Sample records for heavy ion collider

  1. Ion Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  2. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, R; Fischer, W; Jowett, J M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon 197Au79+ beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both meth...

  3. Strangelet Search at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, Ha

    2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for strangelets in a triggered sample of 61 million central (top 4percent) Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV near beam rapidities at the STAR solenoidal tracker detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We have sensitivity to metastable strangelets with lifetimes of order>_0.1 ns, in contrast to limits over ten times longer in BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) studies and longer still at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Upper limits of a few 10-6 to 10-7 per central Au+Au collision are set for strangelets with mass>~;;30 GeV/c2.

  4. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bruce; M. Blaskiewicz; W. Fischer; J. M. Jowett

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon Au beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  5. Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy-nuclei. We calculate the cross-sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production, and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross-sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times $10^{32}/$cm$^2$/s.

  6. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  7. Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (431st Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crease, Robert P. (Ph.D, Department of Philosophy, Stony Brook University) [Ph.D, Department of Philosophy, Stony Brook University

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the celebration of Brookhaven Lab's 60th anniversary, Robert P. Crease, the Chair of the Philosophy Department at Stony Brook University and BNL's historian, will present the second of two talks on the Lab's history. In "Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider," Dr. Crease will focus on the creation of the world's most powerful colliding accelerator for nuclear physics. Known as RHIC, the collider, as Dr. Crease will recount, was formally proposed in 1984, received initial construction funding from the U.S. Department of Energy in 1991, and started operating in 2000. In 2005, the discovery at RHIC of the world's most perfect liquid, a state of matter that last existed just moments after the Big Bang, was announced, and, since then, this perfect liquid of quarks and gluons has been the subject of intense study.

  8. Has the QCD Critical Point Been Signaled by Observations at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacey, Roy A.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alexander, J. M.; Chung, P.; Holzmann, W. G.; Issah, M.; Taranenko, A. [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3400 (United States); Danielewicz, P. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Stoecker, Horst [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet D60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The shear viscosity to entropy ratio ({eta}/s) is estimated for the hot and dense QCD matter created in Au+Au collisions at BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider ({radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV). A very low value is found; {eta}/s{approx}0.1, which is close to the conjectured lower bound (1/4{pi}). It is argued that such a low value is indicative of thermodynamic trajectories for the decaying matter which lie close to the QCD critical end point.

  9. Heavy-quark probes of the quark-gluon plasma and interpretation of recent data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hees, H.; Greco, V.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strongly interacting QGP (sQGP), as well as parton coalescence, can play an essential role in the interpretation of recent data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), and thus illuminate the nature of the sQGP and its hadronization. Our main...

  10. Bound-free pair production cross section in heavy-ion colliders from the equivalent photon approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Aste

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Exact calculations of the electron-positron pair production by a single photon in the Coulomb field of a nucleus with simultaneous capture of the electron into the K-shell are discussed for different nuclear charges. Using the equivalent photon method of Weizsaecker and Williams, a simple expression for the bound-free production of electron-positron pairs by colliding very-high-energy fully stripped heavy ions is derived for nuclei of arbitrary charge.

  11. The Smallest Drops of the Hottest Matter? New Investigations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (493rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sickles, Anne [BNL Physics Department

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Pool sharks at the billiards hall know that sometimes you aim to rocket the cue ball for a head-on collision, and other times, a mere glance will do. Physicists need to know more than a thing or two about collision geometry too, as they sift through data from the billions of ions that smash together at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Determining whether ions crash head-on or just glance is crucial for the physicists analyzing data to study quark-gluon plasma—the ultra-hot, "perfect" liquid of quarks and gluons that existed more than 13 billion years ago, before the first protons and neutrons formed. For these physicists, collision geometry data provides insights about quark-gluon plasma's extremely low viscosity and other unusual properties, which are essential for understanding more about the "strong force" that holds together the nucleus, protons, and neutrons of every atom in the universe. Dr. Sickles explains how physicists use data collected at house-sized detectors like PHENIX and STAR to determine what happens before, during, and after individual particle collisions among billions at RHIC. She also explains how the ability to collide different "species" of nuclei at RHIC—including protons and gold ions today and possibly more with a proposed future electron-ion collider upgrade (eRHIC)—enables physicists to probe deeper into the mysteries of quark-gluon plasma and the strong force.

  12. Fourth workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatyga, M.; Moskowitz, B. (eds.)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics: physics at RHIC; flavor flow from quark-gluon plasma; space-time quark-gluon cascade; jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions; parton distributions in hard nuclear collisions; experimental working groups, two-arm electron/photon spectrometer collaboration; total and elastic pp cross sections; a 4{pi} tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer; hadron spectroscopy; efficiency and background simulations for J/{psi} detection in the RHIC dimuon experiment; the collision regions beam crossing geometries; Monte Carlo simulations of interactions and detectors; proton-nucleus interactions; the physics of strong electromagnetic fields in collisions of relativistic heavy ions; a real time expert system for experimental high energy/nuclear physics; the development of silicon multiplicity detectors; a pad readout detector for CRID/tracking; RHIC TPC R D progress and goals; development of analog memories for RHIC detector front-end electronic systems; calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment; construction of a highly segmented high resolution TOF system; progress report on a fast, particle-identifying trigger based on ring-imaging and highly integrated electronics for a TPC detector.

  13. Hadronic resonance production in d+Au collisions at root S(NN) = 200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangaharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; deToledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p(T). We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m...

  14. Fluctuations of charge separation perpendicular to the event plane and local parity violation in ?S[subscript NN] = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    Previous experimental results based on data (?15 × 10[superscript 6] events) collected by the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider suggest event-by-event charge-separation fluctuations perpendicular to ...

  15. System-size independence of directed flow at the RelativisticHeavy-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure directed flow (v{sub 1}) for charged particles in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}), transverse momentum (p{sub t}) and collision centrality, based on data from the STAR experiment. We find that the directed flow depends on the incident energy but, contrary to all available model implementations, not on the size of the colliding system at a given centrality. We extend the validity of the limiting fragmentation concept to v{sub 1} in different collision systems, and investigate possible explanations for the observed sign change in v{sub 1}(p{sub t}).

  16. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

  17. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. Core - Corona Model analysis of the Low Energy Beam Scan at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) in Brookhaven (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gemard; J. Aichelin

    2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrality dependence of spectra of identified particles in collisions between ultrarelativistic heavy ions with a center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) of 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ is analyzed in the core - corona model. We show that at these energies the spectra can be well understood assuming that they are composed of two components whose relative fraction depends on the centrality of the interaction: The core component which describes an equilibrated quark gluon plasma and the corona component which is caused by nucleons close to the surface of the interaction zone which scatter only once and which is identical to that observed in proton-proton collisions. The success of this approach at 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ shows that the physics does not change between this energy and $\\sqrt{s}=200~ AGeV$ for which this model has been developed (Aichelin 2008). This presents circumstantial evidence that a quark gluon plasma is also created at center of mass energies as low as 11.5 $AGeV$.

  19. THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) REFRIGERATOR SYSTEM AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: PHASE III OF THE SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND OPERATIONS UPGRADES FOR 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIDI-YEKHLEF,A.; TUOZZOLO,J.; THAN, R.; KNUDSEN, P.; ARENIUS, D.

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and I1 of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase 111, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for, the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  20. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Refrigerator System at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Phase III of the System Performance and Operations Upgrades for 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Sidi-Yekhlef; R. Than; J. Tuozzolo; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen; D. Arenius

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and II of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase III, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  1. STAR Highlights on Heavy Ion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shusu Shi

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    RHIC-STAR is a mid-rapidity collider experiment for studying high energy nuclear collisions. The main physics goals of STAR experiment are 1) studying the properties of the strongly coupled Quark Gluon Plasma, 2) explore the QCD phase diagram structure. In these proceedings, we will review the recent results of heavy ion physics at STAR.

  2. QCD Factorization for heavy quarkonium production at collider energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Wei Qiu

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, I briefly review several models of the heavy quarkonium production at collider energies, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

  3. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

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  5. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Abreu; S. V. Akkelin; J. Alam; J. L. Albacete; A. Andronic; D. Antonov; F. Arleo; N. Armesto; I. C. Arsene; G. G. Barnafoldi; J. Barrette; B. Bauchle; F. Becattini; B. Betz; M. Bleicher; M. Bluhm; D. Boer; F. W. Bopp; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; W. Busza; M. Cacciari; A. Capella; J. Casalderrey-Solana; R. Chatterjee; L. -W. Chen; J. Cleymans; B. A. Cole; Z. Conesa Del Valle; L. P. Csernai; L. Cunqueiro; A. Dainese; J. Dias de Deus H. -T. Ding; M. Djordjevic; H. Drescher; I. M. Dremin A. Dumitru; A. El; R. Engel; D. d'Enterria; K. J. Eskola; G. Fai; E. G. Ferreiro; R. J. Fries; E. Frodermann; H. Fujii; C. Gale; F. Gelis; V. P. Goncalves; V. Greco; C. Greiner; M. Gyulassy; H. van Hees; U. Heinz; H. Honkanen; W. A. Horowitz; E. Iancu; G. Ingelman; J. Jalilian-Marian; S. Jeon; A. B. Kaidalov; B. Kampfer; Z. -B. Kang; Iu. A. Karpenko; G. Kestin; D. Kharzeev; C. M. Ko; B. Koch; B. Kopeliovich; M. Kozlov; I. Kraus; I. Kuznetsova; S. H. Lee; R. Lednicky; J. Letessier; E. Levin; B. -A. Li; Z. -W. Lin; H. Liu; W. Liu; C. Loizides; I. P. Lokhtin; M. V. T. Machado; L. V. Malinina; A. M. Managadze; M. L. Mangano; M. Mannarelli; C. Manuel; G. Martinez; J. G. Milhano; A. Mocsy; D. Molnar; M. Nardi; J. K. Nayak; H. Niemi; H. Oeschler; J. -Y. Ollitrault; G. Paic; C. Pajares; V. S. Pantuev; G. Papp; D. Peressounko; P. Petreczky; S. V. Petrushanko; F. Piccinini; T. Pierog; H. J. Pirner; S. Porteboeuf; I. Potashnikova; G. Y. Qin; J. -W. Qiu; J. Rafelski; K. Rajagopal; J. Ranft; R. Rapp; S. S. Rasanen; J. Rathsman; P. Rau; K. Redlich; T. Renk; A. H. Rezaeian; D. Rischke; S. Roesler; J. Ruppert; P. V. Ruuskanen; C. A. Salgado; S. Sapeta; I. Sarcevic; S. Sarkar; L. I. Sarycheva; I. Schmidt; A. I. Shoshi; B. Sinha; Yu. M. Sinyukov; A. M. Snigirev; D. K. Srivastava; J. Stachel; A. Stasto; H. Stocker; C. Yu. Teplov; R. L. Thews; G. Torrieri; V. Topor Pop; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos; K. L. Tuchin; S. Turbide; K. Tywoniuk; A. Utermann; R. Venugopalan; I. Vitev; R. Vogt; E. Wang; X. N. Wang; K. Werner; E. Wessels; S. Wheaton; S. Wicks; U. A. Wiedemann; G. Wolschin; B. -W. Xiao; Z. Xu; S. Yasui; E. Zabrodin; K. Zapp; B. Zhang; B. -W. Zhang; H. Zhang; D. Zhou

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This writeup is a compilation of the predictions for the forthcoming Heavy Ion Program at the Large Hadron Collider, as presented at the CERN Theory Institute 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions', held from May 14th to June 10th 2007.

  7. Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier Executive Summary Understanding the glue that binds us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.2.3 Physics Possibilities at the Intensity Frontier . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1 charge. This causes the gluons to interact with each other, generating nearly all the mass of the nucleon

  8. Prospects of Heavy Neutrino Searches at Future Lepton Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Shankha; Ibarra, Alejandro; Mandal, Tanumoy; Mitra, Manimala

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the future prospects of heavy neutrino searches at next generation lepton colliders. In particular, we focus on the planned electron-positron colliders, operating in two different beam modes, namely, $e^+e^-$ and $e^-e^-$. In the $e^+e^-$ beam mode, we consider various production and decay modes of the heavy neutrino ($N$), and find that the final state with $e+2j+\\slashed{E}$, arising from the $e^+e^-\\to N\

  9. Acceleration of heavy ions in the AGS and CBA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, M.Q.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan has been developed to inject ion beams from the Brookhaven Tandem or a cyclotron added to the Tandem into the AGS. This beam could then be injected into a relativistic heavy ion collider. The availability of many CBA components adds to the attractiveness of this proposal.

  10. The Emerging QCD Frontier: The Electron Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Ullrich

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-interactions of gluons determine all the unique features of QCD and lead to a dominant abundance of gluons inside matter already at moderate $x$. Despite their dominant role, the properties of gluons remain largely unexplored. Tantalizing hints of saturated gluon densities have been found in $e$+p collisions at HERA, and in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Saturation physics will have a profound influence on heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. But unveiling the collective behavior of dense assemblies of gluons under conditions where their self-interactions dominate will require an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC): a new facility with capabilities well beyond those In this paper I outline the compelling physics case for $e$+A collisions at an EIC and discuss briefly the status of machine design concepts. of any existing accelerator.

  11. Heavy Ion Event Displays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulated collisions of lead ions in the LHC experiments. Additional photos, video and information are available at these links: Lead-ion collision images from the ALICE...

  12. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  13. Pionic Fusion of Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Horn; G. C. Ball; D. R. Bowman; W. G. Davies; D. Fox; A. Galindo-Uribarri; A. C. Hayes; G. Savard; L. Beaulieu; Y. Larochelle; C. St-Pierre

    1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first experimental observation of the pionic fusion of two heavy ions. The 12C(12C,24Mg)pi0 and 12C(12C,24Na)pi+ cross sections have been measured to be 208 +/- 38 and 182 +/- 84 picobarns, respectively, at E_cm = 137 MeV. This cross section for heavy-ion pion production, at an energy just 6 MeV above the absolute energy-conservation limit, constrains possible production mechanisms to incorporate the kinetic energy of the entire projectile-target system as well as the binding energy gained in fusion.

  14. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. During this period, our program focuses on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus central collisions. We participated in the preparation of letters of intent for two RHIC experiments -- the OASIS proposal and the Di-Muon proposal -- and worked on two RHIC R D efforts -- a silicon strip detector project and a muon-identifier project. A small fraction of time was also devoted to physics programs outside the realm of heavy ion reactions by several individuals.

  15. Heavy Ions - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCIResearchGulfCenterHeavy Ions Heavy ions

  16. Title Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy J. Glauber

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I shall try to say a few words about two particular ways in which my own work has a certain relation to your work with heavy ions. My title is therefore "Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics".

  17. Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remsberg, L.P.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

  18. Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remsberg, L.P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

  19. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -see http://videos.komando.com/2008/08/19/water-painting/]. #12;12/7/08 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual12/7/08 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory 1 Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and fusion* Presented by B. Grant Logan on behalf of the U.S. Heavy Ion

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

  1. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  2. Colliding Nuclei at High Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains what happens when atomic nucleii travelling at close to the speed of light smash together in Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  3. Five Years of Tracking Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Franz

    2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Five years have passed since the first collisions of Au nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on Long Island. With nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies of up to sqrt(s_NN)=200GeV RHIC provides the highest energy heavy ion collisions at any existing collider. To study the dynamics of nuclear matter at extreme temperatures and pressures hundreds of produced particles need to be tracked and identified, which provides a sizable challenge to the four experiments. This article tries to summarize these first years of RHIC operation from the detector point of view and give a glimpse at the future of the accelerator and its experiments.

  4. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Funding Agencies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising ScienceRecentRegional companies eyeRelationshipsFunding

  5. Collider searches and cosmology in the MSSM with heavy scalars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carena, Marcela; /Fermilab; Freitas, A.; /Zurich U.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a variety of supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the scalar partners of the quarks and leptons are predicted to be very heavy and beyond the reach of next-generation colliders. For instance, the realization of electroweak baryogenesis in supersymmetry requires new sources of CP-violation, which can only be naturally accommodated with electric dipole moment constraints if the first and second generation scalar fermions are beyond the TeV scale. Also in focus-point supersymmetry and split supersymmetry the scalar fermions are very heavy. In this work, the phenomenology of scenarios with electroweak baryogenesis and in the focus point region at the LHC and ILC is studied, which becomes challenging due to the presence of heavy scalar fermions. Implications for the analysis of baryogenesis and dark matter are deduced. It is found that precision measurements of superpartner properties allow an accurate determination of the dark matter relic density in both scenarios, while important but only incomplete information about the baryogenesis mechanism can be obtained.

  6. Pre-Town Meeting on Spin Physics at an Electron-Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elke-Caroline Aschenauer; Ian Balitsky; Leslie Bland; Stanley J. Brodsky; Matthias Burkardt; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Abhay Deshpande; Markus Diehl; Leonard Gamberg; Matthias Grosse Perdekamp; Jin Huang; Charles Hyde; Xiangdong Ji; Xiaodong Jiang; Zhong-Bo Kang; Valery Kubarovsky; John Lajoie; Keh-Fei Liu; Ming Liu; Simonetta Liuti; Wally Melnitchouk; Piet Mulders; Alexei Prokudin; Andrey Tarasov; Jian-Wei Qiu; Anatoly Radyushkin; David Richards; Ernst Sichtermann; Marco Stratmann; Werner Vogelsang; Feng Yuan

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A polarized $ep/eA$ collider (Electron--Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center--of--mass energy $\\sqrt{s} \\sim 20$ to $\\sim100$~GeV (upgradable to $\\sim 150$ GeV) and a luminosity up to $\\sim 10^{34} \\, \\textrm{cm}^{-2} \\textrm{s}^{-1}$, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three--dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini--review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper~\\cite{Accardi:2012qut}.

  7. The Design of a Large Booster Ring for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Nissen, Todd Satogata, Yuhong Zhang

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present the current design of the large booster ring for the Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab. The booster ring takes 3 GeV protons or ions of equivalent rigidity from a pre-booster ring, and accelerates them to 20 GeV for protons or equivalent energy for light to heavy ions before sending them to the ion collider ring. The present design calls for a figure-8 shape of the ring for superior preservation of ion polarization. The ring is made of warm magnets and shares a tunnel with the two collider rings. Acceleration is achieved by warm RF systems. The linear optics has been designed with the transition energy above the highest beam energy in the ring so crossing of transition energy will be avoided. Preliminary beam dynamics studies including chromaticity compensation are presented in this paper.

  8. The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -consistent power plant design for a multi- beam induction linac, final focus and chamber propagationThe Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy Grant Logan Director Heavy-Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Presented to FESAC Workshop on Development Paths

  9. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very beginning, the design studies at Jefferson Lab have focused on achieving high collider performance, particularly ultrahigh luminosities up to 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} per detector with large acceptance, while maintaining high polarization for both the electron and light-ion beams. These are the two key performance requirements of a future electron-ion collider facility as articulated by the NSAC Long Range Plan. In MEIC, a new ion complex is designed specifically to deliver ion beams that match the high bunch repetition and highly polarized electron beam from CEBAF. During the last two years, both development of the science case and optimization of the machine design point toward a medium-energy electron-ion collider as the topmost goal for Jefferson Lab. The MEIC, with relatively compact collider rings, can deliver a luminosity above 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy up to 65 GeV. It offers an electron energy up to 11 GeV, a proton energy up to 100 GeV, and corresponding energies per nucleon for heavy ions with the same magnetic rigidity. This design choice balances the scope of the science program, collider capabilities, accelerator technology innovation, and total project cost. An energy upgrade could be implemented in the future by adding two large collider rings housed in another large tunnel to push the center-of-mass energy up to or exceeding 140 GeV. After careful consideration of an alternative electron energy recovery linac on ion storage ring approach, a ring-ring collider scenario at high bunch repetition frequency was found to offer fully competitive performance while eliminating the uncertainties of challenging R&D on ampere-class polarized electron sources and many-pass energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). The essential new elements of an MEIC facility at Jefferson Lab are an electron storage ring and an entirely new, modern ion acceleration and storage complex. For the high-current electron collider ring, the upgraded 12 GeV CEBAF SRF linac will serve as a full-energy injector, and, if needed, provide top

  10. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efthimion, P.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

  11. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube...

  12. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion collisions are an ideal tool to explore the QCD phase diagram. The goal is to study the equation of state (EOS) and to search for possible in-medium modifications of hadrons. By varying the collision energy a variety of regimes with their specific physics interest can be studied. At energies of a few GeV per nucleon, the regime where experiments were performed first at the Berkeley Bevalac and later at the Schwer-Ionen-Synchrotron (SIS) at GSI in Darmstadt, we study the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and try to identify in-medium modifications of hadrons. Towards higher energies, the regime of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the Super-Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, we expect to produce a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The physics goal is to identify the QGP and to study its properties. By varying the energy, different forms of matter are produced. At low energies we study dense nuclear matter, similar to the type of matter neutron stars are made of. As the energy is increased the main constituents of the matter will change. Baryon excitations will become more prevalent (resonance matter). Eventually we produce deconfined partonic matter that is thought to be in the core of neutron stars and that existed in the early universe. At low energies a great variety of collective effects is observed and a rather good understanding of the particle production has been achieved, especially that of the most abundantly produced pions and kaons. Many observations can be interpreted as time-ordered emission of various particle species. It is possible to determine, albeit model dependent, the equation of state of nuclear matter. We also have seen indications, that the kaon mass, especially the mass of the K{sup +}, might be modified by the medium created in heavy ion collisions. At AGS energies and above, emphasis shifts towards different aspects. Lattice QCD calculations predict the transition between a Quark-Gluon Plasma and a hadronic state at a critical temperature, T{sub c}, of about 150 to 190 MeV at vanishing baryon density. The energy density at the transition point is about 1:0 GeV/fm{sup 3}. It is generally assumed that chiral symmetry restoration happens simultaneously. In the high-energy regime, especially at RHIC, a rich field of phenomena [3] has revealed itself. Hot and dense matter with very strong collectivity has been created. There are indications that collectivity develops at the parton level, i.e. at a very early stage of the collision, when the constituents are partons rather than hadrons. Signs of pressure driven collective effects are our main tool for the study of the EOS. There are also strong indications that in the presence of a medium hadronization occurs through the process of quark coalescence and not through quark fragmentation, the process dominant for high-energy p+p reactions. We limit this report to the study of hadrons emitted in heavy ion reactions. The report is divided into two parts. The first part describes the phenomena observed from hadrons produced at low energies, whereas the second part concentrates on the search for signs of a partonic state at high energies.

  13. Production of heavy flavor and photons on high-energy colliders, and rare decays of heavy mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production of heavy flavor and photons on high-energy colliders, and rare decays of heavy mesons (FCNC) decay ¯B0 ¯K0 e+ e- K- + e+ e-. Prompt photon production in pp (p¯p) collisions. Production measurement of photon polarization is difficult, therefore one can instead use virtual-photon production b

  14. Partonic coalescence in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a covariant coalescence model, we study hadron production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from both soft partons in the quark-gluon plasma and hard partons in minijets. Including transverse flow of soft partons and independent...

  15. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: research with multiple- beam experiment MBE-4; induction linac systems experiments; and long- range research and development of heavy-ion fusion accelerators.

  16. Probing the Symmetry Energy with Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, W G; Zhang, Y; Danielewicz, P; Famiano, M; Li, Z; Steiner, A W

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints on the EoS for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) at supra-saturation densities have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities. Comparisons are made to other available constraints.

  17. Probing the Symmetry Energy with Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang; Y. Zhang; P. Danielewicz; M. Famiano; Z. Li; A. W. Steiner

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints on the EoS for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) at supra-saturation densities have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities. Comparisons are made to other available constraints.

  18. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to today's large NP accelerators like GSI-FAIR, RHIC economical for 1-2 GWe baseload power plants. Heavy chambers. · Competitive economics: projected in several power plant studies and with no high levelSlide 1 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Briefing for the National Academy

  19. Detection of Heavy Metal Ions Based on Quantum Point Contacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    . The ability to detect trace amounts of metal ions is important because of the toxicity of heavy metal ionsDetection of Heavy Metal Ions Based on Quantum Point Contacts Vasanth Rajagopalan, Salah Boussaad on many living organisms and the consequence of heavy metal ions not being biodegradable. To date, heavy

  20. Diagnostics of quark-gluon plasma in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions by hard QCD-processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. P. Lokhtin

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the possibilities for studying properties of dense QCD-matter, created in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions, by hard QCD-production processes, so-called "hard" probes -- heavy quarkonia, hard jets, high mass dimuons. Special attention is paid to the potential of coming heavy ion experiments on Large Hadron Collider to observe the rescattering and energy losses of hard partons in quark-gluon plasma.

  1. High energy heavy ions: techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pioneering work at the Bevalac has given significant insight into the field of relativistic heavy ions, both in the development of techniques for acceleration and delivery of these beams as well as in many novel areas of applications. This paper will outline our experiences at the Bevalac; ion sources, low velocity acceleration, matching to the synchrotron booster, and beam delivery. Applications discussed will include the observation of new effects in central nuclear collisions, production of beams of exotic short-lived (down to 1 ..mu..sec) isotopes through peripheral nuclear collisions, atomic physics with hydrogen-like uranium ions, effects of heavy ''cosmic rays'' on satellite equipment, and an ongoing cancer radiotherapy program with heavy ions. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Research in heavy-ion nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, S.J.; Prosser, F.W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Fusion-fission in light nuclear systems; High-resolution Q-value measurement for the {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg reaction; Heavy-ion reactions and limits to fusion; and Hybrid MWPC-Bragg curve detector development.

  3. Causal dissipative hydrodynamics for heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly discuss the recent developments in causal dissipative hydrodynamic for relativistic heavy ion collisions. Phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity over entropy ratio from several experimental data, e.g. STAR's $\\phi$ meson data, centrality dependence of elliptic flow, universal scaling elliptic flow etc. are discussed. QGP viscosity, extracted from hydrodynamical model analysis can have very large systematic uncertainty due to uncertain initial conditions.

  4. Causal dissipative hydrodynamics for heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2011-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly discuss the recent developments in causal dissipative hydrodynamic for relativistic heavy ion collisions. Phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity over entropy ratio from several experimental data, e.g. STAR's $\\phi$ meson data, centrality dependence of elliptic flow, universal scaling elliptic flow etc. are discussed. QGP viscosity, extracted from hydrodynamical model analysis can have very large systematic uncertainty due to uncertain initial conditions.

  5. BARC TIFR Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    enterprise using accelerated heavy ion beams is to unravel the complexities of the nuclear world in all by the accelerator. The projectile impinges on a target nucleus with enough energy to overcome the electrostatic repulsion so that the collision process is governed by the nuclear interactions. Using a variety

  6. Flow and equation of state in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danielewicz, P

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of flow in heavy-ion collisions and of inference of hadronic-matter properties is reviewed.

  7. Flow and equation of state in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Danielewicz

    1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of flow in heavy-ion collisions and of inference of hadronic-matter properties is reviewed.

