-ION AND PROTON DRIVERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUGGIERO,A.

    2007-10-01

    Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerators are being proposed as an alternative to Super-conducting Linacs (SCL), Rapid-Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) and Cyclotrons for the acceleration of very intense Heavy-Ion and Proton beams in the medium energy range. One application is the acceleration of ions of Uranium-238 to an energy of 400 MeV/u, and the average power of 400 kWatt, and the other a 1-GeV Proton Driver with an average beam power of 10 MWatt. One or two FFAG rings are needed for acceleration of both beams. They adopt a Non-Scaling Lattice (NSL) to reduce the size and the cost of the accelerator. The continuous wave (CW) mode of operation is achieved with the method of Harmonic Number Jump (HNJ).

  3. Off-momentum dynamic aperture for lattices in the RHIC heavy ion runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Zhang, S.

    2012-05-20

    To reduce transverse emittance growth rates from intrabeam scattering in the RHIC heavy ion runs, a lattice with an increased phase advance in the arc FODO cells was adopted in 2008-2011. During these runs, a large beam loss due to limited off-momentum dynamic aperture was observed during longitudinal RF re-bucketing and with transverse cooling. Based on the beam loss observations in the previous ion runs and the calculated off-momentum apertures, we decided to adopt the lattice used before 2008 for the 2012 U-U and Cu-Au runs. The observed beam decay and the measured momentum aperture in the 2012 U-U run are presented.

  4. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-12-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion energy systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. In this paper, we examine three different modes of beam propagation: neutralized ballistic transport, assisted pinched transport, and self-pinched transport. The status of our understanding of these three modes is summarized, and the constraints imposed by beam propagation upon the chamber environment, as well as their compatibility with various chamber and target concepts, are considered. We conclude that, on the basis of our present understanding, there is a reasonable range of parameter space where beams can propagate in thick-liquid wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers.

  5. Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.

    2009-10-19

    Parameters are given of muon colliders with center of mass energies of 1.5 and 3 TeV. Pion production is from protons on a mercury target. Capture, decay, and phase rotation yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling reduces the emittances until the trains are merged into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in 6 dimensions is then applied, followed by final transverse cooling in 50 T solenoids. After acceleration the muons enter the collider ring. Ongoing R&D is discussed.

  6. Final Technical Report DE-FG02-08ER41540. Establishing the Transport Properties of QCD With Heavy Ion Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teaney, Derek

    2015-03-17

    We review the results of the DE-FG02-08ER41540, "Establishing the transport properties of QCD with heavy ion reactions"

  7. RHIC Performance as a 100 GeV Polarized Proton Collider in Run-9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hahn, H.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Menga, P.M.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Pozdeyev, E.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    During the second half of Run-9, the Relativisitc Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided polarized proton collisions at two interaction points. The spin orientation of both beams at these collision points was controlled by helical spin rotators, and physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. Recent developments and improvements will be presented, as well as luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-9.

  8. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  9. Radiation damage by light- and heavy-ion bombardment of single-crystal LiNbO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Hsu-Cheng; Zhang, Lihua; Malladi, Girish; Dadap, Jerry I.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Kisslinger, Kim; Vemuri, Rama Sesha R.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Bakhru, Hassaram; Osgood, Jr., Richard M.

    2015-04-14

    In this work, a battery of analytical methods including in situ RBS/C, confocal micro-Raman, TEM/STEM, EDS, AFM, and optical microscopy were used to provide a comparative investigation of light- and heavy-ion radiation damage in single-crystal LiNbO?. High (~MeV) and low (~100s keV) ion energies, corresponding to different stopping power mechanisms, were used and their associated damage events were observed. In addition, sequential irradiation of both ion species was also performed and their cumulative depth-dependent damage was determined. It was found that the contribution from electronic stopping by high-energy heavy ions gave rise to a lower critical fluence for damage formationmorethan for the case of low-energy irradiation. Such energy-dependent critical fluence of heavy-ion irradiation is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that for the case of light-ion damage. In addition, materials amorphization and collision cascades were seen for heavy-ion irradiation, while for light ion, crystallinity remained at the highest fluence used in the experiment. The irradiation-induced damage is characterized by the formation of defect clusters, elastic strain, surface deformation, as well as change in elemental composition. In particular, the presence of nanometric-scale damage pockets results in increased RBS/C backscattered signal and the appearance of normally forbidden Raman phonon modes. The location of the highest density of damage is in good agreement with SRIM calculations. (author)less

  10. Swift heavy ion irradiation of Pt nanocrystals: II. Structural changes and H desorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giulian, R.; Araujo, L.L.; Kluth, P.; Sprouster, D.J.; Schnohr, C.S.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2014-09-24

    The structural properties and H desorption from embedded Pt nanocrystals (NCs) following irradiation with swift heavy ions were investigated as a function of energy and fluence. From x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis, Pt-H bonding was identified in NCs annealed in a forming gas (95% N{sub 2} + 5% H{sub 2}) ambient. The H content decreased upon irradiation and the desorption process was NC-size dependent such that larger NCs required a higher fluence to achieve a H-free state. Pt-H bonding and NC dissolution both perturbed the NC structural parameters (coordination number, bond-length and mean-square relative displacement) as determined with extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements.

  11. Relativistic heavy ion physics. Progress report, November 15, 1992--November 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K.

    1993-11-01

    This is a progress report for the period May 1992 through April 1993. The first section, entitled ``Purpose and Trends, gives background on the recent trends in the research program and its evolution from an emphasis on nuclear structure physics to its present emphasis on relativistic heavy ion and RHIC physics. The next section, entitled ``Physics Research Progress``, is divided into four parts: participation in the program to develop a large detector named PHENIX for the RHIC accelerator; joining E864 at the AGS accelerator and the role in that experiment; progress made in the study of electromagnetic dissociation highlight of this endeavor is an experiment carried out with the {sup 197}Au beam from the AGS accelerator in April 1992; progress in completion of the nuclear structure studies. In the final section a list of publications, invited talks, and contributed talks is given.

  12. Dynamical approach to heavy-ion induced fusion using actinide target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aritomo, Y.; Hagino, K.; Chiba, S.; Nishio, K.

    2012-10-20

    To treat heavy-ion reactions using actinide target nucleus, we propose a model which takes into account the coupling to the collective states of interacting nuclei in the penetration of the Coulomb barrier and the dynamical evolution of nuclear shape from the contact configuration. A fluctuation-dissipation model (Langevin equation) was applied in the dynamical calculation, where effect of nuclear orientation at the initial impact on the prolately deformed target nucleus was considered. Using this model, we analyzed the experimental data for the mass distribution of fission fragments (MDFF) in the reaction of {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U at several incident energies. Fusion-fission, quasifission and deep-quasi-fission are separated as different trajectories on the potential energy surface. We estimated the fusion cross section of the reaction.

  13. Operation of a multiple cell array detector in plasma experiments with a heavy ion beam diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncalves, B.; Malaquias, A.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Pereira, L.; Silva, C.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Khrebtov, S.M.; Dreval, N.B.; Krupnik, L.I.; Hidalgo, C.; Depablos, J.

    2004-10-01

    A multiple cell array detector (MCAD) has been developed to investigate the spatial structure of plasma turbulence in fusion plasmas. This system is expected to provide simultaneous measurements of edge and core density fluctuations with both temporal and spatial resolution, extending the range and number of the sample volumes simultaneously recorded by a heavy ion beam diagnostic (HIBD). Since the detector (usually located close to the vessel wall of a plasma device) operates in a strong plasma radiation environment, the effective shielding of the detector presents a special problem. This article describes and compares the MCAD operation conditions on ISTTOK tokamak and TJ-II stellarator. Experimental results of the detector performance are presented together with the first measurements of n{sub e}{sigma}{sub eff} in the TJ-II plasmas.

  14. Quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    We briefly give an elementary introduction to the expansion of the Early Universe till when the phase transition of the quark-gluon plasma to a hadronic matter takes place. Then we describe some main element of the study of QGP by mean of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC's)

  15. Response of nanostructured ferritic alloys to high-dose heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Chad M.; White, Ryan M.; LeBeau, James M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-02-01

    A latest-generation aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to study heavy-ion-irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Results are presented for STEM X-ray mapping of NFA 14YWT irradiated with 10 MeV Pt to 16 or 160 dpa at -100°C and 750°C, as well as pre-irradiation reference material. Irradiation at -100°C results in ballistic destruction of the beneficial microstructural features present in the pre-irradiated reference material, such as Ti-Y-O nanoclusters (NCs) and grain boundary (GB) segregation. Irradiation at 750°C retains these beneficial features, but indicates some coarsening of the NCs, diffusion of Al to the NCs, and a reduction of the Cr-W GB segregation (or solute excess) content. Ion irradiation combined with the latest-generation STEM hardware allows for rapid screening of fusion candidate materials and improved understanding of irradiation-induced microstructural changes in NFAs.

  16. Future directions in intermediate energy heavy ion physics. A proposed expansion of the Holifield Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    A proposal is presented for a major accelerator addition to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. The expanded facility will provide ion beams of mass 1 to 238 amu with a combination of energy, intensity, momentum resolution, and beam quality not currently available at any other facility in North America. The physics motivation for such an addition is discussed, and involves physics dominated by meson-exchange forces, Coulomb-force dominated physics, and possibly a regime where the quark and gluon degrees of freedom are significant. The physics research would include topics in atomic and interdisciplinary areas as well as nuclear physics. Some remarks are made on the merits of Oak Ridge as a site for this facility, placing the proposal in some historical perspective. The accelerator system is then described, giving the required beam properties, and the parameters of the synchrotron ring components, injection, ring magnets, RF systems, vacuum system, and electron cooling system and stochastic cooling system requirements. Also described are such facilities as buildings, beam transport and shielding, and experimental facilities, including target areas. (LEW)

  17. A very thin havar film vacuum window for heavy ions to perform radiobiology studies at the BNL Tandem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieberger, P.; Abendroth, H.; Alessi, J.; Cannizzo, L.; Carlson, C.; Gustavsson, A.; Minty, M.; Snydstrup, L.

    2011-03-28

    Heavy ion beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will be made available for radiobiology studies on cell cultures. Beam energy losses need to be minimized both in the vacuum window and in the air in order to achieve the ranges required for the cells to be studied. This is particularly challenging for ions heavier than iron. The design is presented of a 0.4-inch diameter Havar film window that will satisfy these requirements. Films as thin as 80 microinches were successfully pressure tested. The final thickness to be used may be slightly larger to help in achieving pin hole free windows. We discuss design considerations and present pressure and vacuum test results as well as tests with heavy ion beams.

  18. Plasma channel and Z-pinch dynamics for heavy ion transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponce-Marquez, David

    2002-07-09

    A self stabilized, free standing, z-pinch plasma channel has been proposed to deliver the high intensity heavy ion beam from the end of a driver to the fuel target in a heavy ion inertial fusion power plant. The z-pinch relaxes emittance and energy spread requirements requiring a lower cost driver. A z-pinch transport would reduce the number of beam entry port holes to the target chamber from over a hundred to four as compared to neutralized ballistic focusing thus reducing the driver hardware exposure to neutron flux. Experiments where a double pulse discharge technique is used, z-pinch plasma channels with enhanced stability are achieved. Typical parameters are 7 kV pre-pulse discharge and 30 kV main bank discharge with 50 kA of channel current in a 7 torr background gas atmosphere. This work is an experimental study of these plasma channels examining the relevant physics necessary to understand and model such plasmas. Laser diagnostics measured the dynamical properties of neutrals and plasma. Schlieren and phase contrast techniques probe the pre-pulse gas dynamics and infrared interferometry and faraday effect polarimetry are used on the z-pinch to study its electron density and current distribution. Stability and repeatability of the z-pinch depend on the initial conditions set by the pre-pulse. Results show that the z-pinch channel is wall stabilized by an on-axis gas density depression created by the pre-pulse through hydrodynamic expansion where the ratio of the initial gas density to the final gas density is > 10/1. The low on-axis density favors avalanching along the desired path for the main bank discharge. Pinch time is around 2 s from the main bank discharge initiation with a FWHM of {approx} 2 cm. Results also show that typical main bank discharge plasma densities reach 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} peak on axis for a 30 kV, 7 torr gas nitrogen discharge. Current rise time is limited by the circuit-channel inductance with the highest contribution to the impedance due to the plasma. There is no direct evidence of surface currents due to high frequency skin effects and magnetic field experiments indicate that > 70% of the current carried by the channel is enclosed within FWHM of the channel. Code-experiment benchmark comparisons show that simulations capture the main mechanisms of the channel evolution, but complete atomic models need to be incorporated.

  19. Jet and electromagnetic tomography (JET) of extreme phases of matter in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinz, Ulrich

    2015-08-31

    The Ohio State University (OSU) group contributed to the deliverables of the JET Collaboration three major products: 1. The code package iEBE-VISHNU for modeling the dynamical evolution of the soft medium created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, from its creation all the way to final freeze-out using a hybrid approach that interfaces a free-streaming partonic pre-equilbrium stage with a (2+1)-dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamical stage for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase and the microscopic hadron cascade UrQMD for the hadronic rescattering and freeze-out stage. Except for UrQMD, all dynamical evolution components and interfaces were developed at OSU and tested and implemented in collaboration with the Duke University group. 2. An electromagnetic radiation module for the calculation of thermal photon emission from the QGP and hadron resonance gas stages of a heavy-ion collision, with emission rates that have been corrected for viscous effects in the expanding medium consistent with the bulk evolution. The electromagnetic radiation module was developed under OSU leadership in collaboration with the McGill group and has been integrated in the iEBE-VISHNU code package. 3. An interface between the Monte Carlo jet shower evolution and hadronization codes developed by the Wayne State University (WSU), McGill and Texas A&M groups and the iEBE-VISHNU bulk evolution code, for performing jet quenching and jet shape modification studies in a realistically modeled evolving medium that was tuned to measured soft hadron data. Building on work performed at OSU for the theoretical framework used to describe the interaction of jets with the medium, initial work on the jet shower Monte Carlo was started at OSU and moved to WSU when OSU Visiting Assistant Professor Abhijit Majumder accepted a tenure track faculty position at WSU in September 2011. The jet-hydro interface was developed at OSU and WSU and tested and implemented in collaboration with the McGill, Texas A&M, and LBNL groups.

  20. Heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in the LHC era: from proton-proton to heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Andronic, A.; Arleo, F.; Arnaldi, R.; Beraudo, A.; Bruna, E.; Caffarri, D.; del Valle, Z. C.; Contreras, J. G.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; et al

    2016-02-29

    This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussionmore » of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photo-production in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Union 7th Framework Programme.« less

  1. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  2. (3+1)D hydrodynamic simulation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2010-07-15

    We present music, an implementation of the Kurganov-Tadmor algorithm for relativistic 3+1 dimensional fluid dynamics in heavy-ion collision scenarios. This Riemann-solver-free, second-order, high-resolution scheme is characterized by a very small numerical viscosity and its ability to treat shocks and discontinuities very well. We also incorporate a sophisticated algorithm for the determination of the freeze-out surface using a three dimensional triangulation of the hypersurface. Implementing a recent lattice based equation of state, we compute p{sub T}-spectra and pseudorapidity distributions for Au+Au collisions at sq root(s)=200 GeV and present results for the anisotropic flow coefficients v{sub 2} and v{sub 4} as a function of both p{sub T} and pseudorapidity eta. We were able to determine v{sub 4} with high numerical precision, finding that it does not strongly depend on the choice of initial condition or equation of state.

  3. Two-photon interactions with nuclear breakup in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Gorbunov, Yuri; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2009-10-15

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, because the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass, and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distributions for exclusive {gamma}{gamma} production of mesons and lepton pairs and for {gamma}{gamma} reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross sections for {gamma}{gamma} interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission (XnXn) and single-neutron emission (1n1n) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied {gamma}{gamma} interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross sections may be calculated. The typical p{sub T} of {gamma}{gamma} final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so p{sub T} may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  4. Two-Photon Interactions with Nuclear Breakup in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Gorbunov, Yuri; R Klein, Spencer; Nystrand, Joakim

    2010-07-07

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross-sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, since the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distributions for exclusive {gamma}{gamma} production of mesons and lepton pairs, and for {gamma}{gamma} reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross-sections for {gamma}{gamma} interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission (XnXn) and single neutron emission (1n1n) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied {gamma}{gamma} interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross-sections may be calculated. The typical p{sub T} of {gamma}{gamma} final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so p{sub T} may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  5. Time-of-flight energy analyzer for the plasma potential measurements by a heavy ion beam diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nedzelskiy, I.S.; Malaquias, A.; Goncalves, B.; Silva, C.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.

    2004-10-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) technique for the plasma potential measurements by a heavy ion beam diagnostic (HIBD) with a multiple cell array detector has been elaborated on tokamak ISTTOK as an alternative to the traditional electrostatic energy analyzer. This article describes the design and operation of a four-channel TOF energy analyzer (TOFEA). First results of plasma potential measurements by TOFEA are presented proving the feasibility of this technique in experiments with HIBD.

  6. Cavity morphology in a Ni based superalloy under heavy ion irradiation with hot pre-injected helium. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, He; Yao, Zhongwen, E-mail: yaoz@me.queensu.ca; Daymond, Mark R. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Kirk, Marquis A. [Material Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    In the current investigation, TEM in-situ heavy ion (1?MeV Kr{sup 2+}) irradiation with helium pre-injected at elevated temperature (400?C) was conducted to simulate in-reactor neutron irradiation induced damage in CANDU spacer material Inconel X-750, in an effort to understand the effects of helium on irradiation induced cavity microstructures. Three different quantities of helium, 400 appm, 1000 appm, and 5000 appm, were pre-injected directly into TEM foils at 400?C. The samples containing helium were then irradiated in-situ with 1?MeV Kr{sup 2+} at 400?C to a final dose of 5.4 dpa (displacement per atom). Cavities were formed from the helium injection solely and the cavity density and size increased with increasing helium dosage. In contrast to previous heavy ion irradiations with cold pre-injected helium, heterogeneous nucleation of cavities was observed. During the ensuing heavy ion irradiation, dynamical observation showed noticeable size increase in cavities which nucleated close to the grain boundaries. A bubble-void transformation was observed after Kr{sup 2+} irradiation to high dose (5.4?dpa) in samples containing 1000 appm and 5000 appm helium. Cavity distribution was found to be consistent with in-reactor neutron irradiation induced cavity microstructures. This implies that the distribution of helium is greatly dependent on the injection temperature, and helium pre-injection at high temperature is preferred for simulating the migration of the transmutation produced helium.

  7. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and their partial or total evaporation in the expanding flow.

  8. J/{psi} production and elliptic flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song Taesoo; Xu Jun; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng

    2011-01-15

    Using the two-component model for charmonium production, which includes contributions from both initial hard nucleon-nucleon scattering and from regeneration in the quark-gluon plasma, we study the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} and elliptic flow v{sub 2} of J/{psi} in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. For the expansion dynamics of produced hot, dense matter, we introduce a schematic fireball model with its transverse acceleration determined from the pressure gradient inside the fireball and azimuthally anisotropic expansion parametrized to reproduce measured v{sub 2} of light hadrons. We assume that light hadrons freeze out at the temperature of 120 MeV while charmonia freeze out at 160 MeV, similar to the kinetic and chemical freeze-out temperatures in the statistical model, respectively. For the properties of charmonia in the quark-gluon plasma, we use the screening mass between their charm and anticharm quarks and their dissociation cross sections given by the perturbative quantum chromodynamical (pQCD) calculations in the leading order and up to the next-to-leading order, respectively. For the relaxation time of charm and anticharm quarks in the quark-gluon plasma, we also use the one calculated in the leading-order pQCD. Modeling the effect of higher-order corrections in pQCD by introducing multiplicative factors to the dissociation cross sections of charmonia and the elastic scattering cross sections of charm and anticharm quarks, we find that this effect is small for the R{sub AA} of J/{psi} as they suppress the number of initially produced J/{psi} but enhance the number of regenerated ones. The higher-order corrections increase, however, the v{sub 2} of J/{psi}. Our results suggest that the v{sub 2} of J/{psi} can play an important role in discriminating between J/{psi} production from initial hard collisions and from regeneration in the quark-gluon plasma.

  9. Experimental plan for investigating building-earth heat transfer at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1980-11-01

    An experimental plan is presented for investigating heat transfer between below-grade portions of building envelopes and the surrounding soil. Included is a detailing of data to be collected at an earth-sheltered structure (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research Building) to be constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The attributes of the required data collection instrumentation are defined and a program to assure the accuracy of the collected data is discussed. The experimental plan is intended to be used as a guide to selection, installation, and maintenance of instrumentation as well as in data collection and verification.

  10. Rf System Requirements for JLabs MEIC Collider Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shaoheng; Li, Rui; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. At the top energy are the electron and ion collider rings. For the ion ring, it accelerates five long ion bunches to colliding energy and rebunches ions into a train of very short bunches before colliding. A set of low frequency RF system is needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping. Another set of high frequency RF cavities is needed to rebunch ions. For the electron ring, superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed to compensate the synchrotron radiation energy loss. The impedance of the SRF cavities must be low enough to keep the high current electron beam stable. The preliminary design requirements of these RF cavities are presented.

  11. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, W.U.

    1993-08-01

    This report contain papers on the following topics: The Cold-Fusion Saga; Decay Patterns of Dysprosium Nuclei Produced in {sup 32}S + {sup 118,124}Sn Fusion Reactions; Unexpected Features of Reactions Between Very Heavy Ions at Intermediate Bombarding Energies; Correlations Between Neutrons and Charged Products from the Dissipative Reaction {sup 197}Au+{sup 208}Pb at E/A = 29 MeV; Dissipative Dynamics of Projectile-Like Fragment Production in the Reaction {sup 209}Bi+{sup 136}Xe at E/A = 28.2 MeV; Dynamical Production of Intermediate-Mass Fragments in Peripheral {sup 209}Bi+{sup 136}Xe Collisions at E{sub lab}/A = 28.2 MeV; The Rochester 960-Liter Neutron Multiplicity Meter; A Simple Pulse Processing Concept for a Low-Cost Pulse-Shape-Based Particle Identification; A One-Transistor Preamplifier for PMT Anode Signals; A Five-Channel Multistop TDC/Event Handler for the SuperBall Neutron Multiplicity Meter; Construction of the SuperBall -- a 16,000-Liter Neutron Detector for Calorimetric Studies of Intermediate-Energy Heavy-Ion Reactions; A Computer Code for Light Detection Efficiency Calculations for Photo-multipliers of a Neutron Detector; Evaluation of Gd-Loaded Liquid Scintillators for the SuperBall Neutron Calorimeter; and Measurement of the Interaction of Cosmic-Ray {mu}{sup {minus}} with a Muon Telescope.

  12. Effect of the electrostatic plasma lens on the emittance of ahigh-current heavy ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chekh, Yu.; Goncharov, A.; Protsenko, I.; Brown, I.G.

    2004-01-10

    We describe measurements we have made of the emittance of a high-current, moderate-energy ion beam after transport through a permanent-magnet electrostatic plasma lens. The results indicate the absence of emittance growth due to the lens, when the lens is adjusted for optimal beam focusing. The measured emittance for a 16 keV Cu{sup 2+} ion beam formed by a vacuum arc ion source was about 0.4 {pi} {center_dot} mm {center_dot} mrad at a beam current of 50 mA rising more-or-less linearly to 1.5 {pi} {center_dot} mm {center_dot} mrad at 250 mA, and was conserved in beam transport through the lens. These results have significance for the application of high-current ion sources and the electrostatic plasma lens to particle accelerator injection.

  13. Reactor Chamber and Balance-of-Plant Characteristics for a Fast-Ignition Heavy-Ion Fusion Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medin, Stanislav; Churazov, Mikhail; Koshkarev, Dmitri; Sharkov, Boris; Orlov, Yurii; Suslin, Viktor; Zemskov, Eugeni

    2003-05-15

    The concept of a fast-ignition heavy-ion fusion (FIHIF) power plant involves a cylindrical target and superhigh energy ion beams. The driver produces one plus/minus charge state multimass platinum ions with energy of 100 GeV. The driver efficiency and the target gain are taken as 0.25 and 100, respectively. The preliminary data on the energy fluxes delivered to the reactor chamber wall by the 500-MJ fusion yield are presented. The reactor chamber designed has two sections. In the first section, the microexplosions occur, and in the second section of bigger volume the expansion and condensation of vapors take place. The response of the blanket and the thin liquid film at the first-wall surface is evaluated. Lithium-lead eutectic is taken as a coolant. The evaporated mass and the condensation time are estimated, taking into account major thermophysical effects. The estimated neutron spectrum from the FIHIF target gives an average neutron energy of 11.9 MeV. The mechanical stresses in the construction material due to neutron energy release are evaluated. The outlet coolant chamber temperature is taken as 550 deg. C. The heat conversion system consisting of three coolant loops provides a net efficiency of the FIHIF power plant of 0.37.

  14. Recent results in the study of heavy-ion elastic scattering at large angles. [180/sup 0/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrette, J.; Kahana, S.

    1983-01-01

    The observation, a few years ago, of unexpected large cross sections at backward angles in the elastic scattering of mass-asymmetric heavy ion systems gave us hope that we could learn something new and more precise on the properties of the average ion-ion potential. The subsequent observation of broad regular structures in the elastic and inelastic excitation functions near theta/sub cm/ = 180/sup 0/ were also very promising. Numerous models were proposed to explain some or all the observed features. These models can be divided mainly in two groups. Some try to modify directly the average optical potential whereas others associate the observed cross sections to a modification of specific partial waves outside the scope of the optical potential. This separation in two groups is not always clear since as demonstrated adding a Regge pole to a strongly absorbing potential is under some conditions perfectly equivalent to changing the shape of this potential. Similarly the resonances added to an S matrix can be understood as the manifestation of the potential resonances of a completely different optical potential. We describe recent calculations which have been carried on to try to understand the behavior of the data near the barrier.

  15. Dynamical dipole gamma radiation in heavy-ion collisions on the basis of a quantum molecular dynamics model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H. L.; Tian, W. D.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Chen, J. G.; Fang, D. Q.; Guo, W.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-04-15

    Dynamical dipole gamma-ray emission in heavy-ion collisions is explored in the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The studies are focused on systems of {sup 40}Ca bombarding {sup 48}Ca and its isotopes at different incident energies and impact parameters. Yields of gamma rays are calculated and the centroid energy and dynamical dipole emission width of the gamma spectra are extracted to investigate the properties of gamma emission. In addition, sensitivities of dynamical dipole gamma-ray emission to the isospin and the symmetry energy coefficient of the equation of state are studied. The results show that detailed study of dynamical dipole gamma radiation can provide information on the equation of state and the symmetry energy around the normal nuclear density.

  16. Design study of primary ion provider for RHIC-EBIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J.; Okamura, M.

    2009-09-20

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed the new pre-injector system, Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  17. Thermal nature of charmonium transverse momentum spectra from Au-Au collisions at the highest energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkelin, S. V.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.

    2010-03-15

    We analyze the transverse momentum distribution of J/psi mesons produced in Au+Au collisions at the top RHIC energy within a blast-wave model that accounts for a possible inhomogeneity of the charmonium distribution and/or flow fluctuations. The results imply that the transverse momentum spectra of J/psi, phi, and OMEGA hadrons measured at the RHIC can be described well if kinetic freeze-out takes place just after chemical freeze-out for these particles.

  18. Effect of final state interactions on particle production in d+Au collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X.; Xu, Z.; Chen, J.; Ren, Z.; Xu, N.; Zheng, Q.; and Zhu, X.

    2011-09-15

    We show that particle species dependence of enhanced hadron production at intermediate transverse momentum (p{sub T}) for d+Au collisions at RHIC can be understood in terms of the hadronization from string fragmentation and the subsequent hadronic rescatterings in the final state. A multiphase transport model (AMPT) with two different hadronization mechanisms, string fragmentation or parton coalescence, is used in our study. When the hadrons are formed from string fragmentation, the subsequent hadronic rescatterings will result in particle mass dependence of the nuclear modification factor R{sub CP}, which is consistent with the present experimental data. On the other hand, in the framework of parton coalescence, the mass dependence disappears and the strangeness plays an important role in hadron production.

  19. Elliptic flow of thermal photons and formation time of quark gluon plasma at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Rupa; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2009-02-15

    We calculate the elliptic flow of thermal photons from Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies for a range of values for the formation time {tau}{sub 0} but a fixed entropy (or particle rapidity density). The results are found to be quite sensitive to {tau}{sub 0}. The value of v{sub 2} for photons decreases as {tau}{sub 0} decreases and admits a larger contribution from the quark gluon plasma phase, which has a smaller v{sub 2}. The elliptic flow coefficient for hadrons, however, is only marginally dependent on {tau}{sub 0}.

  20. Measuring the isotropization time of quark-gluon plasma from direct photons at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Lusaka; Roy, Pradip

    2009-05-15

    We calculate transverse momentum distribution of direct photons from various sources by taking into account the initial state momentum anisotropy of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and late stage transverse flow effects. To evaluate the photon yield from hadronic matter we include the contributions from baryon-meson reactions. The total photon yield, calculated for various combinations of initial conditions and transition temperatures, is then compared with the recent measurement of photon transverse momentum distribution by the PHENIX Collaboration. It is shown that because of the initial state anisotropy the photon yield from the QGP is larger by a factor of 8-10 than that of the isotropic case in the intermediate p{sub T} regime. It is also demonstrated that the presence of such an anisotropy can describe the PHENIX photon data better than the isotropic case in the present model. We show that the isotropization time thus extracted lies within the range 1.5{>=}{tau}{sub iso}{>=}0.5 fm/c for the initial conditions used here.

  1. Higher order QED in high-mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2010-08-15

    Lowest order and higher order QED calculations have been carried out for the RHIC high mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs observed by PHENIX with single zero-degree-calorimeter triggers. The lowest order QED results for the experimental acceptance are about two standard deviations larger than the PHENIX data. Corresponding higher order QED calculations are within one standard deviation of the data.

  2. Comparing the same-side ridge in p-p angular correlations at 7 TeV to data measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Kettler, David T.

    2011-08-15

    The Compact Muon Solenoid Collaboration (CMS) has recently reported the appearance of a same-side ridge structure in two-particle angular correlations from 7-TeV p-p collisions. The ridge in p-p collisions at 7 TeV has been compared to a ridge structure in more-central Au-Au collisions at 200 GeV, interpreted by some as evidence for a dense, flowing QCD medium. In this study we make a detailed comparison between 200-GeV p-p correlations and the CMS results. We find that 7-TeV minimum-bias jet correlations are remarkably similar to those at 200 GeV, even to the details of the same-side peak geometry. Appearance of a same-side ridge reflects a change in the sign of the azimuth curvature determined by the ratio of azimuth quadrupole-to-dipole amplitudes. Extrapolation of quadrupole systematics from 200 GeV suggests that the same-side ridge at 7 TeV is a manifestation of the quadrupole amplitude enhanced relative to the dipole by the energy increase and applied cuts.

  3. Evidence for Strong Breit Interaction in Dielectronic Recombination of Highly Charged Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Kavanagh, Anthony P.; Currell, Fred J.; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Li, Yueming; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2008-02-22

    Resonant strengths have been measured for dielectronic recombination of Li-like iodine, holmium, and bismuth using an electron beam ion trap. By observing the atomic number dependence of the state-resolved resonant strength, clear experimental evidence has been obtained that the importance of the generalized Breit interaction (GBI) effect on dielectronic recombination increases as the atomic number increases. In particular, it has been shown that the GBI effect is exceptionally strong for the recombination through the resonant state [1s2s{sup 2}2p{sub 1/2}]{sub 1}.

  4. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEP-II components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This

  5. Effects of ion-neutral collisions on Alfven waves: The presence of forbidden zone and heavy damping zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, C. J.; Lee, L. C.; Kuo, C. L.; Wang, C. B.

    2013-03-15

    Alfven waves are low-frequency transverse waves propagating in a magnetized plasma. We define the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub 0} as {omega}{sub 0}=kV{sub A}cos{theta}, where k is the wave number, V{sub A} is the Alfven speed, and {theta} is the angle between the wave vector and the ambient magnetic field. There are partially ionized plasmas in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasma systems, such as in the solar chromosphere, interstellar clouds, and the earth ionosphere. The presence of neutral particles may modify the wave frequency and cause damping of Alfven waves. The effects on Alfven waves depend on two parameters: (1) {alpha}=n{sub n}/n{sub i}, the ratio of neutral density (n{sub n}), and ion density (n{sub i}); (2) {beta}={nu}{sub ni}/{omega}{sub 0}, the ratio of neutral collisional frequency by ions {nu}{sub ni} to the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub 0}. Most of the previous studies examined only the limiting case with a relatively large neutral collisional frequency or {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1. In the present paper, the dispersion relation for Alfven waves is solved for all values of {alpha} and {beta}. Approximate solutions in the limit {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1 as well as {beta} Much-Less-Than 1 are obtained. It is found for the first time that there is a 'forbidden zone (FZ)' in the {alpha}-{beta} parameter space, where the real frequency of Alfven waves becomes zero. We also solve the wavenumber k from the dispersion equation for a fixed frequency and find the existence of a 'heavy damping zone (HDZ).' We then examine the presence of FZ and HDZ for Alfven waves in the ionosphere and in the solar chromosphere.

  6. Microscopic heavy-ion theory. Final Report. February 2014-June 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, David J.; Oberacker, Volker E.; Umar, A. Sait

    2015-06-30

    The Vanderbilt nuclear theory group conducts research in the areas of low-energy nuclear reactions and in neutrino oscillations. Specically, we study dynamics of nuclear reactions microscopically, in particular for neutron-rich nuclei which will be accessible with current and future radioactive ion beam facilities. The neutrino work concentrates on constructing computational tools for analyzing neutrino oscillation data. The most important of these is the analysis of the Super K atmospheric data. Our research concentrates on the following topics which are part of the DOE Long-Range Plan: STUDIES OF LOW-ENERGY REACTIONS OF EXOTIC NUCLEI (Professors Umar and Oberacker), including sub-barrier fusion cross sections, capture cross sections for superheavy element production, and nuclear astrophysics applications. Our theory project is strongly connected to experiments at RIB facilities around the world, including NSCL-FRIB (MSU) and ATLAS-CARIBU (Argonne). PHENOMENOLOGY OF NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS (Prof. Ernst), extracting information from existing neutrino oscillation experiments and proposing possible future experiments in order to better understand the oscillation phenomenon.

  7. Nuclear-structure studies with pions and heavy ions. Progress report, June 1, 1980-May 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehnhard, D.

    1981-03-01

    Experiments performed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility yielded very striking results. In inelastic pion scattering from /sup 14/C near the (3,3) resonance cross sections ratios R = sigma(..pi../sup +/)/sigma(..pi../sup -/) and R/sup -1/ = sigma(..pi../sup -/)/sigma(..pi../sup +/) were observed that are significantly larger than the free pion-nucleon values. These results were interpreted as due to strong cancellations of the neutron and proton components in the transition amplitude. Measurements of /sup 13/C(..pi..,..pi..') excitation functions between 100 and 300 MeV at two momentum transfers showed dramatically different energy dependencies for ..delta..S =0 and ..delta..S = 1 transitions. They were used to derive nuclear structure information on several highly excited states. Pion data for other nuclei (/sup 12/C, /sup 16/O, /sup 40/Ca, etc.) were analyzed and information on isospin mixing, the double-charge-exchange reaction mechanism, and the excitation of collective states was extracted. Further data were taken with a 547 MeV proton beam on /sup 13/C. The data taking for the (t,t') and (/sup 3/He,/sup 3/He') reactions at the Los Alamos Van de Graaff has been completed. The continuing studies of the heavy-ion nucleus optical potential yielded information on very systematic dependencies of the potential depths on the incident energy.

  8. OPERATION OF THE RHIC AU ION SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STESKI,D.B.; ALESSI,J.; BENJAMIN,J.; CARLSON,C.; MANNI,M.; THIEBERGER,P.; WIPLICH,M.

    2001-09-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is beginning its second year of operation. A cesium sputter ion source injecting into a tandem Van de Graaff provides the gold ions for RHIC. The ion source is operated in the pulsed beam mode and produces a 500{micro}sec long pulse of Au{sup -} with a peak intensity of 290pA at the entrance of the tandem. After acceleration in the tandem and post stripping, this results in a beam of Au{sup +32} with an intensity of 80e{micro}A and an energy of 182MeV. Over the last several years, a series of improvements have been made to increase the intensity of the pulsed beam from the ion source. Details of the source performance and improvements will be presented. In addition, an effort is under way to provide other beam species for RHIC collisions.

  9. Dynamics of heavy-Rydberg ion-pair formation in K(14p,20p)-SF{sub 6}, CCl{sub 4} collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C. H.; Kelley, M.; Buathong, S.; Dunning, F. B.

    2014-06-21

    The dynamics of formation of heavy-Rydberg ion-pair states through electron transfer in K(np)-SF{sub 6}, CCl{sub 4} collisions is examined by measuring the velocity, angular, and binding energy distributions of the product ion pairs. The results are analyzed with the aid of a Monte Carlo collision code that models both the initial electron capture and the subsequent evolution of the ion pairs. The model simulations are in good agreement with the experimental data and highlight the factors such as Rydberg atom size, the kinetic energy of relative motion of the Rydberg atom and target particle, and (in the case of attaching targets that dissociate) the energetics of dissociation that can be used to control the properties of the product ion-pair states.

  10. Burnout thresholds and cross section of power MOS transistors with heavy ions. Technical report, 1 May 1986-30 April 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waskiewicz, A.E.; Groninger, J.W.

    1990-02-01

    Power MOSFET heavy ion-induced Single Event Burnout tests were performed jointly by representatives of the Aerospace Corporation, NASA Goddard, NWSC Crane and Rockwell International. For the most part, presented are the results of the burnout threshold and cross section characterizations performed on n-channel power MOSFETs, however a small amount of p-channel data is also included. In addition, data on the effect of temperature, gate bias, total dose and inductive loading on MOSFET Single Event Burnout sensitivity is preferred. At the time of the test effort, radiation hardened devices were being developed by International Rectifier and RCA/GE. The heavy-ion-induced burnout test results on available samples of these devices are also incorporated for comparison to the commercial and JEDEC versions tested.

  11. Compositional analysis and depth profiling of thin film CrO{sub 2} by heavy ion ERDA and standard RBS: a comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khamlich, S.; Msimanga, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C.A.; Nuru, Z.Y.; McCrindle, R.; Maaza, M.

    2012-08-15

    Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) thin film has generated considerable interest in applied research due to the wide variety of its technological applications. It has been extensively investigated in recent years, attracting the attention of researchers working on spintronic heterostructures and in the magnetic recording industry. However, its synthesis is usually a difficult task due to its metastable nature and various synthesis techniques are being investigated. In this work a polycrystalline thin film of CrO{sub 2} was prepared by electron beam vaporization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} onto a Si substrate. The polycrystalline structure was confirmed through XRD analysis. The stoichiometry and elemental depth distribution of the deposited film were measured by ion beam nuclear analytical techniques heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), which both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Moreover, the analysis carried out highlights the importance of complementary usage of the two techniques to obtain a more complete description of elemental content and depth distribution in thin films. - Graphical abstract: Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films of CrO{sub 2} have been grown by e-beam evaporation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} target in vacuum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composition was determined by heavy ion-ERDA and RBS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HI-ERDA and RBS provided information on the light and heavy elements, respectively.

  12. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF PURE AMMONIA AND AMMONIA-WATER ICES INDUCED BY HEAVY IONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordalo, V.; Da Silveira, E. F.; Seperuelo Duarte, E.

    2013-09-10

    Cosmic rays are possibly the main agents to prevent the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surfaces in cold dense clouds. Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is one of the most abundant molecules present in dust ice mantles, with a concentration of up to 15% relative to water (H{sub 2}O). FTIR spectroscopy is used to monitor pure NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice samples as they are irradiated with Ni and Zn ion beams (500-600 MeV) at GANIL/France. New species, such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), diazene (N{sub 2}H{sub 2} isomers), molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were identified after irradiation of pure NH{sub 3} ices. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) are some of the products of the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice radiolysis. The spectral band at 6.85 {mu}m was observed after irradiation of both types of ice. Besides the likely contribution of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and amino (NH{sub 2}) radicals, data suggest a small contribution of NH{sub 2}OH to this band profile after high fluences of irradiation of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ices. The spectral shift of the NH{sub 3} ''umbrella'' mode (9.3 {mu}m) band is parameterized as a function of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratio in amorphous ices. Ammonia and water destruction cross-sections are obtained, as well as the rate of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O (1:10) ice compaction, measured by the OH dangling bond destruction cross-section. Ammonia destruction is enhanced in the presence of H{sub 2}O in the ice and a power law relationship between stopping power and NH{sub 3} destruction cross-section is verified. Such results may provide relevant information for the evolution of molecular species in dense molecular clouds.