  8. Flow and equation of state in heavy ion collisions (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danielewicz, P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of flow in heavy-ion collisions and of inference of hadronic-matter properties is reviewed.

  9. Medium induced jet absorption at relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Drees; Haidong Feng; Jiangyong Jia

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The dense medium created in Au + Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) significantly suppresses particle production from hard scattering processes and their characteristic back-to-back angular correlation. We present a simple model of jet absorption in dense matter which incorporates a realistic nuclear geometry. Our calculations are performed at the jet level and assume independent jet fragmentation in the vacuum. This model describes quantitatively the centrality dependence of the observed suppression of the high $p_T$ hadron yield and of the back-to-back angular correlations. The azimuthal anisotropy of high $p_T$ particle production can not be accounted for using a realistic nuclear geometry.

  10. Detecting exotic heavy leptons at the large hadron collider.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, B C; Harris, Chris M; Parker, Michael A; Richardson, P; Webber, Bryan R

    the cuts actually slightly increases with mass due to the longer time delays. 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 1000 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Cr os s se ct io n (fb ) Mass of heavy lepton (GeV) Before applying cuts After applying cuts Figure 5: Cross...

  11. High Current Ion Sources and Injectors for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam driven inertial fusion requires short ion beam pulses with high current and high brightness. Depending on the beam current and the number of beams in the driver system, the injector can use a large diameter surface ionization source or merge an array of small beamlets from a plasma source. In this paper, we review the scaling laws that govern the injector design and the various ion source options including the contact ionizer, the aluminosilicate source, the multicusp plasma source, and the MEVVA source.

  12. Imaging of granular sources in high energy heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Tao Yang; Wei-Ning Zhang; Lei Huo; Jing-Bo Zhang

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the source imaging for a granular pion-emitting source model in high energy heavy ion collisions. The two-pion source functions of the granular sources exhibit a two-tiered structure. Using a parametrized formula of granular two-pion source function, we examine the two-tiered structure of the source functions for the imaging data of Au+Au collisions at Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the imaging technique introduced by Brown and Danielewicz is suitable for probing the granular structure of the sources. Our data-fitting results indicate that there is not visible granularity for the sources at AGS energies. However, the data for the RHIC collisions with the selections of $40 < {\\rm centrality} < 90%$ and $0.20

  13. Heavy ion fusion physics issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple systems model has been used to determine the sensitivity of the cost of electricity and the total cost of a power plant to the various uncertainties expressed in the following six issues. (1) can, at reasonable cost, an accelerator be built that puts more than 1 MJ of energy into a small 6-D phase space volume. (2) Can the beam be focused over a distance of several meters onto a small target in a reaction chamber. (3) Do present calculations adequately describe ion energy deposition. (4) Do current numerical simulations adequately describe the hydrodynamic and thermonuclear behavior of targets. (5) Can targets be cheaply mass produced. (6) Can an economical, tritium-breeding reactor be built.

  14. Commissioning of the EBIS-based heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Binello, S.; Hoff, L.; Kondo, K.; Lambiase, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.; Morris, J.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Snydstrup, L.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Schempp, A.; Ratzinger, U.; Kanesue, T.

    2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The status is presented of the commissioning of a new heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This preinjector uses an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), and an RFQ and IH Linac, both operating at 100.625 MHz, to produce 2 MeV/u ions of any species for use, after further acceleration, at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Among the increased capabilities provided by this preinjector are the ability to produce ions of any species, and the ability to switch between multiple species in 1 second, to simultaneously meet the needs of both science programs. For initial setup, helium beam from EBIS was injected and circulated in the Booster synchrotron. Following this, accelerated Au{sup 32+} and Fe{sup 20+} beams were transported to the Booster injection point, fulfilling DOE requirements for project completion.

  15. Reversing a heavy-ion collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail Stephanov; Yi Yin

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a novel approach to study the longitudinal hydrodynamic expansion of the quark-gluon fluid created in heavy-ion collisions. It consists of two steps: First, we apply the maximum entropy method to reconstruct the freeze-out surface from experimentally measured particle distribution. We then take the output of the reconstruction as the "initial" condition to evolve the system back in time by solving the 1+1 ideal hydrodynamic equations analytically, using the method of Khalatnikov and Landau. We find an approximate Bjorken-like plateau in the energy density vs rapidity profile at the early times, which shrinks with time as the boundary shocks propagate inward. In Bjorken frame, the fluid velocity is close to zero within the plateau, as in the Bjorken solution, but increases outside the plateau. The results carry implications for fully numerical hydrodynamic simulations as well as models of heavy-ion collisions based on gauge-gravity duality.

  16. Constraining the Eq. of State of Super-Hadronic Matter from Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt; Evan Sangaline; Paul Sorensen; Hui Wang

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The equation of state of QCD matter for temperatures near and above the quark-hadron transition (165 MeV) is inferred within a Bayesian framework through the comparison of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and from the Large Hadron Collider to theoretical models. State-of- the-art statistical techniques are applied to simultaneously analyze multiple classes of observables while varying 14 independent model parameters. The resulting posterior distribution over possible equations of state is consistent with results from lattice gauge theory.

  17. A Radiographic Technique With Heavy Ion Microbeams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muscio, J. [ECyT, UNSAM, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Debray, M. E.; Valda, A. A. [ECyT, UNSAM, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); U.A. Fisica, Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, A. J. [U.A. Fisica, Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); ECyT, UNSAM, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Kesque, J. M.; Minsky, D. M. [U.A. Fisica, Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we introduce a new technique to perform densitometric and multielemental analysis of samples at the same time using a simple detector with heavy ion micro-beams. It consists in the simultaneous analysis of X-rays induced in the sample and in a secondary target arranged behind the specimen. The X-rays originated in the secondary target are attenuated when crossing the specimen producing a radiographic image with a monochromatic source.

  18. ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    plasmas are being considered as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus beyond resonance. Keywords: Plasma focus; RF plasma; Beam charge neutralization 1. INTRODUCTION A possible heavyECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization PHILIP C. EFTHIMION,1 ERIK GILSON,1

  19. Grazing collisions of gravitational shock waves and entropy production in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin Shu; Shuryak, Edward [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    AdS/CFT correspondence is now widely used for the study of strongly coupled plasmas, such as those produced in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. While properties of equilibrated plasma and small deviations from equilibrium are by now reasonably well understood, the plasma's initial formation and thermal equilibration is a much more challenging issue which remains to be studied. In the dual gravity language, these problems are related to the formation of bulk black holes, and studying trapped surfaces, as we do in this work, is a way to estimate the properties (temperature and entropy) of such black holes. Extending the work by Gubser et al. for central collisions, we find numerically trapped surfaces for noncentral collisions of ultrarelativistic black holes (gravitational shock waves) with different energies. We observe that beyond a certain critical impact parameter, the trapped surface does not exist, and we argue that there are some experimental indications for a similar jump in entropy production as a function of the impact parameter in real heavy ion collisions. We also present a simple solvable example of the so-called wall-on-wall collision, for colliding objects that depend on the holographic coordinate only. Finally, we critically discuss the applicability of the AdS/CFT approach to real-world heavy ion collisions.

  20. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  1. The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions (490th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenke, Bjoern [BNL Physics Department

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The sun can’t do it, but colossal machines like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe sure can. Quarks and gluons make up protons and neutrons found in the nucleus of every atom in the universe. At heavy ion colliders like RHIC and the LHC, scientists can create matter more than 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun—so hot that protons and neutrons melt into a plasma of quarks and gluons. The particle collisions and emerging quark-gluon plasma hold keys to understanding how these fundamental particles interact with each other, which helps explain how everything is held together—from atomic nuclei to human beings to the biggest stars—how all matter has mass, and what the universe looked like microseconds after the Big Bang. Dr. Schenke discusses theory that details the shape and structure of heavy ion collisions. He will also explain how this theory and data from experiments at RHIC and the LHC are being used to determine properties of the quark-gluon plasma.

  2. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon (gamma(dir)) and pi(0) are measured in p + p and Au + Au collisions at center-of-mass energy root(S)(NN) = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. A shower...

  3. The role of Spectator Fragments at an electron Ion collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian White; Mark Strikman

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient detection of spectator fragments is key to the main topics at an electron-ion collider (eIC). Any process which leads to emission of fragments or $\\gamma$'s breaks coherence in diffractive processes. Therefore this is equivalent to non-detection of rapidity gaps in pp collisions. For example, in coherent photoproduction of vector mesons their 4-momentum transfer distribution would image the "gluon charge" in the nucleus in the same way that Hofstadter measured its charge structure using elastic scattering of $\\sim$100 MeV electrons. Whereas he could measure the $\\sim$4 MeV energy loss by the electron due to excitation of nuclear energy levels (Figure 1), even the energy spread of the incident beam would prevent such an inclusive selection of quasielastic events at an eIC. The only available tool is fragment detection. Since, in our example, one finds that $\\sim100$ of deexcitations go through $\\gamma$'s or 1 neutron, rarely to 2 neutron and never to protons(due to Coulomb barrier suppression), the eIC design should emphasize their detection.

  4. Probing the Quark Sea and Gluons: the Electron-Ion Collider Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolf Ent

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIC is the generic name for the nuclear science-driven Electron-Ion Collider presently considered in the US. Such an EIC would be the world’s first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world’s first e-A collider. Very little remains known about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A large community effort to sharpen a compelling nuclear science case for an EIC occurred during a ten-week program taking place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle from September 13 to November 19, 2010. The critical capabilities of a stage-I EIC are a range in center-of-mass energies from 20 to 70 GeV and variable, full polarization of electrons and light ions (the latter both longitudinal and transverse), ion species up to A=200 or so, multiple interaction regions, and a high luminosity of about 10{sup 34} electron-nucleons per cm{sup 2} and per second. The physics program of such a stage-I EIC encompass inclusive measurements (ep/A{yields}e'+X), which require detection of the scattered lepon and/or the full scattered hadronic debris with high precision, semi-inclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+h+X), which require detection in coincidence with the scattered lepton of at least one (current or target region) hadron; and exclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+N'/A'+{gamma}/m), which require detection of all particles in the reaction. The main science themes of an EIC are to i) map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, ii) discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and (iii) understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. In addition, there are opportunities at an EIC for fundamental symmetry and nucleon structure measurements using the electroweak probe. To truly make headway to image the sea quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, the EIC needs high luminosity over a range of energies as more exclusive scattering probabilities are small, and any integrated detector/interaction region design needs to provide uniform coverage to detect spectator and diffractive products. This is because e-p and even more e-A colliders have a large fraction of their science related to what happens to the nucleon or ion beams. As a result, the philosophy of integration of complex detectors into an extended interaction region faces challenging constraints. Designs feature crossing angles between the protons or heavy ions during collisions with electrons, to remove potential problems for the detector induced by synchrotron radiation. Designs allocate quite some detector space before the final-focus ion quads, at the cost of luminosity, given that uniform detection coverage is a must for deep exclusive and diffractive processes. The integrated EIC detector/interaction region design at JLab focused on establishing full acceptance for such processes over a wide range of proton energies (20-100 GeV) with well achievable interaction region magnets. The detector design at BNL uses the higher ion beam energies to achieve good detection efficiency for instance for protons following a DVCS reaction, for proton beam energies starting from 100 GeV. Following a recommendation of the 2007 US Nuclear Science Long-Range Planning effort, the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics (DOE/NP) has allocated accelerator R&D funds to lay the foundation for a polarized EIC. BNL, in association with JLab and DOE/NP, has also established a generic detector R&D program to address the scientific requirements for measurements at a future EIC.

  5. Jets in heavy ion collisions with ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Spousta; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy loss of high-p_T partons provides insight into the transport properties of the medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Evidence for this energy loss was first experimentally established through observation of high-p_T hadron suppression at RHIC. More recently, measurements of fully reconstructed jets have been performed at the LHC. In this summary the latest experimental results from the ATLAS collaboration on jet suppression are presented. In particular the jet suppression in inclusive jet yields, path length dependence of the jet suppression, photon-jet and Z^0-jet correlations, heavy flavor suppression, and jet fragmentation are discussed. These results establish qualitative features of the jet quenching mechanism as experimental fact and provide constraints on models of jet energy loss.

  6. Theoretical overview: Light ion lessons, heavy ion hopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavin, S.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments using light ion beams of atomic masses A {approximately} 30 have been underway since 1986 at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS at the respective energies {radical}s {approximately} 5 A GeV and 20 A GeV. The first truly heavy ion runs with a gold beam began this spring at the AGS. In this talk I will survey our progress towards an understanding of nuclear collision dynamics, focusing on those issues that are relevant to Au+Au at the AGS. In view of what we have already learned from the light ion data, I will argue that the prospects for producing matter at extreme density in these experiments are excellent.

  7. Theoretical overview: Light ion lessons, heavy ion hopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavin, S.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments using light ion beams of atomic masses A [approximately] 30 have been underway since 1986 at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS at the respective energies [radical]s [approximately] 5 A GeV and 20 A GeV. The first truly heavy ion runs with a gold beam began this spring at the AGS. In this talk I will survey our progress towards an understanding of nuclear collision dynamics, focusing on those issues that are relevant to Au+Au at the AGS. In view of what we have already learned from the light ion data, I will argue that the prospects for producing matter at extreme density in these experiments are excellent.

  8. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calzetta, E. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  9. Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of...

  10. Jet Reconstruction in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevil Salur

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of strong suppression of inclusive hadron distributions and di-hadron correlations at high $p_{T}$, while providing evidence for partonic energy loss, also suffer from geometric biases due to the competition of energy loss and fragmentation. The measurements of fully reconstructed jets is expected to lack these biases as the energy flow is measured independently of the fragmentation details. In this article, we review the recent results from the heavy ion collisions collected by the STAR experiment at RHIC on direct jet reconstruction utilizing the modern sequential recombination and cone jet reconstruction algorithms together with their background subtraction techniques. In order to assess the jet reconstruction biases a comparison with the jet cross section measurement in $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions to account for nuclear geometric effects is performed. Comparison of the inclusive jet cross section obtained in central Au+Au events with that in $p+p$ collisions, published previously by STAR, suggests that unbiased jet reconstruction in the complex heavy ion environment indeed may be possible.

  11. Design of High Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron- Light Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slawomir Bogacz; Antje Bruell; Jean Delayen; Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolf Ent; Joseph Grames; Andrew Hutton; Geoffrey Krafft; Rui Li; Nikolitsa Merminga; Benard Poelker; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Byung Yunn; Yuhong Zhang; C Montag

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of fundamental structure of nucleons require an electron-ion collider of a center-of-mass energy up to 90 GeV at luminosity up to 1035 cm-2s-1 with both beams polarized. A CEBAF-based collider of 9 GeV electrons/positrons and 225 GeV ions is envisioned to meet this science need and as a next step for CEBAF after the planned 12 GeV energy upgrade of the fixed target program. A ring-ring scheme of this collider developed recently takes advantage of the existing polarized electron CW beam from the CEBAF and a green-field design of an ion complex with electron cooling. We present a conceptual design and report design studies of this high-luminosity collider.

  12. Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Drinking Water Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Drinking Water Using a High-Resolution Differential Surface-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for heavy metal ion detection. The sensor surface the sensing surface with peptides NH2- Gly-Gly-His-COOH and NH2-(His)6-COOH. Cu2+ in drinking water was tested

  13. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY-ION PHYSICS WITHOUT NUCLEAR CONTACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    RELATIVISTIC HEAVY-ION PHYSICS WITHOUT NUCLEAR CONTACT The large electromagnetic field generated physics research--for example, for investigating nuclear structure, hadronic structure, atomic physics Berkeley Laboratory--it became clear that heavy-ion physics without nuclear contact could be very useful

  14. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    Final Focus Solenoid and Target Chamber ­ Cathodic Arc Plasma Source (CAPS) Developed by André AndersThe Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Plasma Sources for Drivers and NDCX-II 19 P. Gilson Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National

  15. Boltzmann-Langevin transport model for heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayik, S. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)]|[Joint Institute for Heavy-Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies exhibit catastrophic phenomena which requires descriptions based on stochastic transport models. First, the Boltzmann-Langevin model, which provides an example of such stochastic approaches, is briefly described. Then, a projection method for obtaining numerical solutions of the Boltzmann-Langevin equation is discussed. Finally, some applications of the model to heavy-ion collisions are presented.

  16. HEAVY ION PHYSICS WITH THE ATLAS DETECTOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WHITE, S.

    2005-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Soon after the LHC is commissioned with proton beams the ATLAS experiment will begin studies of Pb-Pb collisions with a center of mass energy of {radical}s{sub NN} = 5.5 TeV. The ATLAS program is a natural extension of measurements at RHIC in a direction that exploits the higher LHC energies and the superb ATLAS calorimeter and tracking coverage. At LHC energies, collisions will be produced with even higher energy density than observed at RHIC. The properties of the resulting hot medium can be studied with higher energy probes, which are more directly interpreted through modification of jet properties emerging from these collisions, for example. Other topics which are enabled by the 30-fold increase in center of mass energy include probing the partonic structure of nuclei with hard photoproduction (in UltraPeripheral collisions) and in p-Pb collisions. Here we report on evaluation of ATLAS capabilities for Heavy Ion Physics.

  17. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q $. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the in-cone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  18. Preservation and control of the proton and deuteron polarizations in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondratenko, Anatoliy [Scientific and Technical Laboratory Zaryad, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Filatov, Yury [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Lin, Fanglei [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Kondratenko, M. A. [Scientific and Technical Laboratory Zaryad, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme of preserving the proton and deuteron beam polarizations during acceleration and storage in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab. This scheme allows one to provide both the longitudinal and transverse polarization orientations of the proton and deuteron beams at the interaction points of the figure-8 ion collider ring. We discuss questions of matching the polarization direction at all stages of the beam transport including the pre-booster, large booster and ion collider ring.

  19. Actinide Production in the Reaction of Heavy Ions with Curium-248

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moody, K.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE REACTION OF HEAVY IONS WITH CURIUM-248 K.J. Moody (Ph.D.IN THE REACTION OF HEAVY IONS WITH CURIUM-248 Kenton James

  20. Response of Nanocrystalline 3C Silicon Carbide to Heavy-Ion Irradiatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanocrystalline 3C Silicon Carbide to Heavy-Ion Irradiation. Response of Nanocrystalline 3C Silicon Carbide to Heavy-Ion Irradiation. Abstract: Nanostructured materials are...

  1. RHIC | Physics of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 MediaBrookhavenBlackA NewThe

  2. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider | The Case for Continuing Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORV 15051 Modification MOThe Case for

  3. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gábor András Almási; György Wolf

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have considered the equilibration in a relativistic heavy ion collision using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20-40 fm/c which time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have also shown that the mass spectra of broad resonances immediately follows their in-medium spectral functions.

  4. Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remec, Igor [ORNL; Ronningen, Reginald M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Heilbronn, Lawrence [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  5. THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAVY ION ACCELERATORS Principal Components . . . . .Ion Sources Pre-accelerators Low-beta Accelerators Sain Accelerators Rf Linacs . . .

  6. Interaction region design for a RHIC-based medium-energy electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.; Beebe-Wang, J.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    As a first step in a staged approach towards a RHIC-based electron-ion collider, installation of a 4 GeV energy-recovery linac (ERL) in one of the RHIC interaction regions is currently under investigation. To minimize costs, the interaction region of this collider has to use the present RHIC magnets for focusing of the high-energy ion beam. Meanwhile, electron low-beta focusing needs to be added in the limited space available between the existing separator dipoles. We discuss the challenges and present the current design status of this e-A interaction region.

  7. Electron-Ion Collider - taking us to the next QCD frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Wei Qiu

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, I demonstrate that the proposed Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will be an ideal and unique future facility to address many overarching questions about QCD and strong interaction physics at one place. The EIC will be the world's first polarized electron-proton (and light ion), as well as the first electron-nucleus collider at flexible collision energies. With its high luminosity and beam polarization, the EIC distinguishes itself from HERA and the other fixed target electron-hadron facilities around the world. The EIC is capable of taking us to the next QCD frontier to explore the glue that binds us all.

  8. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. Annual progress report, [January 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  9. Nuclear molecular configurations in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugam, G.; Padmini, M.D. (Department of Physics, Presidency College, Madras 600005, India (IN))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibilities of nuclear molecular configurations in symmetric and asymmetric heavy ion collisions are investigated by choosing a proper parametrization for the molecule-like compound state. We treat the nucleus as a rotating liquid drop in terms of the elliptic lemniscatoid parametrization suggested by Royer and Remaud which describes all deformed shapes that occur during the process of fusion of two nuclei, starting from two touching spheres to a single one with the intermediate formation of a deep neck. Only one parameter ({ital s} for the symmetric and {ital s}{sub 1} for the conditional asymmetric case) is needed to define all the shapes encountered in the process. The shape has a neck as long as {ital s} or {ital s}{sub 1} is less than 1/ {radical}2 . In this parametrization, analytical expressions can be obtained for volume, surface, and moment of inertia while the Coulomb energy has to be evaluated numerically. The total energy of the system is calculated as a function of the parameter {ital s} or {ital s}{sub 1}, for various spins and if the stable shape corresponding to minimum energy is one with a neck, then it is concluded that the molecular configuration is possible. Our model yields results which are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  10. Particle Production in High-energy Heavy-ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Nian Wang

    2001-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle production mechanisms in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are reviewed in connection with recent experimental data from RHIC. Implications on mini-jet production, parton saturation and jet quenching are discussed.

  11. On possible $?$ vacua states in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have simulated the possible $\\Theta$ vacua states in heavy ion collisions. In a quench like scenario, random phases of the chiral fields were evolved in a zero temperature potential incorporating the breaking of $U_A(1)$ symmetry. Initial random phases very quickly settles into oscillation around the values dictated by the potential. The simulation indicate that $\\Theta$ vacua states that can be populated in heavy ion collisions is a coherent superposition of a number of modes.

  12. Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, J A

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated heavy ions Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in ion-beam-driven high energy density Summary: Special Topics on Accelerators and Beams 8, 124201 (2005). 12;91506 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science... Physics and Heavy Ion...

  14. Coherent Electromagnetic Heavy Ion Reactions: (1) Exact Treatment of Pair Production and Ionization; (2) Mutual Coulomb Dissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, A. J.

    1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Some recent theoretical results on coherent electromagnetic processes in ultrarelativistic heavy ion reactions are surveyed. In ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, Coulomb induced cross sections are huge, much larger than geometric. For the RHIC case of 100 GeV x 100 GeV colliding gold ions the predicted cross section for bound-electron positron pairs is about 110 barns. The corresponding cross section for continuum electron-positron pairs has recently been recalculated to be 34,000 barns, consistent with the result of the classic formula of Landau and Lifshitz. The cross section for Coulomb dissociation of the nucleus is about 95 barns, and the cross section for ionization of a single electron on one of the ions is about 100,000 barns.

  15. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of amorphous carbon films bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahner, E; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Costa Pinto, P; Yin Vallgren, C; Bender, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade, intense experimental studies on the heavy-ion induced molecular desorption were performed in several particle accelerator laboratories worldwide in order to understand and overcome large dynamic pressure rises caused by lost beam ions. Different target materials and various coatings were studied for desorption and mitigation techniques were applied to heavy-ion accelerators. For the upgrade of the CERN injector complex, a coating of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) vacuum system with a thin film of amorphous carbon is under study to mitigate the electron cloud effect observed during SPS operation with the nominal proton beam for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the SPS is also part of the heavy-ion injector chain for LHC, dynamic vacuum studies of amorphous carbon films are important to determine their ion induced desorption yields. At the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator (LINAC 3), carbon-coated accelerator-type stainless steel vacuum chambers were tested for desorption using 4.2 Me...

  16. HEAVY-ION IMAGING APPLIED TO MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy particles rat h er than the vax~at1.on 1n t h e x-rayprograms on the a PDPll-34 and VAX- 780 computers. The image

  17. Review of Heavy-ion Induced Desorption Studies for Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahner, E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During high-intensity heavy-ion operation of several particle accelerators worldwide, large dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were caused by lost beam ions that impacted under grazing angle onto the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced desorption, observed, for example, at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion intensity, luminosity, and beam lifetime of the accelerator. For the heavyion program at CERN's Large Hadron Collider collisions between beams of fully stripped lead (208Pb82+) ions with a beam energy of 2.76 TeV/u and a nominal luminosity of 10**27 cm**-2 s**-1 are foreseen. The GSI future project FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) aims at a beam intensity of 10**12 uranium (238U28+) ions per second to be extracted from the synchrotron SIS18. Over the past years an experimental effort has been made to study the observed dynamic vacuum degradations, which are important to understand and overcome for present and future particle accelerators. The paper reviews the resu...

  18. Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

  19. Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolfe, J.; Gearhart, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jenkins, T.; McComick, D.; Nelson, R.; Reagan, D.; Ross, M.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. RECENT PROGRESS IN HEAVY ION SOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of hydrogen into thermonuclear fusion reactors. A summary ofFusion Plasma Sources Other sources of high charge state ions include the dense plasma in magnetic confinement thermonuclear

  1. Energy levels of a heavy ion moving in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Hongwei; Chen, Wencong [Department of Physics, Shangqiu Normal University, Shangqiu 476000 (China)] [Department of Physics, Shangqiu Normal University, Shangqiu 476000 (China); Zhao, Yongtao [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Fuli [Department of Applied Physics, Xian Jiao-Tong University, Xian 710049 (China)] [Department of Applied Physics, Xian Jiao-Tong University, Xian 710049 (China); Dong, Chenzhong [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)] [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the potential of a slowly moving test particle moving in collisional dense plasmas is studied. It is composed of the Debye-shielding potential, wake potential, and collision term. The Ritz variational-perturbational method is developed for calculating relativistic binding energy levels of a heavy ion moving in dense plasmas. Binding energy levels of a heavy ion moving in plasmas are calculated. The results show that both non-relativistic energy levels and relativistic energy levels become more negative as the temperature becomes high. They also become more negative as the number density decreasing. Relativistic correction is important for calculating binding energy levels. Both relativistic energy levels and non-relativistic energy levels vary minutely as the speed of heavy ion varies.

  2. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Sandeep K. [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Goloubinoff, Pierre [Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Christen, Philipp [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: christen@bioc.uzh.ch

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  3. Low Density Nuclear Matter in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Lijun

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    2 ,a a = 93.15 MeV/c 2 , and the pairing term, B, is 0 MeV/c 2 for odd-even or even-odd nuclei, -11.2 MeV/c 2 for even-even nuclei and +11.2 MeV/c 2 for odd-odd nuclei [24, 25, 26, 27, 28]. A classical result is shown in the Fig. 2. 6 Fig. 2. Binding... dissertation project possible. vii TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION .......................... 1 A. General Picture of Heavy Ion Collisons ........... 1 B. Transport Models to Simulate Heavy Ion Collisions .... 2 C...

  4. QCD plasma instability and thermalisation at heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich Bodeker; Kari Rummukainen

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Under suitable non-equilibrium conditions QCD plasma can develop plasma instabilities, where some modes of the plasma grow exponentially. It has been argued that these instabilities can play a significant role in the thermalisation of the plasma in heavy-ion collision experiments. We study the instability in SU(2) plasmas using the hard thermal loop effective lattice theory, which is suitable for studying real-time evolution of long wavelength modes in the plasma. We observe that under suitable conditions the plasma can indeed develop an instability which can grow to a very large magnitude, necessary for the rapid thermalisation in heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Benchmarking Heavy Ion Transport Codes FLUKA, HETC-HEDS MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronningen, Reginald Martin [Michigan State University; Remec, Igor [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Heilbronn, Lawrence H. [University of Tennessee-Knoxville

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Powerful accelerators such as spallation neutron sources, muon-collider/neutrino facilities, and rare isotope beam facilities must be designed with the consideration that they handle the beam power reliably and safely, and they must be optimized to yield maximum performance relative to their design requirements. The simulation codes used for design purposes must produce reliable results. If not, component and facility designs can become costly, have limited lifetime and usefulness, and could even be unsafe. The objective of this proposal is to assess the performance of the currently available codes � PHITS, FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and HETC-HEDS � that could be used for design simulations involving heavy ion transport. We plan to access their performance by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data of benchmark quality. Quantitative knowledge of the biases and the uncertainties of the simulations is essential as this potentially impacts the safe, reliable and cost effective design of any future radioactive ion beam facility. Further benchmarking of heavy-ion transport codes was one of the actions recommended in the �Report of the 2003 RIA R&D Workshop".

  6. Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cost direct plasma MHD direct conversion [38], as well as toT-lean targets and direct conversion for heavy ion fusion. [conversion loss of beam energy into x-rays. High ablation velocities with heavy ion direct

  7. Progress in heavy ion fusion researcha... C. M. Celata,b)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    Park, Maryland 20742 D. V. Rose and D. R. Welch Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico.S. Heavy Ion Fusion HIF program is to produce commercial electricity by using multiple beams of heavy ions

  8. Heavy ion collisions and the pre-equilibrium exciton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betak, E. [Institute of Physics SAS, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian Univ., 74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a feasible way to apply the pre-equilibrium exciton model in its masterequation formulation to heavy-ion induced reactions including spin variables. Emission of nucleons, {gamma}'s and also light clusters is included in our model.

  9. A short course on Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Some ideas/concepts in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. To a large extent, the discussions are non-comprehensive and non-rigorous. It is intended for fresh graduate students of Homi Bhabha National Institute, Kolkata Centre, who are intending to pursue career in theoretical /experimental high energy nuclear physics. Comments and criticisms will be appreciated.

  10. A short course on Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some ideas/concepts in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. To a large extent, the discussions are non-comprehensive and non-rigorous. It is intended for fresh graduate students of Homi Bhabha National Institute, Kolkata Centre, who are intending to pursue career in theoretical /experimental high energy nuclear physics. Comments and criticisms will be appreciated.

  11. Chemical Equilibrium in Heavy Ion Collisions: Rapidity Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Becattini; J. Cleymans

    2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle yields in heavy ion collisions show an overwhelming evidence for chemical or relative chemical equilibrium at all beam energies. The rapidity dependence of the thermal parameters $T$ and $\\mu_B$ can now be determined over a wide range of rapidities and show a systematic behavior towards an increase in $\\mu_B$ away from mid-rapidity.

  12. Heavy ion physics challenges at Bevalac/SIS energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses where the future of higher energy heavy ion acceleration may lead in terms of understanding the nucleus. The discussion concerns obstacles to formulating an equation of state for nuclear matter at high temperature and density. Implications of this research for astrophysical problems is also presented. (LSP)

  13. Event by event fluctuations in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Volker

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the physics underlying event-by-event fluctuations in relativistic heavy ion collisions. We will argue that the fluctuations of the ratio of positively over negatively charged particles may serve as a unique signature for the Quark Gluon Plasma.

  14. Quantum microscopic approach to low-energy heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of nuclear reactions at low energy where quantum effects play a significant role is an important challenge of nuclear physics. The interplay between nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms is crucial at energiesQuantum microscopic approach to low-energy heavy ion collisions C´edric Simenel1,2, Aditya Wakhle2

  15. Resonance Absorption and Regeneration in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sascha Vogel; Marcus Bleicher

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The regeneration of hadronic resonances is discussed for heavy ion collisions at SPS and SIS-300 energies. The time evolutions of Delta, rho and phi resonances are investigated. Special emphasize is put on resonance regeneration after chemical freeze-out. The emission time spectra of experimentally detectable resonances are explored.

  16. Source dimensions in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1994-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments on pion correlations, interpreted as interferometric measurements of the collision zone, are compared with models that distinguish a prehadronic phase and a hadronic phase. The models include prehadronic longitudinal expansion, conversion to hadrons in local kinetic equilibrium, and rescattering of the produced hadrons. The longitudinal radius measured in collisions of 200 GeV/u sulfur nuclei on a heavy target require the existence of a prehadronic phase which converts to the hadronic phase at densities around 0.8 GeV/fm{sup 3}. The transverse radii cannot be reproduced without introducing more complex dynamics into the transverse expansion.

  17. Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Energy: Summaries of Program Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Kaganovich, I; Seidl, P A; Briggs, R J; Faltens, A; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Logan, B G

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is to apply high-current accelerator technology to IFE power production. Ion beams of mass {approx}100 amu and kinetic energy {>=} 1 GeV provide efficient energy coupling into matter, and HIF enjoys R&D-supported favorable attributes of: (1) the driver, projected to be robust and efficient; see 'Heavy Ion Accelerator Drivers.'; (2) the targets, which span a continuum from full direct to full indirect drive (and perhaps fast ignition), and have metal exteriors that enable injection at {approx}10 Hz; see 'IFE Target Designs'; (3) the near-classical ion energy deposition in the targets; see 'Beam-Plasma Interactions'; (4) the magnetic final lens, robust against damage; see 'Final Optics-Heavy Ion Beams'; and (5) the fusion chamber, which may use neutronically-thick liquids; see 'Liquid-Wall Chambers.' Most studies of HIF power plants have assumed indirect drive and thick liquid wall protection, but other options are possible.

  18. Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Water by High-Resolution Surface Plasmon Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Water by High-Resolution Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy voltammetry (ASV) capability has been demonstrated for detecting heavy metal ions in water. Metal ions in water from part-per-million to sub-part-per-billion levels with good linearity. Heavy metal poisoning

  19. The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Status and new physics directions for heavy-ion-driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratories First Point Scientific University of Maryland Tech-X University of Missouri FAR-Tech Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Advanced Magnet Laboratory Idaho National Environmental and Engineering scientific question fundamental to future applications of heavy ion beams to both high energy density physics

  20. Dynamical analysis on heavy-ion fusion reactions near Coulomb barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Feng-Shou Zhang

    2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The shell correction is proposed in the improved isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model, which plays an important role in heavy-ion fusion reactions near Coulomb barrier. By using the ImIQMD model, the static and dynamical fusion barriers, dynamical barrier distribution in the fusion reactions are analyzed systematically. The fusion and capture excitation functions for a series of reaction systems are calculated and compared with experimental data. It is found that the fusion cross sections for neutron-rich systems increase obviously, and the strong shell effects of two colliding nuclei result in a decrease of the fusion cross sections at the sub-barrier energies. The lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers favors the enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections, which is related to the nucleon transfer and the neck formation in the fusion reactions.

  1. Chemical properties of super-hadronic matter created in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt; Claudia Ratti; William Patrick McCormack

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary charge balance functions from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are compared to a model where quarks are produced in two waves. If a chemically equilibrated quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is created the strength and diffusive spread of the first wave should be governed by the chemical composition of the QGP, while the second wave should be determined by the increased number of quarks required to make the observed final-state hadrons. A simple model parameterizes the chemistry of the super-hadronic matter and the two correlation lengths for the two waves. Calculations are compared to preliminary data from the STAR Collaboration. The chemistry of the super-hadronic matter appears to be within 20\\% of expectations from lattice gauge theory.

  2. Validation of Heavy Ion Transport Capabilities in PHITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronningen, Reginald M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the Monte Carlo code system PHITS is validated for heavy ion transport capabilities by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data from heavy ion reactions of benchmark quality. These data are from measurements of secondary neutron production cross sections in reactions of Xe at 400 MeV/u with lithium and lead targets, measurements of neutrons outside of thick concrete and iron shields, and measurements of isotope yields produced in the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam on a beryllium target and on a tantalum target. A practical example that tests magnetic field capabilities is shown for a simulated 48Ca beam at 500 MeV/u striking a lithium target to produce the rare isotope 44Si, with ion transport through a fragmentation-reaction magnetic pre-separator. The results of this study show that PHITS performs reliably for the simulation of radiation fields that is necessary for designing safe, reliable and cost effective future high-powered heavy-ion accelerators in rare isotope beam facilities.

  3. Concepts for ELIC - A High Luminosity CEBAF Based Electron-Light Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ya. Derbenev, A. Bogacz, G. Krafft, R. Li, L. Merminga, B. Yunn, Y. Zhang

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CEBAF accelerator based electron-light ion collider (ELIC) of rest mass energy from 20 to 65 GeV and luminosity from 10^33 to 10^35 cm6-2s^-1 with both beams polarized is envisioned as a future upgrade to CEBAF. A two step upgrade scenario is under study: CEBAF accelerator-ring-ring scheme (CRR) as the first step, and a multi-turn ERL-ring as the second step, to attain a better electron emittance and maximum luminosity. In this paper we report results of our studies of the CRR version of ELIC.

  4. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  5. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  6. Kaon production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fuchs

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article reviews the physics related to kaon and antikaon production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies. Chiral dynamics predicts substantial modifications of the kaon properties in a dense nuclear environment. The status of the theoretical predictions as well as experimental evidences for medium effects such as repulsive/attractive mass shifts for $K^+/K^-$ are reviewed. In the vicinity of the thresholds, and even more pronounced below threshold, the production of strangeness is a highly collective process. Starting from elementary reaction channels the phenomenology of $K^+$ and $K^-$ production, i.e. freeze-out densities, time scales etc. as derived from experiment and theoretical transport calculations is presented. Below threshold kaon production shows a high sensitivity on the nuclear compression reached in heavy ion reactions. This allows to put constraints on the nuclear equation-of-state which are finally discussed.

  7. Temperature of projectile like fragments in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, S Das; Chaudhuri, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model in which a projectile like fragment can be simply regarded as a remnant after removal of some part of the projectile leads to an excited fragment. This excitation energy can be calculated with a Hamiltonian that gives correct nuclear matter binding, compressibility and density distribution in finite nuclei. In heavy ion collisions the model produces a dependence of excitation energy on impact parameter which appears to be correct but the magnitude of the excitation energy falls short. It is argued that dynamic effects left out in the model will increase this magnitude. The model can be directly extended to include dynamics but at the expense of increased computation. For many calculations for observables, a temperature is an easier tool to use rather than an excitation energy. Hence temperature dependences on impact parameter in heavy ion collisions are displayed.

  8. Temperature of projectile like fragments in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Das Gupta; S. Mallik; G. Chaudhuri

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A model in which a projectile like fragment can be simply regarded as a remnant after removal of some part of the projectile leads to an excited fragment. This excitation energy can be calculated with a Hamiltonian that gives correct nuclear matter binding, compressibility and density distribution in finite nuclei. In heavy ion collisions the model produces a dependence of excitation energy on impact parameter which appears to be correct but the magnitude of the excitation energy falls short. It is argued that dynamic effects left out in the model will increase this magnitude. The model can be directly extended to include dynamics but at the expense of increased computation. For many calculations for observables, a temperature is an easier tool to use rather than an excitation energy. Hence temperature dependences on impact parameter in heavy ion collisions are displayed.

  9. Charge Fluctuations as Thermometer for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Mathias

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a determination of freeze-out conditions in heavy-ion collisions based on ratios of cu- mulants of net electric charge fluctuations obtained from lattice QCD. These ratios can reliably be calculated for a wide range of chemical potential values by using a next-to-leading order Taylor series expansion around the limit of vanishing baryon, electric charge and strangeness chemical potentials. We first determine the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials that characterize the conditions in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We then show that a comparison of lattice QCD results for ratios of up to third order cumulants of electric charge fluctuations with experimental results allows us to extract the freeze-out baryon chemical potential and the freeze-out temperature. We apply our method to preliminary data of the STAR and PHENIX collaborations.

  10. Charge Fluctuations as Thermometer for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathias Wagner

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a determination of freeze-out conditions in heavy-ion collisions based on ratios of cu- mulants of net electric charge fluctuations obtained from lattice QCD. These ratios can reliably be calculated for a wide range of chemical potential values by using a next-to-leading order Taylor series expansion around the limit of vanishing baryon, electric charge and strangeness chemical potentials. We first determine the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials that characterize the conditions in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We then show that a comparison of lattice QCD results for ratios of up to third order cumulants of electric charge fluctuations with experimental results allows us to extract the freeze-out baryon chemical potential and the freeze-out temperature. We apply our method to preliminary data of the STAR and PHENIX collaborations.

  11. Femtoscopy in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions: Two Decades of Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mike Lisa; Scott Pratt; Ron Soltz; Urs Wiedemann

    2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of two-particle correlations have provided the chief means for determining spatio-temporal characteristics of relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss the theoretical formalism behind these studies and the experimental methods used in carrying them out. Recent results from RHIC are put into context in a systematic review of correlation measurements performed over the past two decades. The current understanding of these results is discussed in terms of model comparisons and overall trends.

  12. First Order Phase Transition in Intermediate Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pan; S. Das Gupta; M. Grant

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We model the disassembly of an excited nuclear system formed as a result of a heavy ion collision. We find that, as the beam energy in central collisions in varied, the dissociating system crosses a liquid-gas coexistence curve, resulting in a first-order phase transition. Accessible experimental signatures are identified: a peak in specific heat, a power-law yield for composites, and a maximum in the second moment of the yield distribution.

  13. Heavy ion induced failures in a power IGBT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorfevre, E.; Dachs, C.; Detcheverry, C.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J. [Univ. Montpellier II (France)] [Univ. Montpellier II (France); Roubaud, F. [Univ. des Antilles-Guyanne, Kourou (French Guiana)] [Univ. des Antilles-Guyanne, Kourou (French Guiana); Calvet, M.C. [Aerospatiale, Les Mureaux (France)] [Aerospatiale, Les Mureaux (France); Ecoffet, R. [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France)] [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power semiconductor devices are going through a rapid evolution. Modern components, such as Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT), have become widely accepted as well-suited devices for many power electronic applications. Here, heavy-ion induced destructive failures are reported in N-channel power IGBTs. For the first time, an experimental and 2D simulation investigation shows that latchup is involved in the triggering of the device.

  14. Aspects of heavy-ion collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolschin, G. [Institut für Theoretische Physik der Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of relativistic heavy-ion collisions are considered in this article: (1) Stopping and baryon transport in a QCD-based approach, (2) charged-hadron production in a nonequilibrium-statistical relativistic diffusion model (RDM), and (3) quarkonia suppression and in particular, ? suppression in PbPb at the current LHC energy of ?(s{sub NN})?=?2.76TeV.

  15. Production of bound {$?^{+}?^{-}$}-systems in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. F. Ginzburg; U. D. Jentschura; S. G. Karshenboim; F. Krauss; V. G. Serbo; G. Soff

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Dimuonium (the bound system of two muons, $\\mu^+\\mu^-$-atom) has not been observed yet. In this paper we discuss the electromagnetic production of dimuonium at RHIC and LHC in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The production of parastates is analyzed in the equivalent photon approximation. For the treatment of orthostates, we develop a three photon formalism. We determine the production rates at RHIC and LHC with an accuracy of a few percent and discuss problems related to the observation of dimuonium.

  16. Isotope analysis in central heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCL-EX Collaboration; :; E. Geraci; U. Abbondanno; L. Bardelli; S. Barlini; M. Bini; M. Bruno; F. Cannata; G. Casini; M. Chiari; M. D'Agostino; J. DeSanctis; A. Giussani; F. Gramegna; V. L. Kravchuk; A. L. Lanchais; P. Marini; A. Moroni; A. Nannini; A. Olmi; A. Ordine; G. Pasquali; S. Piantelli; G. Poggi; G. Vannini

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Symmetry energy is a key quantity in the study of the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Heavy ion collisions at low and intermediate energies, performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, can be used to extract information on the symmetry energy coefficient Csym, which is currently poorly known but relevant both for astrophysics and for structure of exotic nuclei.

  17. Hybrid approaches to heavy ion collisions and future perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marlene Nahrgang; Christoph Herold; Stefan Schramm; Marcus Bleicher

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the current status of hybrid approaches to describe heavy ion collisions and their future challenges and perspectives. First we present a hybrid model combining a Boltzmann transport model of hadronic degrees of freedom in the initial and final state with an optional hydrodynamic evolution during the dense and hot phase. Second, we present a recent extension of the hydrodynamical model to include fluctuations near the phase transition by coupling a chiral field to the hydrodynamic evolution.

  18. Damage profile and ion distribution of slow heavy ions in compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yanwen; Wang Chongmin; Zhu Zihua; Jiang Weilin; Weber, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Bae, I.-T. [Small Scale Systems Integration and Packaging Center, State University of New York at Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Sun Kai [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ishimaru, Manabu [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a significant concentration of defects and lattice disorder in solids during their slowing-down process via ion-solid interactions. For irradiation effects research and many industrial applications, atomic defect production, ion range, and doping concentration are commonly estimated by the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) code. In this study, ion-induced damage and projectile ranges of low energy Au ions in SiC are determined using complementary ion beam and microscopy techniques. Considerable errors in both disorder profile and ion range predicted by the SRIM code indicate an overestimation of the electronic stopping power, by a factor of 2 in most cases, in the energy region up to 25 keV/nucleon. Such large discrepancies are also observed for slow heavy ions, including Pt, Au, and Pb ions, in other compound materials, such as GaN, AlN, and SrTiO{sub 3}. Due to the importance of these materials for advanced device and nuclear applications, better electronic stopping cross section predictions, based on a reciprocity principle developed by Sigmund, is suggested with fitting parameters for possible improvement.

  19. Tests of an RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity for an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castilla Loeza, Alejandro [ODU, JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the scheme of developing a medium energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab, we have designed a compact superconducting rf dipole cavity at 750 MHz to crab both electron and ion bunches and increase luminosities at the interaction points (IP) of the machine. Following the design optimization and characterization of the electromagnetic properties such as peak surface fields and shunt impedance, along with field nonuniformities, multipole components content, higher order modes (HOM) and multipacting, a prototype cavity was built by Niowave Inc. The 750 MHz prototype crab cavity has been tested at 4 K and is ready for re-testing at 4 K and 2 K at Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the detailed results of the rf tests performed on the 750 MHz crab cavity prototype.

  20. Study of electromagnetic dissociation of heavy nuclei at the relativistic heavy ion collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makeev, Andrei

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Finally the ZDCs should be able to withstand a radiation dose of 10s rad. , which is the expected exposure during several years of RHIC operation. Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) is not a particularly radiation tolerant plastic. It is known to lose... material (PMMA plastic). In order to rnaxinuze effectiveness of light collection by fibers whole sandwich-like con- struction is tilted at 45 angle. The ZDCs are segmented longitudmally into the three modules, each 2 nuclear lengths thick...

  1. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  2. Heavy quark diffusion in pre-equilibrium stage of heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Santosh K; Mazumder, Surasree; Greco, Vincenzo; Alam, Jan-e

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of the heavy quarks have been evaluated in the pre-equilibrium phase which is expected to be formed in the early stages of the evolving fire ball produced in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. The interaction of the probe with the gluon in the pre-equilibrium phase has been treated within the framework of perturbative QCD. For the pre-equilibrium gluon distribution function we have used the KLN and Classical Yang Mills(CYM) models. It is observed that the magnitude of both the transport coefficients have significant values in the pre-equilibrium phase and comparable to the magnitudes obtained for kinetically equilibrated gluonic system. However, these values are larger than the value estimated for a chemically equilibrated quark gluon plasma. The results may have significant impact on the experimental observable like the suppression and elliptic flow of single electron spectra originating from the decays of heavy mesons produced in heavy ion collisions at RHIC a...

  3. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, David P. (St. Petersburg, FL); Browning, James F. (Palm Harbour, FL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  4. High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Albuquerque, New Mexico. ~Received 21 February 2005; Accepted 20 April 2005! Abstract High energy heavy ions to the fast ion emission process. The interest in laser plasmas and interaction phenomena of heavy ion beams!. Thus there is a tradition to investigate accelerator related issues like beam transport phenomena

  5. Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier - Understanding the glue that binds us all

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Accardi; J. L. Albacete; M. Anselmino; N. Armesto; E. C. Aschenauer; A. Bacchetta; D. Boer; W. K. Brooks; T. Burton; N. -B. Chang; W. -T. Deng; A. Deshpande; M. Diehl; A. Dumitru; R. Dupré; R. Ent; S. Fazio; H. Gao; V. Guzey; H. Hakobyan; Y. Hao; D. Hasch; R. Holt; T. Horn; M. Huang; A. Hutton; C. Hyde; J. Jalilian-Marian; S. Klein; B. Kopeliovich; Y. Kovchegov; K. Kumar; K. Kumeri?ki; M. A. C. Lamont; T. Lappi; J. -H. Lee; Y. Lee; E. M. Levin; F. -L. Lin; V. Litvinenko; T. W. Ludlam; C. Marquet; Z. -E. Meziani; R. McKeown; A. Metz; R. Milner; V. S. Morozov; A. H. Mueller; B. Müller; D. Müller; P. Nadel-Turonski; H. Paukkunen; A. Prokudin; V. Ptitsyn; X. Qian; J. -W. Qiu; M. Ramsey-Musolf; T. Roser; F. Sabatié; R. Sassot; G. Schnell; P. Schweitzer; E. Sichtermann; M. Stratmann; M. Strikman; M. Sullivan; S. Taneja; T. Toll; D. Trbojevic; T. Ullrich; R. Venugopalan; S. Vigdor; W. Vogelsang; C. Weiss; B. -W. Xiao; F. Yuan; Y. -H. Zhang; L. Zheng

    2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on "Gluons and quark sea at high energies" at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them, and it benefited from inputs from the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to propel the QCD science program in the U.S., established with the CEBAF accelerator at JLab and the RHIC collider at BNL, to the next QCD frontier.

  6. Antiflow of kaons in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, S.; Ko, Che Ming; Lin, ZW; Zhang, B.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 034902 ~1999!. @11# G.Q. Li and C.M. Ko, Phys. Rev. C 54, R2159 ~1996!; G. @29# G.E. Brown, C.B. Dover, P.B. Siegel, and W. Weise, Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2723 ~1988!. @30# S.A. Voloshin, Phys. Rev. C 55, R1630 ~1997!. @31# A.M. Poskanzer and S....A. Voloshin, Phys. Rev. C 58, 1671 RAPID COMMUNICATIONS ANTIFLOW OF KAONS IN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION . . . PHYSICAL REVIEW C 62 061903~R! Song, B.A. Li, and C.M. Ko, Nucl. Phys. A646, 481 ~1999!. @12# J.R. Ritman et al., FOPI Collaboration, Z. Phys. A 352...

  7. Phenomenology of Strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Torrieri

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an overview of the phenomenology of strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions, within the paradigm of the statistical model of particle production. We argue that, while strangeness enhancement data is suggestive of a phase transition, the mechanism triggering enhancement is still elusive. We study the feasibility to constrain this mechanism by determining the scaling variable of strangeness enhancement. We further argue that to test the applicability of the statistical model generally, and to confirm our interpretation of the statistical physics responsible for strangeness enhancement, the scaling of strange particle fluctuations ($K/\\pi$ and other particles) w.r.t. yields has to be explored.

  8. Stopping and Baryon Transport in Heavy Ion Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Videbaek

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report I will give an experimental overview on nuclear stopping in hadron collisions, and relate observations to understanding of baryon transport. Baryon number transport is not only evidenced via net-proton distributions but also by the enhancement of strange baryons near mid-rapidity. Although the focus is on high-energy data obtained from pp and heavy ions from RHIC, relevant data from SPS and ISR will be considered. A discussion how the available data at higher energy relates and gives information on baryon junction, quark-diquark breaking will be made.

  9. From Stopping to Viscosity in Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Brent W.; Danielewicz, Pawel [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Stopping in heavy ion collisions is investigated with the aim of learning about the shear viscosity of nuclear matter. Boltzmann equation simulations are compared to available data on stopping in the energy range of 20-117 MeV/nucleon. Stopping observables used include momentum anisotropy and linear momentum transfer. The data show that modeling the transport with free nucleon-nucleon cross-sections is inaccurate and reduced cross-sections are required. Reduction of the cross-sections produces an increase in the shear viscosity of nuclear matter, compared to calculations based on free cross-sections.

  10. Pion flow and antiflow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bao-An; Ko, Che Ming.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Pang, T. Schlagel, and S. Wang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4406 ~1995!. @6# B.A. Li and C.M. Ko, Phys. Rev. C 52, 2037 ~1995!. @7# P. Danielewicz and G. Odyniec, Phys. Lett. 157B, 146 ~1985!. FIG. 4. The transverse momentum dependence of the strength R... are ex- pected to be useful for detailed experimental studies of pion flow and antiflow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We would like to thank P. Danielewicz and G.Q. Li for helpful discussions. B.A.L. also acknowledges the kind hos- pitality...

  11. Thermophoretic Flow in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thoma, M H

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If a quark-gluon plasma is formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, there might be a mixed phase of quarks and gluons and hadronic clusters when the critical temperature is reached in the expansion of the fireball. If there is a temperature gradient in the fireball, the hadronic clusters, embedded in the heat bath of quarks and gluons, are subjected to a thermophoretic force. It is shown that even for small temperature gradients and short lifetimes of the mixed phase thermophoresis leads to a strong flow.

  12. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2DifferentThe FiveD. The LawThe The Heavy Ion

  13. Recent Progress on Design Studies of High-Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Bruell, A; Chevtsov, P; Derbenev, Y S; Ent, R; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Merminga, L

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of a ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF has been continuously optimized to cover a wide center-of-mass energy region and to achieve high luminosity and polarization to support next generation nuclear science programs. Here, we summarize the recent design improvements and R&D progress on interaction region optics with chromatic aberration compensation, matching and tracking of electron polarization in the Figure-8 ring, beam-beam simulations and ion beam cooling studies.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric heavy-ion induced Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collisions up to beam energies per nucleon of 2 Ge... of heavy ion reactions in terms of transport equations ... Source: Bauer, Wolfgang - Department of Physics and Astronomy,...