  13. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-05

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  14. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-05-17

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  15. The longitudinal dependence of heavy-ion composition in the 2013 April 11 solar energetic particle event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mason, G. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2014-09-20

    On 2013 April 11 active region 11719 was centered just west of the central meridian; at 06:55 UT, it erupted with an M6.5 X-ray flare and a moderately fast (?800 km s{sup 1}) coronal mass ejection. This solar activity resulted in the acceleration of energetic ions to produce a solar energetic particle (SEP) event that was subsequently observed in energetic protons by both ACE and the two STEREO spacecraft. Heavy ions at energies ?10 MeV nucleon{sup 1} were well measured by SEP sensors on ACE and STEREO-B, allowing the longitudinal dependence of the event composition to be studied. Both spacecraft observed significant enhancements in the Fe/O ratio at 12-33 MeV nucleon{sup 1}, with the STEREO-B abundance ratio (Fe/O = 0.69) being similar to that of the large, Fe-rich SEP events observed in solar cycle 23. The footpoint of the magnetic field line connected to the ACE spacecraft was longitudinally farther from the flare site (77 versus 58), and the measured Fe/O ratio at ACE was 0.48, 44% lower than at STEREO-B but still enhanced by more than a factor of 3.5 over average SEP abundances. Only upper limits were obtained for the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He abundance ratio at both spacecraft. Low upper limits of 0.07% and 1% were obtained from the ACE sensors at 0.5-2 and 6.5-11.3 MeV nucleon{sup 1}, respectively, whereas the STEREO-B sensor provided an upper limit of 4%. These characteristics of high, but longitudinally variable, Fe/O ratios and low {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are not expected from either the direct flare contribution scenario or the remnant flare suprathermal material theory put forth to explain the Fe-rich SEP events of cycle 23.

  16. Cavity morphology in a Ni based superalloy under heavy ion irradiation with cold pre-injected helium. I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, He; Yao, Zhongwen Daymond, Mark R.; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2014-03-14

    In order to understand radiation damage in the nickel based superalloy Inconel X-750 in thermal reactors, where (n, ?) transmutation reaction also occurred in addition to fast neutron induced atomic displacement, heavy ion (1?MeV Kr{sup 2+}) irradiation with pre-injected helium was performed under in-situ observations of an intermediate voltage electron microscope at Argonne National Laboratory. By comparing to our previous studies using 1?MeV Kr{sup 2+} irradiation solely, the pre-injected helium was found to be essential in cavity nucleation. Cavities started to be visible after Kr{sup 2+} irradiation to 2.7 dpa at ?200?C in samples containing 200 appm, 1000 appm, and 5000 appm helium, respectively, but not at lower temperatures. The cavity growth was observed during the continuous irradiation. Cavity formation appeared along with a reduced number density of stacking fault tetrahedra, vacancy type defects. With higher pre-injected helium amount, a higher density of smaller cavities was observed. This is considered to be the result of local trapping effect of helium which disperses vacancies. The average cavity size increases with increasing irradiation temperatures; the density reduced; and the distribution of cavities became heterogeneous at elevated temperatures. In contrast to previous characterization of in-reactor neutron irradiated Inconel X-750, no obvious cavity sink to grain boundaries and phase boundaries was found even at high doses and elevated temperatures. MC-type carbides were observed as strong sources for agglomeration of cavities due to their enhanced trapping strength of helium and vacancies.

  17. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup 1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (cooling). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  18. Studies of heavy ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, August 1, 1979-July 31, 1980. [Univ. of Rochester, New York, 8/1/79-7/31/80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huizenga, J.R.

    1980-07-01

    The study of heavy-ion reaction mechanisms at the SuperHILAC and LAMPF is reported. Preprints of five articles and manuscripts of four recent conference papers are given, along with complete citations of publications and a list of personnel. Significant work was performed in the following areas: the bombarding energy dependence of the /sup 209/Bi + /sup 136/Xe reaction; the fragment yields for specific Z and A for projectile-like fragments produced in the reaction of 8.3-MeV/u /sup 56/Fe ions with targets of /sup 56/Fe, /sup 165/Ho, /sup 209/Bi, and /sup 238/U; and time distributions of fragments from delayed fission after muon capture for muonic /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 242/Pu. (RWR)

  19. Radiative return capabilities of a high-energy, high-luminositye+e-collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Karliner, Marek; Low, Matthew; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-14

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy ECM can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at ECM = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy e+e- colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  20. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  1. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  2. Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scaletransport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2007-02-14

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program that explores heavy-ion beam as the driver option for fusion energy production in an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) plant. The HCX is a beam transport experiment at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linear accelerator driver. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density {approx}0.2 {micro}C/m) over long pulse durations (4 {micro}s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K{sup +} ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor ({approx}80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss. We achieved good envelope control, and re-matching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  3. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, F.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Morozov, V. S.; Pilat, F.; Zhang, Y.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, M.; Wang, M-H; Wienands, U.

    2015-07-14

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEPII components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  4. The Muon Collider as a $H/A$ factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichten, Estia; Martin, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We show that a muon collider is ideally suited for the study of heavy H/A scalars, cousins of the Higgs boson found in two-Higgs doublet models and required in supersymmetric models. The key aspects of H/A are: (1) they are narrow, yet have a width-to-mass ratio far larger than the expected muon collider beam-energy resolution, and (2) the larger muon Yukawa allows efficient s-channel production. We study in detail a representative Natural Supersymmetry model which has a 1.5 Tev H/A with $m_H$- $m_A$ = 10 Gev. The large event rates at resonant peak allow the determination of the individual H and A resonance parameters (including CP) and the decays into electroweakinos provides a wealth of information unavailable to any other present or planned collider.

  5. The Muon Collider as a $H/A$ factory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eichten, Estia; Martin, Adam; Univ. of Notre Dame, IN

    2013-11-22

    We show that a muon collider is ideally suited for the study of heavy H/A scalars, cousins of the Higgs boson found in two-Higgs doublet models and required in supersymmetric models. The key aspects of H/A are: (1) they are narrow, yet have a width-to-mass ratio far larger than the expected muon collider beam-energy resolution, and (2) the larger muon Yukawa allows efficient s-channel production. We study in detail a representative Natural Supersymmetry model which has a 1.5 Tev H/A with $m_H$- $m_A$ = 10 Gev. The large event rates at resonant peak allow the determination of the individual Hmore » and A resonance parameters (including CP) and the decays into electroweakinos provides a wealth of information unavailable to any other present or planned collider.« less

  6. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  7. A new scheme of causal viscous hydrodynamics for relativistic heavy-ion collisions: A Riemann solver for quarkgluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Nonaka, Chiho; Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 ; Takamoto, Makoto; Max-Planck-Institut fr Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a state-of-the-art algorithm for solving the relativistic viscous hydrodynamics equation with the QCD equation of state. The numerical method is based on the second-order Godunov method and has less numerical dissipation, which is crucial in describing of quarkgluon plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We apply the algorithm to several numerical test problems such as sound wave propagation, shock tube and blast wave problems. In sound wave propagation, the intrinsic numerical viscosity is measured and its explicit expression is shown, which is the second-order of spatial resolution both in the presence and absence of physical viscosity. The expression of the numerical viscosity can be used to determine the maximum cell size in order to accurately measure the effect of physical viscosity in the numerical simulation.

  8. Heavy ion Coulomb excitation and gamma decay studies of the one and two phonon giant dipole resonances in {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, P.E.; Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.

    1993-12-01

    Projectile -- photon coincidences were measured for the scattering of an 80 MeV/nucleon {sup 64}Zn beam from {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi targets at the GANIL heavy ion accelerator facility. Projectile-like particles between 0.5{degrees} and 4.5{degrees} relative to the incident beam direction were detected in the SPEG energy loss spectrometer where their momentum, charge, and mass were determined. Photons were detected in the BaF{sub 2} scintillation detector array TAPS. Light charged particles produced in the reaction were detected in the KVI Forward Wall. The analysis of the data acquired in this experiment is focused on three different phenomena: (1) the two phonon giant dipole resonance, (2) time dependence of the decay of the one phonon giant dipole resonance, and (3) giant resonance strength in projectile nuclei.

  9. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  10. Director's colloquium March 18 large hadron collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director's colloquium large hadron collider Director's colloquium March 18 large hadron collider Lyndon Evans of CERN will talk about the most complex scientific instrument ever ...

  11. Electrical conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma and soft photon spectrum in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Yi

    2014-10-06

    We extract the electrical conductivity ?0 of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and study the effects of magnetic field and chiral anomaly on soft photon azimuthal anisotropy, v?, based on the thermal photon spectrum at 0.4GeV < p?< 0.6GeV at the RHIC energy. As a basis for my analysis, we derive the behavior of retarded photon self-energy of a strongly interacting neutral plasma in hydrodynamic regime in the presence of magnetic field and chiral anomaly. By evolving the resulting soft thermal photon production rate over the realistic hydrodynamic background and comparing the results with the data from the PHENIX Collaboration, I found that the electrical conductivity at QGP temperature is in the range: 0.4 < ??/(eT) < 1.1, which is comparable with recent studies on lattice. I also compare the contribution from the magnetic field and chiral anomaly to soft thermal photon v? with the data. I argue that at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the chiral magnetic wave would give negative contribution to photon v?.

  12. Electrical conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma and soft photon spectrum in heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yin, Yi

    2014-10-06

    We extract the electrical conductivity σ0 of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and study the effects of magnetic field and chiral anomaly on soft photon azimuthal anisotropy, v₂, based on the thermal photon spectrum at 0.4GeV < p⊥< 0.6GeV at the RHIC energy. As a basis for my analysis, we derive the behavior of retarded photon self-energy of a strongly interacting neutral plasma in hydrodynamic regime in the presence of magnetic field and chiral anomaly. By evolving the resulting soft thermal photon production rate over the realistic hydrodynamic background and comparing the results with the data from the PHENIX Collaboration,more » I found that the electrical conductivity at QGP temperature is in the range: 0.4 < σ₀/(e²T) < 1.1, which is comparable with recent studies on lattice. I also compare the contribution from the magnetic field and chiral anomaly to soft thermal photon v₂ with the data. I argue that at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the chiral magnetic wave would give negative contribution to photon v₂.« less

  13. The standard model and colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-03-01

    Some topics in the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions are discussed, as well as how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders which will become operational in the next few years. The radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed briefly, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which are relevant to hadron colliders are then discussed. Some of the problems which the standard model does not solve are discussed, and the energy ranges accessible to the new colliders are indicated. (LEW)

  14. Scanning Synchronization of Colliding Bunches for MEIC Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Popov, V. P.; Chernousov, Y. D.; Kazakevich, G. M.

    2015-09-01

    Synchronization of colliding beams is one of the major issues of an electron-ion collider (EIC) design because of sensitivity of ion revolution frequency to beam energy. A conventional solution for this trouble is insertion of bent chicanes in the arcs space. In our report we consider a method to provide space coincidence of encountering bunches in the crab-crossing orbits Interaction Region (IR) while repetition rates of two beams do not coincide. The method utilizes pair of fast kickers realizing a bypass for the electron bunches as the way to equalize positions of the colliding bunches at the Interaction Point (IP). A dipole-mode warm or SRF cavities fed by the magnetron transmitters are used as fast kickers, allowing a broad-band phase and amplitude control. The proposed scanning synchronization method implies stabilization of luminosity at a maximum via a feedback loop. This synchronization method is evaluated as perspective for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion collider (MEIC) project of JLab with its very high bunch repetition rate.

  15. Synthesis of nanocrystalline thin films of gold on the surface of GaSb by swift heavy ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jadhav, Vidya; Dubey, S. K.; Yadav, A. D.; Singh, A.

    2013-02-05

    Thin films of gold ({approx}100 nm thick) were deposited on p-type GaSb substrates. These samples were irradiated with 100 MeV Fe{sup 7+}ions for the fluence of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. After irradiation, samples were characterized using AFM, UV-VIS -NIR, X-Ray Diffraction techniques. AFM studies showed the presence of clusters on the surface of GaSb. R.M.S. roughness of the sample was found to increase w.r.t ion fluence. Absorption coefficient obtained from the Ultra violet - Visible NIR (UV-VIS -NIR) spectra of the samples irradiated with various fluences compared with non irradiated GaSb. The annealing experiment showed a significant improvement in the absorption coefficient after rapid thermal annealing at temperature of 400 Degree-Sign C. X-Ray Diffraction study reveals different orientations of Au film.

  16. Dynamical Dipole Mode in Heavy-Ion Fusion-Evaporation and Fission Reactions in the {sup 192}Pb Mass Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvestri, R.; Inglima, G.; La Commara, M.; Martin, B.; Sandoli, M.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; Boiano, A.; Romoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Baran, V.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Rizzo, C.

    2011-10-28

    The prompt {gamma}-ray emission related with the dynamical dipole mode decay was investigated in the {sup 192}Pb mass region by means of the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 152}Sm and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 144}Sm fusion-evaporation and fission reactions at E{sub lab} = 11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. The two reactions populate, through entrance channel having different charge asymmetries, the {sup 192}Pb compound nucleus at an excitation energy of 236 MeV with identical spin distribution. Preliminary results of this experiment show that the dynamical dipole mode survives in collisions involving heavier mass reaction partners than those studied previously. As a fast cooling mechanism on the fusion path, the prompt dipole {gamma} radiation could be of interest for the synthesis of super-heavy elements through ''hot'' fusion reactions.

  17. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  18. EIS-0138: Superconducting Super Collider

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of constructing the Superconducting Super Collider, a large proton accelerator, at each of seven alternative locations.

  19. Light-emitting Si nanostructures formed in SiO{sub 2} on irradiation with swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kachurin, G. A. Cherkova, S. G.; Skuratov, V. A.; Marin, D. V.; Cherkov, A. G.

    2010-04-15

    SiO{sub 2} layers containing implanted excess Si are irradiated with Xe ions with an energy of 130 MeV and doses of 3 x 10{sup 12}-10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. In the samples irradiated with a dose of 3 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, {approx}10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} segregated clusters 3-4 nm in dimension are detected by transmission electron microscopy. With increasing dose, the dimensions and number of these clusters increase. In the photoluminescence spectrum, a 660- to 680-nm band is observed, with the intensity dependent on the dose. After passivation of the sample with hydrogen at 500 deg. C, the band disappears, but a new {approx}780-nm band typical of Si nanocrystals becomes evident. On the basis of the entire set of data, it is concluded that the 660- to 680-nm band is associated with imperfect Si nanocrystals grown in the tracks of Xe ions due to high ionization losses. The nonmonotonic dependence of the photoluminescence intensity on the dose is attributed to the difference between the diameters of tracks and the diameters of the displacements' cascades responsible for defect formation.

  20. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  1. Stability of nanoclusters in 14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened steel under heavy ion-irradiation by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; V. Shutthanandan; Y.Q. Wu

    2014-12-01

    14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 C, 450 C, and 600 C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of TiYO nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 1023 to 3.6 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

  2. Fission and quasifission modes in heavy-ion-induced reactions leading to the formation of Hs{sup *}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itkis, I. M.; Kozulin, E. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Chernysheva, E. V.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Goennenwein, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.; Hanappe, F.; Vardaci, E.; Goes Brennand, E. de

    2011-06-15

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb have been measured. All reactions lead to Hs isotopes. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs{sup *}, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, leading to the formation of a similar compound nucleus, the main part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier fusion-fission is the main process leading to the formation of symmetric fragments for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies.

  3. Fusion-fission and quasifission in the reactions with heavy ions leading to the formation of Hs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kozulin, E. M.

    2012-10-20

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm,{sup 36}S+{sup 238}U and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb leading to Hs isotopes have been measured. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs*, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U the considerable part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier the symmetric fragments originate mainly from fusion-fission process for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies. The pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities as a function of the fragment mass have been obtained for the reactions studied.

  4. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, James Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-15

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  5. Nuclear structure studies with pions and heavy ions. Progress report, June 1, 1979-May 31, 1980. [Univ. of Minnesota, June 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehnhard, D.

    1980-03-01

    The elastic and inelastic scattering of ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ by /sup 13/C, /sup 16/O, and /sup 17/O was studied at pion energies close to the (3,3) resonance. Data were taken at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Large asymmetries were observed, two of which are consistent with pure neutron and pure proton excitations. Transitions to strongly excited states of /sup 13/C are in strikingly good agreement with theoretical predictions of Lee and Kurath. In sharp contrast, strong disagreements are found for the weakly excited states. The asymmetries for /sup 16/O + ..pi../sup + -/ were interpreted as due to isospin mixing between the excited states. High-resolution data for (t,t') and (/sup 3/He,/sup 3/He') on /sup 13/C were taken to supplement the pion work. Asymmetries were found for the relative cross sections for some states. In studies of the heavy-ion-nucleus potential the effect of potential resonances on the elastic scattering of /sup 16/O + /sup 28/Si was found to be small. A close similarity between the elastic exchange amplitude at 180/sup 0/ and the effect of the parity dependence on the elastic amplitude was found. Fits to the new data at 40 and 41.226 MeV required the use of a composite absorptive potential. The surface derivative part of this potential can be deduced from a coupled-channels calculation. 17 figures.

  6. In-beam Mssbauer spectroscopy of {sup 57}Fe/{sup 57}Mn in MgO and NaF at Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubo, M. K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Mihara, M.; Nagatomo, T.; Sato, W.; Miyazaki, J.; Sato, S.; Kitagawa, A.

    2014-02-15

    Development of efficient ion supply of {sup 58}Fe from {sup 58}Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, and quick switching between therapy and material science at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba realized a new {sup 57}Mn in-beam emission Mssbauer spectroscopy measurement system. Application to simple binary chemical compounds, MgO and NaF, proved the usefulness of the system to probe chemical and physical behaviors of trace impurities in solids. Annealing of lattice defects produced by the implantation and ?-decay of {sup 57}Mn and/or ?-ray emission recoil was observed by a local probe.

  7. INTERPLANETARY PROPAGATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE HEAVY IONS OBSERVED AT 1 AU AND THE ROLE OF ENERGY SCALING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, G. M.; Haggerty, D. K.; Li, G.; Zank, G. P.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Desai, M. I.

    2012-12-20

    We have studied {approx}0.3 to >100 MeV nucleon{sup -1} H, He, O, and Fe in 17 large western hemisphere solar energetic particle events (SEP) to examine whether the often observed decrease of Fe/O during the rise phase is due to mixing of separate SEP particle populations, or is an interplanetary transport effect. Our earlier study showed that the decrease in Fe/O nearly disappeared if Fe and O were compared at energies where the two species interplanetary diffusion coefficient were equal, and therefore their kinetic energy nucleon{sup -1} was different by typically a factor {approx}2 ({sup e}nergy scaling{sup )}. Using an interplanetary transport model that includes effects of focusing, convection, adiabatic deceleration, and pitch angle scattering we have fit the particle spectral forms and intensity profiles over a broad range of conditions where the 1 AU intensities were reasonably well connected to the source and not obviously dominated by local shock effects. The transport parameters we derive are similar to earlier studies. Our model follows individual particles with a Monte Carlo calculation, making it possible to determine many properties and effects of the transport. We find that the energy scaling feature is preserved, and that the model is reasonably successful at fitting the magnitude and duration of the Fe/O ratio decrease. This along with successfully fitting the observed decrease of the O/He ratio leads us to conclude that this feature is best understood as a transport effect. Although the effects of transport, in particular adiabatic deceleration, are very significant below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}, the spectral break observed in these events at 1 AU is only somewhat modified by transport, and so the commonly observed spectral breaks must be present at injection. For scattering mean free paths of the order of 0.1 AU adiabatic deceleration is so large below {approx}200 keV nucleon{sup -1} that ions starting with such energies at injection are cooled sufficiently as to be unobservable at 1 AU. Because of the complicating factors of different spectral break energies for different elements, it appears that SEP abundances determined below the break are least susceptible to systematic distortions.