  15. Uniformity of fuel target implosion in Heavy Ion Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, S; Suzuki, T; Karino, T; Barada, D; Ogoyski, A I; Ma, Y Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In inertial confinement fusion the target implosion non-uniformity is introduced by a driver beams' illumination non-uniformity, a fuel target alignment error in a fusion reactor, the target fabrication defect, et al. For a steady operation of a fusion power plant the target implosion should be robust against the implosion non-uniformities. In this paper the requirement for the implosion uniformity is first discussed. The implosion uniformity should be less than a few percent. A study on the fuel hotspot dynamics is also presented and shows that the stagnating plasma fluid provides a significant enhancement of vorticity at the final stage of the fuel stagnation. Then non-uniformity mitigation mechanisms of the heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination are also briefly discussed in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). A density valley appears in the energy absorber, and the large-scale density valley also works as a radiation energy confinement layer, which contributes to a radiation energy smoothing. In HIF a wobbling he...

  16. Pulsed, Inductively Generated, Streaming Plasma Ion Source for Heavy Ion Fusion Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven C. Glidden; Howard D Sanders; John B. Greenly; Daniel L. Dongwoo

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a compact, high current density, pulsed ion source, based on electrodeless, inductively driven gas breakdown, developed to meet the requirements on normalized emittance, current density, uniformity and pulse duration for an ion injector in a heavy-ion fusion driver. The plasma source produces >10 ?s pulse of Argon plasma with ion current densities >100 mA/cm2 at 30 cm from the source and with strongly axially directed ion energy of about 80 eV, and sub-eV transverse temperature. The source has good reproducibility and spatial uniformity. Control of the current density during the pulse has been demonstrated with a novel modulator coil method which allows attenuation of the ion current density without significantly affecting the beam quality. This project was carried out in two phases. Phase 1 used source configurations adapted from light ion sources to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. In Phase 2 the performance of the source was enhanced and quantified in greater detail, a modulator for controlling the pulse shape was developed, and experiments were conducted with the ions accelerated to >40 kV.

  17. SYSTEMATIC STUDIES OF HEAVY ION COLLISIONS TO SEARCH FOR QUARK-GLUON PLASMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuqiang Wang

    2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator (OJI) Award, 'Systematic Studies of Heavy Ion Collisions to Search for Quark-Gluon Plasma', grant DE-FG02-02ER41219, Principal Investigator (PI) Fuqiang Wang. The research under the grant was divided into two phases. The first concentrated on systematic studies of soft hadron production at low transverse momentum (p{sub T}), in particular the production of (anti-)baryon and strangeness in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. The second concentrated on measurements of di-hadron and multi-hadron jet-correlations and investigations of medium response to jets. The research was conducted at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL with the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment. The total grant is $214,000. The grant established a PC farm solely used for this research. The PC farm consists of 8 nodes with a total of 16 CPUs and 3 disk servers of total 2 TB shared storage. The current balance of the grant is $19,985. The positive balance is because an initial purchase of $22,600 for the PC farm came out of the PI's start-up fund due to the lateness of the award. The PC farm is an integral part of the Purdue Physics Department's computer cluster. The grant supported two Ph.D. graduate students. Levente Molnar was supported from July 2002 to December 2003, and worked on soft hadron production. His thesis title is Systematics of Identified Particle Production in pp, d-Au and Au-Au Collisions at RHIC Energies. He graduated in 2006 and now is a Postdoctoral fellow at INFN Sezione di Bari, Italy working on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. Jason Ulery was supported from January 2004 to July 2007. His thesis title is Two- and Three-Particle Jet-Like Correlations. He defended his thesis in October 2007 and is moving to Frankfurt University, Germany to work on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The research by this grant resulted in 7 journal publications (2 PRL, 1 PLB, 1 PRC, 2 submitted and 1 in preparation), and 14 invited talks and 10 contributed talks at major conferences. These are listed at end of this report.

  18. Novel synthetic phytochelatin-based capacitive biosensor for heavy metal ion detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    to increasing levels of diverse pollutants. Heavy metals represent some of the most toxic ones not only to pollution by heavy metals, and is trying to remediate, control and minimize such pollution as muchNovel synthetic phytochelatin-based capacitive biosensor for heavy metal ion detection Ibolya

  19. Energy loss of relativistic heavy ions in matter B.A. Weaver*, A.J. Westphal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Pui-Tak "Peter"

    Energy loss of relativistic heavy ions in matter B.A. Weaver*, A.J. Westphal Space Sciences.50.Bw Keywords: Energy loss; Stopping power; Heavy ions 1. Introduction The theory of energy loss has.: + 1-510-642-9733; fax: + 1- 510-643-7629. E-mail address: weaver@curium.ssl.berkeley.edu (B.A. Weaver

  20. Formation of Superdense Hadronic Matter in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba0-An; Ko, Che Ming.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the detail of a newly developed relativistic transport model (ART 1.0) for high energy heavy-ion collisions. Using this model, we first study the general collision dynamics between heavy ions at the AGS energies. We then show...

  1. Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser18, deliver an intense uranium beam that deposit about 1 kJ0g specific energy in solid matter. Using 2004! Abstract Intense heavy ion beams from the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung ~GSI, Darmstadt

  2. Short Communication Kinetics and thermodynamics of heavy metal ions sequestration onto novel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Jian Ru

    biomasses had been chosen and utilized by researchers to sequester toxic heavy metal ions from industrialShort Communication Kinetics and thermodynamics of heavy metal ions sequestration onto novel is generally considered as the most toxic metal in natural ecosystems (Clarkson, 1993). Over the years, various

  3. Two particle correlation effects and Differential HBT for rotation in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csernai, L P; Wang, D J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peripheral heavy ion reactions at ultra relativistic energies have large angular momentum that can be studied via two particle correlations using the Differential Hanbury Brown and Twiss method. We analyze the possibilities and sensitivity of the method in a rotating system. We also study an expanding solution of the fluid dynamical model of heavy ion reactions.

  4. Determining the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy using heavy-ion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li; Gao-Chan Yong

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent progress in the determination of the subsaturation density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy from heavy-ion collisions as well as the theoretical progress in probing the high density behavior of the symmetry energy in heavy-ion reactions induced by high energy radioactive beams. We further discuss the implications of these results for the nuclear effective interactions and the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei.

  5. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R., Jr.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Sun,22 Y. Sun,38 Z. Sun,21 B. Surrow,23 T. J. M. Symons,22 A. Szanto de Toledo,37 J. Takahashi,7 A. H. Tang,3 Z. Tang,38 T. Tarnowsky,33 D. Thein,42 J. H. Thomas,22 J. Tian,39 A. R. Timmins,2 S. Timoshenko,26 Tlusty ,11 M. Tokarev,12 T. A. Trainor,48...

  6. Pion and photon production in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. David

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of neutral pions and direct photons are closely connected experimentally, on the other hand they probe quite different aspects of relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this short review of the $\\pi^0$ results from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC our focus is on the $\\phi$-integrated nuclear modification factor, its energy and system size dependence, and the impact of these results on parton energy loss models. We also discuss the current status of high $p_T$ and thermal direct photon measurements both in $p$ + $p$ and Au+Au collisions. Recognizing the advantages of measuring not only the "signal", but also all the "references" needed for proper interpretation in the same experiments (with same or similar systematics) we argue that RHIC should regularly include $d$ + A and even $d$ + $d$ collisions into its system size and energy scan.

  7. Consequences of energy conservation in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete characterization of particle production and emission in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is in general not feasible experimentally. This work demonstrates, however, that the availability of essentially complete pseudorapidity distributions for charged particles allows for a reliable estimate of the average transverse momenta and energy of emitted particles by requiring energy conservation in the process. The results of such an analysis for Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}= 130 and 200 GeV are compared with measurements of mean-p_T and mean-E_T in regions where such measurements are available. The mean-p_T dependence on pseudorapidity for Au+Au collisions at 130 and 200 GeV is given for different collision centralities.

  8. Net-proton probability distribution in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Braun-Munzinger; B. Friman; F. Karsch; K. Redlich; V. Skokov

    2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute net-proton probability distributions in heavy ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas model. The model results are compared with data taken by the STAR Collaboration in Au-Au collisions at sqrt(s_{NN})= 200 GeV for different centralities. We show that in peripheral Au-Au collisions the measured distributions, and the resulting first four moments of net-proton fluctuations, are consistent with results obtained from the hadron resonance gas model. However, data taken in central Au-Au collisions differ from the predictions of the model. The observed deviations can not be attributed to uncertainties in model parameters. We discuss possible interpretations of the observed deviations.

  9. Blast of light fragments from central heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielewicz, P.; Pan, Q. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of collective expansion on light-fragment emission from central heavy-ion collisions are studied by carrying out calculations in a transport model with dynamic production of {ital A}{le}3 fragments. Beam energies of few hundred MeV/nucleon are considered. In the simulations the formation of a region of dense excited nuclear matter is observed, which expands in transverse directions. The expansion is reflected in the angular distributions and in the mean transverse energies of emitted fragments. At the late stage of expansion the characteristic features of local thermodynamic equilibrium are identified. Different particles share nearly the same collective energy per nucleon, and nearly the same thermal energy. The calculated mean transverse energies of the fragments reflect the collective energy whose magnitude varies with impact parameter. However, the fragment energies only partially agree with available data. The calculated spectra exhibit different slopes at angles around c.m. 90{degree} in central reactions.

  10. Isotropization from Color Field Condensate in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Floerchinger; Christof Wetterich

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The expanding fireball shortly after a heavy ion collision may be qualitatively described by a condensate of color fields or gluons which is analogous to Bose-Einstein-condensation for massive bosonic particles. This condensate is a transient non-equilibrium phenomenon and breaks Lorentz-boost symmetry. The dynamics of color field condensates involves collective excitations and is rather different from the perturbative scattering of gluons. In particular, it provides for an efficient mechanism to render the local pressure approximately isotropic after a short time of 0.2 fm/c. We suggest that an isotropic color field condensate may play a central role for a simple description of prethermalization and isotropization in the early stages of the collision.

  11. Multi Module Modeling of Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magas, V. K.; Csernai, L. P. (László P.); Keranen, A.; Manninen, J.; Strottman, D. D. (Daniel D.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi Module Model is required for the realistic and detailed description of an ultrarelativistic heavy ion reaction. We are working in the framework of such a model: initial stages are described by Effective String Rope Model with expanding final streaks; hydrodynamical approach is used for the intermediate stages. This paper is mainly devoted to Third Module - the one dealing with Freeze Out (FO). Two possibilities are discussed in details: (A) freeze out at the constant time hypersurface, where the statistical production model is used to describe post FO particle species; and (B) simultaneous hadronization and freeze out from supercooled QGP. For the last case the ALCOR-like algorithm for calculation of the post FO particle species is presented, due to the fact that these do not have time to reach chemical equilibrium.

  12. Practical Materials for Heavy Metal Ion Chelation: PolyethylenimPractical Materials for Heavy Metal Ion Chelation: Polyethyleniminesines tailored onto The Surface oftailored onto The Surface of Porous SilicaPorous Silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taralp, Alpay

    Practical Materials for Heavy Metal Ion Chelation: PolyethylenimPractical Materials for Heavy Metal *presenting author INTRODUCTION As a result of heavy metal ion release from industrial wastewater, water pollution has become a serious problem. Waste streams contain solutions of metal ions, such as copper

  13. Design study of a DPIS injector for a heavy ion FFAG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamura,M.; Raparia, D.; Ishibashi, K.; Yonemura, Y.; Kanesue, T.

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new heavy ion injector linac is proposed for providing heavy ion beams to a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator in Kyushu University. A combination of the new intense laser source based injector and the FFAG will be able to accelerate high current ion beams with 100 Hz of a repetition rate. The planned average current reaches 7 {micro}A with carbon 6+ beam.

  14. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion: Summary Report of the Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidl, P.A.; Barnard, J.J.

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 23-26, 2011. The workshop began with plenary sessions to review the state of the art in HIF (heavy ion fusion), followed by parallel working groups, and concluded with a plenary session to review the results. There were five working groups: IFE (inertial fusion energy) targets, RF approach to HIF, induction accelerator approach to HIF, chamber and driver interface, ion sources and injectors.

  15. Atomic nuclei decay modes by spontaneous emission of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M.; Sndulescu, A.; Greiner, W.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The great majority of the known nuclides with Z>40, including the so-called stable nuclides, are metastable with respect to several modes of spontaneous superasymmetric splitting. A model extended from the fission theory of alpha decay allows one to estimate the lifetimes and the branching ratios relative to the alpha decay for these natural radioactivities. From a huge amount of systematic calculations it is concluded that the process should proceed with maximum intensity in the trans-lead nuclei, where the minimum lifetime is obtained from parent-emitted heavy ion combinations leading to a magic (/sup 208/Pb) or almost magic daughter nucleus. More than 140 nuclides with atomic number smaller than 25 are possible candidates to be emitted from heavy nuclei, with half-lives in the range of 10/sup 10/--10/sup 30/ s: /sup 5/He, /sup 8en-dash10/Be, /sup 11,12/B, /sup 12en-dash16/C, /sup 13en-dash17/N, /sup 15en-dash22/O, /sup 18en-dash23/F, /sup 20en-dash26/Ne, /sup 23en-dash28/Na, /sup 23en-dash30/Mg, /sup 27en-dash32/Al, /sup 28en-dash36/Si, /sup 31en-dash39/P, /sup 32en-dash42/S, /sup 35en-dash45/Cl, /sup 37en-dash47/Ar, /sup 40en-dash49/ K, . .Ca, /sup 44en-dash53/ Sc, /sup 46en-dash53/Ti, /sup 48en-dash54/V, and /sup 49en-dash55/ Cr. The shell structure and the pairing effects are clearly manifested in these new decay modes.

  16. J/psi production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from a multiphase transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW; Pal, S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the present study is a hybrid model based on three Monte Carlo models for the three stages of relativistic heavy ion collisions, i.e., the heavy ion jet interaction generator J?c production in relativistic heavy ion collision Bin Zhang,1 C.M. Ko,2 Bao...V. With this dynamic transport model, we find that the net number of produced J/c from the parton and hadron phases is smaller than that expected from initial nucleon-nucleon collisions, contrary to the J/c en- ?2002 The American Physical Society1 ZHANG, KO, LI...

  17. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

  18. Observing non-Gaussian sources in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D. A.; Danielewicz, P.

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the possibility of extracting non-Gaussian sources from two-particle correlations in heavy-ion reactions. Non-Gaussian sources have been predicted in a variety of model calculations and may have been seen in various like-meson pair correlations. As a tool for this investigation, we have developed an improved imaging method that relies on a basis spline expansion of the source functions with an improved implementation of constraints. We examine under what conditions this improved method can distinguish between Gaussian and non-Gaussian sources. Finally, we investigate pion, kaon, and proton sources from the p-Pb reaction at 450 GeV/nucleon and from the S-Pb reaction at 200 GeV/nucleon studied by the NA44 experiment. Both the pion and kaon sources from the S-Pb correlations seem to exhibit a Gaussian core with an extended, non-Gaussian halo. We also find evidence for a scaling of the source widths with particle mass in the sources from the p-Pb reaction.

  19. Fifth high-energy heavy-ion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was the fifth of a continuing series of summer studies held at LBL to discuss high energy heavy ion collisions. Recently, a similar meeting has been held on alternate years at GSI (Darmstadt); and, in 1979, we held a meeting at LBL exclusively devoted to ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Two new features distinguish this study from earlier meetings in the series. First, the energy range for discussion was broadened by including collisions from about 20 MeV/nucleon to the highest available in the cosmic radiation. The lower range, particularly below 100 MeV/nucleon, will be under intense study in the near future with machines such as the upgraded Bevalac, Michigan State University Superconducting Cyclotron, GANIL in France, and the SC at CERN. Recently, the high energy collision regime has been expanded by the successful operation of the CERN ISR with alpha particles. Second, in addition to an extensive program of invited talks, we decided for the first time to actively solicit contributions. Forty-seven individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  20. A power-law description of heavy ion collision centrality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas A. Trainor; Duncan J. Prindle

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum-bias distribution on heavy ion collision multiplicity $n_{ch}$ is well approximated by power-law form $n_{ch}^{-3/4}$, suggesting that a change of variable to $n_{ch}^{1/4}$ may provide more precise access to the structure of the distribution and to A-A collision centrality. We present a detailed centrality study of Hijing-1.37 Monte Carlo data at 200 GeV using the power-law format. We find that the minimum-bias distribution on $n_{participant}^{1/4}$, determined with a Glauber Monte Carlo simulation, is uniform except for a 5% sinusoidal variation. The power-law format reveals precise linear relations between Glauber parameters $n_{part}$ and $n_{bin}$ and the fractional cross section. The power-law format applied to RHIC data facilitates incorporation of extrapolation constraints on data and Glauber distributions to obtain a ten-fold improvement in centrality accuracy for peripheral collisions.

  1. Baryon Annihilation and Regeneration in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yinghua Pan; Scott Pratt

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of baryon-antibaryon annihilation during the hadronic stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision is explored by simulating the chemical evolution of a hadron gas. Beginning with a chemically equilibrated gas at an initial temperature of 170 MeV, the chemical composition of a representative hydrodynamic cell is followed throughout the hadronic stage. The cell's volume changes with time according to a parameterization that mimics a three-dimensional hydrodynamic expansion. The chemical evolution includes both annihilation and regeneration of baryons, consistent with detailed balance. During the hadronic stage, the number of baryons drops by approximately $40\\%$ for the case where there is no net baryonic charge. When the calculations are performed without the baryon regenerating processes, e.g. $5\\pi\\rightarrow p\\bar{p}$, the loss of baryons was found to be closer to $50\\%$. After accounting for annihilation, yields are consistent with measurements from the ALICE Collaboration at the LHC. Baryon annihilation is shown to alter the extracted chemical breakup temperature by significantly changing the $p/\\pi$ ratio. Assuming that annihilation cross sections are independent of the strangeness and isospin of the annihilating baryon and anti-baryon, the loss of strange baryons from annihilation is found to be similar.

  2. A lower cost development path for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Meier, W.R. [Shafer (W.J.) Associates, Inc., Wakefield, MA (United States)

    1993-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    If two features of the inertial fusion process are exploited successfully, they can lead to significantly lower costs for demonstrating the feasibility of commercial electric power production from this source of energy. First, fusion capsule ignition and burn physics is independent of reaction chamber size and hydrodynamically-equivalent capsules can be designed to perform at small yield, exactly as they do at large yield. This means that an integrated test of all power plant components and feasibility tests of various reaction chamber concepts can be done at much smaller sizes (about 1--2 m first wall radius) and much lower powers (tens of MWs) than magnetic fusion development facilities such as ITER. Second, the driver, which is the most expensive component of currently conceived IFE development facilities, can be used to support more than one experiment target chamber/reactor (simultaneously and/or sequentially). These two factors lead to lower development facility costs, modular facilities, and the planning flexibility to spread costs over time or do several things in parallel and thus shorten the total time needed for development of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). In this paper the authors describe the general feature of a heavy ion fusion development plan that takes advantage of upgradable accelerators and the ability to test chambers and reactor systems at small scale in order to reduce development time and costs.

  3. asymmetric heavy-ion collisions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    generation of jet reconstruction algorithms which are also applicable in the heavy ion environment. We review the latest results on jet-medium interactions as seen in A+A...

  4. Kaon dispersion relation and flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of a relativistic transport model (ART) for heavy-ion collisions at AGS energies, we examine the effects of a kaon dispersion relation on the transverse flow of kaons and their transverse momentum and azimuthal angle...

  5. J/psi production and elliptic flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Taesoo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Xu, Jun.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upsilon(2) of J/psi in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. For the expansion dynamics of produced hot, dense matter, we introduce a schematic fireball model with its transverse acceleration determined from the pressure gradient inside the fireball...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne superconducting heavy-ion Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the GDR has been used... nuclei at rather low excitation energy and finite spin is to use cold fusion in symmetric heavy-ion re... -Battelle, LLC under con- tract DE-AC05-00OR22725...

  7. Anomalous positrons from heavy ion collisions: Past results and future plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betts, R.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current status of the experimental study of anomalous lines observed in the spectra of positrons produced in heavy ion collisions is reviewed. A new experiment to measure positron-electron coincidences is discussed. 26 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M J of fusion yield. This NIF capsule design ab- sorbs 200capsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy-ion beams (designs emerge, and, if the NIF's ignition campaign is also

  9. Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B. Grant

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fusion yield [16]. This NIF capsule design absorbs 200 kJcapsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy ion beams (designs emerge, and, i f the NIF's ignition campaign is also

  10. Generation, transport and focusing of high-brightness heavy ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, Enrique

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) has been built at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory. NTX is the first successful integrated beam system experiment that explores various physical phenomena, and ...

  11. Studies of high transverse momentum phenomena in heavy ion collisions using the PHOBOS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenger, Edward (Edward Allen)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of high-pT particles as calibrated probes has proven to be an effective tool for understanding the properties of the system produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this thesis, two such measurements are ...

  12. Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dash, Monika

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

  13. Constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy from heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, M B; Coupland, D; Danielewicz, P; Famiano, F; Hodges, R; Kilburn, M; Lu, F; Lynch, W G; Winkelbauer, J; Youngs, M; Zhang, YingXun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints on the Equation of State for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions over a range of energies. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities from isospin diffusions and neutron proton ratios. This article reviews the experimental constraints on the density dependence of Symmetry Energy at sub-saturation density.

  14. Constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy from heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Tsang; Z. Chajecki; D. Coupland; P. Danielewicz; F. Famiano; R. Hodges; M. Kilburn; F. Lu; W. G. Lynch; J. Winkelbauer; M. Youngs; YingXun Zhang

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints on the Equation of State for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions over a range of energies. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities from isospin diffusions and neutron proton ratios. This article reviews the experimental constraints on the density dependence of Symmetry Energy at sub-saturation density.

  15. Isospin relaxation time in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an isospin-dependent transport model, we have studied the isospin and momentum relaxation times in the heavy residues formed in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. It is found that only at incident energies below the Fermi energy...

  16. Recent results from the UrQMD hybrid model for heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleicher, Marcus; Steinheimer, Jan; van Hees, Hendrik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings present recent results from transport-hydrodynamics-hybrid models for heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies. The main focus is on the absorption of (anti-)protons in the hadronic afterburner stage of the reaction, di-lepton production at SPS and heavy quark dynamics.

  17. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, and in p + p and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) {phi} meson transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra in central Au + Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the p{sub T} spectra from p + p, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high p{sub T} and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant {phi}/K{sup -} yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {Omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T} {approx} 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au + Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

  18. Systematics of cross sections for target K-vacancy production in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Yong

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross sections for K-shell ionization by heavy ions have been determined from the measurements of target K x-ray yields. The measurements were performed with Ar, Kr, and Xe ions at energies from 2.5 to 25 MeV/amu and self-supported metallic foil...

  19. THE HOLIFIELD HEAVY-ION RESEARCH FACILITY AT OAK RIDGE C. M. JONES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1353 THE HOLIFIELD HEAVY-ION RESEARCH FACILITY AT OAK RIDGE C. M. JONES Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, U.S.A. Résumé. 2014 Un nouveau laboratoire de recherche sur les ions lourds est actuellement en construction au Laboratoire National d'Oak Ridge. Cet exposé présente une

  20. Heavy flavours in heavy-ion collisions: quenching, flow and correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Beraudo; A. De Pace; M. Monteno; M. Nardi; F. Prino

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the quenching, elliptic flow and azimuthal correlations of heavy flavour particles in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions obtained through the POWLANG transport setup, developed in the past to study the propagation of heavy quarks in the Quark-Gluon Plasma and here extended to include a modeling of their hadronization in the presence of a medium. Hadronization is described as occurring via the fragmentation of strings with endpoints given by the heavy (anti-)quark Q(Qbar) and a thermal parton qbar(q) from the medium. The flow of the light quarks is shown to affect significantly the R_AA and v_2 of the final D mesons, leading to a better agreement with the experimental data. The approach allows also predictions for the angular correlation between heavy-flavour hadrons (or their decay electrons) and the charged particles produced in the fragmentation of the heavy-quark strings.

  1. Intercombination and forbidden transition rates in C-and N-like ions ,,O2 measured at a heavy-ion storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chantler, Christopher T.

    ¿ ... measured at a heavy-ion storage ring E. Tra¨bert,1, * A. G. Calamai,2 J. D. Gillaspy,3 G. Gwinner,4 X-dipole forbidden transitions between the levels of the ground complex in C-like ions of O and F and in N-like ions of S have been measured optically at a heavy-ion storage ring. The lifetime results, 1.250 13 ms for the 2s2

  2. Heating of Heavy Ions by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) Driven Collisionless Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. E. Korreck; T. H. Zurbuchen; S. T. Lepri; J. M . Raines

    2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Shock heating and particle acceleration processes are some of the most fundamental physical phenomena of plasma physics with countless applications in laboratory physics, space physics, and astrophysics. This study is motivated by previous observations of non-thermal heating of heavy ions in astrophysical shocks (Korreck et al. 2004). Here, we focus on shocks driven by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) which heat the solar wind and accelerate particles. This study focuses specifically on the heating of heavy ions caused by these shocks. Previous studies have focused only on the two dynamically dominant species, H+ and He2+ . This study utilizes thermal properties measured by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft to examine heavy ion heating. This instrument provides data for many heavy ions not previously available for detailed study, such as Oxygen (O6+, O7+), Carbon (C5+, C6+), and Iron (Fe10+). The ion heating is found to depend critically on the upstream plasma

  3. Heavy ion Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (HIRBS) for the near surface characterization of electronic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K.M.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of heavy ion projectiles for Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) provides several potential advantages over conventional RBS with /sup 4/He beams. Among these advantages are the improved mass resolution for heavy elements (>50 amu) and the increased accessible depth of analysis. A series of experiments using 20-MeV /sup 16/O beam backscattered from a variety of targets was performed in order to examine the potential advantages of heavy ion RBS in the near-surface characterization of semiconductors with masses >50 amu. Important questions such as mass resolution, depth resolution, isotopic effects, absolute sensitivity and minimum detectable limit of impurities were investigated. Ion implantations and multiple layered structures on GaAs substrates as well as metal germanide systems were studied. The development of the method in conjunction with the channeling technique is also discussed.

  4. On the accuracy of using Fokker Planck equation in heavy ion collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Nirupam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of Fokker-Planck equation to heavy quark transport in the evolving medium created in heavy ion collision is critically scrutinised. We realise that the approach introduces a moderate uncertainty in drag and diffusion coefficients culminating in huge ambiguity in the theoretical prediction of nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$. Quantitative estimation of the error is presented by considering recent developments in this field.

  5. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic HeavyIon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au + Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub {perpendicular}}.

  6. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman, 1960Real Property Management IntegratedReference

  7. K+ Production in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experimental data on K+ production at 2.1 GeV/nucleon are not explained by either the cascade model or the fireball model. Here we introduce a hybrid model in which the total kaon yield is given by individual nucleon- nucleon collisions but its momentum.... Various suggestions have been proposed for un- derstanding the experimental data. Schnetzer et pl. 4 suggest that high energy pions (with energy above =700 MeV) produced in the collision may collide with nucleons to produce K' with large mo- mentum...