  8. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tourun, Yagmur [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2010-01-08

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  9. From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

  10. Ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion irradiation: Response of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} to intense electronic excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Tracy, Cameron L.; Cusick, Alex B.; Abere, Michael J.; Yalisove, Steven M.; Torralva, Ben; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2015-04-27

    In order to investigate the response of materials to extreme conditions, there are several approaches to depositing extremely high concentrations of energy into very small volumes of material, including ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. In this study, crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations in cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} have been investigated using ultrafast laser irradiation. The phases produced by the extreme conditions of irradiation were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited a cubic-to-monoclinic phase transformation, as evidenced by the appearance of the monoclinic (402{sup }), (003), (310), and (112{sup }) peaks in the GIXRD pattern and of four A{sub g} and three B{sub g} Raman modes. ZrO{sub 2} underwent a monoclinic-to-tetragonal phase transformation, as evidenced by the emergence of the tetragonal (101) peak in the GIXRD pattern and of E{sub g} and A{sub 1g} Raman modes. The new phases formed by ultrafast laser irradiation are high temperature polymorphs of the two materials. No evidence of amorphization was seen in the GIXRD data, though Raman spectroscopy indicated point defect accumulation. These results are identical to those produced by irradiation with SHIs, which also deposit energy in materials primarily through electronic excitation. The similarity in damage process and material response between ultrafast laser and SHI irradiation suggests a fundamental relationship between these two techniques.

  11. Conventional power sources for colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 ..mu..sec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 ..mu..sec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 ..mu..sec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths.

  12. Initial eccentricity in deformed {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au and {sup 238}U+{sup 238}U collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filip, Peter; Lednicky, Richard; Masui, Hiroshi; Xu Nu

    2009-11-15

    Initial eccentricity and eccentricity fluctuations of the interaction volume created in relativistic collisions of deformed {sup 197}Au and {sup 238}U nuclei are studied using optical and Monte Carlo (MC) Glauber simulations. It is found that the nonsphericity noticeably influences the average eccentricity in central collisions, and eccentricity fluctuations are enhanced from deformation. Quantitative results are obtained for Au+Au and U+U collisions at energy {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV.

  13. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... L. W. May, S. Wuenschel, B. Stein, and S. J. Yennello Analysis of 86,78Kr + 64,58Ni data taken on the upgraded NIMROD-ISiS...... II-28 S. Wuenschel, S. ...

  14. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REACTIONS Temperature dependence of the isospin distillation in nuclear fragmentation ................................ II-1 D. V. Shetty for the NIMROD Collaboration Midrapidity emission in nuclear fragmentation .................................................................................. II-2 D. V. Shetty for the NIMROD Collaboration Isospin dependence of the <N/Z> in nuclear fragmentation .............................................................. II-3 D. V. Shetty, for the

  15. SECTION II. HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Caloric Curve for Medium Mass Nuclei J. Cibor, R. Wada, K. Hagel, M. Lunardon, N. Marie, R. Alfaro, W. Shen, B. Xiao, Y. Zhao, J. Li, M. Murray, J.B. Natowitz, Z. Majka and...

  16. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  17. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-04

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  18. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  19. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland)This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop SecretariatIWLC2010 is hostedby CERN

  20. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Baer, Howard; Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Gao, Yuanning; Hoang, Andre; Kanemura, Shinya; List, Jenny; Logan, Heather...

  1. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics You are accessing a ...

  2. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  3. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously withmore » the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.« less

  4. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  5. Research and Development of Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

  6. 9-D polarized proton transport in the MEIC figure 8 collider ring - first steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meot, F.; Morozov, V. S.

    2015-05-03

    Spin tracking studies in the MEIC figure-8 collider ion ring are presented, based on a very preliminary design of the lattice. They provide numerical illustrations of some of the aspects of the figure-8 concept, including spin-rotator based spin control, and lay out the path towards a complete spin tracking simulation of a figure-8 ring.

  7. 9-D polarized proton transport in the MEIC figure-8 collider ring: first steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meot, F.; Morozov, V. S.

    2014-10-24

    Spin tracking studies in the MEIC figure-8 collider ion ring are presented, based on a very preliminary design of the lattice. They provide numerical illustrations of some of the aspects of the figure-8 concept, including spin-rotator based spin control, and lay out the path towards a complete spin tracking simulation of a figure-8 ring.

  8. Reliable operation of the Brookhaven EBIS for highly charged ion production for RHIC and NSRL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beebe, E. Alessi, J. Binello, S. Kanesue, T. McCafferty, D. Morris, J. Okamura, M. Pikin, A. Ritter, J. Schoepfer, R.

    2015-01-09

    An Electron Beam Ion Source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC EBIS) was commissioned at Brookhaven in September 2010 and since then it routinely supplies ions for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) as the main source of highly charged ions from Helium to Uranium. Using three external primary ion sources for 1+ injection into the EBIS and an electrostatic injection beam line, ion species at the EBIS exit can be switched in 0.2 s. A total of 16 different ion species have been produced to date. The length and the capacity of the ion trap have been increased by 20% by extending the trap by two more drift tubes, compared with the original design. The fraction of Au{sup 32+} in the EBIS Au spectrum is approximately 12% for 70-80% electron beam neutralization and 8 pulses operation in a 5 Hertz train and 4-5 s super cycle. For single pulse per super cycle operation and 25% electron beam neutralization, the EBIS achieves the theoretical Au{sup 32+} fractional output of 18%. Long term stability has been very good with availability of the beam from RHIC EBIS during 2012 and 2014 RHIC runs approximately 99.8%.

  9. The Interplay Between Collider Searches For Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons and Direct Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carena, Marcela; Hooper, Dan; Vallinotto, Alberto; /Fermilab /Chicago U. /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.

    2006-11-01

    In this article, we explore the interplay between searches for supersymmetric particles and Higgs bosons at hadron colliders (the Tevatron and the LHC) and direct dark matter searches (such as CDMS, ZEPLIN, XENON, EDELWEISS, CRESST, WARP and others). We focus on collider searches for heavy MSSM Higgs bosons (A, H, H{sup {+-}}) and how the prospects for these searches are impacted by direct dark matter limits and vice versa. We find that the prospects of these two experimental programs are highly interrelated. A positive detection of A, H or H{sup {+-}} at the Tevatron would dramatically enhance the prospects for a near future direct discovery of neutralino dark matter. Similarly, a positive direct detection of neutralino dark matter would enhance the prospects of discovering heavy MSSM Higgs bosons at the Tevatron or the LHC. Combining the information obtained from both types of experimental searches will enable us to learn more about the nature of supersymmetry.

  10. Updates to the International Linear Collider Damping Rings Baseline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Updates to the International Linear Collider Damping Rings Baseline Design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Updates to the International Linear Collider Damping Rings...

  11. Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider ...

  12. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Collider We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected...

  13. The Brookhaven National Laboratory electron beam ion source for RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, J.G.; Barton, D.; Beebe, E.; Bellavia, S.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lambiase, R.; Lockey, R.; McNerney, A.; Mapes, M.; Marneris, I.; Okamura, M.; Phillips, D.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Snydstrup, L.; Theisen, C.; Wilinski, M.

    2010-02-22

    As part of a new heavy ion preinjector that will supply beams for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory, construction of a new electron beam ion source (EBIS) is now being completed. This source, based on the successful prototype Brookhaven National Laboratory Test EBIS, is designed to produce milliampere level currents of all ion species, with q/m = (1/6)-(1/2). Among the major components of this source are a 5 T, 2-m-long, 204 mm diameter warm bore superconducting solenoid, an electron gun designed to operate at a nominal current of 10 A, and an electron collector designed to dissipate {approx} 300 kW of peak power. Careful attention has been paid to the design of the vacuum system, since a pressure of 10{sup -10} Torr is required in the trap region. The source includes several differential pumping stages, the trap can be baked to 400 C, and there are non-evaporable getter strips in the trap region. Power supplies include a 15 A, 15 kV electron collector power supply, and fast switchable power supplies for most of the 16 electrodes used for varying the trap potential distribution for ion injection, confinement, and extraction. The EBIS source and all EBIS power supplies sit on an isolated platform, which is pulsed up to a maximum of 100 kV during ion extraction. The EBIS is now fully assembled, and operation will be beginning following final vacuum and power supply tests. Details of the EBIS components are presented.

  14. Compensatable muon collider calorimeter with manageable backgrounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raja, Rajendran

    2015-02-17

    A method and system for reducing background noise in a particle collider, comprises identifying an interaction point among a plurality of particles within a particle collider associated with a detector element, defining a trigger start time for each of the pixels as the time taken for light to travel from the interaction point to the pixel and a trigger stop time as a selected time after the trigger start time, and collecting only detections that occur between the start trigger time and the stop trigger time in order to thereafter compensate the result from the particle collider to reduce unwanted background detection.

  15. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. ); Kozanecki, W. )

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  16. Nonglobal correlations in collider physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moult, Ian; Larkoski, Andrew J.

    2016-01-13

    Despite their importance for precision QCD calculations, correlations between in- and out-of-jet regions of phase space have never directly been observed. These so-called non-global effects are present generically whenever a collider physics measurement is not explicitly dependent on radiation throughout the entire phase space. In this paper, we introduce a novel procedure based on mutual information, which allows us to isolate these non-global correlations between measurements made in different regions of phase space. We study this procedure both analytically and in Monte Carlo simulations in the context of observables measured on hadronic final states produced in e+e- collisions, though itmore » is more widely applicable.The procedure exploits the sensitivity of soft radiation at large angles to non-global correlations, and we calculate these correlations through next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The bulk of these non-global correlations are found to be described in Monte Carlo simulation. They increase by the inclusion of non-perturbative effects, which we show can be incorporated in our calculation through the use of a model shape function. As a result, this procedure illuminates the source of non-global correlations and has connections more broadly to fundamental quantities in quantum field theory.« less

  17. Inhomogeneity smoothing using density valley formed by ion beam...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    deposition in an ion-beam inertial confinement fusion pellets by numerical simulation. ... dominated beam physics for heavy ion fusion, Saitama (Japan), 10-12 Dec 1998; Other ...

  18. Review of physics results from the Tevatron: Heavy flavor physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, Jonathan; Van Kooten, Rick

    2015-02-28

    We present a review of heavy flavor physics results from the CDF and D0 Collaborations operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A summary of results from Run 1 is included, but we concentrate on legacy results of charm and b physics from Run 2, including results up to Summer 2014.

  19. Review of physics results from the Tevatron: Heavy flavor physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, Jonathan; van Kooten, Rick

    2015-02-28

    In this study, we present a review of heavy flavor physics results from the CDF and DØ Collaborations operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A summary of results from Run 1 is included, but we concentrate on legacy results of charm and b physics from Run 2, including results up to Summer 2014.

  20. Simulation and optimization of a 10 A electron gun with electrostatic compression for the electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.; Beebe, E. N.; Raparia, D.

    2013-03-15

    Increasing the current density of the electron beam in the ion trap of the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) in BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility would confer several essential benefits. They include increasing the ions' charge states, and therefore, the ions' energy out of the Booster for NASA applications, reducing the influx of residual ions in the ion trap, lowering the average power load on the electron collector, and possibly also reducing the emittance of the extracted ion beam. Here, we discuss our findings from a computer simulation of an electron gun with electrostatic compression for electron current up to 10 A that can deliver a high-current-density electron beam for EBIS. The magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap is formed with a magnetic shield surrounding the gun electrodes and the residual magnetic field on the cathode is (5 Division-Sign 6) Gs. It was demonstrated that for optimized gun geometry within the electron beam current range of (0.5 Division-Sign 10) A the amplitude of radial beam oscillations can be maintained close to 4% of the beam radius by adjusting the injection magnetic field generated by a separate magnetic coil. Simulating the performance of the gun by varying geometrical parameters indicated that the original gun model is close to optimum and the requirements to the precision of positioning the gun elements can be easily met with conventional technology.

  1. Temperature and epi thickness dependence of the heavy ion induced latchup threshold for a CMOS/epi 16K static RAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L.S.; Nichols, D.K.; Coss, J.R.; Price, W.E.; Binder, D.

    1987-12-01

    Data have been obtained with krypton and xenon ions for the latchup threshold vs. temperature of four different versions of a Harris CMOS/epi 16K static RAM. These special versions of the HM6516 RAM have 12-micron, 9-micron, 7-micron and 5-micron epi thicknesses, as grown. The test data showed a marked improvement in latchup resistance with decreasing epi thickness and with decreasing temperature over the range of 25/sup 0/C (operating chip ambient) to 100/sup 0/C.s.

  2. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  3. International linear collider reference design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  4. FFAG Designs for Muon Collider Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J. Scott

    2014-01-13

    I estimate FFAG parameters for a muon collider with a 70mm longitudinal emittance. I do not discuss the lower emittance beam for a Higgs factory. I produce some example designs, giving only parameters relevant to estimating cost and performance. The designs would not track well, but the parameters of a good design will be close to those described. I compare these cost estimates to those for a fast-ramping synchrotron and a recirculating linear accelerator. I conclude that FFAGs do not appear to be cost-effective for the large longitudinal emittance in a high-energy muon collider.

  5. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  6. Microsoft Word - DCebra_11_19_2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The existence of this deconfined partonic phase has been well established at the top energies available at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider ...

  7. Rainer Fries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    My research is related to the experimental programs at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Teaching ...

  8. Kinematical correlations of dielectrons from semileptonic decays of heavy mesons and Drell-Yan processes at BNL RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maciula, R.; Slipek, G.; Szczurek, A.

    2011-03-01

    We discuss kinematical correlations between charged leptons from semileptonic decays of open charm/bottom leptons produced in the Drell-Yan mechanism as well as some other mechanisms not included so far in the literature in proton-proton scattering at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The distributions of charm and bottom quarks/antiquarks are calculated in the framework of the k{sub t}-factorization approach. For this calculation we use different unintegrated parton distributions from the literature. The hadronization of heavy quarks is done with the help of well-known fragmentation functions. Uncertainties of our predictions related to heavy quark masses, factorization, and renormalization scales as well as due to the choice of fragmentation model are also discussed. We use semileptonic decay functions found by fitting recent semileptonic data obtained by the CLEO and BABAR collaborations. The Drell-Yan processes were calculated including transverse momenta of quarks and antiquarks, using the Kwiecinski parton distributions. We have also taken into consideration reactions initiated by purely QED {gamma}{sup *{gamma}*} fusion in elastic and inelastic pp collisions as well as a recently proposed diffractive mechanism of exclusive charm-anticharm production. The contribution of the latter mechanism is rather small. We get a good description of the dilepton invariant mass spectrum measured recently by the PHENIX Collaboration and present predictions for the dilepton pair transverse momentum distribution as well as the distribution in the azimuthal angle between electron and positron.

  9. Anomalous grain growth in the surface region of a nanocrystalline CeO2 film under low-temperature heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Zhang, Yanwen; Moll, Sandra J.; Varga, Tamas; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J.

    2012-06-15

    Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline ceria are investigated under ion irradiation at different temperatures. Irradiations at temperatures of 300 and 400 K result in uniform grain growth throughout the film. Anomalous grain growth is observed in thin films of nanocrystalline ceria under 3 MeV Au+ irradiation at 160 K. At this low temperature, significant grain growth is observed within 100 nm from the surface, no obvious growth is detected in the rest of the films. While the grain growth is attributed to a defect-stimulated mechanism at room temperature and above, a defect diffusion-limited mechanism is significant at low temperature with the primary defect responsible being the oxygen vacancy. The nanocrystalline grains remain in the cubic phase regardless of defect kinetics.

  10. Conductivity enhancement in PVA?PEO?EC?LiCF?{sub 3}SO{sub 3} blends upon swift heavy O{sup 7+} ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joge, Prajakta Kanchan, D. K. Sharma, Poonam Jayswal, Manish; Awasthi, D. K.

    2014-04-24

    In the present study, the PVA?PEO?EC?LiCF?{sub 3}SO{sub 3} blend system was prepared using solution cast technique. The system was prepared by taking 5 different concentrations LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} in the range of 3wt% to 11 wt%, at a fixed proportion of the rest of the constituents. These blend films had been exposed to O{sup 7+} radiations of 80 MeV at a current of 1pnA at a fluence of 110{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The conductivity variation of the specimens is investigated using impedance spectroscopy wherein; the conductivity enhances drastically upon irradiation at all the concentrations of salt. The thermal characteristics of the blend films are being studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry.

  11. HEAVY ION FUSION SCIENCE VIRTUAL NATIONAL LABORATORY 1ST QUARTER 2010 MILESTONE REPORT: Simulations of fast correction of chromatic aberrations to establish physics specifications for implementation on NDCX-1 and NDCX-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LIDIA, S.M.; LUND, S.M.; SEIDL, P.A.

    2010-01-04

    This milestone has been accomplished. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory has completed simulations of a fast correction scheme to compensate for chromatic and time-dependent defocusing effects in the transport of ion beams to the target plane in the NDCX-1 facility. Physics specifications for implementation in NDCX-1 and NDCX-2 have been established. This milestone has been accomplished. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory has completed simulations of a fast correction scheme to compensate for chromatic and time-dependent defocusing effects in the transport of ion beams to the target plane in the NDCX-1 facility. Physics specifications for implementation in NDCX-1 and NDCX-2 have been established. Focal spot differences at the target plane between the compressed and uncompressed regions of the beam pulse have been modeled and measured on NDCX-1. Time-dependent focusing and energy sweep from the induction bunching module are seen to increase the compressed pulse spot size at the target plane by factors of two or more, with corresponding scaled reduction in the peak intensity and fluence on target. A time-varying beam envelope correction lens has been suggested to remove the time-varying aberration. An Einzel (axisymmetric electric) lens system has been analyzed and optimized for general transport lines, and as a candidate correction element for NDCX-1. Attainable high-voltage holdoff and temporal variations of the lens driving waveform are seen to effect significant changes on the beam envelope angle over the duration of interest, thus confirming the utility of such an element on NDCX-1. Modeling of the beam dynamics in NDCX-1 was performed using a time-dependent (slice) envelope code and with the 3-D, self-consistent, particle-in-cell code WARP. Proof of concept was established with the slice envelope model such that the spread in beam waist positions relative to the target plane can be minimized with a carefully designed Einzel lens waveform and transport line. WARP simulations have verified the efficacy of the Einzel lens while including more detailed beam physics. WARP simulations have also indicated some unpredicted transittime effects, and methods are currently being explored to compensate and reduce this complication. We have explored the use of an Einzel lens, or system of Einzel lenses, to compensate for chromatic aberrations in the beam focal spot in the NDCX-2 target plane. The final beam manipulations in NDCX-2 (linear velocity ramp, charge neutralization, high field final focus solenoid) are similar to NDCX-1 though the NDCX-2 beam has much higher energy and current. The most relevant distinctions are that the pulse duration at the entrance to the drift compression section is tenfold shorter, and that the beam energy tenfold higher, than in NDCX-1. Placing a time-dependent, envelope angle correcting element at the neutralized drift region entrance presents a very significant challenge to voltage holdoff and voltage swing V(t) in a single Einzel lens. Placing the Einzel lens(es) further upstream reduces the required voltage risetime V'(t) to effect the necessary envelope correction, while increasing the duration over which the timedependent voltage must vary. While this simplifies the technological challenge of designing and operating a Einzel lens in NDCX-2, it does require much finer control of the correcting waveform and measurements of its effect on space-charge dominated beams over a much longer axial path length to target than in the NDCX-1.

  12. Inverse neutrinoless double beta decay revisited: Neutrinos, Higgs triplets, and a muon collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-06-01

    We revisit the process of inverse neutrinoless double beta decay (e{sup -}e{sup -{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -}) at future linear colliders. The cases of Majorana neutrino and Higgs triplet exchange are considered. We also discuss the processes e{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -} and {mu}{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -}, which are motivated by the possibility of muon colliders. For heavy neutrino exchange, we show that masses up to 10{sup 6} (10{sup 5}) GeV could be probed for ee and e{mu} machines, respectively. The stringent limits for mixing of heavy neutrinos with muons render {mu}{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -} less promising, even though this process is not constrained by limits from neutrinoless double beta decay. If Higgs triplets are responsible for inverse neutrinoless double beta decay, observable signals are only possible if a very narrow resonance is met. We also consider unitarity aspects of the process in case both Higgs triplets and neutrinos are exchanged. An exact seesaw relation connecting low energy data with heavy neutrino and triplet parameters is found.