  8. Fabrication of nanopores in a graphene sheet with heavy ions: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Weisen; Liang, Li; Zhang, Shuo [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, Shijun [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic China (China)] [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic China (China); Xue, Jianming [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic China (China)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the formation process of nanopores in a suspended graphene sheet irradiated by using energetic ions though a mask. By controlling the ion parameters including mass, energy, and incident angle, different kinds of topography were observed in the graphene sheet. Net-like defective structures with carbon atom chains can be formed at low ion fluences, which provide the possibility to functionalize the irradiated sample with subsequent chemical methods; finally a perfect nanopore with smooth edge appears when the ion fluence is high enough. We found that the dependence of ion damage efficiency on ion fluence, energy, and incident angle are different from that predicted by the semi-empirical model based on the binary-collision approximation, which results from the special structure of graphene. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to fabricate controlled nanopores/nanostructures in graphene via heavy ion irradiation.

  9. Dispersion relation approach to sub-barrier heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzin, V.L.M.; Hussein, M.S.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the conditions under which the dispersion relation technique, extensively employed in the context of elastic scattering, can be used in the analysis of heavy-ion fusion reactions. General unitarity defect arguments are used for this purpose. With the aid of an inverse dispersion relation, which gives the imaginary part of the fusion inclusive polarization potential in terms of the principal part integral involving the real part of the inclusive polarization potential, the sub-barrier fusion of heavy ions is discussed. The system /sup 16/O+/sup A/Sm is taken as an example.

  10. Selected Topics in the Physics of Heavy Ion Collisions (1/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In these lectures, I discuss some classes of measurements accessible in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. How can these observables be measured, to what extent can they be calculated, and what do they tell us about the dense mesoscopic system created during the collision? In the first lecture, I shall focus in particular on measurements that constrain the spatio-temporal picture of the collisions and that measure centrality, orientations and extensions. In the subsequent lectures, I then discuss on how classes of measurements allow one to characterize collective phenomena, and to what extent these measurements can constrain the properties of matter produced in heavy ion collisions.

  11. Lattice QCD and Hydro/Cascade Model of Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Cheng

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here on a recent lattice study of the QCD transition region at finite temperature and zero chemical potential using domain wall fermions (DWF). We also present a parameterization of the QCD equation of state obtained from lattice QCD that is suitable for use in hydrodynamics studies of heavy ion collisions. Finally, we show preliminary results from a multi-stage hydrodynamics/hadron cascade model of a heavy ion collision, in an attempt to understand how well the experimental data (e.g. particle spectra, elliptic flow, and HBT radii) can constrain the inputs (e.g. initial temperature, freezeout temperature, shear viscosity, equation of state) of the theoretical model.

  12. Evaluation of excitation energy and spin from light charged particles multiplicities in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckmeyer, J C; Grotowski, K; Pawowski, P; Aiello, S; Anzalone, A; Bini, M; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Cardella, G; Casini, G; Cavallaro, S; Charvet, J L; Dayras, R; De Filippo, E; Durand, D; Femin, S; Frankland, J D; Galíchet, E; Geraci, M; Giustolisi, F; Guazzoni, P; Iacono-Manno, M; Lanzalone, G; Lanzan, G; Le Neindre, N; Lo Nigro, S; Lo Piano, F; Olmi, A; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Pârlog, M; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Rivet, M F; Rizzo, F; Rosato, E; Roy, R; Sambataro, S; Sperduto, M L; Stefanini, A A; Sutera, C; Tamain, B; Vient, E; Volant, C; Wieleczko, J P; Zetta, L

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple procedure for evaluating the excitation energy and the spin transfer in heavy-ion dissipative collisions is proposed. It is based on a prediction of the GEMINI evaporation code : for a nucleus with a given excitation energy, the average number of emitted protons decreases with increasing spin, whereas the average number of alpha particles increases. Using that procedure for the reaction 107Ag+58Ni at 52 MeV/nucleon, the excitation energy and spin of quasi-projectiles have been evaluated. The results obtained in this way have been compared with the predictions of a model describing the primary dynamic stage of heavy-ion collisions.

  13. The beam energy dependence of collective flow in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Hannah; Auvinen, Jussi; Bleicher, Marcus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goals of heavy ion research are to explore the phase diagram of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and to investigate the properties of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter created at high temperatures and/or densities. Collective anisotropic flow is one of the most promising observables to gain insights about the properties of the system created in relativistic heavy ion reactions. The current status of the beam energy dependence of the first three Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distribution of the produced particles $v_1$ to $v_3$ within hybrid transport plus hydrodynamics approaches are summarized.

  14. The beam energy dependence of collective flow in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannah Petersen; Jan Steinheimer; Jussi Auvinen; Marcus Bleicher

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goals of heavy ion research are to explore the phase diagram of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and to investigate the properties of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter created at high temperatures and/or densities. Collective anisotropic flow is one of the most promising observables to gain insights about the properties of the system created in relativistic heavy ion reactions. The current status of the beam energy dependence of the first three Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distribution of the produced particles $v_1$ to $v_3$ within hybrid transport plus hydrodynamics approaches are summarized.

  15. Central collisions of heavy ions. Progress report, October 1, 1990--September 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Sun-yiu

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. During this period, our program focuses on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus central collisions. We participated in the preparation of letters of intent for two RHIC experiments -- the OASIS proposal and the Di-Muon proposal -- and worked on two RHIC R&D efforts -- a silicon strip detector project and a muon-identifier project. A small fraction of time was also devoted to physics programs outside the realm of heavy ion reactions by several individuals.

  16. From fusion to total disassembly: global stopping in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jatinder K. Dhawan; Narinder Dhiman; Aman D. Sood; Rajeev K. Puri

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the quantum molecular dynamics model, we aim to investigate the emis- sion of light complex particles, and degree of stopping reached in heavy-ion colli- sions. We took incident energies between 50 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. In addition, central and peripheral collisions and different masses are also considered. We ob- serve that the light complex particles act in almost similar manner as anisotropic ratio. In other words, multiplicity of light complex particles is an indicator of global stopping in heavy-ion collisions. We see that maximum light complex particles and stopping is obtained for heavier masses in central collisions.

  17. Estimation of Heavy Ion Densities From Linearly Polarized EMIC Waves At Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Linearly polarized EMIC waves are expected to concentrate at the location where their wave frequency satisfies the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance condition as the result of a mode conversion process. In this letter, we evaluate absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance in the Earth geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of helium and azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers in dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentration, it only occurs for a limited range of azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Our results suggest that, at L = 6.6, linearly polarized EMIC waves can be generated via mode conversion from the compressional waves near the crossover frequency. Consequently, the heavy ion concentration ratio can be estimated from observations of externally generated EMIC waves that have polarization.

  18. Ferroelectric plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers E.P. Gilson a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    Ferroelectric plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers E.P. Gilson a,n , R.C. Davidson for plasma sources for driver applications. Plasma sources for drivers will need to be highly reliable using beams with high perveances that are relevant to heavy ion fusion driver systems, the facility

  19. Solar-wind protons and heavy ions sputtering of lunar surface materials A.F. Barghouty a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-wind protons and heavy ions sputtering of lunar surface materials A.F. Barghouty a, , F Available online 21 December 2010 Keywords: Solar wind sputtering Lunar regolith KREEP soil Potential a c t Lunar surface materials are exposed to $1 keV/amu solar-wind protons and heavy ions on almost

  20. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  1. On the possibility of spontaneous generation of turbulent Alfvén waves in solar plasma by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C. S. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China) [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China); Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Zhongli, Taiwan (China); Zhao, G. Q. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China) [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Chen, L.; Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China)] [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we discuss spontaneous generation of Alfvén waves. The discussion is motivated by the study of the solar transition region. We show that the heavy ions in this region can play critical roles. A quasilinear theory is derived. On the basis of this theory, we can discuss the saturation level of the wave spectral energy associated with each species of ions. Several essential issues relevant to the transition region are also discussed.

  2. Computer Simulation and Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Treatment of Tumor Cells Using Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Keel Brandon

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPUTER SIMULATION AND COMPARISON OF PROTON AND CARBON ION TREATMENT OF TUMOR CELLS USING PARTICLE AND HEAVY ION TRANSPORT CODE SYSTEM A Thesis by KEEL BRANDON CURTIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... AND HEAVY ION TRANSPORT CODE SYSTEM A Thesis by KEEL BRANDON CURTIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair...

  3. Momentum conservation and correlation analyses in heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Borghini

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Global transverse-momentum conservation induces correlations between any number of particles, which contribute in particular to the two- and three-particle correlations measured in heavy-ion collisions. These correlations are examined in detail, and their importance for studies of jets and their interaction with the medium is discussed.

  4. Production of Dileptons in Heavy Ion Collisions at SPS-Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Koch

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution we will discuss the production of low mass dileptons in SPS-energy heavy ion collisions. We briefly review the current theoretical situation before we turn to the analysis of the recent data for Pb+Au. We also will discuss the role of baryons as a source for dileptons.

  5. Research in heavy-ion nuclear physics. Annual progress report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, S.J.; Prosser, F.W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Fusion-fission in light nuclear systems; High-resolution Q-value measurement for the {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg reaction; Heavy-ion reactions and limits to fusion; and Hybrid MWPC-Bragg curve detector development.

  6. INT Program 13-3 Quantitative Large Amplitude Shape Dynamics: fission and heavy ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    INT Program 13-3 Quantitative Large Amplitude Shape Dynamics: fission and heavy ion fusion Workshop on: Experimental Status and Prospects October 14 - 18, 2013 Talks are 40 minutes long and followed and nuclear data Katsuhisa Nishio, JAEA 2:00 Fission shape evolution by Brownian motion Jorgen Randrup, LBNL 3

  7. INT Program INT13-3 Quantitative Large Amplitude Shape Dynamics: fission and heavy ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    INT Program INT13-3 Quantitative Large Amplitude Shape Dynamics: fission and heavy ion fusion Talou, LANL "Fundamental and Applied Nuclear Fission Research at LANL" · 11:00 am: Anatoli Afanasjev, Mississippi State Univ "Fission in covariant DFT: status and open questions" Wednesday, October 2, 2013 Room C

  8. Probing anharmonic properties of nuclear surface vibration by heavy-ion fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Takigawa; K. Hagino; S. Kuyucak

    1997-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Describing fusion reactions between ^{16}O and ^{154}Dy and, between ^{16}O and ^{144}Sm by the $sd-$ and $sdf-$ interacting boson model, we show that heavy-ion fusion reactions are strongly affected by anharmonic properties of nuclear surface vibrations and nuclear shape, and thus provide a powerful method to study details of nuclear structure and dynamics.

  9. Fermionic Molecular Dynamics: Multifragmentation in heavy-ion collisions and in excited nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Feldmeier; J. Schnack

    1997-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Within Fermionic Molecular Dynamics we investigate fragmentation of a compound system which was created in a heavy-ion collision at a beam energy in the Fermi energy domain and the decay of excited iron nuclei. We show that in FMD many-body correlations play an important role in the formation of fragments.

  10. Structural changes induced by heavy ion irradiation in titanium silicon carbide J.C. Nappa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Structural changes induced by heavy ion irradiation in titanium silicon carbide Authors J.C. Nappéa, UMR 8609, Bât. 108, 91405 Orsay, France ABSTRACT Carbide-type ceramics, which have remarkable at high temperature. The MAX phases, and more particularly titanium silicon carbide, are distinguished

  11. Microstructural changes induced by low energy heavy ion irradiation in titanium silicon carbide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Microstructural changes induced by low energy heavy ion irradiation in titanium silicon carbide, and it was validated on irradiated silicon carbide. The swelling of Ti3SiC2 was estimated to 2.2 ±0 to these working conditions, non-oxide refractory ceramics are required as fuel cladding. Thus, carbides turn out

  12. Mechanism of Elongation of Gold or Silver Nanoparticles in Silica by Irradiation with Swift Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Mechanism of Elongation of Gold or Silver Nanoparticles in Silica by Irradiation with Swift Heavy nanoparticles oriented parallel to one another can be synthesized in SiO2 by ion irradiation. Our aim, silica glass 1. Introduction Well-defined Au nanoparticles and nanorods are desirable for their optical

  13. Alternative Size and Lifetime Measurements for High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt; Silvio Petriconi

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-Particle correlations based on the interference of identical particles has provided the chief means for determining the shape and lifetime of sources in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Here, Strong and Coulomb induced correlations are shown to provide equivalent information.

  14. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1977-1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirruccello, M.C.; Tobias, C.A. (eds.)

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 46 papers presented in this progress report. This report is a major review of studies with accelerated heavy ions carried out by the Biology and Medicine Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1977 to 1980. (KRM)

  15. Investigation of collective radial expansion and stopping in heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Investigation of collective radial expansion and stopping in heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies in central Xe+Sn reactions at Fermi energies. Performing a comparison between the predictions central collisions at Fermi energies. However, considering the same central event selection

  16. Kinetic And Potential Sputtering Of Lunar Regolith: The Contribution Of The Heavy (Minority) Solar Wind Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinetic And Potential Sputtering Of Lunar Regolith: The Contribution Of The Heavy (Minority) Solar Wind Ions F.W. Meyera1 , P.R. Harrisa2 , H.M. Meyer IIIb , H. Hijazia , A.F. Barghoutyc a Physics, Huntsville, AL 35812, USA Abstract. In this paper the sputtering of lunar regolith by protons and solar wind

  17. {gamma} spectroscopy around doubly magic {sup 48}Ca by heavy-ion transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Silvia [Department of Physics, University of Milano and INFN, Milano (Italy)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    {gamma} spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 48}Ca is performed by the heavy-ion transfer reaction {sup 48}Ca on {sup 64}Ni at 282 MeV, with the PRISMA-CLARA setup at Legnaro Laboratory. Angular distributions, polarizations and lifetimes analysis probe spin and parities of several excited states, shading lights on their configuration. In the one neutron transfer channels, {sup 49}Ca and {sup 47}Ca, states arising by coupling a single particle to the 3{sup -} phonon of {sup 48}Ca are observed, showing the robustness of nuclear collectivity in rather light systems. The work demonstrates the feasibility of complete in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy with heavy-ion transfer reactions and provides a method that can be further exploited in the future with heavy targets and radioactive beams.

  18. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  19. A Harmonic Kicker Scheme for the Circulator Cooler Ring in the Proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nissen, Edward W.; Hutton, Andrew M.; Kimber, Andrew J.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current electron cooler design for the proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab utilizes a circulator ring for reuse of the cooling electron bunch up to 100 times to cool the ion beams. This cooler requires a fast kicker system for injecting and extracting individual bunches in the circulator ring. Such a kicker must work at a high repetition rate, up to 7.5 to 75 MHz depending on the number of turns in the recirculator ring. It also must have a very short rise and fall time (of order of 1 ns) such that it will kick an individual bunch without disturbing the others in the ring. Both requirements are orders of magnitude beyond the present state-of-the-art as well as the goals of other on-going kicker R&D programs such as that for the ILC damping rings. In this paper we report a scheme of creating this fast, high repetition rate kicker by combining RF waveforms at multiple frequencies to create a kicker waveform that will, for example, kick every eleventh bunch while leaving the other ten unperturbed. We also present a possible implementation of this scheme as well as discuss its limitations.

  20. Overview of Theory and Modeling in the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, R C; Celata, C M; Cohen, R H; De Hoon, M; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I D; Lee, E P; Lee, W W; Lund, S M; Olson, C L; Qin, H; Rose, D V; Sharp, W M; Startsev, E A; Tzenov, Stephan I; Vay, J L; Welch, D R; Yu, S S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents analytical and simulation studies of intense heavy ion beam propagation, including the injection, acceleration, transport and compression phases, and beam transport and focusing in background plasma in the target chamber. Analytical theory and simulations that support the High Current Experiment (HCX), the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and the advanced injector development program are being used to provide a basic understanding of the nonlinear beam dynamics and collective processes, and to develop design concepts for the next-step Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), an Integrated Research Experiment (IRE), and a heavy ion fusion driver. Three-dimensional (3-D) nonlinear perturbative simulations have been applied to collective instabilities driven by beam temperature anisotropy and to two-stream interactions between the beam ions and any unwanted background electrons. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the 2 MV Electrostatic Quadrupole (ESQ) injector have clarified t...

  1. Heavy-ion transfer reactions at large internuclear distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, D.; Corradi, L.; Szilner, S.; Pollarolo, G.; Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Farnea, E.; Michelagnoli, C.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C. A.; Courtin, S.; Goasduff, A.; Haas, F.; Mijatovic, T.; Soic, N.; Grebosz, J. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, I-35131, Padova (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer reaction for the {sup 116}Sn+{sup 60}Ni system has been studied using the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer at different bombarding energies from above to well below the Coulomb barrier. The experiment has been done in inverse kinematics and light target-like ions have been detected with PRISMA placed at very forward angles. Good mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy resolutions have been achieved. Sufficient statistics has been accumulated to extract angular distributions for different bombarding energies have been extracted and the response function of the spectrometer has been studied to correct for the aberration due to the transport of the ions in PRISMA. The comparison between the present case and the previously measured {sup 96}Zr+{sup 40}Ca system, superfluid and near closed shells nuclei, respectively, should significantly improve our understanding of nucleon-nucleon correlation properties in multinucleon transfer processes.

  2. Systematics of heavy-ion fusion hindrance at extreme sub-barrier energies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. L.; Back, B. B.; Esbensen, H.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Rehm, K. E.; Physics

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of hindrance in heavy-ion induced fusion reactions at extreme sub-barrier energies represents a challenge for theoretical models. Previously, it has been shown that in medium-heavy systems, the onset of fusion hindrance depends strongly on the 'stiffness' of the nuclei in the entrance channel. In this work, we explore its dependence on the total mass and the Q-value of the fusing systems and find that the fusion hindrance depends in a systematic way on the entrance channel properties over a wide range of systems.

  3. Systematics of heavy-ion fusion hindrance at extreme sub-barrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Jiang; B. B. Back; H. Esbensen; R. V. F. Janssens; abd K. E. Rehm

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of hindrance in heavy-ion induced fusion reactions at extreme sub-barrier energies represents a challenge for theoretical models. Previously, it has been shown that in medium-heavy systems, the onset of fusion hindrance depends strongly on the "stiffness" of the nuclei in the entrance channel. In this work, we explore its dependence on the total mass and the $Q$-value of the fusing systems and find that the fusion hindrance depends in a systematic way on the entrance channel properties over a wide range of systems.

  4. Systematics of heavy-ion fusion hindrance at extreme sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C.L.; Back, B.B.; Esbensen, H.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Rehm, K.E. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of hindrance in heavy-ion induced fusion reactions at extreme sub-barrier energies represents a challenge for theoretical models. Previously, it has been shown that in medium-heavy systems, the onset of fusion hindrance depends strongly on the ''stiffness'' of the nuclei in the entrance channel. In this work, we explore its dependence on the total mass and the Q-value of the fusing systems and find that the fusion hindrance depends in a systematic way on the entrance channel properties over a wide range of systems.

  5. Sorption of heavy metal ions on new metal-ligand complexes chemically derived from Lycopodium clavatum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pehlivan, E.; Ersoz, M.; Yildiz, S. [Univ. of Selcuk, Konya (Turkey); Duncan, H.J. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated as a function of pH using a novel exchanger system whereby Lycopodium clavatum is functionalized with carboxylate and glyoxime metal-ligand complexes. The new ligand exchangers were prepared using a reaction of diaminosporopollenin with various metal-ligand complexes of glyoxime and monocarboxylic acid. The sorptive behavior of these metal-ligand exchangers and the possibilities to remove and to recover selectively heavy metal cations using these systems are discussed on the basis of their chemical natures and their complexing properties.

  6. Electron loss from fast heavy ions: Target-scaling dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuBois, R. D. [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Santos, A. C. F.; Montenegro, E. C. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRJ, Caixa Postal 68528 Rio de Janeiro, BR-21941-972 RJ (Brazil); Sigaud, G. M. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, BR-22452-970 RJ (Brazil)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The target dependence for projectile electron loss is investigated using experimental data taken from the literature. Impact energies range from a few tens of eV/u to tens of MeV/u. For energies less than several MeV/u, the target dependences are shown to be very similar, independent of projectile species and charge state. Overall, however, with increasing impact energy the cross-section dependence on the target nuclear charge systematically increases. It is shown that none of the existing cross-section target scaling models reproduce these features. A model, based on Born scaling and including both the antiscreening and screening contributions to projectile electron loss, is developed. With the inclusion of relativistic effects, which increase the contribution from both channels at high energies, and ''target saturation'' effects, which reduce the contribution from the screening term for heavy targets and lower impact energies, this model describes quite reasonably all available experimental data. A simple scaling formula that reproduces the measured atomic number and impact velocity dependences is provided. This formula is applicable for projectile electron loss in collisions with either atomic or molecular targets and for impact energies ranging from a few to tens of MeV/u.

  7. Dynamics of strangeness production in heavy-ion collisions near threshold energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin

    2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of the improved isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model, the dynamics of strangeness (K$^{0,+}$, $\\Lambda$ and $\\Sigma^{-,0,+}$) production in heavy-ion collisions near threshold energies is investigated systematically, in which the strange particles are considered to be mainly produced by the inelastic collisions of baryon-baryon and pion-baryon. The collisions in the region of supra-saturation densities of the dense baryonic matter formed in heavy-ion collisions dominate the yields of strangeness production. The total multiplicities as functions of incident energies and collision centralities are calculated with the Skyrme parameter SLy6. The excitation function of strangeness production is analyzed and also compared with the KaoS data for the K$^{+}$ production in the reactions $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C and $^{197}$Au+$^{197}$Au.

  8. Net-charge probability distributions in heavy ion collisions at chemical freeze-out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Braun-Munzinger; B. Friman; F. Karsch; K. Redlich; V. Skokov

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore net charge probability distributions in heavy ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas model. The distributions for strangeness, electric charge and baryon number are derived. We show that, within this model, net charge probability distributions and the resulting fluctuations can be computed directly from the measured yields of charged and multi-charged hadrons. The influence of multi-charged particles and quantum statistics on the shape of the distribution is examined. We discuss the properties of the net proton distribution along the chemical freeze-out line. The model results presented here can be compared with data at RHIC energies and at the LHC to possibly search for the relation between chemical freeze-out and QCD cross-over lines in heavy ion collisions.

  9. Recirculating induction accelerator as a low-cost driver for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, J.J.; Newton, M.A.; Reginato, L.L.; Sharp, W.M.; Shay, H.D.; Yu, S.S.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a fusion driver, a heavy ion accelerator offers the advantages of efficient target coupling, high reliability, and long stand-off focusing. While the projected cost of conventional heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers based on multiple beam induction linacs are quite competitive with other inertial driver options, a driver solution which reduces the cost by a factor of two or more will make the case for HIF truly compelling. The recirculating induction accelerator has the potential of large cost reductions. For this reason, an intensive study of the recirculator concept was performed by a team from LLNL and LBL over the past year. We have constructed a concrete point design example of a 4 MJ driver with a projected efficiency of 35% and projected cost of less than 500 million dollars. A detailed report of our findings during this year of intensive studies has been recently completed. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. The Heavy-Ion Approximation for Ambipolar Diffusion Calcuations for Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, P; McKee, C; Klein, R

    2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ambipolar diffusion redistributes magnetic flux in weakly ionized plasmas and plays a critical role in star formation. Simulations of ambipolar diffusion using explicit MHD codes are prohibitively expensive for the level of ionization observed in molecular clouds ({approx}< 10{sup -6}) since an enormous number of time steps is required to represent the dynamics of the dominant neutral component with a time step determined by the trace ion component. Here we show that ambipolar diffusion calculations can be significantly accelerated by the 'heavy-ion approximation', in which the mass density of the ions is increased and the collisional coupling constant with the neutrals decreased such that the product remains constant. In this approximation, the ambipolar diffusion time and the ambipolar magnetic Reynolds number remain unchanged. We present three tests of the heavy-ion approximation: C-type shocks, the Wardle instability, and the 1D collapse of a magnetized slab. We show that this approximation is quite accurate provided that (1) the square of the Alfven Mach number is small compared to the ambipolar diffusion Reynolds number for dynamical problems, and that (2) the ion mass density is negligible for quasi-static problems; a specific criterion is given for the magnetized slab problem. The first condition can be very stringent for turbulent flows with large density fluctuations.

  11. Hydro-inspired parameterizations of freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Florkowski; Wojciech Broniowski

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Popular parameterizations of the freeze-out conditions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are discussed. Similarities and differences between the blast-wave model and the single-freeze-out model, both used recently to interpret the RHIC data, are outlined. A non-boost-invariant extension of the single-freeze-out model is proposed and applied to describe the recent BRAHMS data.

  12. Actinide Production in the Reaction of Heavy Ions withCurium-248

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, K.J.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of {sup 248}Cm with {sup 18}O, {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from {sup 48}Ca and {sup 238}U bombardments of {sup 248}Cm. Simple extrapolation of the product yields into unknown regions of charge and mass indicates that the use of heavy ion transfer reactions to produce new, neutron-rich above-target species is limited. The substantial production of neutron-rich below-target species, however, indicates that with very heavy ions like {sup 136}Xe and {sup 238}U the new species {sup 248}Am, {sup 249}Am and {sup 247}Pu should be produced with large cross sections from a {sup 248}Cm target. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate {sup 247}Pu is outlined. The failure is probably due to the half life of the decay, which is calculated to be less than 3 minutes. The absolute gamma ray intensities from {sup 251}Bk decay, necessary for calculating the {sup 251}Bk cross section, are also determined.

  13. Status and Promise of Particle Interferometry in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selemon Bekele; Fabio Braghin; Zbigniew Chajecki; Paul Chung; John G. Cramer; Tamas Csorgo; Hans Eggers; Sean Gavin; Frederique Grassi; Yogiro Hama; Adam Kisiel; Che-Ming Ko; Tomoi Koide; Gastao Krein; Roy Lacey; Richard Lednicky; Michael A. Lisa; Wesley Metzger; Dariusz Miskowiec; Kenji Morita; Sandra S. Padula; Scott Pratt; Wei-Liang Qian; Vladislav Simak; Yuri Sinyukov; Michal Sumbera; Bernardo M. Tavares; Giuseppe Verde; Detlef Zschiesche

    2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    After five years of running at RHIC, and on the eve of the LHC heavy-ion program, we highlight the status of femtoscopic measurements. We emphasize the role interferometry plays in addressing fundamental questions about the state of matter created in such collisions, and present an enumerated list of measurements, analyses and calculations that are needed to advance the field in the coming years.

  14. K+ production in baryon-baryon and heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, GQ; Ko, Che Ming; Chung, WS.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaon production cross sections in nucleon-nucleon, nucleon-Delta, and Delta-Delta interactions are studied in a boson exchange model. For the latter two interactions, the exchanged pion can be on-mass shell...only contributions due to a virtual pion an included via the Peierls method by taking into account the finite Delta width. With these cross sections and also those for pion-baryon interactions, subthreshold kaon production from heavy-ion collisions...