  13. Non-Large Hadron Collider Physics Program at CERN (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Non-Large Hadron Collider Physics Program at CERN Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Non-Large Hadron Collider Physics Program at CERN You are accessing a document from...

  14. Towards a Future Linear Collider and The Linear Collider Studies at CERN

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    During the week 18-22 October, more than 400 physicists will meet at CERN and in the CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva) to review the global progress towards a future linear collider. The 2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both the CLIC and ILC options. Among the topics presented and discussed will be the progress towards the CLIC Conceptual Design Report in 2011, the ILC Technical Design Report in 2012, physics and detector studies linked to these reports, and an increasing numbers of common working group activities. The seminar will give an overview of these topics and also CERN?s linear collider studies, focusing on current activities and initial plans for the period 2011-16. n.b: The Council Chamber is also reserved for this colloquium with a live transmission from the Main Auditorium.

  15. Higgs boson and Z physics at the first muon collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demarteau, M.; Han, T.

    1998-01-01

    The potential for the Higgs boson and Z-pole physics at the first muon collider is summarized, based on the discussions at the ``Workshop on the Physics at the First Muon Collider and at the Front End of a Muon Collider``.

  16. Heavy loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, D.

    1982-01-01

    The extreme pressures on the roof and walls of an earth-sheltered residential home are discussed and the need for careful planning is stressed. Pertinent terms are defined. Footings and wall structure (reinforced concrete walls and concrete block walls) are described. Roofing systems are discussed in detail and illustrated: (1) poured-in-place concrete roof slabs; (2) pre-cast concrete planks; and (3) heavy timber roofs. Insulation of earth-sheltered homes is reviewed in terms of using: (1) urethanes; (2) extruded polystyrene; and (3) expanded polystyrene. Advantages, disadvantages, R-factors, costs, and installation are discussed. (MJJ)

  17. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, C.; Ryutov, D.; Hu, S.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Manuel, M.; et al

    2013-12-01

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generatedmore » by the well-known ∇Te ×∇ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~5×10⁴) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.« less

  18. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.; Ryutov, D.; Hu, S.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Manuel, M.; Rinderknecht, H.; Petrasso, R.; Amendt, P.; Park, H.; Remington, B.; Wilks, S.; Betti, R.; Froula, D.; Knauer, J.; Meyerhofer, D.; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Young, R.; Koenig, M.

    2013-12-01

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic models prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generated by the well-known ?Te ?ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be frozen in the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~510?) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.

  19. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Fellow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Gail G.; Snopak, Pavel; Bao, Yu

    2015-03-20

    Muons are fundamental particles like electrons but much more massive. Muon accelerators can provide physics opportunities similar to those of electron accelerators, but because of the larger mass muons lose less energy to radiation, allowing more compact facilities with lower operating costs. The way muon beams are produced makes them too large to fit into the vacuum chamber of a cost-effective accelerator, and the short muon lifetime means that the beams must be reduced in size rather quickly, without losing too many of the muons. This reduction in size is called "cooling." Ionization cooling is a new technique that can accomplish such cooling. Intense muon beams can then be accelerated and injected into a storage ring, where they can be used to produce neutrino beams through their decays or collided with muons of the opposite charge to produce a muon collider, similar to an electron-positron collider. We report on the research carried out at the University of California, Riverside, towards producing such muon accelerators, as part of the Muon Accelerator Program based at Fermilab. Since this research was carried out in a university environment, we were able to involve both undergraduate and graduate students.

  20. Radiative return capabilities of a high-energy, high-luminositye+e-collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karliner, Marek; Low, Matthew; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-14

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy ECM can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at ECM = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy e+e- colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  1. Heavy metal biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  2. International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of

  3. First Beam for Large Hadron Collider | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Beam for Large Hadron Collider First Beam for Large Hadron Collider September 10, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - An international collaboration of scientists today sent the first beam of protons zooming at nearly the speed of light around the world's most powerful particle accelerator-the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)-located at the CERN laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) invested a total $531 million in the

  4. A Fast Monte Carlo Simulation for the International Linear Collider

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Detector (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect A Fast Monte Carlo Simulation for the International Linear Collider Detector Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Fast Monte Carlo Simulation for the International Linear Collider Detector The following paper contains details concerning the motivation for, implementation and performance of a Java-based fast Monte Carlo simulation for a detector designed to be used in the International Linear Collider. This simulation, presently included

  5. 2009 SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T. W. O'Donnell, and H. Griffin Calibration of the 40Ca + 40Ca data taken on NIMROD-ISiS array C. Bottosso, J. B. Natowitz, K. Hagel, R. Wada, M. Huang, A. Bonasera, G. Liu, G. ...

  6. Proceedings of the heavy ion fusion workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1980-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 35 of the included papers. Abstracts for 9 of the remaining papers appeared earlier in ERA. Two of the included papers were title listed only. (MOW)

  7. 2009 SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of hot nuclear fragments S. Wuenschel, A. Bonasera, L. W. May, G. A. Souliotis, R. Tripathi, S. Galanopoulos, Z. Kohley, K. Hagel, D. V. Shetty, K. Huseman, S. N.Soisson, B. C....

  8. Plasma Instabilities in Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attems, M.; Rebhan, A.; Strickland, M.

    2011-05-23

    Non-Abelian plasma instabilities play a crucial role in the nonequilibrium dynamics of a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma. The Chromo-Weibel instabilities have been proposed as a possible mechanism for the fast apparent thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma and have been extensively studied in stationary anisotropic plasmas using the so-called hard-loop approximation. The generalization to the hard-expanding-loop (HEL) formalism allows the (numerical) calculation of the time evolution of gluonic mean fields in the more realistic dynamical case of anisotropic expansion.

  9. A young person's view of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moya, A.

    1990-08-01

    This report gives a simple description of the Superconducting Super Collider, how it works, and what it is used for. (LSP)

  10. Far Future Colliders and Required R&D Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    Particle colliders for high energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the collider has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size and the cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but its pace of progress has greatly slowed down. In this paper we very briefly review the R&D toward near future colliders and make an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and outline the changes in the paradigm required for the next breakthroughs.

  11. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  12. Luminosity goals for a 100-TeV pp collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hinchliffe, Ian; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Quigg, Chris; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-20

    We consider diverse examples of science goals that provide a framework to assess luminosity goals for a future 100-TeV proton-proton collider.

  13. Collider Tests of the Little Higgs Model (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Collider Tests of the Little Higgs Model The ... Research Org: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (US) ...

  14. The Very Large Hadron Collider: The farthest energy frontier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cost more than what is presently politically acceptable. This talk summarizes the strategies of collider design including staged deployment, comparison with electron-positron...

  15. Luminosity goals for a 100-TeV pp collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinchliffe, Ian; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Quigg, Chris; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-04-23

    We consider diverse examples of science goals that provide a framework to assess luminosity goals for a future 100-TeV proton-proton collider.

  16. The Very Large Hadron Collider: The farthest energy frontier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    would cost more than what is presently politically acceptable. This talk summarizes the strategies of collider design including staged deployment, comparison with...

  17. EIS-0138-S: Superconducting Super Collider, Supplemental, Waxahatchie, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this supplementary statement to analyze the environmental impacts of design modifications to the Superconducting Super Collider that were made following the publication of the Record of Decision that selected Ellis County, Texas, as the location of the laboratory facility. This statement supplements DOE/EIS-0138, Superconducting Super Collider.

  18. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D; efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  19. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

    1997-10-07

    An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures. 6 figs.

  20. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, John Paul (Albuquerque, NM); Burns, Erskine John Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Draper, Charles Hadley (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

  1. W/Z + jets production at the tevatron {bar p}p collider (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: WZ + jets production at the tevatron bar pp collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: WZ + jets production at the tevatron bar pp collider You are...

  2. Linear Collider LHC Subpanel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Subpanel on the Linear Collider and the Large Hadron Collider High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings 2015 HEPAP Membership ChargesReports Charter .pdf file ...

  3. Governance of the International Linear Collider Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, B.; Barish, B.; Delahaye, J.P.; Dosselli, U.; Elsen, E.; Harrison, M.; Mnich, J.; Paterson, J.M.; Richard, F.; Stapnes, S.; Suzuki, A.; Wormser, G.; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-31

    Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency, clearly apportioned at both a national and global level, is essential if the project is to be realised. Finally, models for running costs and decommissioning at the conclusion of the ILC project are proposed. This document represents an interim report of the bodies and individuals studying these questions inside the structure set up and supervised by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). It represents a request for comment to the international community in all relevant disciplines, scientific, technical and most importantly, political. Many areas require further study and some, in particular the site selection process, have not yet progressed sufficiently to be addressed in detail in this document. Discussion raised by this document will be vital in framing the final proposals due to be published in 2012 in the Technical Design Report being prepared by the Global Design Effort of the ILC.

  4. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P.; Kozanecki, W.

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  5. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider We present a study of the experimental determination of the forward-backward asymmetry in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} t{bar t} and in the subsequent t {yields} Wb decay, studied in the context of the International Linear Collider. This process probes the elementary couplings of the top

  6. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  7. New Methods of Particle Collimation in Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancari, Giulio; /Fermilab

    2011-10-01

    The collimation system is an essential part of the design of any high-power accelerator. Its functions include protection of components from accidental and intentional energy deposition, reduction of backgrounds, and beam diagnostics. Conventional multi-stage systems based on scatterers and absorbers offer robust shielding and efficient collection of losses. Two complementary concepts have been proposed to address some of the limitations of conventional systems: channeling and volume reflection in bent crystals and collimation with hollow electron beams. The main focus of this paper is the hollow electron beam collimator, a novel concept based on the interaction of the circulating beam with a 5-keV, magnetically confined, pulsed hollow electron beam in a 2-m-long section of the ring. The electrons enclose the circulating beam, kicking halo particles transversely and leaving the beam core unperturbed. By acting as a tunable diffusion enhancer and not as a hard aperture limitation, the hollow electron beam collimator extends conventional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. Results on the collimation of 980-GeV antiprotons are presented, together with prospects for the future.

  8. SSC 50 mm collider dipole cryostat design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1992-04-01

    The cryostat of a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course of their expected operating life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems.

  9. Cryostat design for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1990-09-01

    The cryostat of an SSC dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the cold mass assembly. It serves to support the cold mass accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation (MLI) system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their 25 year expected life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC collider dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the thermal, structural, and dynamic considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanesue, Takeshi Okamura, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro

    2014-11-10

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90?mT, 1?m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2??s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2??10{sup 11}, which was provided by a single 1?J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  11. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-12

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. In this study, the laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  12. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-10

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  13. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-12

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. In this study, the laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, whichmore » was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.« less

  14. June 30, 2008: US portion of Large Hadron Collider completed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    June 30, 2008The Department and the National Science Foundation announce that the U.S. contribution to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been completed on budget and ahead of schedule. The LHC,...

  15. SCIENCE ON SATURDAY- "The Large Hadron Collider: big science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 5, 2013, 9:30am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium SCIENCE ON SATURDAY- "The Large Hadron Collider: big science for big questions" Professor James Olsen Department of ...

  16. ALCF helps tackle the Large Hadron Collider's big data challenge...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALCF helps tackle the Large Hadron Collider's big data challenge Author: Jim Collins November 3, 2015 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google E-mail Printer-friendly version Argonne ...

  17. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Authors: Baer, Howard ; Barklow, Tim ; Fujii, Keisuke ; Gao, Yuanning ; Hoang, Andre ; Kanemura, Shinya ; List, Jenny ; Logan, Heather E. ; Nomerotski, Andrei ; Perelstein, Maxim ; Peskin, Michael E. ; Poschl, Roman ; Reuter, Jurgen ; Riemann, Sabine ; Savoy-Navarro,

  18. Discrimination of new physics models with the International Linear Collider

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discrimination of new physics models with the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discrimination of new physics models with the International Linear Collider Authors: Asano, Masaki ; Saito, Tomoyuki ; Suehara, Taikan ; Fujii, Keisuke ; Hundi, R. S. ; Itoh, Hideo ; Matsumoto, Shigeki ; Okada, Nobuchika ; Takubo, Yosuke ; Yamamoto, Hitoshi Publication Date: 2011-12-02 OSTI Identifier: 1098342 Type: Publisher's Accepted

  19. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Authors: Baer, Howard ; Barklow, Tim ; Fujii, Keisuke ; Gao, Yuanning ; Hoang, Andre ; Kanemura, Shinya ; List, Jenny ; Logan, Heather E. ; Nomerotski, Andrei ; Perelstein, Maxim ; Peskin, Michael E. ; Poschl, Roman ; Reuter, Jurgen ; Riemann, Sabine ; Savoy-Navarro,

  20. JLab Supports International Linear Collider Cavity Development Work |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Supports International Linear Collider Cavity Development Work NEWPORT NEWS, Va. Feb. 12, 2008 - It's not often that major-league baseball and nuclear physics get to share the limelight, but that's what's happening at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab. The baseball connection involves a nine-cell niobium cavity developed by KEK accelerator scientists in Japan as one of several designs being tested for development for the proposed International Linear Collider. JLab is

  1. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and

  2. Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider Authors: Devetak, Erik ; Nomerotski, Andrei ; Peskin, Michael Publication Date: 2011-08-17 OSTI Identifier: 1100572 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998

  3. Polarized Ion Beams in Figure-8 Rings of JLab's MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Kondratenko, M.A.; Filatov, Yury

    2014-07-01

    The Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is designed to provide high polarization of both colliding beams. One of the unique features of JLab's MEIC is figure-8 shape of its rings. It allows preservation and control of polarization of all ion species including small-anomalous-magnetic-moment deuterons during their acceleration and storage. The figure-8 design conceptually expands the capability of obtaining polarized high-energy beams in comparison to conventional designs because of its property of having no preferred periodic spin direction. This allows one to control effectively the beam polarization by means of magnetic insertions with small field integrals. We present a complete scheme for preserving the ion polarization during all stages of acceleration and its control in the collider's experimental straights.

  4. Development of the conventional facilities of the Superconducting Super Collider. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toohig, T.E.

    1994-02-01

    This report discusses an overview of the construction of facilities at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  5. Numerical calculation of the ion polarization in MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yury

    2015-09-01

    Ion polarization in the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) is controlled by means of universal 3D spin rotators designed on the basis of "weak" solenoids. We use numerical calculations to demonstrate that the 3D rotators have negligible effect on the orbital properties of the ring. We present calculations of the polarization dynamics along the collider's orbit for both longitudinal and transverse polarization directions at a beam interaction point. We calculate the degree of depolarization due to the longitudinal and transverse beam emittances in case when the zero-integer spin resonance is compensated.

  6. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T.

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  7. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory1st Quarter FY08 Milestone Report: Report Initial Work on Developing Plasma Modeling Capability in WARP for NDCX ExperimentsReport Initial work on developing Plasma Modeling Capability in WARP for NDCX Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, A.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2007-12-10

    This milestone has been accomplished. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) has developed and implemented an initial beam-in-plasma implicit modeling capability in Warp; has carried out tests validating the behavior of the models employed; has compared the results of electrostatic and electromagnetic models when applied to beam expansion in an NDCX-I relevant regime; has compared Warp and LSP results on a problem relevant to NDCX-I; has modeled wave excitation by a rigid beam propagating through plasma; and has implemented and begun testing a more advanced implicit method that correctly captures electron drift motion even when timesteps too large to resolve the electron gyro-period are employed. The HIFS-VNL is well on its way toward having a state-of-the-art source-to-target simulation capability that will enable more effective support of ongoing experiments in the NDCX series and allow more confident planning for future ones.

  8. Higgs friends and counterfeits at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Patrick J.; Tucker-Smith, David; Weiner, Neal; /New York U., CCPP /New York U. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2011-04-01

    We consider the possibility of 'Higgs counterfeits' - scalars that can be produced with cross sections comparable to the SM Higgs, and which decay with identical relative observable branching ratios, but which are nonetheless not responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. We also consider a related scenario involving 'Higgs friends,' fields similarly produced through gg fusion processes, which would be discovered through diboson channels WW,ZZ,{gamma}{gamma}, or even {gamma}Z, potentially with larger cross sections times branching ratios than for the Higgs. The discovery of either a Higgs friend or a Higgs counterfeit, rather than directly pointing towards the origin of the weak scale, would indicate the presence of new colored fields necessary for the sizable production cross section (and possibly new colorless but electroweakly charged states as well, in the case of the diboson decays of a Higgs friend). These particles could easily be confused for an ordinary Higgs, perhaps with an additional generation to explain the different cross section, and we emphasize the importance of vector boson fusion as a channel to distinguish a Higgs counterfeit from a true Higgs. Such fields would naturally be expected in scenarios with 'effective Z's,' where heavy states charged under the SM produce effective charges for SM fields under a new gauge force. We discuss the prospects for discovery of Higgs counterfeits, Higgs friends, and associated charged fields at the LHC.

  9. Ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  10. Super-Heavy Element Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Targets for Super-Heavy Element Research Presented at International Workshop on Super-Heavy Element Research SHE-15 J. B. Roberto Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge,...

  11. Power Saving Optimization for Linear Collider Interaction Region Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Optimization of Interaction Region parameters of a TeV energy scale linear collider has to take into account constraints defined by phenomena such as beam-beam focusing forces, beamstrahlung radiation, and hour-glass effect. With those constraints, achieving a desired luminosity of about 2E34 would require use of e{sup +}e{sup -} beams with about 10 MW average power. Application of the 'travelling focus' regime may allow the required beam power to be reduced by at least a factor of two, helping reduce the cost of the collider, while keeping the beamstrahlung energy loss reasonably low. The technique is illustrated for the 500 GeV CM parameters of the International Linear Collider. This technique may also in principle allow recycling the e{sup +}e{sup -} beams and/or recuperation of their energy.

  12. Massive Stars in Colliding Wind Systems: the GLAST Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-29

    Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems are considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory. The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems.

  13. Charge recombination in the muon collider cooling channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernow, R. C.; Palmer, R. B.

    2012-12-21

    The final stage of the ionization cooling channel for the muon collider must transversely recombine the positively and negatively charged bunches into a single beam before the muons can be accelerated. It is particularly important to minimize any emittance growth in this system since no further cooling takes place before the bunches are collided. We have found that emittance growth could be minimized by using symmetric pairs of bent solenoids and careful matching. We show that a practical design can be found that has transmission {approx}99%, emittance growth less than 0.1%, and minimal dispersion in the recombined bunches.

  14. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S

    2011-03-20

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in R&D towards a neutrino factory and muon collider. The U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has been formed recently to expedite the R&D efforts. This paper will review the U.S. MAP R&D programs for a neutrino factory and muon collider. Muon ionization cooling research is the key element of the program. The first muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment, MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment), is under construction now at RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) in the UK. The current status of MICE will be described.

  15. Ripple distribution in magnet strings of Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedley, K. ); Jayasuriya, A. ); Christiansen, C. ); Shafer, R. )

    1994-08-01

    The voltage ripple in the power supplies of the Collider generate ripple current in the magnet coil that, in turn, generates ripple in the magnetic field of dipoles and quadrupoles. The ripple in the magnetic field will be a function of time and space due to the transmission line effect. The work reported in this paper gives a thorough analysis the frequency spectrum and the spatial propagation pattern of the differential mode ripple in the magnet strings for the injection mode and the collider mode.

  16. Single and multiple intrabeam scattering in hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Single and multiple intra-beam scattering are usually considered separately. Such separation works well for electron-positron colliders but usually yields only coarse description in the case of hadron colliders. Boltzmann type integro-differential equation is used to describe evolution of longitudinal distribution due to IBS. The finite size of the longitudinal potential well, its non-linearity and x-y coupling are taken into account. The model predictions for longitudinal and transverse distributions are compared to the experimental measurements.

  17. When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home When Galaxies Collide: Ripples Indicate Recent Impact Close to Home June 28, 2012 - 11:16am Addthis This is a graphic representation of the Milky Way, the galaxy in which Earth is contained. Scientists know of more than 20 visible satellite galaxies that circle the center of the Milky Way, with masses ranging from one million to one billion solar masses. Occasionally, one of these orbiting galaxies pass

  18. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  19. A review of the intrinsic heavy quark content of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S. J.; Kusina, A.; Lyonnet, F.; Schienbein, I.; Spiesberger, H.; Vogt, R.