  15. Work distribution of an expanding gas and transverse energy production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Zhang; Jay P. Mayfield

    2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The work distribution of an expanding extreme relativistic gas is shown to be a gamma distribution with a different shape parameter as compared with its non-relativistic counterpart. This implies that the shape of the transverse energy distribution in relativistic heavy ion collisions depends on the particle contents during the evolution of the hot and dense matter. Therefore, transverse energy fluctuations provide additional insights into the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in these collisions.

  16. Work distribution of an expanding gas and transverse energy production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work distribution of an expanding extreme relativistic gas is shown to be a gamma distribution with a different shape parameter as compared with its non-relativistic counterpart. This implies that the shape of the transverse energy distribution in relativistic heavy ion collisions depends on the particle contents during the evolution of the hot and dense matter. Therefore, transverse energy fluctuations provide additional insights into the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in these collisions.

  17. $?$ vacua states in heavy ion collisions in presence of dissipation and noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied possible formation of $\\Theta$ vacua states in heavy ion collisions. Random phases of the chiral fields were evolved in a finite temperature potential, incorporating the breaking of $U_A(1)$ symmetry. Initial random phases very quickly settle into oscillation around the values dictated by the potential. The simulation study indicate that an initial $\\Theta$=0 state do not evolve into a $\\Theta$ $\

  18. Sound Wave in Hot Dense Matter Created in Heavy Ion Collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Sun; Z. Yang

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A model to study the sound wave in hot dense matter created in heavy ion collisions by jet is proposed.The preliminary data of jet shape analysis of PHENIX Collaboration for all centralities and two directions is well explained in this model. Then the wavelength of the sound wave, the natural frequency of the hot dense matter and the speed of sound wave are estimated from the fit.

  19. An overview of relativistic hydrodynamics as applied to heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strottman, D.D.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of relativistic hydrodynamics as applied to heavy ions is reviewed. Constraints on the nuclear equation of state, as well as the form of the hydrodynamic equations imposed by causality are discussed. Successes (flow, side-splash, scaling) and shortcomings of one-fluid hydrodynamics are reviewed. Models for pion production within hydrodynamics and reasons for disagreement with experiment are assessed. Finally, the motivations for and the implementations of multi-fluid models are presented. 74 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Central collisions of heavy ions. Progress report, October 1, 1991--September 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Sun-yiu

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R&D project was performed.

  1. Thermally Fluctuating Second-Order Viscous Hydrodynamics and Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Young; J. I. Kapusta; C. Gale; S. Jeon; B. Schenke

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem requires the presence of thermal noise in viscous fluids. The time and length scales of heavy ion collisions are small enough so that the thermal noise can have a measurable effect on observables. Thermal noise is included in numerical simulations of high energy lead-lead collisions, increasing average values of the momentum eccentricity and contributing to its event by event fluctuations.

  2. Rho0 Photoproduction in Ultra-Peripheral Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions with STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoproduction reactions occur when the electromagnetic field of a relativistic heavy ion interacts with another heavy ion. The STAR collaboration presents a measurement of {rho}{sup 0} and direct {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photoproduction in ultra-peripheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We observe both exclusive photoproduction and photoproduction accompanied by mutual Coulomb excitation. We find a coherent cross-section of {sigma}(AuAu {yields} Au*Au* {rho}{sup 0}) = 530 {+-} 19 (stat.) {+-} 57 (syst.) mb, in accord with theoretical calculations based on a Glauber approach, but considerably below the predictions of a color dipole model. The {rho}{sup 0} transverse momentum spectrum (p{sub T}{sup 2}) is fit by a double exponential curve including both coherent and incoherent coupling to the target nucleus; we find {sigma}{sub inc}/{sigma}{sub coh} = 0.29 {+-} 0.03 (stat.) {+-} 0.08 (syst.). The ratio of direct {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} production is comparable to that observed in {gamma}p collisions at HERA, and appears to be independent of photon energy. Finally, the measured {rho}{sup 0} spin helicity matrix elements agree within errors with the expected s-channel helicity conservation.

  3. Critical issues for high-brightness heavy-ion beams -- prioritized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) will provide motivation toobtaining funding for the NIF, the Large Hadron Collider (

  4. Densification, anisotropic deformation, and plastic flow of SiO2 during MeV heavy ion irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    use in optical fibers. Some of the studies showed that ion irradiation causes densificationDensification, anisotropic deformation, and plastic flow of SiO2 during MeV heavy ion irradiation E and implantation masks to 4.0 MeV Xe irradiation is studied. Trenches in silica deform dramatically after

  5. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, T., E-mail: ttinoue@juntendo.ac.jp; Sugimoto, S.; Sasai, K. [Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113–8421 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113–8421 (Japan); Hattori, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263–0024 (Japan)] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263–0024 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz.

  6. Progress in heavy ion driven inertial fusion energy: From scaledexperiments to the integrated research experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, J.J.; Ahle, L.E.; Baca, D.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bieniosek,F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Davidson, R.C.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Franks, R.M.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; deHoon, M.J.L.; Kaganovich, I.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.; Prost, L.R.; Qin, H.; Rose, D.; Sabbi, G-L.; Sangster, T.C.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Shuman, D.; Vay, J.L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.; Yu, S.S.

    2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The promise of inertial fusion energy driven by heavy ion beams requires the development of accelerators that produce ion currents ({approx}100s Amperesheam) and ion energies ({approx}1-10 GeV) that have not been achieved simultaneously in any existing accelerator. The high currents imply high generalized perveances, large tune depressions. and high space charge potentials of the beam center relative to the beam pipe. Many of the scientific issues associated with ion beams of high perveance and large tune depression have been addressed over the last two decades on scaled experiments at Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the University of Maryland, and elsewhere. The additional requirement of high space charge potential (or equivalently high line charge density) gives rise to effects (particularly the role of electrons in beam transport) which must be understood before proceeding to a large scale accelerator. The first phase of a new series of experiments in Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF VNL), the High Current Experiments (HCX), is now being constructed at LBNL. The mission of the HCX will be to transport beams with driver line charge density so as to investigate the physics of this regime, including constraints on the maximum radial filling factor of the beam through the pipe. This factor is important for determining both cost and reliability of a driver scale accelerator. The HCX will provide data for design of the next steps in the sequence of experiments leading to an inertial Fusion energy power plant. The focus of the program after the HCX will be on integration of all of the manipulations required for a driver. In the near term following HCX, an Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) of the same general scale as the HCX is envisioned.

  7. fcc-hcp phase transformation in Co nanoparticles induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprouster, D. J.; Giulian, R.; Schnohr, C. S.; Araujo, L. L.; Kluth, P.; Byrne, A. P.; Foran, G. J.; Johannessen, B.; Ridgway, M. C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonally close-packed (hcp) phase transformation in spherical Co nanoparticles achieved via swift heavy-ion irradiation. Co nanoparticles of mean diameter 13.2 nm and fcc phase were first formed in amorphous SiO{sub 2} by ion implantation and thermal annealing and then irradiated at room temperature with 9-185 MeV Au ions. The crystallographic phase was identified with x-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron diffraction and quantified, as functions of the irradiation energy and fluence, with the former. The transformation was complete at low fluence prior to any change in nanoparticle shape or size and was governed by electronic stopping. A direct-impact mechanism was identified with the transformation interaction cross-section correlated with that of a molten ion track in amorphous SiO{sub 2}. We suggest the shear stress resulting from the rapid thermal expansion about an ion track in amorphous SiO{sub 2} was sufficient to initiate the fcc-to-hcp phase transformation in the Co nanoparticles.

  8. Time-Depentent Hartree-Fock description of heavy ions fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cédric Simenel; Benoît Avez

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscopic mean-field description of heavy ions fusion is performed in the framework of the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory using a Skyrme interaction with the SLy4d parametrization. A good agreement with experiments is obtained on the position of the fusion barriers for various total masses, mass asymmetries and deformations. The excitation function of the 16O+208Pb is overestimated by about 16% above the barrier. The restriction to an independent particles state in the mean-field dynamics prevents the description of sub-barrier fusion. Effect of transfer on fusion is discussed.

  9. Direct photon emission in Heavy Ion Collisions from Microscopic Transport Theory and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjoern Baeuchle; Marcus Bleicher

    2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct photon emission in heavy-ion collisions is calculated within a relativistic micro+macro hybrid model and compared to the microscopic transport model UrQMD. In the hybrid approach, the high-density part of the collision is calculated by an ideal 3+1-dimensional hydrodynamic calculation, while the early (pre-equilibrium-) and late (rescattering-) phase are calculated with the transport model. Different scenarios of the transition from the macroscopic description to the transport model description and their effects are studied. The calculations are compared to measurements by the WA98-collaboration and predictions for the future CBM-experiment are made.

  10. Production of Anticentauro Events in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sood

    2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel method for studying the production of anticentauro events in high energy heavy ion collisions utilizing Chebyshev expansion coefficients. These coefficients have proved to be very efficient in investigating the pattern of fluctuations in neutral pion fraction. For the anticentauro like events, the magnitude of first few coefficients is strongly enhanced (~3 times) as compared to those of normal HIJING events. Various characteristics of Chebyshev coefficients are studied in detail and the probability of formation of exotic events is calculated from the simulated events.

  11. Estimation of electric conductivity of the quark gluon plasma via asymmetric heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuji Hirono; Masaru Hongo; Tetsufumi Hirano

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that in asymmetric heavy-ion collisions, especially off-central Cu+Au collisions, a sizable strength of electric field directed from Au nucleus to Cu nucleus is generated in the overlapping region, because of the difference in the number of electric charges between the two nuclei. This electric field would induce an electric current in the matter created after the collision, which result in a dipole deformation of the charge distribution. The directed flow parameters $v_1^{\\pm}$ of charged particles turn out to be sensitive to the charge dipole and provide us with information about electric conductivity of the quark gluon plasma.

  12. Anomalous transport effects and possible environmental symmetry "violation" in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinfeng Liao

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The heavy ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur and in a sense allow environmental symmetry "violation" phenomena. For example certain anomalous transport processes, forbidden in usual medium, become possible in such domains. We briefly review recent progress in both the theoretical understanding and experimental search of various anomalous transport effects (such as the Chiral Magnetic Effect, Chiral Separation Effect, Chiral Electric Separation Effect, Chiral Electric/Magnetic Waves, etc) in the hot QCD fluid created by such collisions.

  13. Free magnetized knots of parity-violating deconfined matter in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. N. Chernodub

    2010-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the local parity violation in the quark-gluon plasma supports existence of free (meta)stable knots of deconfined hot quark matter stabilized by superstrong magnetic fields. The magnetic field in the knots resembles the spheromak plasma state of the magnetic confinement approach to nuclear fusion. The size of the knot is quantized, being inversely proportional to the chiral conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma. The parity symmetry is broken inside the knot. Particles produced in the decays of the knots have unusual azimuthal distribution and specific flavor content. We argue that these knots may be created in noncentral heavy-ion collisions.

  14. Free magnetized knots of parity-violating deconfined matter in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chernodub, M N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the local parity violation in the quark-gluon plasma supports existence of free (meta)stable knots of deconfined hot quark matter stabilized by superstrong magnetic fields. The magnetic field in the knots resembles the spheromak plasma state of the magnetic confinement approach to nuclear fusion. The size of the knot is quantized, being inversely proportional to the chiral conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma. The parity symmetry is broken inside the knot. Particles produced in the decays of the knots have unusual azimuthal distribution and specific flavor content. We argue that these knots may be created in noncentral heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitschke, J.M. (ed.)

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor.

  16. Interplay between compound and fragments aspects of nuclear fission and heavy-ion reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwamoto, A [JAPAN; Ichikawa, I [JAPAN

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The scission point in nuclear fission plays a special role where one-body system changes to two-body system. Inverse of this situation is realized in heavy-ion fusion reaction where two-body system changes to one body system. Among several peculiar phenomena expected to occur during this change, we focus our attention to the behavior of compound and fragments shell effects. Some aspects of the interplay between compound and fragments shell effect are discussed related to the topics of the fission valleys in the potential energy surface of actinide nuclei and the fusion-like trajectory found in the cold fusion reaction leading to superheavy nuclei.

  17. Production Cross Section of Neutron-Rich Calcium Isotopes in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donghong Zhang; Wenjie Xie; Jun Su; Fengshou Zhang

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model along with the GEMINI model, heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies are studied. We calculate the production cross sections of different fragments for reactions of 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn+124Sn at different beam energies. The species and production cross sections of neutron-rich isotopes are generally dependent on the isospin of the system and the incident energies. The nucleon 48Ca and 54Ca are more productive for the neutron-rich system at 30 to 150 MeV/nucleon.

  18. Collective flow as a probe of heavy-ion reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awes, T.C.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective flow of nuclear matter probes the dynamics of heavy-ion reactions and can provide information about the nuclear-matter equation of state. In particular, the incident energy dependences of collective flow may be a sensitive means to deduce the existence of a Quark Gluon Plasma phase in the equation of state. Collective flow measurements from 30 A MeV to 200 A GeV incident energies are briefly reviewed. Preliminary results on collective flow from the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS are presented.

  19. Contribution of the Reaction Ny-]Nnk to Antikaon Production in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy spectrum can also be understood qualitatively. ' There is another process NY ?+NNK which may also contribute to the production of antikaons in heavy-ion collisions. Since the threshold energies for this process are -455 MeV and -635 MeV for Y...=X and Y=A, respectively, and are larger than those for the process m Y?+KN, which are ?120 MeV and -215 MeV for Y=X and Y=A, respectively, one might intuitively think that the contribution from the reaction NY~NNK is negligible. To ensure...

  20. Ultraviolet energy dependence of particle production sources in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolschin, Georg

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy dependence of particle production sources in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is investigated from RHIC to LHC energies. Whereas charged-hadron production in the fragmentation sources follows a ln(s_NN/s_0) law, particle production in the mid-rapidity gluon-gluon source exhibits a much stronger dependence proportional to ln^3(s_NN/s_0), and becomes dominant between RHIC and LHC energies. The production of particles with pseudorapidities beyond the beam rapidity is also discussed.

  1. Recent results from HADES on electron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HADES Collaboration; T. Galatyuk; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Braun-Munzinger; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; J. Díaz; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; A. Gil; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; D. Kirschner; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; E. Morinière; J. Mousa; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; P. Zhou

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic investigations of dilepton production are performed at the SIS accelerator of GSI with the HADES spectrometer. The goal of this program is a detailed understanding of di-electron emission from hadronic systems at moderate temperatures and densities. New results obtained in HADES experiments focussing on electron pair production in elementary collisions are reported here. They pave the way to a better understanding of the origin of the so-called excess pairs earlier on observed in heavy-ion collisions by the DLS collaboration and lately confirmed in two measurements of the HADES collaboration using C+C and Ar+KCl collisions. Results of these studies are discussed.

  2. Recent results from HADES on electron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galatyuk, T; Balanda, A; Belver, D; Belyaev, A V; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cabanelas, P; Castro, E; Chernenko, S; Christ, T; Destefanis, M; Díaz, J; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O V; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gil, A; Gilardi, C; Golubeva, M; González-Díaz, D; Guber, F; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Kirschner, D; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kotte, R; Krizek, F; Krücken, R; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Lang, S; Lange, J S; Lapidus, K; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Morinière, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Otwinowski, J; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Sudol, M; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wisniowski, M; Wojcik, T; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y V; Zhou, P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic investigations of dilepton production are performed at the SIS accelerator of GSI with the HADES spectrometer. The goal of this program is a detailed understanding of di-electron emission from hadronic systems at moderate temperatures and densities. New results obtained in HADES experiments focussing on electron pair production in elementary collisions are reported here. They pave the way to a better understanding of the origin of the so-called excess pairs earlier on observed in heavy-ion collisions by the DLS collaboration and lately confirmed in two measurements of the HADES collaboration using C+C and Ar+KCl collisions. Results of these studies are discussed.

  3. Exposure of nuclear track emulsion to thermal neutrons, heavy ions and muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Artemenkov; V. Bradnova; A. A. Zaitsev; P. I. Zarubin; I. G. Zarubina; R. R. Kattabekov; K. Z. Mamatkulov; V. V. Rusakova

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical analysis of exposures of test samples of reproduced nuclear track emulsion (NTE) is presented. In boron enriched NTE the angular and energy correlations of products of the reaction induced by thermal neutrons n$_{th} + ^{10}B \\rightarrow ^{7}Li + (\\gamma) + \\alpha$ are studied. NTE was exposed to ions $^{86}Kr^{+17}$ and $^{124}Xe^{+26}$ of energy about 1.2 A MeV. Measurements of the heavy ion ranges of in NTE allowed one to determine their energy on a basis of the SRIM model. Nuclear stars of large multiplicity of target nuclei are observed in exposure of NTE to ultrarelativistic $\\mu$-mesons. The kinematical characteristics of the events of splitting of carbon nuclei into three $\\alpha$-particles studied in this exposure point to a nuclear diffractive mechanism of interactions.

  4. Response of nanostructured ferritic alloys to high-dose heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Chad M.; White, Ryan M.; LeBeau, James M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A latest-generation aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to study heavy-ion-irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Results are presented for STEM X-ray mapping of NFA 14YWT irradiated with 10 MeV Pt to 16 or 160 dpa at -100°C and 750°C, as well as pre-irradiation reference material. Irradiation at -100°C results in ballistic destruction of the beneficial microstructural features present in the pre-irradiated reference material, such as Ti-Y-O nanoclusters (NCs) and grain boundary (GB) segregation. Irradiation at 750°C retains these beneficial features, but indicates some coarsening of the NCs, diffusion of Al to the NCs, and a reduction of the Cr-W GB segregation (or solute excess) content. Ion irradiation combined with the latest-generation STEM hardware allows for rapid screening of fusion candidate materials and improved understanding of irradiation-induced microstructural changes in NFAs.

  5. Amorphization of crystalline Si due to heavy and light ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Riley, D. J.; Donnelly, S. E. [Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Birtcher, R. C. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of amorphous silicon in crystalline silicon by bombardment with light (Si) and heavy (Xe) ions has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy with in situ ion irradiation. Experiments have been carried out at room temperature and low temperature (50 K) and the results are compared to a simple numerical model for amorphization. The results indicate that the amorphization mechanisms for both irradiations are heterogeneous in nature and that numerous overlaps of the collision cascade are generally required to render the crystal amorphous. Following from this, the nature of the material within the confines of collision cascades will be discussed and it will be shown that the individual cascade volume is not necessarily amorphous as previously described in the scientific literature but contains varying degrees of damage depending on the energy deposited within the cascade.

  6. Amorphization of crystalline Si due to heavy and light ion irradiation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Riley, D. J.; Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Salford

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of amorphous silicon in crystalline silicon by bombardment with light (Si) and heavy (Xe) ions has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy with in situ ion irradiation. Experiments have been carried out at room temperature and low temperature (50 K) and the results are compared to a simple numerical model for amorphization. The results indicate that the amorphization mechanisms for both irradiations are heterogeneous in nature and that numerous overlaps of the collision cascade are generally required to render the crystal amorphous. Following from this, the nature of the material within the confines of collision cascades will be discussed and it will be shown that the individual cascade volume is not necessarily amorphous as previously described in the scientific literature but contains varying degrees of damage depending on the energy deposited within the cascade.

  7. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley; ,

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of

  8. Microscopic dynamics simulations of heavy-ion fusion reactions induced by neutron-rich nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wang; Li Ou; Yingxun Zhang; Zhuxia Li

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The heavy-ion fusion reactions induced by neutron-rich nuclei are investigated with the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model. With a subtle consideration of the neutron skin thickness of nuclei and the symmetry potential, the stability of nuclei and the fusion excitation functions of heavy-ion fusion reactions $^{16}$O+$^{76}$Ge, $^{16}$O+$^{154}$Sm, $^{40}$Ca+$^{96}$Zr and $^{132}$Sn+$^{40}$Ca are systematically studied. The fusion cross sections of these reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier can be well reproduced by using the ImQMD model. The corresponding slope parameter of the symmetry energy adopted in the calculations is $L \\approx 78$ MeV and the surface energy coefficient is $g_{\\rm sur}=18\\pm 1.5$ MeVfm$^2$. In addition, it is found that the surface-symmetry term significantly influences the fusion cross sections of neutron-rich fusion systems. For sub-barrier fusion, the dynamical fluctuations in the densities of the reaction partners and the enhanced surface diffuseness at neck side result in the lowering of the fusion barrier.

  9. Heavy Ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Schukraft; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy ion experiment ALICE took first data at the CERN LHC accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in pp and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most QCD inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine-tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high density matter created at LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid.

  10. Femtoscopically Probing the Freeze-out Configuration in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Annan Lisa; Scott Pratt

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-particle femtoscopy reveals the space-time substructure of the freeze-out configuration from heavy ion collisions. Detailed fingerprints of bulk collectivity are evident in space-momentum correlations, which have been systematically measured as a function of particle type, three-momentum, and collision conditions. A clear scenario, dominated by hydrodynamic-type flow emerges. Reproducing the strength and features of the femtoscopic signals in models involves important physical quantities like the Equation of State, as well as less fundamental technical details. An interesting approximate "factorization" in the measured systematics suggests that the overall physical freeze-out scale is set by final state chemistry, but the kinematic substructure is largely universal. Referring to previous results from hadron and lepton collisions, we point to the importance of determining whether these "universal" trends persist from the largest to the smallest systems. We review theoretical expectations for heavy ion femtoscopy at the LHC, and point to directions needing further theory and experimental work at RHIC and the LHC.

  11. Charged Particle and Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Raghunath; Behera, Nirbhay K; Nandi, Basanta K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the charged particle and photon multiplicity, and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like...

  12. Development of a heavy-ion identification method using a combined time-of-flight [delta]E-E technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanus, Roy Gene

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF A HEAVY-ION IDENTIFICATION METHOD USING A COMBINED TIME-OF-FLIGHT, AE-E TECHNIQUE A Thesis by ROY GENE HANUS e Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Physics DEVELOPMENT OF A HEAVY-ION IDENTIFICATION METHOD USING A COMBINED TIME-OF-FLIGHT, BE-E TECHNIQUE A Thesis by ROY GENE HANUS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head...

  13. Effects of swift heavy ions irradiation parameters on optical properties of muscovite mica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Sheng-Xia; Zeng, Jian; Song, Yin; Mo, Dan; Yao, Hui-Jun; Duan, Jing-Lai; Sun, You-Mei; Hou, Ming-Dong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muscovite mica sheets with a thickness of 25 {\\mu}m were irradiated by various kinds of swift heavy ions (Sn, Xe and Bi) in HIRFL. The fluences ranged from 1$\\times$10^{10} ions/cm^2 to 8$\\times$10^{11} ions/cm^2. The electronic energy loss (dE/dx)_e was increased from 14.7 keV/nm to 31.2 keV/nm. The band gap and Urbach energy of pristine and irradiated mica were analyzed by ultraviolet- visible spectroscopy. Periodic fringes in long wave length of the absorption spectra caused by interference phenomenon, were disturbed as the (dE/dx)_e increased. It was suggested that the chemical bonds between Tetrahedral-Octohedral-Tetrahedral (TOT) layers of mica were destroyed. Thus the smooth surface was cleaved after irradiation. The band gap was narrowed down with the increasing (dE/dx)_e and fluences. The values of Urbach energy were increased as the (dE/dx)_e and fluences gradually increased. It was indicated that the amount of defects and the proportion of amorphous structure were increased in mica irradiated under...

  14. Swift-heavy-ion-induced damage formation in III-V binary and ternary semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnohr, C. S.; Kluth, P.; Giulian, R.; Llewellyn, D. J.; Byrne, A. P.; Cookson, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage formation in InP, GaP, InAs, GaAs, and the related ternary alloys Ga{sub 0.50}In{sub 0.50}P and Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As irradiated at room temperature with 185 MeV Au ions was studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in channeling configuration, transmission electron microscopy, and small-angle x-ray scattering. Despite nearly identical ion-energy loss in these materials, their behavior under swift-heavy-ion irradiation is strikingly different: InP and Ga{sub 0.50}In{sub 0.50}P are readily amorphized, GaP and GaAs remain almost undamaged and InAs and Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As exhibit intermediate behavior. A material-dependent combination of irradiation-induced damage formation and annealing is proposed to describe the different responses of the III-V materials to electronic energy loss.

  15. Ion assisted deposition of optical and protective coatings for heavy metal fluoride glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNally, J.J.; Al-Jumaily, G.A.; McNeil, J.R.

    1986-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy metal fluoride glass materials are attractive for optical applications in the near UV through IR wavelength regions. However, many compositions are relatively soft and hygroscopic and possess low softening temperature (250--300/sup 0/C). We have applied ion assisted deposition (IAD) techniques to deposit MgF/sub 2/, SiO/sub 2/, and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//SiO/sub 2/ thin film structures on fluoride glass substrates at ambient substrate temperature (--100/sup 0/C). The coatings deposited using IAD improve the environmental durability of the fluoride glass and appear to have reasonably good optical characteristics; without application of IAD, the deposited coatings are not durable and have poor adhesion.

  16. Scaling of Anisotropic Flows in Intermediate Energy and Ultra-relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Ma

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Anisotropic flows ($v_2$ and $v_4$) of hadrons and light nuclear clusters are studied by a partonic transport model and nucleonic transport model, respectively, in ultra-relativistic and intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. Both number-of-constituent-quark scaling of hadrons, especially for $\\phi$ meson which is composed of strange quarks, and number-of-nucleon scaling of light nuclear clusters are discussed and explored for the elliptic flow ($v_2$). The ratios of $v_4/v_2^2$ of hadrons and nuclear clusters are, respectively, calculated and they show different constant values which are independent of transverse momentum. The above phenomena can be understood, respectively, by the coalescence mechanism in quark-level or nucleon-level.

  17. Excitation of nuclear anharmonic vibrations in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagino; S. Kuyucak; N. Takigawa

    1997-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the effects of multi-phonon excitations on heavy-ion fusion reactions at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier, focusing especially on the role of anharmonicities. We carry out a systematic study of those effects on the excitation function of the fusion cross section and on the fusion barrier distribution, by using the vibrational limit of the interacting boson model. We also analyze the recently measured high-precision data of the $^{16}$O + $^{148}$Sm fusion reaction with this model and discuss the anharmonic properties of the quadrupole as well as the octupole vibrations in $^{148}$Sm. Negative and positive static quadrupole moments are deduced for the first 2$^+$ and 3$^-$ states in $^{148}$Sm, respectively. It is shown that the fusion barrier distribution strongly depends on the sign of the quadrupole moments, suggesting that subbarrier fusion reactions offer an alternative method to extract the static quadrupole moments of phonon states in spherical nuclei.