    2015-04-29

    We present a review of the state of the art of our understanding of the intrinsic charm and bottom content of the nucleon. We discuss theoretical calculations, constraints from global analyses, and collider observables sensitive to the intrinsic heavy quark distributions. In addition, a particular emphasis is put on the potential of a high energy and high luminosity fixed target experiment using the LHC beams (AFTER@LHC) to search for intrinsic charm.

  20. A Review of the Intrinsic Heavy Quark Content of the Nucleon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brodsky, S. J.; Kusina, A.; Lyonnet, F.; Schienbein, I.; Spiesberger, H.; Vogt, R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a review of the state of the art of our understanding of the intrinsic charm and bottom content of the nucleon. We discuss theoretical calculations, constraints from global analyses, and collider observables sensitive to the intrinsic heavy quark distributions. A particular emphasis is put on the potential of a high energy and high luminosity fixed target experiment using the LHC beams (AFTER@LHC) to search for intrinsic charm.

  1. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y.; Boysen, John E.; Branthaver, Jan F.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  2. Computer protection plan for the Superconducing Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, S.

    1992-04-15

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current unclassified computer security program practices, Policies and procedures for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). This document includes or references all related policies and procedures currently implemented throughout the SSCL. The document includes security practices which are planned when the facility is fully operational.

  3. PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-12-11

    Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider place stringent demands on the proton beam used to generate the desired beam of muons. Here we discuss the advantages and challenges of muon accelerators and the rationale behind the requirements on proton beam energy, intensity, bunch length, and repetition rate. Example proton driver configurations that have been considered in recent years are also briefly indicated.

  4. Superconducting Super Collider Magnet System requirements. Revision A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1986-10-23

    This report discusses the Superconducting Super Collider magnet system requirements when the following categories: Functions; operational performance requirements; system configuration and essential features; structural requirements; availability/reliability; instrumentation and control requirements; design life; environment; maintenance requirements; interface systems; quality assurance; safety; and applicable codes and standards.

  5. DESIGN OF A 6 TEV MUON COLLIDER (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DESIGN OF A 6 TEV MUON COLLIDER Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DESIGN OF A 6 TEV MUON COLLIDER You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE)...

  6. DESIGN OF A 6 TEV MUON COLLIDER (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DESIGN OF A 6 TEV MUON COLLIDER Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DESIGN OF A 6 TEV MUON COLLIDER Authors: Wang, M.-H. ; Nosochkov, Y. ; Cai, Y. ; SLAC ; Palmer, M. ;...

  7. A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From Higgs Factory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From Higgs Factory to Multi-TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From...

  8. A Feasibility Study of an e e- Ring Collider for Higgs Factory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: A Feasibility Study of an e e- Ring Collider for Higgs Factory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Feasibility Study of an e e- Ring Collider for Higgs...

  9. ABSTRACTS FOR PAPERS SUBMITTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Subnucleonic Degrees of Freedom, Heavy Ion Collider, Changchun, China, eds. T. T. S. Kuo, H. T. S. Lee, and C. S. Wu (2001) (in press) Heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic...

  10. SEARCHING FOR HIGGS BOSONS AND NEW PHYSICS AT HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung Kao

    2007-09-05

    The objectives of research activities in particle theory are predicting the production cross section and decay branching fractions of Higgs bosons and new particles at hadron colliders, developing techniques and computer software to discover these particles and to measure their properties, and searching for new phenomena and new interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The results of our project could lead to the discovery of Higgs bosons, new particles, and signatures for new physics, or we will be able to set meaningful limits on important parameters in particle physics. We investigated the the prospects for the discovery at the CERN Large Hadron Collider of Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles. Promising results are found for the CP-odd pseudoscalar ($A^0$) and the heavier CP-even scalar ($H^0$) Higgs bosons with masses up to 800 GeV. Furthermore, we study properties of the lightest neutralino ($\\chi^0$) and calculate its cosmological relic density in a supersymmetric $U(1)'$ model as well as the muon anomalous magnetic moment $a_\\mu = (g_\\mu - 2)/2$ in a supersymmetric $U(1)'$ model. We found that there are regions of the parameter space that can explain the experimental deviation of $a_\\mu$ from the Standard Model calculation and yield an acceptable cold dark matter relic density without conflict with collider experimental constraints. % Recently, we presented a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section of inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion ($b\\bar{b} \\to hh$) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model and the minimal supersymmetric model. We plan to predict the Higgs pair production rate and to study the trilinear coupling among the Higgs bosons. % In addition, we have made significant contributions in B physics, single top production, charged Higgs search at the Fermilab as well as in grid computing for both D0 and ATLAS.

  11. Importance of proper renormalization scale-setting for QCD testing at colliders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Xing-Gang; Wang, Sheng-Quan; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-12-22

    A primary problem affecting perturbative quantum chromodynamic (pQCD) analyses is the lack of a method for setting the QCD running-coupling renormalization scale such that maximally precise fixed-order predictions for physical observables are obtained. The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC) eliminates the ambiguities associated with the conventional renormalization scale-setting procedure, yielding predictions that are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme. The QCD coupling scales and the effective number of quark flavors are set order-by-order in the pQCD series. The PMC has a solid theoretical foundation, satisfying the standard renormalization group invariance condition and all of the self-consistency conditions derived frommore » the renormalization group. The PMC scales at each order are obtained by shifting the arguments of the strong force coupling constant αs to eliminate all non-conformal {βi} terms in the pQCD series. The {βi} terms are determined from renormalization group equations without ambiguity. The correct behavior of the running coupling at each order and at each phase-space point can then be obtained. The PMC reduces in the NC → 0 Abelian limit to the Gell-Mann-Low method. In this brief report, we summarize the results of our recent application of the PMC to a number of collider processes, emphasizing the generality and applicability of this approach. A discussion of hadronic Z decays shows that, by applying the PMC, one can achieve accurate predictions for the total and separate decay widths at each order without scale ambiguities. We also show that, if one employs the PMC to determine the top-quark pair forward-backward asymmetry at the next-to-next-to-leading order level, one obtains a comprehensive, self-consistent pQCD explanation for the Tevatron measurements of the asymmetry. This accounts for the “increasing-decreasing” behavior observed by the D0 collaboration for increasing tt invariant mass. At lower energies, the angular distributions of heavy quarks can be used to obtain a direct determination of the heavy quark potential. A discussion of the angular distributions of massive quarks and leptons is also presented, including the fermionic component of the two-loop corrections to the electromagnetic form factors. These results demonstrate that the application of the PMC systematically eliminates a major theoretical uncertainty for pQCD predictions, thus increasing collider sensitivity to possible new physics beyond the Standard Model.« less

  12. Importance of proper renormalization scale-setting for QCD testing at colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xing-Gang; Wang, Sheng-Quan; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-12-22

    A primary problem affecting perturbative quantum chromodynamic (pQCD) analyses is the lack of a method for setting the QCD running-coupling renormalization scale such that maximally precise fixed-order predictions for physical observables are obtained. The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC) eliminates the ambiguities associated with the conventional renormalization scale-setting procedure, yielding predictions that are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme. The QCD coupling scales and the effective number of quark flavors are set order-by-order in the pQCD series. The PMC has a solid theoretical foundation, satisfying the standard renormalization group invariance condition and all of the self-consistency conditions derived from the renormalization group. The PMC scales at each order are obtained by shifting the arguments of the strong force coupling constant αs to eliminate all non-conformal {βi} terms in the pQCD series. The {βi} terms are determined from renormalization group equations without ambiguity. The correct behavior of the running coupling at each order and at each phase-space point can then be obtained. The PMC reduces in the NC → 0 Abelian limit to the Gell-Mann-Low method. In this brief report, we summarize the results of our recent application of the PMC to a number of collider processes, emphasizing the generality and applicability of this approach. A discussion of hadronic Z decays shows that, by applying the PMC, one can achieve accurate predictions for the total and separate decay widths at each order without scale ambiguities. We also show that, if one employs the PMC to determine the top-quark pair forward-backward asymmetry at the next-to-next-to-leading order level, one obtains a comprehensive, self-consistent pQCD explanation for the Tevatron measurements of the asymmetry. This accounts for the “increasing-decreasing” behavior observed by the D0 collaboration for increasing tt invariant mass. At lower energies, the angular distributions of heavy quarks can be used to obtain a direct determination of the heavy quark potential. A discussion of the angular distributions of massive quarks and leptons is also presented, including the fermionic component of the two-loop corrections to the electromagnetic form factors. These results demonstrate that the application of the PMC systematically eliminates a major theoretical uncertainty for pQCD predictions, thus increasing collider sensitivity to possible new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  13. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - An Introduction (1/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    This is the first lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This first lecture provides a brief introduction to hadron collider physics and collider detector experiments as well as offers some analysis guidelines. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  14. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron interaction cross sections for boron. While corrections to the data files themselves are simple to implement and distribute, it is quite possible, however, that coding changes may be required in G4beamline or even in GEANT4 to fully correct nuclear interactions. Regardless, these studies are ongoing and future results will be reflected in updated releases of G4beamline.

  15. Quark-Gluon Plasma: a New State of Matter

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains the nature of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter produced at Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  16. Quark-Gluon Plasma: a New State of Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains the nature of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter produced at Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  17. Lattice QCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from this data and used in the analysis of experimental data produced in the collisions of relativistic heavy ions at Brookhaven National Lab and the Large Hadron Collider. ...

  18. Probing contact interactions at high energy lepton colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, K.; Godfrey, S.; Hewett, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    Fermion compositeness and other new physics can be signaled by the presence of a strong four-fermion contact interaction. Here the authors present a study of {ell}{ell}qq and {ell}{ell}{ell}{prime}{ell}{prime} contact interactions using the reactions: {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} {ell}{prime}{sup +} {ell}{prime}{sup {minus}}, b{anti b}, c{anti c} at future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders with {radical}s = 0.5--5 TeV and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders with {radical}s = 0.5, 4 TeV. They find that very large compositeness scales can be probed at these machines and that the use of polarized beams can unravel their underlying helicity structure.

  19. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S

    2009-04-29

    There is considerable interest in the use of muon beams to create either an intense source of decay neutrinos aimed at a detector located 3000-7500 km away (a Neutrino Factory), or a Muon Collider that produces high-luminosity collisions at the energy frontier. R&D aimed at producing these facilities has been under way for more than 10 years. This paper will review experimental results from MuCool, MERIT, and MICE and indicate the extent to which they will provide proof-of-principle demonstrations of the key technologies required for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. Progress in constructing components for the MICE experiment will also be described.

  20. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-21

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  1. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  2. Physics and technology of the next linear collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    The authors present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center-of-mass energy 0.5--1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. The physics goals discussed here are: Standard Model processes and simulation; top quark physics; Higgs boson searches and properties; supersymmetry; anomalous gauge boson couplings; strong WW scattering; new gauge bosons and exotic particles; e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}}, e{sup {minus}}{gamma}, and {gamma}{gamma} interactions; and precision tests of QCD.

  3. Progress on muon{sup +}muon{sup {minus}} colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1997-05-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of muon colliders are discussed. Recent results of calculations of the radiation hazard from muon decay neutrinos are presented. This is a significant problem for machines with center of mass energy of 4 TeV, but of no consequence for lower energies. Plans are outlined for future theoretical and experimental studies. Besides continued work on the parameters of a 4 TeV collider, studies are now starting on a machine near 100 GeV that could be a factory for the s-channel production of Higgs particles. Proposals are also presented for a demonstration of ionization cooling and of the required targeting, pion capture, and phase rotation rf.

  4. Status of superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schermer, R.I.

    1993-09-01

    The arc sections of the High Energy Booster and the two Collider Rings will need more than 10,000, very large, superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets. Development work on these magnets was carried out at US/DOE laboratories in a program that began in the mid 1980`s. In 1991-1992, the technology was transferred to industry and twenty, full-length, Collider dipoles were successfully fabricated and tested. This program, along with HERA and Tevatron experience, has provided industry a data base to use in formulating detailed designs for the prototypes of the accelerator magnets, with an eye to reducing cost and enhancing producibility. Several model magnets from this latest phase of the industrial program have already been tested. The excessive ramp-rate sensitivity of the magnets is understood and solutions are under investigation.

  5. Jeff Porter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Energy Nuclear Physics (HENP) experiments: DLS at LBNL, NA49 at CERN, STAR at BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and ALICE at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ...

  6. New timing system for the Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffrath, L.; Bernstein, D.; Kang, H.; Koontz, R.; Leger, G.; Ross, M.; Pierce, W.; Wilmunder, A.

    1984-11-01

    In order to be able to meet the goals of the Stanford Linear Collider, a much more precise timing system had to be implemented. This paper describes the specification and design of this system, and the results obtained from its use on 1/3 of the SLAC linac. The functions of various elements are described, and a programmable delay unit (PDU) is described in detail.

  7. Toward design of the Collider Beam Collimation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drozhdin, A.; Mokhov, N.; Soundranayagam, R.; Tompkins, J.

    1994-02-01

    A multi-component beam collimation system for the Superconducting Super Collider is described. System choice justification and design requirements are presented. System consists of targets, scrapers, and collimators with appropriate cooling and radiation shielding. Each component has an independent control for positioning and aligning with respect to the beam. Results of beam loss distribution, energy deposition calculations, and thermal analyses, as well as cost estimate, are presented.

  8. Baseline scheme for polarization preservation and control in the MEIC ion complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yury

    2015-09-01

    The scheme for preservation and control of the ion polarization in the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) has been under active development in recent years. The figure-8 configuration of the ion rings provides a unique capability to control the polarization of any ion species including deuterons by means of "weak" solenoids rotating the particle spins by small angles. Insertion of "weak" solenoids into the magnetic lattices of the booster and collider rings solves the problem of polarization preservation during acceleration of the ion beam. Universal 3D spin rotators designed on the basis of "weak" solenoids allow one to obtain any polarization orientation at an interaction point of MEIC. This paper presents the baseline scheme for polarization preservation and control in the MEIC ion complex.

  9. Audit of controls over Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory subcontractor expenditures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-22

    In January 1989 the Department of Energy contracted with Universities Research Association, Inc. to design, construct, manage, operate, and maintain the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. Through Fiscal Year 1992, costs for subcontractor goods and services accounted for about 75 percent of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory expenditures. The Office of Inspector General evaluated the adequacy of controls in place to ensure that subcontractor costs were reasonable, as required by the contract. The following conclusions were drawn from the audit. The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory did not consistently exercise prudent business judgment in making subcontractor expenditures. As a result, $60 million in expenditures already made and $128 million planned with commercial subcontractors were, in the authors opinion, unnecessary, excessive, or represented uncontrolled growth. The audit also found inadequate justifications, accountability, and cost controls over $143 million in expenditures made and $47 million planned with other Department of Energy laboratories. Improvements were needed in subcontract administration and internal controls, including appropriate audit coverage of the subcontracts. In addition, Department of Energy guidance concerning procurement actions between the laboratories needed to be established.

  10. Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

    2000-04-11

    Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

  11. Sandia Energy - Heavy Duty Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Engines Engine Combustion Fuels Heavy Duty Fuels Heavy Duty FuelsAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:12:35+00:00 Schematic of single-cylinder engine with optical access. Laser enters...

  12. Transfer of polarized 3He ions in the AtR beam transfer line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsoupas N.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    In addition to collisions of electrons with various unpolarized ion species as well as polarized protons, the proposed electron-hadron collider (eRHIC) will facilitate the collisions of electrons with polarized {sup 3}He ions. The AGS is the last acceleration stage, before injection into one of the RHIC's collider ring for final acceleration. The AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line will be utilized to transport the polarized {sup 3}He ions from AGS into one of the RHIC's collider rings. Some of the peculiarities of the AtR line's layout (simultaneous horizontal and vertical bends) may degrade the matching of the stable spin direction of the AtR line with that of RHIC's. In this paper we discuss possible simple modifications of the AtR line to accomplish a perfect matching of the stable spin direction of the injected {sup 3}He beam with the stable spin direction at the injection point of RHIC.

  13. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  14. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  15. Viscous heavy brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    House, R.F.; Hoover, L.D.

    1984-07-10

    Hydroxyethyl cellulose and a sequestrant are added to a heavy brine containing one or more salts selected from calcium chloride, calcium bromide, and zinc bromide to increase the viscosity of the brine. Preferably the brine contains zinc bromide, has a density in the range from about 14.2-19.2 pounds per gallon, and the sequestrant is a polyphosphonic acid or water soluble salt thereof.

  16. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  17. Future BNL plans for a polarized electron-ion collider (eRHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.

    2009-07-26

    To provide polarized electron-proton collisions of {radical}s = 100 GeV; addition of a 10 GeV electron accelerator to the existing RHIC facility is currently under study. Two design lines are under consideration: a self-polarizing electron ring, and an energy recovery linac. While the latter provides significantly higher luminosities, it is technologically very challenging. We present both design approaches and discuss their advantages and limitations.

  18. HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLE COLLIDERS: PAST 20 YEARS, NEXT 20 YEARS, AND BEYOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2013-09-25

    Particle colliders for high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the colliding beam method and the history of colliders, discusses the development of the method over the last two decades in detail, and examines near-term collider projects that are currently under development. The paper concludes with an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and to find what paradigm changes are necessary

  19. A RECIPE FOR LINEAR COLLIDER FINAL FOCUS SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-05-27

    The design of Final Focus systems for linear colliders is challenging because of the large demagnifications needed to produce nanometer-sized beams at the interaction point. Simple first- and second-order matrix matching have proven insufficient for this task, and minimization of third- and higher-order aberrations is essential. An appropriate strategy is required for the latter to be successful. A recipe for Final Focus design, and a set of computational tools used to implement this approach, are described herein. An example of the use of this procedure is given.

  20. Physics at the e⁺e⁻ linear collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moortgat-Picka, G.; Kronfeld, A. S.

    2015-08-14

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e⁺e⁻ linear collider in the energy range of √s = 92 GeV–3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focuses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  1. Physics at the e?e? linear collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moortgat-Picka, G.; Kronfeld, A. S.

    2015-08-14

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e?e? linear collider in the energy range of ?s = 92 GeV3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focuses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  2. NLO QCD corrections to ZZ jet production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binoth, T.; Gleisberg, T.; Karg, S.; Kauer, N.; Sanguinetti, G.

    2010-05-26

    A fully differential calculation of the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production of Z-boson pairs in association with a hard jet at the Tevatron and LHC is presented. This process is an important background for Higgs particle and new physics searches at hadron colliders. We find sizable corrections for cross sections and differential distributions, particularly at the LHC. Residual scale uncertainties are typically at the 10% level and can be further reduced by applying a veto against the emission of a second hard jet. Our results confirm that NLO corrections do not simply rescale LO predictions.

  3. CLIC Project Overview (In Conjunction with the Muon Collider Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Latina, Andrea

    2010-01-08

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV in order to make the multi-TeV range accessible for physics. The current goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology by the year 2010. Recently, important progress has been made concerning the high-gradient accelerating structure tests and the experiments with beam in the CLIC test facility, CTF3. On the organizational side, the CLIC international collaborations have significantly gained momentum, boosting the CLIC study.

  4. Heat leak performance of SSC collider dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisend, J.G. II; Levin, M.; Franks, D.; Pletzer, R.; Augustynowicz, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Boroski, W.B.

    1993-09-01

    The large number of superconducting dipoles in the SSC results in a stringent heat leak budget for each dipole. Ensuring that the dipoles meet this budget is vital to the successful operation or the collider. This work surveys heat leak measurements taken during 4 different magnet string tests. These tests involved both 40 mm and SO mm aperture dipoles. In these experiments the heat leak to the 80 K shield, 20 K shield and cold mass are measured. The results are compared to predictions from a computational thermal model of the dipole cryostat. Discrepancies are seen between the predicted and measured values. Possible explanations for these discrepancies are given.

  5. Control Surveys for Underground Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greening, W.J.Trevor; Robinson, Gregory L.; Robbins, Jeffrey S.; Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    Particular care had to be taken in the design and implementation of the geodetic control systems for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) due to stringent accuracy requirements, the demanding tunneling schedule, long duration and large size of the construction effort of the project. The surveying requirements and the design and implementation of the surface and underground control scheme for the precise location of facilities which include approximately 120 km of bored tunnel are discussed. The methodology used for the densification of the surface control networks, the technique used for the transfer of horizontal and vertical control into the underground facilities, and the control traverse scheme employed in the tunnels is described.

  6. Grazing collisions of gravitational shock waves and entropy production in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    heavy ion collisions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Grazing collisions of gravitational shock waves and entropy production in heavy ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Grazing collisions of gravitational shock waves and entropy production in heavy ion collisions AdS/CFT correspondence is now widely used for the study of strongly coupled plasmas, such as those produced in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. While properties

  7. Project X ICD-2 and its upgrades for Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, Valeri; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This paper reviews the Initial Configuration Document for Fermilab's Project X and considers its possible upgrades for neutrino factory or muon collider.

  8. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-20

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton–proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This article briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  9. W/Z + jets production at the tevatron {bar p}p collider (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: W/Z + jets production at the tevatron {bar p}p collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: W/Z + jets production at the tevatron {bar p}p collider Both the D0 and CDF experiments at Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s = 1.8TeV have accumulated over 13pb{sup {minus}1} of data during the 1992--1993 collider run. Each experiment collected more than 10,000 W {yields} l + {nu} and 1,000 Z {yields} l + {bar l} candidates for each lepton species (e and

  10. Polarized 3He? ion source with hyperfine state selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudnikov, V.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Dudnikov, A.

    2015-04-01

    High beam polarization is essential to the scientific productivity of a collider. Polarized 3He ions are an essential part of the nuclear physics programs at existing and future ion-ion and electron-ion colliders such as BNL's RHIC and eRHIC and JLab's ELIC. Ion sources with performance exceeding that achieved today are a key requirement for the development of these next generation high-luminosity high-polarization colliders. The development of high-intensity high-brightness arc-discharge ion sources at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) has opened up an opportunity for realization of a new type of a polarized 3He? ion source. This report discusses a polarized 3He? ion source based on the large difference of extra-electron auto-detachment lifetimes of the different 3He? ion hyperfine states. The highest momentum state of 5/2 has the largest lifetime of ? ? 350 s while the lower momentum states have lifetimes of ? ~ 10 s. By producing 3He? ion beam composed of only the |5/2, 5/2> hyperfine states and then quenching one of the states by an RF resonant field, 3He? beam polarization of 90% can be achieved. Such a method of polarized 3He? production has been considered before; however, due to low intensities of the He+ ion sources existing at that time, it was not possible to produce any interesting intensity of polarized 3He? ions. The high-brightness arc-discharge ion source developed at BINP can produce a high-brightness 3He+ beam with an intensity of up to 2 A allowing for selection of up to ?1-4 mA of 3He? ions with ?90% polarization. The high gas efficiency of an arc-discharge source is important due to the high cost of 3He gas. Some features of such a PIS as well as prototype designs are considered. An integrated 3He? ion source design providing high beam polarization could be prepared using existing BNL equipment with incorporation of new designs of the 1) arc discharge plasma generator, 2) extraction system, 3) charge exchange jet, and 4) magnetic separation system.

  11. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty ...

  12. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel ...

  13. Progress in Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Drendel, Brian; Gollwitzer, Keith; Johnson, Stan; Lebedev, Valeri; Leveling, Anthony; Morgan, James; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Peterson, Dave; Sondgeroth, Alan; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Fermilab Collider Run II has been ongoing since 2001. During this time peak luminosities in the Tevatron have increased from approximately 10 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1} to 300 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup 02}sec{sup -1}. A major contributing factor in this remarkable performance is a greatly improved antiproton production capability. Since the beginning of Run II, the average antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 2 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr to about 24 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. Peak antiproton stacking rates presently exceed 28 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. The antiproton stacking rate has nearly doubled since 2005. It is this recent progress that is the focus of this paper. The process of transferring antiprotons to the Recycler Ring for subsequent transfer to the collider has been significantly restructured and streamlined, yielding additional cycle time for antiproton production. Improvements to the target station have greatly increased the antiproton yield from the production target. The performance of the Antiproton Source stochastic cooling systems has been enhanced by upgrades to the cooling electronics, accelerator lattice optimization, and improved operating procedures. In this paper, we will briefly report on each of these modifications.

  14. The first tunnel section of the Superconducting Super Collider project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundin, T.K.; Laughton, C.; Nelson, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project will be constructed for the United States Department of Energy at a competitively-selected site in Ellis County, Texas, about 30 mile (50 km) south of the central business district of Dallas. The injector system and main collider ring will be housed in 70 mile (110 km) of tunnel, and the project will include additional shafts and underground enclosures with clear spans up to 30 ft (10 m) at depths of more than 250 ft (75 m). The first tunnel segment to be designed and constructed will include approximately 5.9 mile (9.4 km) of 12 ft (3.7 m) finished internal diameter tunnel, four shafts up to 55 ft (16.8 m) diameter, and various connecting tunnels and adits. Construction will be in weak rock lithologies, including mudstones, marls, and chalks with compressive strengths typically between 300 and 2500 psi (2.0 and 17.2 MPa). Design is underway, with an expected bid date before the end of 1990, and with start of construction following in the spring of 1991. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. nuSTORM and A Path to a Muon Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adey, David; Bayes, Ryan; Bross, Alan; Snopok, Pavel

    2015-05-20

    Our article reviews the current status of the nuSTORM facility and shows how it can be utilized to perform the next step on the path toward the realization of a μ+μ- collider. This review includes the physics motivation behind nuSTORM, a detailed description of the facility and the neutrino beams it can produce, and a summary of the short-baseline neutrino oscillation physics program that can be carried out at the facility. The idea for nuSTORM (the production of neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring) was discussed in the literature more than 30 years agomore » in the context of searching for noninteracting (sterile) neutrinos. However, only in the past 5 years has the concept been fully developed, motivated in large part by the facility's unmatched reach in addressing the evolving data on oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. Finally, this article reviews the basics of the μ+μ-collider concept and describes how nuSTORM provides a platform to test advanced concepts for six-dimensional muon ionization cooling.« less

  16. nuSTORM and A Path to a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adey, David; Bayes, Ryan; Bross, Alan; Snopok, Pavel

    2015-05-20

    Our article reviews the current status of the nuSTORM facility and shows how it can be utilized to perform the next step on the path toward the realization of a μ+μ- collider. This review includes the physics motivation behind nuSTORM, a detailed description of the facility and the neutrino beams it can produce, and a summary of the short-baseline neutrino oscillation physics program that can be carried out at the facility. The idea for nuSTORM (the production of neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring) was discussed in the literature more than 30 years ago in the context of searching for noninteracting (sterile) neutrinos. However, only in the past 5 years has the concept been fully developed, motivated in large part by the facility's unmatched reach in addressing the evolving data on oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. Finally, this article reviews the basics of the μ+μ-collider concept and describes how nuSTORM provides a platform to test advanced concepts for six-dimensional muon ionization cooling.

  17. Collider effects of unparticle interactions in multiphoton signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliev, T. M.; Frank, Mariana; Turan, Ismail

    2009-12-01

    A new model of physics, with a hidden conformal sector which manifests itself as an unparticle coupling to standard model particles effectively through higher dimensional operators, predicts strong collider signals due to unparticle self-interactions. We perform a complete analysis of the most spectacular of these signals at the hadron collider, pp(p){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{gamma}{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma}gg. These processes can go through the three-point unparticle self-interactions as well as through some s and t channel diagrams with one and/or two unparticle exchanges. We study the contributions of individual diagrams classified with respect to the number of unparticle exchanges and discuss their effect on the cross sections at the Tevatron and the LHC. We also restrict the Tevatron bound on the unknown coefficient of the three-point unparticle correlator. With the availability of data from the Tevatron, and the advent of the data emerging from the LHC, these interactions can provide a clear and strong indication of unparticle physics and distinguish this model from other beyond the standard model scenarios.

  18. Implementing mitigative actions on the Superconducting Super Collider project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, T.L. )

    1993-01-01

    The Super Collider is the first project for which a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) was prepared under a DOE Order that became effective in 1990. The policy requires a MAP for any project where environmental findings were predicated on taking mitigative actions. The MAP must be approved prior to the start of preliminary design and thus cannot be site or facility-specific because the requisite level of detail would not be available. This gap is filled by a series of environmental compliance plans (ECP) that are prepared by the architect-engineer/constructions manager under the direction of the DOE Management and Operations Contractor for the Super Collider. A given ECP identifies the environmental protection measures applicable to the respective contract package. The designated design team uses the ECP as one of its requirements documents and the environmental staff uses it during design reviews to verify compliance with the MAP. Site audits and monitoring data are used to document compliance and verify the effectiveness of mitigative actions, or identify required corrective actions. The applicability of this process to other projects falling within the scope of the National Environmental Policy Act is discussed.

  19. Propagation dynamics of laterally colliding plasma plumes in laser-blow-off of thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R. K.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.; Kumar, Ajai, E-mail: ajai@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2014-08-15

    We report a systematic investigation of two plume interactions at different spatial separation (3-7?mm) in laser-blow-off. The plasmas plumes are created using Laser-blow-off (LBO) scheme of a thin film. The fast imaging technique is used to record the evolution of seed plasmas and the interaction zone which is formed as a result of interaction of the two seed plasmas. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is used to study evolution of optical emissions of the species present in the different regions of the plasmas. Neutral Li emissions (Li I 670.8?nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ? 2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2}) and Li I 610.3?nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2} ? 3d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2,5/2})) are dominant in the plasmas but significant differences are observed in the emission and estimated plasma parameters of the seed and the interaction zone. The transport of plasma species from the seed plasmas to the interaction zone is discussed in the terms of plume divergence, kinetic energy of particles, and ion acoustic speed. An attempt is made to understand the formation and dynamics of the interaction zone in the colliding LBO seed plasmas.

  20. Mechanical design of 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity for RHIC collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pai, C.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Chang, X.; McIntyre, G.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wu, Q.

    2011-03-28

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Cavity operating at 4.4K is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator with beam transmission along the centerline. This cavity will increase collision luminosity by providing a large longitudinal bucket for stored bunches of RHIC ion beam. The major components of this assembly are the niobium cavity with the mechanical tuner, its titanium helium vessel and vacuum cryostat, the support system, and the ports for HOM and fundamental dampers. The cavity and its helium vessel must meet equivalent safety with the ASME pressure vessel code and it must not be sensitive to frequency shift due to pressure fluctuations from the helium supply system. Frequency tuning achieved by a two stage mechanical tuner is required to meet performance parameters. This tuner mechanism pushes and pulls the tuning plate in the gap of niobium cavity. The tuner mechanism has two separate drive systems to provide both coarse and fine tuning capabilities. This paper discusses the design detail and how the design requirements are met.

  1. A predictive standard model for heavy electron systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yifeng; Curro, N J; Fisk, Z; Pines, D

    2010-01-01

    We propose a predictive standard model for heavy electron systems based on a detailed phenomenological two-fluid description of existing experimental data. It leads to a new phase diagram that replaces the Doniach picture, describes the emergent anomalous scaling behavior of the heavy electron (Kondo) liquid measured below the lattice coherence temperature, T*, seen by many different experimental probes, that marks the onset of collective hybridization, and enables one to obtain important information on quantum criticality and the superconducting/antiferromagnetic states at low temperatures. Because T* is {approx} J{sup 2} {rho}/2, the nearest neighbor RKKY interaction, a knowledge of the single-ion Kondo coupling, J, to the background conduction electron density of states, {rho}, makes it possible to predict Kondo liquid behavior, and to estimate its maximum superconducting transition temperature in both existing and newly discovered heavy electron families.

  2. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  3. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  4. Formation of a long-lived hot field reversed configuration by dynamically merging two colliding high-{beta} compact toroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H. Y.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Barnes, D.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Sevier, L.; Tuszewski, M.; Anderson, M. G.; Andow, R.; Bonelli, L.; Brown, R.; Bui, D. Q.; Bystritskii, V.; Clary, R.; Cheung, A. H.; Conroy, K. D.; Deng, B. H.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Feng, P.

    2011-05-15

    A high temperature field reversed configuration (FRC) has been produced in the newly built, world's largest compact toroid (CT) facility, C-2, by colliding and merging two high-{beta} CTs produced using the advanced field-reversed {theta}-pinch technology. This long-lived, stable merged state exhibits the following key properties: (1) apparent increase in the poloidal flux from the first pass to the final merged state, (2) significantly improved confinement compared to conventional {theta}-pinch FRCs with flux decay rates approaching classical values in some cases, (3) strong conversion from kinetic energy into thermal energy with total temperature (T{sub e} + T{sub i}) exceeding 0.5 keV, predominantly into the ion channel. Detailed modeling using a new 2-D resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, LamyRidge, has demonstrated, for the first time, the formation, translation, and merging/reconnection dynamics of such extremely high-{beta} plasmas.

  5. Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions, Induced Cross-Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-27

    EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined op0tical, Multistep Direct (TUL), Multistep Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus (Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha- particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions andmore »extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions.« less

  6. Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions, Induced Cross-Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-27

    EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined op0tical, Multistep Direct (TUL), Multistep Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus (Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha- particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions andmore » extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions.« less

  7. Low velocity ion stopping in binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tashev, Bekbolat; Baimbetov, Fazylkhan; Deutsch, Claude; Fromy, Patrice

    2008-10-15

    Attention is focused on the low ion velocity stopping mechanisms in multicomponent and dense target plasmas built of quasiclassical electron fluids neutralizing binary ionic mixtures, such as, deuterium-tritium of current fusion interest, proton-heliumlike iron in the solar interior or proton-helium ions considered in planetology, as well as other mixtures of fiducial concern in the heavy ion beam production of warm dense matter at Bragg peak conditions. The target plasma is taken in a multicomponent dielectric formulation a la Fried-Conte. The occurrence of projectile ion velocities (so-called critical) for which target electron slowing down equals that of given target ion components is also considered. The corresponding multiquadrature computations, albeit rather heavy, can be monitored analytical through a very compact code operating a PC cluster. Slowing down results are systematically scanned with respect to target temperature and electron density, as well as ion composition.

  8. Status of ion sources at National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitagawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Goto, A.; Hattori, T.; Hamano, T.; Hojo, S.; Honma, T.; Imaseki, H.; Katagiri, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sekiguchi, M.; Suda, M.; Sugiura, A.; Suya, N.

    2012-02-15

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) maintains various ion accelerators in order to study the effects of radiation of the human body and medical uses of radiation. Two electrostatic tandem accelerators and three cyclotrons delivered by commercial companies have offered various life science tools; these include proton-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE), micro beam irradiation, neutron exposure, and radioisotope tracers and probes. A duoplasmatron, a multicusp ion source, a penning ion source (PIG), and an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) are in operation for these purposes. The Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is an accelerator complex for heavy-ion radiotherapy, fully developed by NIRS. HIMAC is utilized not only for daily treatment with the carbon beam but also for fundamental experiments. Several ECRISs and a PIG at HIMAC satisfy various research and clinical requirements.

  9. Two Complementary Strategies for New Physics Searches at Lepton Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    In this thesis I present two complementary strategies for probing beyond-the-Standard Model physics using data collected in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at lepton colliders. One strategy involves searching for effects at low energy mediated by new particles at the TeV mass scale, at which new physics is expected to manifest. Several new physics scenarios, including Supersymmetry and models with leptoquarks or compositeness, may lead to observable rates for charged lepton-flavor violating processes, which are forbidden in the Standard Model. I present a search for lepton-flavor violating decays of the {Upsilon}(3S) using data collected with the BABAR detector. This study establishes the 90% confidence level upper limits BF({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} e{tau}) < 5.0 x 10{sup -6} and BF({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {mu}{tau}) < 4.1 x 10{sup -6} which are used to place constraints on new physics contributing to lepton-flavor violation at the TeV mass scale. An alternative strategy is to increase the collision energy above the threshold for new particles and produce them directly. I discuss research and development efforts aimed at producing a vertex tracker which achieves the physics performance required of a high energy lepton collider. A small-scale vertex tracker prototype is constructed using Silicon sensors of 50 {mu}m thickness and tested using charged particle beams. This tracker achieves the targeted impact parameter resolution of {sigma}{sub LP} = (5{circle_plus}10 GeV/p{sub T}) as well as a longitudinal vertex resolution of (260 {+-} 10) {mu}m, which is consistent with the requirements of a TeV-scale lepton collider. This detector research and development effort must be motivated and directed by simulation studies of physics processes. Investigation of a dark matter-motivated Supersymmetry scenario is presented, in which the dark matter is composed of Supersymmetric neutralinos. In this scenario, studies of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} H{sup 0}A{sup 0} production process allow for precise measurements of the properties of the A{sup 0} Supersymmetric Higgs boson, which improve the achievable precision on the neutralino dark matter candidate relic density to 8%. Comparison between this quantity and the dark matter density determined from cosmological observations will further our understanding of dark matter by allowing us to determine if it is of Supersymmetric origin.

  10. Surfactant biocatalyst for remediation of recalcitrant organics and heavy metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Story, Sandra (Greenville, SC); Altman; Denis J. (Evans, GA); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

    2011-03-29

    Novel strains of isolated and purified bacteria have been identified which have the ability to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons including a variety of PAHs. Several isolates also exhibit the ability to produce a biosurfactant. The combination of the biosurfactant-producing ability along with the ability to degrade PAHs enhances the efficiency with which PAHs may be degraded. Additionally, the biosurfactant also provides an additional ability to bind heavy metal ions for removal from a soil or aquatic environment.

  11. Surfactant biocatalyst for remediation of recalcitrant organics and heavy metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Story, Sandra (Greenville, SC); Altman, Denis (Evans, GA); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

    2009-01-06

    Novel strains of isolated and purified bacteria have been identified which have the ability to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons including a variety of PAHs. Several isolates also exhibit the ability to produce a biosurfactant. The combination of the biosurfactant-producing ability along with the ability to degrade PAHs enhances the efficiency with which PAHs may be degraded. Additionally, the biosurfactant also provides an additional ability to bind heavy metal ions for removal from a soil or aquatic environment.

  12. Surfactant biocatalyst for remediation of recalcitrant organics and heavy metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Story, Sandra (Greenville, SC); Altman, Denis J. (Evans, GA); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

    2011-03-15

    Novel strains of isolated and purified bacteria have been identified which have the ability to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons including a variety of PAHs. Several isolates also exhibit the ability to produce a biosurfactant. The combination of the biosurfactant-producing ability along with the ability to degrade PAHs enhances the efficiency with which PAHs may be degraded. Additionally, the biosurfactant also provides an additional ability to bind heavy metal ions for removal from a soil or aquatic environment.

  13. Surfactant biocatalyst for remediation of recalcitrant organics and heavy metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Story, Sandra (Greenville, SC); Altman, Denis J. (Evans, GA); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

    2011-05-03

    Novel strains of isolated and purified bacteria have been identified which have the ability to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons including a variety of PAHs. Several isolates also exhibit the ability to produce a biosurfactant. The combination of the biosurfactant-producing ability along with the ability to degrade PAHs enhances the efficiency with which PAHs may be degraded. Additionally, the biosurfactant also provides an additional ability to bind heavy metal ions for removal from a soil or aquatic environment.

  14. APBF-DEC Heavy Duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul Platform Project Update APBF-DEC Heavy Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul Platform Project Update 2003 DEER ...

  15. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy ...

  16. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty ...

  17. Ion Beam Neutralization by a Tenuous Background Plasma ---- Inventors Igor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kaganovich and William Berdanier | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Ion Beam Neutralization by a Tenuous Background Plasma ---- Inventors Igor Kaganovich and William Berdanier The neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications for accelerators, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. This invention shows that for intense ion beam pulses, a background plasma with a low relative density can be used to effectively

  18. Reducing backgrounds in the higgs factory muon collider detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N. V.; Tropin, I. S.

    2014-06-01

    A preliminary design of the 125-GeV Higgs Factory (HF) Muon Collider (MC) has identified an enormous background loads on the HF detector. This is related to the twelve times higher muon decay probability at HF compared to that previously studied for the 1.5-TeV MC. As a result of MARS15 optimization studies, it is shown that with a carefully designed protection system in the interaction region, in the machine-detector interface and inside the detector one can reduce the background rates to a manageable level similar to that achieved for the optimized 1.5-TeV case. The main characteristics of the HF detector background are presented for the configuration found.