  18. Heavy Ion Beam in Resolution of the Critical Point Problem for Uranium and Uranium Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Iosilevskiy; Victor Gryaznov

    2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Important advantages of heavy ion beam (HIB) irradiation of matter are discussed in comparison with traditional sources - laser heating, electron beam, electrical discharge etc. High penetration length (~ 10 mm) is of primary importance for investigation of dense matter properties. This gives an extraordinary chance to reach the uniform heating regime when HIB irradiation is being used for thermophysical property measurements. Advantages of HIB heating of highly-dispersive samples are claimed for providing free and relatively slow quasi-isobaric heating without fast hydrodynamic expansion of heated sample. Perspective of such HIB application are revised for resolution of long-time thermophysical problems for uranium and uranium-bearing compounds (UO2). The priorities in such HIB development are stressed: preferable energy levels, beam-time duration, beam focusing, deposition of the sample etc.

  19. Dipolar degrees of freedom and Isospin equilibration processes in Heavy Ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papa, M; Acosta, L; Amorini, F; Agodi, C; Anzalone, A; Auditore, L; Cardella, G; Cavallaro, S; Chatterjee, M B; De Filippo, E; Francalanza, L; Geraci, E; Grassi, L; Gnoffo, B; Han, J; La Guidara, E; Lanzalone, G; Lombardo, I; Pagano, C Maiolino T Minniti A; Pagano, E V; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Quattrocchi, L; Rizzo, F; Rosato, E; Russotto, P; Trifirò, A; Trimarchi, M; Verde, G; Vigilante, and M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: In heavy ion collision at the Fermi energies Isospin equilibration processes occur- ring when nuclei with different charge/mass asymmetries interacts have been investigated to get information on the nucleon-nucleon Iso-vectorial effective interaction. Purpose: In this paper, for the system 48Ca +27 Al at 40 MeV/nucleon, we investigate on this process by means of an observable tightly linked to isospin equilibration processes and sensitive in exclusive way to the dynamical stage of the collision. From the comparison with dynamical model calculations we want also to obtain information on the Iso-vectorial effective microscopic interaction. Method: The average time derivative of the total dipole associated to the relative motion of all emitted charged particles and fragments has been determined from the measured charges and velocities by using the 4? multi-detector CHIMERA. The average has been determined for semi- peripheral collisions and for different charges Zb of the biggest produced fragment. E...

  20. Kinetic evolution of the glasma and thermalization in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu-Guang Huang; Jinfeng Liao

    2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a highly occupied gluonic matter is created shortly after initial impact, which is in a non-thermal state and often referred to as the Glasma. Successful phenomenology suggests that the glasma evolves rather quickly toward the thermal quark-gluon plasma and a hydrodynamic behavior emerges at very early time $\\sim \\hat{o}(1)$ fm/c. Exactly how such "apparent thermalization" occurs and connects the initial conditions to the hydrodynamic onset, remains a significant challenge for theory as well as phenomenology. We briefly review various ideas and recent progress in understanding the approach of the glasma to the thermalized quark-gluon plasma, with an emphasis on the kinetic theory description for the evolution of such far-from-equilibrium and highly overpopulated, thus weakly-coupled yet strongly interacting glasma.

  1. Dynamical approach to heavy-ion induced fusion using actinide target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aritomo, Y.; Hagino, K.; Chiba, S.; Nishio, K. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, 141980 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To treat heavy-ion reactions using actinide target nucleus, we propose a model which takes into account the coupling to the collective states of interacting nuclei in the penetration of the Coulomb barrier and the dynamical evolution of nuclear shape from the contact configuration. A fluctuation-dissipation model (Langevin equation) was applied in the dynamical calculation, where effect of nuclear orientation at the initial impact on the prolately deformed target nucleus was considered. Using this model, we analyzed the experimental data for the mass distribution of fission fragments (MDFF) in the reaction of {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U at several incident energies. Fusion-fission, quasifission and deep-quasi-fission are separated as different trajectories on the potential energy surface. We estimated the fusion cross section of the reaction.

  2. What we have (not)learned from the ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paic, Guy [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico Distrito Federal 04510 (Mexico)

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is today a flourishing activity both on the experimental and on the theoretical side. Although the theoretical justifications to study these collisions was given already more than three decades ago and the experimental studies have a history of more than 25 years we are still very much in the dark as to the details of the processes and of the characteristics of the matter created in collisions. Increasing the energy of collisions has brought new insights but has also resulted with new challenges. In the present paper I will try from a personal perspective to report on the answers we have collected and on the problems we are faced with. The account is partial, taking into account that it is impossible to render justice to every aspect of the field.

  3. Swift heavy ion irradiation of Pt nanocrystals: II. Structural changes and H desorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giulian, R.; Araujo, L.L.; Kluth, P.; Sprouster, D.J.; Schnohr, C.S.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C. (ANU)

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural properties and H desorption from embedded Pt nanocrystals (NCs) following irradiation with swift heavy ions were investigated as a function of energy and fluence. From x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis, Pt-H bonding was identified in NCs annealed in a forming gas (95% N{sub 2} + 5% H{sub 2}) ambient. The H content decreased upon irradiation and the desorption process was NC-size dependent such that larger NCs required a higher fluence to achieve a H-free state. Pt-H bonding and NC dissolution both perturbed the NC structural parameters (coordination number, bond-length and mean-square relative displacement) as determined with extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements.

  4. Design and characterization of a neutralized-transport experiment for heavy-ion fusion Enrique Henestroza, Shmuel Eylon, Prabir K. Roy, Simon S. Yu, Andre Anders, Frank M. Bieniosek,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    to hit spots on the target with radii of about 2 mm. For the heavy-ion-fusion power-plant scenarios comparisons of these theoretical predictions with experiment, the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion

  5. Heavy ion beam probe advances from the first installation of the diagnostic on an RFP (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P. J. [Xantho Technologies, LLC, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam probes have been installed on a variety of toroidal devices, but the first and only application on a reversed field pinch is the diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Simultaneous measurements of spatially localized equilibrium potential and fluctuations of density and potential, previously inaccessible in the core of the reversed field pinch (RFP), are now attainable. These measurements reflect the unique strength of the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) diagnostic. They will help determine the characteristics and evolution of electrostatic fluctuations and their role in transport, and determine the relation of the interior electric field and flows. Many aspects of the RFP present original challenges to HIBP operation and inference of plasma quantities. The magnetic field contributes to a number of the issues: the comparable magnitudes of the toroidal and poloidal fields and edge reversal result in highly three-dimensional beam trajectories; partial generation of the magnetic field by plasma current cause it and hence the beam trajectories to vary with time; and temporal topology and amplitude changes are common. Associated complications include strong ultraviolet radiation and elevated particle losses that can alter functionality of the electrostatic systems and generate noise on the detectors. These complexities have necessitated the development of new operation and data analysis techniques: the implementation of primary and secondary beamlines, adoption of alternative beam steering methods, development of higher precision electrostatic system models, refinement of trajectory calculations and sample volume modeling, establishment of stray particle and noise reduction methods, and formulation of alternative data analysis techniques. These innovative methods and the knowledge gained with this system are likely to translate to future HIBP operation on large scale stellarators and tokamaks.

  6. Quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greco, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly give an elementary introduction to the expansion of the Early Universe till when the phase transition of the quark-gluon plasma to a hadronic matter takes place. Then we describe some main element of the study of QGP by mean of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC's)

  7. Damages induced by heavy ions in titanium silicon carbide: effects of nuclear and electronic interactions at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , of general formula Mn+1AXn where n = {1,2,3}, M is an early transition metal, A is an A-group (mostly IIIADamages induced by heavy ions in titanium silicon carbide: effects of nuclear and electronic Thanks to their refractoriness, carbides are sensed as fuel coating for the IVth generation of reactors

  8. Study of heavy ion induced fission fragment angular and mass distribution at near and sub-coulomb barrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. K. Ghosh

    2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis presents investigations on the angular and mass distribution of fission fragments on heavy ion induced fission reactions. The present investigations address current issues in heavy ion induced fission reactions like finding the optimum entrance channel for the synthesis of super heavy elements (SHE). A double arm time of flight spectrometer over long flight path was used to measure the precise masses of complementary fission fragments. Necessary large area position sensitive gas detectors, the method of experiments and data analysis were developed. The first string of measurements were for a spherical target (209^Bi) with oxygen and fluorine projectiles. The next series of experiments were done using a deformed target (232^Th) with fluorine, oxygen and carbon projectiles.

  9. Solar ions in the heliosheath: a possible new source of heavy neutral atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Grzedzielski; M. Wachowicz; M. Bzowski; V. Izmodenov

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that multiply ionized coronal C, N, O, Mg, Si, S ions carried by the solar wind and neutralized by consecutive electron captures from neutral interstellar atoms constitute an important new source of neutral atoms in the inner heliosheath, with energies up to ~ 1 keV/n. In the model we developed, the heavy ions are treated as test particles carried by hydrodynamic plasma flow (with a Monte-Carlo description of interstellar neutrals) and undergoing all relevant atomic processes determining the evolution of all charge-states of considered species (radiative and dielectronic recombination, charge exchange, photo-, and electron impact ionization). The total strength of the source is from ~10^6 g/s for S to ~10^8 g/s for O, deposited as neutrals below the heliopause. These atoms should provide, as they drift to supersonic wind region, important sources of PUIs and eventually ACRs, especially for species that are excluded from entering the heliosphere because of their ionization in the LISM. The expected corresponding ENA fluxes at 1 AU are in the range 10^-4 - 10^0 at./(cm^2 s sr), depending on the species and direction (Table 2).

  10. A very thin havar film vacuum window for heavy ions to perform radiobiology studies at the BNL Tandem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieberger, P.; Abendroth, H.; Alessi, J.; Cannizzo, L.; Carlson, C.; Gustavsson, A.; Minty, M.; Snydstrup, L.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will be made available for radiobiology studies on cell cultures. Beam energy losses need to be minimized both in the vacuum window and in the air in order to achieve the ranges required for the cells to be studied. This is particularly challenging for ions heavier than iron. The design is presented of a 0.4-inch diameter Havar film window that will satisfy these requirements. Films as thin as 80 microinches were successfully pressure tested. The final thickness to be used may be slightly larger to help in achieving pin hole free windows. We discuss design considerations and present pressure and vacuum test results as well as tests with heavy ion beams.

  11. Hindrance of Heavy-ion Fusion at Extreme Sub-Barrier Energies in Open-shell Colliding Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Jiang; K. E. Rehm; H. Esbensen; R. V. F. Janssens; B. B. Back; P. Collon; C. N. Davids; J. P. Greene; D. J. Henderson; C. J. Lister; S. Kurtz; R. C. Pardo; T. Pennington; M. Paul; D. Peterson; D. Seweryniak; B. Shumard; S. Sinha; X. D. Tang; I. Tanihata; S. Zhu

    2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The excitation function for the fusion-evaporation reaction 64Ni+100Mo has been measured down to a cross-section of ~5 nb. Extensive coupled-channels calculations have been performed, which cannot reproduce the steep fall-off of the excitation function at extreme sub-barrier energies. Thus, this system exhibits a hindrance for fusion, a phenomenon that has been discovered only recently. In the S-factor representation introduced to quantify the hindrance, a maximum is observed at E_s=120.6 MeV, which corresponds to 90% of the reference energy E_s^ref, a value expected from systematics of closed-shell systems. A systematic analysis of Ni-induced fusion reactions leading to compound nuclei with mass A=100-200 is presented in order to explore a possible dependence of the fusion hindrance on nuclear structure.

  12. Subbarrier heavy ion fusion enhanced by nucleon transfer and subbarrier fusion of nuclei far from the line of ?-stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Yu. Denisov

    1998-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a model for the description of subbarrier fusion of heavy ions which takes into account the coupling to the low-energy surface vibrational states and to the few-nucleon transfer with arbitrary reaction Q-value. The fusion reactions ^{28,30}Si+^{58,62,64}Ni, ^{40}Ca+^{90,96}Zr, ^{28}S+^{94,100}Mo, ^{16,18,20,22,24}O+^{58}Ni and ^{28}Si+^{124,126,128,130,132}Sn are analyzed in detail. The model describes rather well the experimental fusion cross section and mean angular momentum for reactions between nuclei near the \\beta-stability line. It is shown that these quantities are significantly enhanced by few-nucleon transfer with large positive Q-value. A shape independent parameterization of the heavy ion potential at distances smaller then the touching point is proposed.

  13. Charge splitting of directed flow and charge-dependent effects in pion spectra in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rybicki; A. Szczurek; M. Klusek-Gawenda; M. Kielbowicz

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The large and rapidly varying electric and magnetic fields induced by the spectator systems moving at ultrarelativistic velocities induce a charge splitting of directed flow, $v_1$, of positive and negative pions in the final state of the heavy ion collision. The same effect results in a very sizeable distortion of charged pion spectra as well as ratios of charged pions ($\\pi^+/\\pi^-$) emitted at high values of rapidity. Both phenomena are sensitive to the actual distance between the pion emission site and the spectator system. This distance $d_E$ appears to decrease with increasing rapidity of the pion, and comes below $\\sim$1~fm for pions emitted close to beam rapidity. In this paper we discuss how these findings can shed new light on the space-time evolution of pion production as a function of rapidity, and on the longitudinal evolution of the system created in heavy ion collisions.

  14. Adiabatic Heavy Ion Fusion Potentials for Fusion at Deep Sub-barrier Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. S. Sastry; S. Kailas; A. K. Mohanty; A. Saxena

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion cross sections from well above barrier to extreme sub-barrier energies have been analysed using the energy (E) and angular momentum (L) dependent barrier penetration model ({\\small{ELDBPM}}). From this analysis, the adiabatic limits of fusion barriers have been determined for a wide range of heavy ion systems. The empirical prescription of Wilzynska and Wilzynski has been used with modified radius parameter and surface tension coefficient values consistent with the parameterization of the nuclear masses. The adiabatic fusion barriers calculated from this prescription are in good agreement with the adiabatic barriers deduced from {\\small{ELDBPM}} fits to fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness is larger at adiabatic limit, resulting in a lower $\\hbar\\omega$ leading to increase of "logarithmic slope" observed at energies well below the barrier. The effective fusion barrier radius and curvature values are anomalously smaller than the predictions of known empirical prescriptions. A detailed comparison of the systematics of fusion barrier with and without L-dependence has been presented.

  15. Interplay Of Mean Field And Individual Nucleon Collisions Effects At Intermediate Energy Heavy Ion Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subotic, K.; Jordanov, D.; Durasevic, M.; Dragosavac, D. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Grabez, B. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In our study of the reaction 20Ne+27Al at energy of 84 A MeV, the track detectors were used to select the target like fragments arising from processes in which the interacting system becomes disintegrated into a large number of constituent nucleons and one massive fragment. Heavy ion reaction studies at bombarding energies of several tens of MeV/nucleon have provided the evidence that most of reaction cross section, in this energy range, is associated with the production of primary projectile like and target like fragment in the first step of the nuclear reaction. The subsequent evolution of the studied reaction systems, has been usually described either using low energy models based on mean field effects (MFE), or high energy models where reaction proceeds by independent collisions (INC) of individual nucleons in the overlap region between target and projectile. The analysis of our results in terms of different MFE and INC models, prescribing consistent timings, has shown that the reaction mechanism may be defined of interplay of the mean field and individual nucleon collisions effects.

  16. Repulsive nature of optical potentials for high-energy heavy-ion scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Furumoto; Y. Sakuragi; Y. Yamamoto

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent works by the present authors predicted that the real part of heavy-ion optical potentials changes its character from attraction to repulsion around the incident energy per nucleon E/A = 200 - 300 MeV on the basis of the complex G-matrix interaction and the double-folding model (DFM) and revealed that the three-body force plays an important role there. In the present paper, we have precisely analyzed the energy dependence of the calculated DFM potentials and its relation to the elastic-scattering angular distributions in detail in the case of the $^{12}$C + $^{12}$C system in the energy range of E/A = 100 - 400 MeV. The tensor force contributes substantially to the energy dependence of the real part of the DFM potentials and plays an important role to lower the attractive-to-repulsive transition energy. The nearside and farside (N/F) decomposition of the elastic-scattering amplitudes clarifies the close relation between the attractive-to-repulsive transition of the potentials and the characteristic evolution of the calculated angular distributions with the increase of the incident energy. Based on the present analysis, we propose experimental measurements of the predicted strong diffraction phenomena of the elastic-scattering angular distribution caused by the N/F interference around the attractive-to-repulsive transition energy together with the reduced diffractions below and above the transition energy.

  17. Time evolution of gluon coherent state and its von Neumann entropy in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideaki Iida; Teiji Kunihiro; Akira Ohnishi; Toru T. Takahashi

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new prescription for evaluating a von Neumann entropy in the initial stage of high-energy heavy-ion collisions utilizing the time evolution of classical Yang-Mills (CYM) field: The von Neumann entropy is computed for the quantum coherent states constructed so as to give the classical gluon fields as the expectation values. The entropy is to be liberated when the complete decoherence is achieved. As a demonstration, the time evolution of the CYM dynamics is solved with an initial condition which mimics the Glasma state, though in a non-expanding geometry; the Glasma state is characterized by the longitudinal color-electric and -magnetic fields with gluon fields' fluctuations around it. We find that the initial longitudinal fluctuations of the fields play essential roles for the entropy production in two ways: First, the field fluctuations at $t=0$ themselves act as a source of the von Neumann entropy prepared before the time evolution. Second, the initial fluctuations triggers field instabilities, and hence the larger the strength of them, the more the entropy production at later time.

  18. Detection Efficiency of a ToF Spectrometer from Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara, E. de; Marti, G. V.; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Mingolla, M. G. [Laboratorio ANDAR, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Partido de San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Negri, A. E.; Arazi, A.; Figueira, J. M.; Pacheco, A. J.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Carnelli, P. F. F. [Laboratorio ANDAR, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Partido de San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fernandez Niello, J. O. [Laboratorio ANDAR, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Partido de San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de General San Martin, Ayacucho 2197, B1650BWA Partido de San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection efficiency of a time-of-flight system based on two micro-channel plates (MCP) time zero detectors plus a conventional silicon surface barrier detector was obtained from heavy ion elastic recoil measurements (this ToF spectrometer is mainly devoted to measurements of total fusion cross section of weakly bound projectiles on different mass-targets systems). In this work we have used beams of {sup 7}Li, {sup 16}O, {sup 32}S and {sup 35}Cl to study the mass region of interest for its application to measurements fusion cross sections in the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 27}Al systems at energies around and above the Coulomb barrier (0.8V{sub B{<=}}E{<=}2.0V{sub B}). As the efficiency of a ToF spectrometer is strongly dependent on the energy and mass of the detected particles, we have covered a wide range of the scattered particle energies with a high degree of accuracy at the lowest energies. The different experimental efficiency curves obtained in that way were compared with theoretical electronic stopping power curves on carbon foils and were applied.

  19. Pseudo-Critical Enhancement of Thermal Photons in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrik van Hees; Min He; Ralf Rapp

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the spectra and elliptic flow of thermal photons emitted in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions (URHICs) at RHIC and LHC. The thermal emission rates are taken from complete leading-order rates for the QGP and hadronic many-body calculations including baryons and antibaryons, as well as meson-exchange reactions (including Bremsstrahlung). We first update previous thermal fireball calculations by implementing a lattice-QCD based equation of state and extend them to compare to recent LHC data. We then scrutinize the space-time evolution of Au-Au collisions at RHIC by employing an ideal hydrodynamic model constrained by bulk- and multistrange-hadron spectra and elliptic flow, including a non-vanishing initial flow. We systematically compare the evolutions of temperature, radial flow, azimuthal anisotropy and four-volume, and exhibit the temperature profile of thermal photon radiation. Based on these insights, we put forward a scenario with a "pseudo-critical enhancement" of thermal emission rates, and investigate its impact on RHIC and LHC direct photon data.

  20. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  1. Dipolar degrees of freedom and Isospin equilibration processes in Heavy Ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Papa; I. Berceanu; L. Acosta; F. Amorini; C. Agodi; A. Anzalone; L. Auditore; G. Cardella; S. Cavallaro; M. B. Chatterjee; E. De Filippo; L. Francalanza; E. Geraci; L. Grassi; B. Gnoffo; J. Han; E. La Guidara; G. Lanzalone; I. Lombardo; C. Maiolino T. Minniti A. Pagano; E. V. Pagano; S. Pirrone; G. Politi; F. Porto; L. Quattrocchi; F. Rizzo; E. Rosato; P. Russotto; A. Trifirò; M. Trimarchi; G. Verde; and M. Vigilante

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: In heavy ion collision at the Fermi energies Isospin equilibration processes occur- ring when nuclei with different charge/mass asymmetries interacts have been investigated to get information on the nucleon-nucleon Iso-vectorial effective interaction. Purpose: In this paper, for the system 48Ca +27 Al at 40 MeV/nucleon, we investigate on this process by means of an observable tightly linked to isospin equilibration processes and sensitive in exclusive way to the dynamical stage of the collision. From the comparison with dynamical model calculations we want also to obtain information on the Iso-vectorial effective microscopic interaction. Method: The average time derivative of the total dipole associated to the relative motion of all emitted charged particles and fragments has been determined from the measured charges and velocities by using the 4? multi-detector CHIMERA. The average has been determined for semi- peripheral collisions and for different charges Zb of the biggest produced fragment. Experimental evidences collected for the systems 27Al+48Ca and 27Al+40Ca at 40 MeV/nucleon used to support this novel method of investigation are also discussed.

  2. Initialization of hydrodynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions with an energy-momentum transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Yu. Naboka; S. V. Akkelin; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A key ingredient of hydrodynamical modeling of relativistic heavy ion collisions is thermal initial conditions, an input that is the consequence of a pre-thermal dynamics which is not completely understood yet. In the paper we employ a recently developed energy-momentum transport model of the pre-thermal stage to study influence of the alternative initial states in nucleus-nucleus collisions on flow and energy density distributions of the matter at the starting time of hydrodynamics. In particular, the dependence of the results on isotropic and anisotropic initial states is analyzed. It is found that at the thermalization time the transverse flow is larger and the maximal energy density is higher for the longitudinally squeezed initial momentum distributions. The results are also sensitive to the relaxation time parameter, equation of state at the thermalization time, and transverse profile of initial energy density distribution: Gaussian approximation, Glauber Monte Carlo profiles, etc. Also, test results ensure that the numerical code based on the energy-momentum transport model is capable of providing both averaged and fluctuating initial conditions for the hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic nuclear collisions.

  3. Constraining supernova equations of state with equilibrium constants from heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Hempel; Kris Hagel; Joseph Natowitz; Gerd Röpke; Stefan Typel

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Cluster formation is a fundamental aspect of the equation of state (EOS) of warm and dense nuclear matter such as can be found in supernovae (SN). Similar matter can be studied in heavy-ion collisions (HIC). We use the experimental data of Qin et al. 2012 to test calculations of cluster formation and the role of in-medium modifications of cluster properties in SN EOSs. For the comparison between theory and experiment we use chemical equilibrium constants as the main observables. This reduces some of the systematic uncertainties and allows deviations from ideal gas behavior to be identified clearly. In the analysis, we carefully account for the differences between matter in SN and HIC. We find that, at the lowest densities, the experiment and all theoretical models are consistent with the ideal gas behavior. At higher densities ideal behavior is clearly ruled out and interaction effects have to be considered. The contributions of continuum correlations are of relevance in the virial expansion and remain a difficult problem to solve at higher densities. We conclude that at the densities and temperatures discussed mean-field interactions of nucleons, inclusion of all relevant light clusters, and a suppression mechanism of clusters at high densities have to be incorporated in the SN EOS.

  4. Interplay of anisotropies of momentum distribution and mean field in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. H. Simon; P. Danielewicz

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Two important parametrizations of momentum-dependent nucleonic fields, proposed for the simulations of central heavy-ion collisions, one by Gale et al. and the other by Welke et al., suffer from practical limitations. The first gives rise to mean fields isotropic in momentum, even when underlying momentum distributions are anisotropic, making descriptions of early nonequilibrium stages of collisions unrealistic. The second parametrization gives rise to anisotropic mean fields, but is computationally expensive, because the mean field has to be computed separately for every location of a nucleon in phase space, through folding. Here we construct a parametrization of the nucleonic mean field that yields an anisotropic mean field for an anisotropic momentum distribution and is inexpensive computationally. To demonstrate the versatility of our parametrization, we take the case of results from the parametrization by Welke et al. and attempt to approximate them. In arriving at a suitable anisotropic mean-field potential, we draw, on one hand, from the idea behind the parametrization of Gale et al., of a separable expansion of the potential energy, and, on the other, from the idea of a parallel expansion of the energy and mean field in anisotropy. We show that using our novel parametrization we can qualitatively and partially quantitatively reproduce the features of the mean-field parametrization of Welke et al.. This opens up the possibility of exploring the effects of mean-field anisotropy in collisions, without the penalty of computational cost behind the folding parametrization.

  5. Constraining supernova equations of state with equilibrium constants from heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hempel, Matthias; Natowitz, Joseph; Röpke, Gerd; Typel, Stefan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cluster formation is a fundamental aspect of the equation of state (EOS) of warm and dense nuclear matter such as can be found in supernovae (SN). Similar matter can be studied in heavy-ion collisions (HIC). We use the experimental data of Qin et al. 2012 to test calculations of cluster formation and the role of in-medium modifications of cluster properties in SN EOSs. For the comparison between theory and experiment we use chemical equilibrium constants as the main observables. This reduces some of the systematic uncertainties and allows deviations from ideal gas behavior to be identified clearly. In the analysis, we carefully account for the differences between matter in SN and HIC. We find that, at the lowest densities, the experiment and all theoretical models are consistent with the ideal gas behavior. At higher densities ideal behavior is clearly ruled out and interaction effects have to be considered. The contributions of continuum correlations are of relevance in the virial expansion and remain a diff...

  6. The role of surface energy coefficients and nuclear surface diffuseness in the fusion of heavy-ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishwar Dutt; Rajeev K. Puri

    2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the effect of surface energy coefficients as well as nuclear surface diffuseness in the proximity potential and ultimately in the fusion of heavy-ions. Here we employ different versions of surface energy coefficients. Our analysis reveals that these technical parameters can influence the fusion barriers by a significant amount. A best set of these parameters is also given that explains the experimental data nicely.

  7. In-medium NN cross sections determined from stopping and collective flow in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y; Li, Z; Danielewicz, Pawel; Li, Zhuxia; Zhang, Yingxun

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-medium nucleon-nucleon scattering cross sections are explored by comparing results of quantum molecular dynamics simulations to data on stopping and on elliptic and directed flow in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions. The comparison points to in-medium cross sections which are suppressed at low energies but not at higher energies. Positive correlations are found between the degree of stopping and the magnitudes of elliptic and directed flows.

  8. In-medium NN cross sections determined from stopping and collective flow in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yingxun Zhang; Zhuxia Li; Pawel Danielewicz

    2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In-medium nucleon-nucleon scattering cross sections are explored by comparing results of quantum molecular dynamics simulations to data on stopping and on elliptic and directed flow in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions. The comparison points to in-medium cross sections which are suppressed at low energies but not at higher energies. Positive correlations are found between the degree of stopping and the magnitudes of elliptic and directed flows.