  19. Precise Predictions for Z + 4 Jets at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ita, H.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Cordero, F.Febres; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2011-12-09

    We present the cross section for production of a Z boson in association with four jets at the Large Hadron Collider, at next-to-leading order in the QCD coupling. When the Z decays to neutrinos, this process is a key irreducible background to many searches for new physics. Its computation has been made feasible through the development of the on-shell approach to perturbative quantum field theory. We present the total cross section for pp collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV, after folding in the decay of the Z boson, or virtual photon, to a charged-lepton pair. We also provide distributions of the transverse momenta of the four jets, and we compare cross sections and distributions to the corresponding ones for the production of a W boson with accompanying jets.

  20. 2005 Final Report: New Technologies for Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter McIntyre; Al McInturff

    2005-12-31

    This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles. The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with free su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the construction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group comes of age in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design.

  1. High energy particle colliders: past 20 years, next 20 years and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.; /Fermilab

    2012-04-01

    Particle colliders for high energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the collider has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size and the cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but its pace of progress has greatly slowed down. In this paper we very briefly review the method and the history of colliders, discuss in detail the developments over the past two decades and the directions of the R and D toward near future colliders which are currently being explored. Finally, we make an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and outline the changes in the paradigm required for the next breakthroughs.

  2. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.; Padilla, Dennis D.; Wingo, Robert M.; Worl, Laura A.; Johnson, Michael D.

    2003-07-22

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  3. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2006-12-26

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  4. Advances in heavy oil hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendizabal, O.B. )

    1988-06-01

    The world increase in heavy crudes has forced refiners to develop different processes that upgrade the yields and product properties recovered from these crudes. However, some of the optimized and new processes are not able to handle whole heavy crude oils, due to the high viscosity and corrosion of their long and short residues. The different processes for heavy crudes can be classified in two areas: physical (vg. Liquid Extraction) and chemical processes. The catalytic hydrotreating process, which belongs to this last classification, has demonstrated to be an economical upgrading process for heavy crude oil. This paper describes the development by the Mexican Petroleum Institute of the process to hydrotreat maya heavy crude. The effect of the operating conditions, the catalyst ---- development and the technical - economical analysis are presented. The product properties and yields are compared with the results obtained with light crude oil like isthmus.

  5. 2014-2015 SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and S. Typel Exploring clusterization in 28Si+12C collisions at 35MeVu with the NIMROD-ISiS array X.G. Cao, K. Schmidt, E.-J. Kim, K. Hagel, M. Barbui, S. Wuenschel, J.B. ...

  6. 2010-2011 SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy calibration of the 40Ca + 40Ca data taken on the NIMROD-ISiS array K. Schmidt, C. Bottosso, J. B. Natowitz, K. Hagel, R. Wada, M. Huang, A. Bonasera, M. Barbui, M. ...

  7. 2013-2014 SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recent results of 45Sc-induced fusion evaporation reactions on 158,160Gd T. A. Werke, D. A. Mayorov, M. C. Alfonso, M. M. Frey, and C. M. Folden III Production cross sections of residues in 50Ti-induced reactions D. A. Mayorov, T. A. Werke, M. C. Alfonso, M. M. Frey, E. E. Tereshatov, and C. M. Folden III Development of nuclear forensics program at Texas A&M University T. K. Bhardwaj, J. R. Allred, K. F. Jones, P. M. Mendoza, R. L. Du, C. M. Folden III, and S. S. Chirayath Exploring the

  8. Heavy ion beam probe operation in time va

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operation in time varying equilibria of improved confinement reversed field pinch discharges D. R. Demers, X. Chen, P. M. Schoch, and P. J. Fimognari Citation: Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E109 (2010); doi: 10.1063/1.3479109 View online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3479109 View Table of Contents: http://rsi.aip.org/resource/1/RSINAK/v81/i10 Published by the American Institute of Physics. Additional information on Rev. Sci. Instrum. Journal Homepage: http://rsi.aip.org Journal Information:

  9. Statistics at work in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1982-07-01

    In the first part special aspects of the compound nucleus decay are considered. The evaporation of particles intermediate between nucleons and fission fragments is explored both theoretically and experimentally. The limitations of the fission decay width expression obtained with the transition state method are discussed, and a more general approach is proposed. In the second part the process of angular momentum transfer in deep inelastic reactions is considered. The limit of statistical equilibrium is studied and specifically applied to the estimation of the degree of alignment of the fragment spins. The magnitude and alignment of the transferred angular momentum is experimentally determined from sequentially emitted alpha, gamma, and fission fragments.

  10. 2011-2012 SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May, P. Marini, D.V. Shetty, W.B. Smith, S.N. Soisson, G.A. Souliotis, B.C. Stein, R. Tripathi, S. Wuenschel, and S.J. Yennello Correlation functions in constrained molecular...

  11. Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear ...

  12. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.W.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4..pi.. detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented.

  13. Electromagnetic Probes: A Chronometer of Heavy Ion Collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Bikash

    2010-11-23

    I have known Predhiman for quite some time and I consider his friendship a great privilege. He along with some of his colleagues made the almost unique transition time to time from Quantum Electrodynamics of his (almost classical) electromagnetic plasma to Quantum Chromodynamics of quarks and gluons. Some of the papers are unique in the sense they surface up to the centre stage of the field of quarks and gluons giving us a new insight; the particular paper of Bannur and Kaw discussing the stability of quark gluon plasma is a particularly interesting one.I wish Predhiman the very best on this occasion and sincerely hope for a long vital and fruitful life that lies ahead.Interestingly enough this transition from QED (electromagnetic plasma) to QCD plasma (Quark Gluon Plasma) was motivated by consuming a very special kind of Indian soft nuts on Sunday afternoons, the consumers consisted of two persons, P. K. Kaw and Jitendra Parikh - some nuts!

  14. JETS OF NUCLEAR MATTER FROM HIGH ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocker, H.; Csernai, L.P.; Graebner, G.; Buchwald, G.; Kruse, H.; Cusson, R.Y.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.

    1980-11-01

    The nuclear fluid dynamical model with final thermal breakup is used to study the reactions {sup 20}Ne + {sup 238}U and {sup 40} Ar + {sup 40}Ca at E{sub LAB}=390 MeV/n. Calculated double differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/d{Omega}dE are in agreement with recent experimental data. It is shown that azimuthally dependent triple differential cross sections d{sup 3}{sigma}/dEd cos{theta}d{phi} yield considerably deeper insight into the collision process and allow for snapshots of the reactions. Strongly correlated jets of nuclear matter are predicted.

  15. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    At third order in the gradient expansion the cumulants characterize the triangularity and the dipole asymmetry

  16. Viscous photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  17. Inertial Fusion Driven by Intense Heavy-Ion Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... A velocity tilt of about 10% is imposed in the final several acceleration cells, and the beam compresses as it drifts through a neutralizing plasma, reaching a longitudinal waist ...

  18. Collision Processes of Highly Charged Ions with Electrons Studied with an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ohtani, Shunsuke; Kavanagh, Anthony P.; Currell, Fred J.; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Li Yueming; Tong Xiaoming

    2009-09-10

    The electron beam ion trap in Tokyo (Tokyo-EBIT)is suitable for studying relativistic effects in the collisions of highly charged heavy ions with electrons because it can produce and trap very highly charged heavy ions which interact with a mono-energetic and unidirectional relativistic electron beam with an energy of up to 200 keV. Recently, we have been studying resonant processes in ionization and recombination by measuring the charge abundance inside the EBIT at the equilibrium. The abundance ratio between adjacent charge states varies slowly with the electron energy when there is no resonant process. However, when the electron energy coincides with the resonant energy at which ionization or recombination is enhanced, the abundance ratio can drastically change. Thus, the resonant processes can be studied by measuring the abundance ratio between adjacent ions as a function of electron beam energy. In this talk, recent progress for heavy ions with very high charge states up to He-like Bi{sup 81+}, is presented. For such ions, relativistic effects significantly affect the resonant processes. For example, the generalized Breit interaction (GBI) effect, which treats the retardation in the exchange of single virtual photon between the free and orbital electrons, has been clearly observed in the DR resonant strength in Li-like Bi{sup 80+}. Recently we have also found that the GBI effect plays an important role in the interference between non-resonant and resonant recombinations. Experimental results are presented in comparison with theoretical calculations.

  19. Ion focusing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-11-10

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  20. Hiding a Heavy Higgs Boson at the 7 TeV LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Yang; Fan, JiJi; Hewett, JoAnne L.

    2012-03-20

    A heavy Standard Model Higgs boson is not only disfavored by electroweak precision observables but is also excluded by direct searches at the 7 TeV LHC for a wide range of masses. Here, we examine scenarios where a heavy Higgs boson can be made consistent with both the indirect constraints and the direct null searches by adding only one new particle beyond the Standard Model. This new particle should be a weak multiplet in order to have additional contributions to the oblique parameters. If it is a color singlet, we find that a heavy Higgs with an intermediate mass of 200-300 GeV can decay into the new states, suppressing the branching ratios for the standard model modes, and thus hiding a heavy Higgs at the LHC. If the new particle is also charged under QCD, the Higgs production cross section from gluon fusion can be reduced significantly due to the new colored particle one-loop contribution. Current collider constraints on the new particles allow for viable parameter space to exist in order to hide a heavy Higgs boson. We categorize the general signatures of these new particles, identify favored regions of their parameter space and point out that discovering or excluding them at the LHC can provide important indirect information for a heavy Higgs. Finally, for a very heavy Higgs boson, beyond the search limit at the 7 TeV LHC, we discuss three additional scenarios where models would be consistent with electroweak precision tests: including an additional vector-like fermion mixing with the top quark, adding another U(1) gauge boson and modifying triple-gauge boson couplings.

  1. Ion acoustic solitons/double layers in two-ion plasma revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakhina, G. S. Singh, S. V. Kakad, A. P.

    2014-06-15

    Ion acoustic solitons and double layers are studied in a collisionless plasma consisting of cold heavier ion species, a warm lighter ion species, and hot electrons having Boltzmann distributions by Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique. In contrast to the previous results, no double layers and super-solitons are found when both the heavy and lighter ion species are treated as cold. Only the positive potential solitons are found in this case. When the thermal effects of the lighter ion species are included, in addition to the usual ion-acoustic solitons occurring at M?>?1 (where the Mach number, M, is defined as the ratio of the speed of the solitary wave and the ion-acoustic speed considering temperature of hot electrons and mass of the heavier ion species), slow ion-acoustic solitons/double layers are found to occur at low Mach number (M?ion-acoustic mode is actually a new ion-ion hybrid acoustic mode which disappears when the normalized number density of lighter ion species tends to 1 (i.e., no heavier species). An interesting property of the new slow ion-acoustic mode is that at low number density of the lighter ion species, only negative potential solitons/double layers are found whereas for increasing densities there is a transition first to positive solitons/double layers, and then only positive solitons. The model can be easily applicable to the dusty plasmas having positively charged dust grains by replacing the heavier ion species by the dust mass and doing a simple normalization to take account of the dust charge.

  2. Freeze-In dark matter with displaced signatures at colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Co, Raymond T.; D’Eramo, Francesco; Hall, Lawrence J.; Pappadopulo, Duccio

    2015-12-11

    Dark matter, X, may be generated by new physics at the TeV scale during an early matter-dominated (MD) era that ends at temperature T{sub R}≪ TeV. Compared to the conventional radiation-dominated (RD) results, yields from both Freeze-Out and Freeze-In processes are greatly suppressed by dilution from entropy production, making Freeze-Out less plausible while allowing successful Freeze-In with a much larger coupling strength. Freeze-In is typically dominated by the decay of a particle B of the thermal bath, B→X. For a large fraction of the relevant cosmological parameter space, the decay rate required to produce the observed dark matter abundance leads to displaced signals at LHC and future colliders, for any m{sub X} in the range keV colliders. This result applies whether the early MD era arises after conventional inflation, when T{sub R} is the usual reheat temperature, or is a generic MD era with an alternative origin. In the former case, if m{sub X} is sufficiently large to be measured from kinematics, the reheat temperature T{sub R} can be extracted. Our result is independent of the particular particle physics implementation of B→X, and can occur via any operator of dimension less than 8 (4) for a post-inflation (general MD) cosmology. An interesting example is provided by DFS axion theories with TeV-scale supersymmetry and axino dark matter of mass GeV to TeV, which is typically overproduced in a conventional RD cosmology. If B is the higgsino, h-tilde, Higgs, W and Z particles appear at the displaced decays, h-tilde→ha-tilde, Za-tilde and h-tilde{sup ±}→W{sup ±}a-tilde. The scale of axion physics, f, is predicted to be in the range (3×10{sup 8}−10{sup 12}) GeV and, over much of this range, can be extracted from the decay length.

  3. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions | Department of Energy Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August,

  4. Preliminary design for a 20 TeV Collider in a deep tunnel at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-12

    The Reference Design Study for a 20 TeV Collider demonstrated the technical and cost feasibility of a 20 TeV superconducting collider facility. Based on magnets of 3T, 5T, and 6.5T the Main Ring of the Collider would have a circumference of 164 km, 113 km, or 90 km. There would be six collision regions, of which four would be developed intially. The 5T and 6.5T rings would have twelve major refrigeration stations, while the 3T design would have 24 major refrigeration stations.

  5. A tevatron collider beauty factory. [Final report, 1980--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This document which is labeled a final report consists of several different items. The first is a proposal for a detector to be developed for beauty physics. The detector is proposed for the Fermilab Tevatron, and would be designed to measure mixing reactions, rare decay modes, and even CP violation in hadron collider beauty production. The general outline of the work proposed is given, and an estimate of the time to actually design the detector is presented, along with proposed changes to the Tevatron to accommodate the system. A preliminary report on an experiment to verify a reported observation of a 17 keV neutrino in tritium decay is presented. The present results in the decay spectra actually show a depression below expected levels, which is not consistent with a massive neutrino. Additional interest has been shown in finishing an electrostatic beta spectrometer which was started several years previously. The instrument uses hemispherical electrostatic electric fields to retard electrons emitted in tritium decay, allowing measurement of integral spectra. The design goal has a 5 eV energy resolution, which may be achievable. A new PhD student is pursuing this experiment. Also the report contains a proposal for additional work in the field of non-perturbative quantum field theory by the theoretical group at OU. The work which is proposed will be applied to electroweak and strong interactions, as well as to quantum gravitational phenomena.

  6. Final Muon Emittance Exchange in Vacuum for a Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, Don; Acosta, John; Cremaldi, Lucien; Hart, Terry; Oliveros, Sandra; Perera, Lalith; Wu, Wanwei; Neuffer, David

    2015-05-07

    We outline a plan for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets focusing onto short absorbers followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small transverse beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low β region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized xyz emittances of (0.071, 0.141, 2.4) mm-rad are exchanged into (0.025, 0.025, 70) mm-rad. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 μs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87%.

  7. A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From Higgs Factory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From Higgs Factory to Multi-TeV Summarized for CSS2013 E. Adli, J.P.Delahaye, S.J.Gessner, M.J. Hogan, T. Raubenheimer (SLAC) W.An,...

  8. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D; for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  9. Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research within the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    muon collaboration (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research within the muon collaboration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research within the muon collaboration No abstract prepared. Authors: Alsharo'a, Mohammad M. ; Ankenbrandt, Charles M. ; Atac, Muzaffer ; Autin, Bruno R. ; Balbekov, Valeri I. ; Barger, Vernon D. ; Benary, Odette ; Bennett, J. Roger

  10. Dijet asymmetry at the energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Dijet asymmetry at the energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider « Prev Next » Title: Dijet asymmetry at the energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider Authors: Young, Clint ; Schenke, Björn ; Jeon, Sangyong ; Gale, Charles Publication Date: 2011-08-15 OSTI Identifier: 1100553 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review C Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN

  11. Dijet asymmetry at the energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dijet asymmetry at the energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dijet asymmetry at the energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider Authors: Young, Clint ; Schenke, Björn ; Jeon, Sangyong ; Gale, Charles Publication Date: 2011-08-15 OSTI Identifier: 1100553 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review C Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue:

  12. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  13. Tracking of Ions Produced at Near Barrier Energies in Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapira, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Examples of detectors, presently in use, for tracking products from nuclear reactions induced by radioactive ion beams are described. A new tracking detector is being designed to study the binary products from reactions induced by heavy neutron-rich radioactive ion beams on heavy neutron-rich target nuclei. The motivation for such studies and the features designed to accomplish this goal will be presented.

  14. Enhanced electrochemical etching of ion irradiated silicon by localized amorphization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Z. Y.; Breese, M. B. H.; Lin, Y.; Tok, E. S.; Vittone, E.

    2014-05-12

    A tailored distribution of ion induced defects in p-type silicon allows subsequent electrochemical anodization to be modified in various ways. Here we describe how a low level of lattice amorphization induced by ion irradiation influences anodization. First, it superposes a chemical etching effect, which is observable at high fluences as a reduced height of a micromachined component. Second, at lower fluences, it greatly enhances electrochemical anodization by allowing a hole diffusion current to flow to the exposed surface. We present an anodization model, which explains all observed effects produced by light ions such as helium and heavy ions such as cesium over a wide range of fluences and irradiation geometries.

  15. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  16. Recent SuperB Design Choices Improve Next-Generation e e___ B-Factory Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittmer, W.; Bertsche, K.; Chao, A.; Novokhatski, A.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.K.; Wienands, U.; Bogomyagkov, A.V.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; Sinyatkin, S.; Vobly, P.; Okunev, I.N.; Bolzon, B.; Brunetti, L.; Jeremie, A.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; /Frascati /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /CERN /Orsay, LAL /Saclay

    2011-08-19

    The SuperB international team continues to optimize the design of an electron-positron collider, which will allow the enhanced study of the origins of flavor physics. The project combines the best features of a linear collider (high single-collision luminosity) and a storage-ring collider (high repetition rate), bringing together all accelerator physics aspects to make a very high luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. This asymmetric-energy collider with a polarized electron beam will produce hundreds of millions of B-mesons at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. The present design is based on extremely low emittance beams colliding at a large Piwinski angle to allow very low {beta}*{sub y} without the need for ultra short bunches. Use of crab-waist sextupoles will enhance the luminosity, suppressing dangerous resonances and allowing for a higher beam-beam parameter. The project has flexible beam parameters, improved dynamic aperture, and spin-rotators in the Low Energy Ring for longitudinal polarization of the electron beam at the Interaction Point. Optimized for best colliding-beam performance, the facility may also provide high-brightness photon beams for synchrotron radiation applications.

  17. High-intensity polarized H-(proton), deuteron and 3He++ion source development at BNL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelenski,A.

    2008-06-23

    New techniques for the production of polarized electron, H{sup -} (proton), D (D+) and {sup 3}H{sup ++} ion beams are discussed. Feasibility studies of these techniques are in progress at BNL. An Optically Pumped Polarized H{sup -} Ion Source (OPPIS) delivers beam for polarization studies in RHIC. The polarized deuteron beam will be required for the deuteron Electron Dipole Moment (EDM) experiment, and the {sup 3}H{sup ++} ion beam is a part of the experimental program for the future eRHIC (Electron Ion) collider.

  18. One-loop gluon amplitude for heavy-quark production at next-to-next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Aybat, S. Mert

    2008-12-01

    We compute the one-loop QCD amplitude for the process gg{yields}QQ in dimensional regularization through order {epsilon}{sup 2} in the dimensional regulator and for arbitrary quark mass values. This result is an ingredient of the next-to-next-to-leading order cross section for heavy-quark production at hadron colliders. The calculation is performed in conventional dimensional regularization using well-known reduction techniques as well as a method based on recent ideas for the functional form of one-loop integrands in four dimensions.

  19. Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeting EPA 2010 Emissions Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Optimization for High ... High Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engine Heavy Truck Engine Development & ...

  20. Highly charged ion secondary ion mass spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamza, Alex V.; Schenkel, Thomas; Barnes, Alan V.; Schneider, Dieter H.

    2001-01-01

    A secondary ion mass spectrometer using slow, highly charged ions produced in an electron beam ion trap permits ultra-sensitive surface analysis and high spatial resolution simultaneously. The spectrometer comprises an ion source producing a primary ion beam of highly charged ions that are directed at a target surface, a mass analyzer, and a microchannel plate detector of secondary ions that are sputtered from the target surface after interaction with the primary beam. The unusually high secondary ion yield permits the use of coincidence counting, in which the secondary ion stops are detected in coincidence with a particular secondary ion. The association of specific molecular species can be correlated. The unique multiple secondary nature of the highly charged ion interaction enables this new analytical technique.