  9. Clustered and neutron-rich low density {open_quotes}neck{close_quotes} region produced in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobotka, L.G.; Dempsey, J.F.; Charity, R.J. [Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Danielewicz, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The creation of a clustered and neutron-rich midvelocity ({open_quotes}neck{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}hot spot{close_quotes}) region in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions is discussed. Reaction simulations suggest that the preponderance of the neutron-rich species in isotopic and isobaric ratios results primarily from the amplification of the initial neutron excess due to d (and by inference {alpha}-particle) cluster formation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Simulation studies of the HADES first level trigger PART I: Performance in heavy-ion induced reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schicker; H. Tsertos

    1996-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The first level trigger of the HADES spectrometer is studied for the heavy-ion collision systems Au+Au and Ne+Ne. The trigger efficiency for central events is given in dependence of the imposed charged particle multiplicity condition. The timing properties of the trigger signal are described. The losses due to deadtime are specified. Finally, the first level trigger rate is reported.

  11. Charged Particle and Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghunath Sahoo; Aditya Nath Mishra; Nirbhay K. Behera; Basanta K. Nandi

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the charged particle and photon multiplicity, and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like charged particles, photons and the transverse energy measurement.

  12. Mini-jet thermalization and diffusion of transverse momentum correlation in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-gang Pang; Qun Wang; Xin-Nian Wang; Rong Xu

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Transverse momentum correlation in azimuthal angle of produced hadrons due to mini-jets are studied first within the HIJING Monte Carlo model in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Jet quenching in the early stage of thermalization is shown to lead to significant diffusion (broadening) of the correlation. Evolution of the transverse momentum density fluctuation that gives rise to such correlation in azimuthal angle in the later stage of heavy-ion collisions is further investigated within a linearized diffusion-like equation and is shown to be determined by the shear viscosity of the evolving dense matter. Such a diffusion equation for the transverse momentum fluctuation is solved with initial values given by HIJING and together with the hydrodynamic equation for the bulk medium. The final transverse momentum correlation in azimuthal angle is calculated along the freeze-out hyper-surface and is found further diffused for larger values of shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s \\sim 0.2-0.4$. Therefore the final transverse momentum correlation in azimuthal angle can be used to study the thermalization of mini-jets in the early stage of heavy-ion collisions and the viscous effect in the hydrodynamic evolution of the strongly coupled quark gluon plasma.

  13. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop entitled Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State (Volume 88)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsch,F.; Kharzeev, D.; Molnar, K.; Petreczky, P.; Teaney, D.

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The interpretation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies with thermal concepts is largely based on the relative success of ideal (nondissipative) hydrodynamics. This approach can describe basic observables at RHIC, such as particle spectra and momentum anisotropies, fairly well. On the other hand, recent theoretical efforts indicate that dissipation can play a significant role. Ideally viscous hydrodynamic simulations would extract, if not only the equation of state, but also transport coefficients from RHIC data. There has been a lot of progress with solving relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. There are already large uncertainties in ideal hydrodynamics calculations, e.g., uncertainties associated with initial conditions, freezeout, and the simplified equations of state typically utilized. One of the most sensitive observables to the equation of state is the baryon momentum anisotropy, which is also affected by freezeout assumptions. Up-to-date results from lattice quantum chromodynamics on the transition temperature and equation of state with realistic quark masses are currently available. However, these have not yet been incorporated into the hydrodynamic calculations. Therefore, the RBRC workshop 'Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State' aimed at getting a better understanding of the theoretical frameworks for dissipation and near-equilibrium dynamics in heavy-ion collisions. The topics discussed during the workshop included techniques to solve the dynamical equations and examine the role of initial conditions and decoupling, as well as the role of the equation of state and transport coefficients in current simulations.

  14. Effect of a short weak prepulse on laser-triggered front-surface heavy-ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bochkarev, S. G.; Bychenkov, V. Yu. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovin, G. V.; Uryupina, D. S.; Shulyapov, S. A.; Savel'ev, A. B. [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, International Laser Centre and Faculty of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Andriyash, A. V. [The All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A suppression of light-ion acceleration (from surface water contaminants) was observed when a moderate-intensity subpicosecond laser pulse was focused on a thick metal target. Simultaneously, an effective generation of high-energy multicharge ions of the target material (Fe) was experimentally observed. A numerical simulation based on the Boltzmann-Vlasov-Poisson model revealed that this is due to the very specific regime of cleaning contaminants from the target surface by the short weak prepulse preceding the main pulse by more than 10 ns and having an intensity below the surface breakdown threshold. Because this prepulse causes the contaminant layer to boil explosively, a low-density gap forms above the target surface. These conditions are consequently favorable for boosting the energy of heavy ions.

  15. Three dimensional simulations of space charge dominated heavy ion beams with applications to inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grote, D.P.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion fusion requires injection, transport and acceleration of high current beams. Detailed simulation of such beams requires fully self-consistent space charge fields and three dimensions. WARP3D, developed for this purpose, is a particle-in-cell plasma simulation code optimized to work within the framework of an accelerator`s lattice of accelerating, focusing, and bending elements. The code has been used to study several test problems and for simulations and design of experiments. Two applications are drift compression experiments on the MBE-4 facility at LBL and design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector for the proposed ILSE facility. With aggressive drift compression on MBE-4, anomalous emittance growth was observed. Simulations carried out to examine possible causes showed that essentially all the emittance growth is result of external forces on the beam and not of internal beam space-charge fields. Dominant external forces are the dodecapole component of focusing fields, the image forces on the surrounding pipe and conductors, and the octopole fields that result from the structure of the quadrupole focusing elements. Goal of the design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector is to produce a beam of as low emittance as possible. The simulations show that the dominant effects that increase the emittance are the nonlinear octopole fields and the energy effect (fields in the axial direction that are off-axis). Injectors were designed that minimized the beam envelope in order to reduce the effect of the nonlinear fields. Alterations to the quadrupole structure that reduce the nonlinear fields further were examined. Comparisons were done with a scaled experiment resulted in very good agreement.

  16. Effects of nuclear absorption on the antiLambda/antiproton ratio in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuqiang Wang; Marlene Nahrgang; Marcus Bleicher

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An enhanced antiLambda/antiproton ratio in heavy-ion relative to p+p collisions has been proposed as one of the signatures for the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) formation. A significantly large (antiLambda+antiSigma0+1.1*antiSigma-)/antiproton ratio of 3.5 has been observed in the mid-rapidity and low transverse momentum region in central Au+Au collisions at the nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 4.9 GeV at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). This is an order of magnitude larger than the values in peripheral Au+Au collisions and p+p collisions at the corresponding energy. By using the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) transport model, we demonstrate that the observed large ratio can be explained by strong absorption of antiprotons (~99.9%) and antiLambdas (~99%) in dense nuclear matter created in central collisions. We find within the model that the initial antiLambda/antiproton ratio, mainly from string fragmentation, does not depend on the collision centrality, and is consistent with that observed in p+p collisions. This suggests that the observed large (antiLambda+antiSigma0+1.1*antiSigma-)/antiproton ratio at the AGS does not necessarily imply the formation of the QGP. We further study the excitation function of the ratio in UrQMD, which may help in the search and study of the QGP.

  17. SPORT: A new sub-nanosecond time-resolved instrument to study swift heavy ion-beam induced luminescence Application to luminescence degradation of a fast plastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    luminescence ­ Application to luminescence degradation of a fast plastic scintillator E. Gardésa,b,* , E the dynamics of UV- visible luminescence under high stopping power heavy ion irradiation. We applied our damages with increasing ion fluence, our investigations reveal a degradation of scintillation intensity

  18. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and their partial or total evaporation in the expanding flow.

  19. Fast six-channel pyrometer for warm-dense-matter experiments with intense heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, P.A.; Kulish, M.I.; Mintsev, V.; Nikolaev, D.N.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Udrea, S.; Tahir, N.A.; Varentsov, D.; Hug, A.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a fast multi-channel radiation pyrometer that was developed for warmdense-matter experiments with intense heavy ion beams at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI). The pyrometer is capable of measuring of brightness temperatures from 2000 K to 50000 K, at 6 wavelengths in visible and near-infrared parts of spectrum, with 5 nanosecond temporal resolution and several micrometers spatial resolution. The pyrometer's spectral discrimination technique is based on interference filters, which act as filters and mirrors to allow for simultaneous spectral discrimination of the same ray at multiple wavelengths.

  20. Isospin Effects in Heavy-Ion Collisions: Some Results From CHIMERA Experiments At LNS And Perspectives With Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Verde, G. [INFN, Sez di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Amorini, F.; Cavallaro, S.; Lombardo, I.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P. [INFN Lab. Naz. del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44-95123 Catania (Italy); Dep. of Phys. and Astr. Univ. Catania Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Maiolino, C. [INFN Lab. Naz. del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44-95123 Catania (Italy); Arena, N.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Lo Nigro, S.; Politi, G. [INFN, Sez di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Dep. of Phys. and Astr. Univ. Catania Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [INFN and Dep. of Phys. Univ. Messina (Italy)] (and others)

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    CHIMERA is a 4{pi} multidetector for charged particles available at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS). A new method to measure the time scale of the emission of nuclear fragments is described, together with some applications in the field of the isospin dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. Competition between fusion-like and binary reactions near the energy threshold for nuclear multifragmentation is discussed. Opportunities are pointed out to use the detector at low and intermediate energies using the kinematical-coincidence method.

  1. Signature of smooth transition from diabatic to adiabatic states in heavy-ion fusion reactions at deep subbarrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takatoshi Ichikawa; Kouichi Hagino; Akira Iwamoto

    2009-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel extension of the standard coupled-channels framework for heavy-ion reactions in order to analyze fusion reactions at deep subbarrier incident energies. This extension simulates a smooth transition between the diabatic two-body and the adiabatic one-body states. To this end, we damp gradually the off-diagonal part of the coupling potential, for which the position of the onset of the damping varies for each eigen channel. We show that this model accounts well for the steep falloff of the fusion cross sections for the $^{16}$O+$^{208}$Pb, $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni, and $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni reactions.

  2. Pion Transverse Momentum Spectrum, Elliptic Flow and Interferometry in the Granular Source Model in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically investigate the pion transverse momentum spectrum, elliptic flow, and Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) interferometry in the granular source model of quark-gluon plasma droplets in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The granular source model can well reproduce the experimental results of the Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 200 GeV and the Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 2.76 TeV with different centralities. We examine the parameters of the granular source models with an uniform and Woods-Saxon initial energy distributions in a droplet. The parameters exhibit certain regularities for collision centrality and energy.

  3. Off-shell effects in Higgs decays to heavy gauge bosons and signal-background interference in Higgs decays to photons at a linear collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebler, Stefan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss off-shell contributions in Higgs decays to heavy gauge bosons $H\\rightarrow VV^{(*)}$ with $V\\in\\lbrace Z,W\\rbrace$ for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson for both dominant production processes $e^+e^-\\rightarrow ZH\\rightarrow ZVV^{(*)}$ and $e^+e^-\\rightarrow \

  4. Mean-field approach in the multi-component gas of interacting particles applied to relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Anchishkin; V. Vovchenko

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Generalized mean-field approach for thermodynamic description of relativistic single- and multi-component gas in the grand canonical ensemble is formulated. In the framework of the proposed approach different phenomenological excluded-volume procedures are presented and compared to the existing ones. The mean-field approach is then used to effectively include hard-core repulsion in hadron-resonance gas model for description of chemical freeze-out in heavy-ion collisions. We calculate the collision energy dependence of several quantities for different values of hard-core hadron radius and for different excluded-volume procedures such as van der Waals and Carnahan-Starling models. It is shown that a choice of the excluded-volume model becomes important for large particle densities, and for large enough values of hadron radii ($r\\gtrsim0.9$ fm) there can be a sizable difference between different excluded-volume procedures used to describe the chemical freeze-out in heavy-ion collisions. For the smaller and more commonly used values of hard-core hadron radii ($r\\lesssim0.5$ fm) the van der Waals excluded-volume procedure is shown to be sufficient.

  5. Nano-porosity in GaSb induced by swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluth, P., E-mail: patrick.kluth@anu.edu.au; Schnohr, C. S.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Lei, W.; Rodriguez, M. D.; Afra, B.; Bierschenk, T.; Ridgway, M. C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Sullivan, J.; Weed, R. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, AMPL, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Li, W.; Ewing, R. C. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1005 (United States)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-porous structures form in GaSb after ion irradiation with 185 MeV Au ions. The porous layer formation is governed by the dominant electronic energy loss at this energy regime. The porous layer morphology differs significantly from that previously reported for low-energy, ion-irradiated GaSb. Prior to the onset of porosity, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy indicates the formation of small vacancy clusters in single ion impacts, while transmission electron microscopy reveals fragmentation of the GaSb into nanocrystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix. Following this fragmentation process, macroscopic porosity forms, presumably within the amorphous phase.

  6. The potential application of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films for heavy ion irradiation detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Huang-Chin [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei, Taiwan 251 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 300 (China); Chen, Shih-Show [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei, Taiwan 251 (China); Department of Information Technology and Mobile Communication, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, Tamsui, New-Taipei, Taiwan 251 (China); Wang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, I-Nan; Chang, Ching-Lin [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei, Taiwan 251 (China); Lee, Chi-Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 300 (China); Guo, Jinghua [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of utilizing the ultra-nanocrystalline (UNCD) films for detecting the Au-ion irradiation was investigated. When the fluence for Au-ion irradiation is lower than the critical value (f{sub c}= 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) the turn-on field for electron field emission (EFE) process of the UNCD films decreased systematically with the increase in fluence that is correlated with the increase in sp{sup 2}-bonded phase ({pi}{sup *}-band in EELS) due to the Au-ion irradiation. The EFE properties changed irregularly, when the fluence for Au-ion irradiation exceeds this critical value. The transmission electron microscopic microstructural examinations, in conjunction with EELS spectroscopic studies, reveal that the structural change preferentially occurred in the diamond-to-Si interface for the samples experienced over critical fluence of Au-ion irradiation, viz. the crystalline SiC phase was induced in the interfacial region and the thickness of the interface decreased. These observations implied that the UNCD films could be used as irradiation detectors when the fluence for Au-ion irradiation does not exceed such a critical value.

  7. RHIC | Electron-Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 MediaBrookhavenBlack Holes200

  8. EBIT spectroscopy of highly charged heavy ions relevant to hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ding Xiaobin; Dong Chenzhong [North West Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Koike, Fumihiro [School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan); Nakano, Tomohide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ohashi, Hayato [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Watanabe, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectra of highly charged iron, gadolinium, and tungsten ions obtained with electron beam ion traps. Spectroscopic studies of these ions are important to diagnose and control hot plasmas in several areas. For iron ions, the electron density dependence of the line intensity ratio in extreme ultraviolet spectra is investigated for testing the model calculation used in solar corona diagnostics. Soft x-ray spectra of gadolinium are studied to obtain atomic data required in light source development for future lithography. Tungsten is considered to be the main impurity in the ITER plasma, and thus visible and soft x-ray spectra of tungsten have been observed to explore the emission lines useful for the spectroscopic diagnostics of the ITER plasma.

  9. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic heavy ions in a fixed target experiment at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rune E. Mikkelsen; Allan H. Sørensen; Ulrik I. Uggerhøj

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the emission of bremsstrahlung from lead and argon ions in A Fixed Target ExpeRiment (AFTER) that uses the LHC beams. With nuclear charges of $Ze$ equal $208$ and $18$ respectively, these ions are accelerated to energies of $7$ TeV$\\times Z $. The bremsstrahlung peaks around $\\approx 100$ GeV and the spectrum exposes the nuclear structure of the incoming ion. The peak structure is significantly different from the flat power spectrum pertaining to a point charge. Photons are predominantly emitted within an angle of $1/\\gamma$ to the direction of ion propagation. Our calculations are based on the Weizs\\"{a}cker-Williams method of virtual quanta with application of existing experimental data on photonuclear interactions.

  10. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion Summary Report of the Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, P.A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion Inertial Fusion: Accelerator and Target Considerations,”i.e. , injector/source, accelerator and target/chamber that10:20am - 11am "The RF accelerator approach to HIF" - P.

  11. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion Summary Report of the Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, P.A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    targets closely resembling NIF targets, to shock- and fast-to ions will be studied on NIF. They also naturally requirebecause of relevance to NIF experiments (both physics and

  12. Nanoscale density fluctuations in swift heavy ion irradiated amorphous SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluth, P.; Giulian, R.; Ridgway, M. C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Pakarinen, O. H.; Djurabekova, F.; Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Byrne, A. P. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the observation of nanoscale density fluctuations in 2 {mu}m thick amorphous SiO{sub 2} layers irradiated with 185 MeV Au ions. At high fluences, in excess of approximately 5 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}, where the surface is completely covered by ion tracks, synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering measurements reveal the existence of a steady state of density fluctuations. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, this steady state is consistent with an ion track ''annihilation'' process, where high-density regions generated in the periphery of new tracks fill in low-density regions located at the center of existing tracks.

  13. On the balance energy and nuclear dynamics in peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajiv Chugh; Rajeev K. Puri

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here the system size dependence of balance energy for semi-central and peripheral collisions using quantum molecular dynamics model. For this study, the reactions of $Ne^{20}+Ne^{20}$, $Ca^{40}+Ca^{40}$, $Ni^{58}+Ni^{58}$, $Nb^{93}+Nb^{93}$, $Xe^{131}+Xe^{131}$ and $Au^{197}+Au^{197}$ are simulated at different incident energies and impact parameters. A hard equation of state along with nucleon-nucleon cross-sections between 40 - 55 mb explains the data nicely. Interestingly, balance energy follows a power law $\\propto{A^{\\tau}}$ for the mass dependence at all colliding geometries. The power factor $\\tau$ is close to -1/3 in central collisions whereas it is -2/3 for peripheral collisions suggesting stronger system size dependence at peripheral geometries. This also suggests that in the absence of momentum dependent interactions, Coulomb's interaction plays an exceedingly significant role. These results are further analyzed for nuclear dynamics at the balance point.

  14. Effects of global charge conservation on time evolution of cumulants of conserved charges in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miki Sakaida; Masayuki Asakawa; Masakiyo Kitazawa

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of the global charge conservation on the cumulants of conserved charges observed in relativistic heavy ion collisions in a finite rapidity window, $\\Delta\\eta$, with a special emphasis on the time evolution of fluctuations in the hadronic medium. It is argued that the experimental result of the net-electric charge fluctuation observed by ALICE does not receive effects from the global charge conservation, because of the finite diffusion distance of charged particles in the hadronic stage. We emphasize that the magnitude of the effect of the global charge conservation can be estimated experimentally by combining the information on the $\\Delta\\eta$ dependences of various cumulants of conserved charges, similarly to other dynamical properties of the hot medium.

  15. The HypHI project: Hypernuclear spectroscopy with stable heavy ion beams and rare isotope beams at GSI and FAIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bianchin; P. Achenbach; S. Ajimura; O. Borodina; T. Fukuda; J. Hoffmann; M. Kavatsyuk; K. Koch; T. Koike; N. Kurz; F. Maas; S. Minami; Y. Mizoi; T. Nagae; D. Nakajima; A. Okamura; W. Ott; B. Özel; J. Pochodzalla; C. Rappold; T. R. Saito; A. Sakaguchi; M. Sako; M. Sekimoto; H. Sugimura; T. Takahashi; H. Tamura; K. Tanida; W. Trautmann

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The HypHI collaboration aims to perform a precise hypernuclear spectroscopy with stable heavy ion beams and rare isotope beams at GSI and fAIR in order to study hypernuclei at extreme isospin, especially neutron rich hypernuclei to look insight hyperon-nucleon interactions in the neutron rich medium, and hypernuclear magnetic moments to investigate baryon properties in the nuclei. We are currently preparing for the first experiment with $^6$Li and $^{12}$C beams at 2 AGeV to demonstrate the feasibility of a precise hypernuclear spectroscopy by identifying $^{3}_{\\Lambda}$H, $^{4}_{\\Lambda}$H and $^{5}_{\\Lambda}$He. The first physics experiment on these hypernuclei is planned for 2009. In the present document, an overview of the HypHI project and the details of this first experiment will be discussed.

  16. Bulk Viscosity driven clusterization of quark-gluon plasma and early freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Torrieri; Boris Tomasik; Igor Mishustin

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new scenario for heavy ion collisions that could solve the lingering problems associated with the so-called HBT puzzle. We postulate that the system starts expansion as the perfect quark-gluon fluid but close to freeze-out it splits into clusters, due to a sharp rise of bulk viscosity in the vicinity of the hadronization transition. We then argue that the characteristic cluster size is determined by the viscosity coefficient and the expansion rate. Typically it is much smaller and independent of the total system volume. These clusters maintain the pre-existing outward-going flow, as a spray of droplets, but develop no flow of their own, and hadronize by evaporation. We provide an ansatz for converting the hydrodynamic output into clusters.

  17. Bulk Viscosity driven clusterization of quark-gluon plasma and early freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrieri, G; Mishustin, I

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new scenario for heavy ion collisions that could solve the lingering problems associated with the so-called HBT puzzle. We postulate that the system starts expansion as the perfect quark-gluon fluid but close to freeze-out it splits into clusters, due to a sharp rise of bulk viscosity in the vicinity of the hadronization transition. We then argue that the characteristic cluster size is determined by the viscosity coefficient and the expansion rate. Typically it is much smaller and independent of the total system volume. These clusters maintain the pre-existing outward-going flow, as a spray of droplets, but develop no flow of their own, and hadronize by evaporation. We provide an ansatz for converting the hydrodynamic output into clusters.

  18. Energy and Atomic Mass Dependence of Nuclear Stopping Power in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions in Interacting Gluon Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. J. Liu; W. Q. Chao; G. Wilk

    1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Monte-Carlo simulation of energy deposition process in relativistic heavy-ion collisions based on a new realization of the Interacting-Gluon-Model (IGM) for high energy $N-N$ collisions. In particular we show results for proton spectra from collisions of $E_{lab}=200 \\ GeV/N$ $^{32}$S beam incident on $^{32}$S target and analyze the energy and mass dependence of nuclear stopping power predicted by our model. Theoretical predictions for proton rapidity distributions of both $^{208}$Pb + $^{208}$Pb collisions at $E_{lab}=160 \\ GeV/N$ CERN SPS and $^{197}$Au + $^{197}$Au at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200 \\ GeV$ BNL RHIC are given.

  19. Absence of Thermophoretic Flow in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions as an Indicator for the Absence of a Mixed Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus H. Thoma

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If a quark-gluon plasma is formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, there may or may not be a mixed phase of quarks, gluons and hadronic clusters when the critical temperature is reached in the expansion of the fireball. If there is a temperature gradient in the fireball, the hadronic clusters, embedded in the heat bath of quarks and gluons, are subjected to a thermophoretic force. It is shown that even for small temperature gradients and short lifetimes of the mixed phase, thermophoresis would lead to a flow essentially stronger than the observed one. The absence of this strong flow provides support for a rapid or sudden hadronization mechanism without a mixed phase.

  20. Spin-rotation coupling in non-exponential decay of hydrogenlike heavy ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Lambiase; G. Papini; G. Scarpetta

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a model in which a recently reported modulation in the decay of the hydrogenlike ions ${}^{140}$Pr$^{58 +}$ and ${}^{142}$Pm$^{60 +}$ arises from the coupling of rotation to the spin of electron and nuclei (Thomas precession). A similar model describes the electron modulation in muon $ g-2$ experiments correctly. Agreement with the GSI experimental results is obtained for the current QED-values of the bound electron g-factors, $g({}^{140}$Pr$^{58 +})=1.872$ and $g({}^{142}$Pm$^{60 +})=1.864$, if the Lorentz factor of the bound electron is $\\sim 1.88$. The latter is fixed by either of the two sets of experimental data. The model predicts that the modulation is not observable if the motion of the ions is linear, or if the ions are stopped in a target.

  1. Simulating Electron Effects in Heavy-Ion Accelerators with Solenoid Focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W. M.; Grote, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Molvik, A. W.; Vay, J.-L.; Seidl, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Coleman, J. E.; Haber, I.

    2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination from electrons is a concern for solenoid-focused ion accelerators being developed for experiments in high-energy-density physics. These electrons, produced directly by beam ions hitting lattice elements or indirectly by ionization of desorbed neutral gas, can potentially alter the beam dynamics, leading to a time-varying focal spot, increased emittance, halo, and possibly electron-ion instabilities. The electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP is used to simulate electron-cloud studies on the solenoid-transport experiment (STX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. We present self-consistent simulations of several STX configurations and compare the results with experimental data in order to calibrate physics parameters in the model.

  2. A pepper-pot emittance meter for low-energy heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kremers, H. R.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Brandenburg, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel emittance meter has been developed to measure the four-dimensional, transverse phase-space distribution of a low-energy ion beam using the pepper-pot technique. A characteristic feature of this instrument is that the pepper-pot plate, which has a linear array of holes in the vertical direction, is scanned horizontally through the ion beam. This has the advantage that the emittance can also be measured at locations along the beam line where the beam has a large horizontal divergence. A set of multi-channel plates, scintillation screen, and ccd camera is used as a position-sensitive ion detector allowing a large range of beam intensities that can be handled. This paper describes the design, construction, and operation of the instrument as well as the data analysis used to reconstruct the four-dimensional phase-space distribution of an ion beam. Measurements on a 15 keV He{sup +} beam are used as an example.

  3. Determination of Dose From Light Charged Ions Relevant to Hadron Therapy Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport System (PHITS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butkus, Michael Patrick

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    on Radiation Protection (ICRP) relates Q and LET together by eqn (9). G733 Gd4c Gd5d G373G372G1e4G375G374G72eG727G736 Gd46 G374G1e4G374G375G372G372 G3beG72eG727G736G3a4 G3G3G3G1 G3G745G742G3G3G3G3G3G3 G72eG727G736G3 Gd51 G373G372G373G372 Gd4f G72eG727G736 Gd4... to note that eqn (9) is a simplified approximation made by the ICRP and although very useful to approximate Q, there are factors other than LET, such as delta ray creation, that influence Q for different ions. The effects that charged particles have...

  4. Rf System Requirements for JLab’s MEIC Collider Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shaoheng [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Wang, Haipeng [JLAB; Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. At the top energy are the electron and ion collider rings. For the ion ring, it accelerates five long ion bunches to colliding energy and rebunches ions into a train of very short bunches before colliding. A set of low frequency RF system is needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping. Another set of high frequency RF cavities is needed to rebunch ions. For the electron ring, superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed to compensate the synchrotron radiation energy loss. The impedance of the SRF cavities must be low enough to keep the high current electron beam stable. The preliminary design requirements of these RF cavities are presented.

  5. QCD Interconnection Studies at Linear Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valery A. Khoze; Torbjörn Sjöstrand

    1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy objects like the W, Z and t are short-lived compared with typical hadronization times. When pairs of such particles are produced, the subsequent hadronic decay systems may therefore become interconnected. We study such potential effects at Linear Collider energies.

  6. A vertical drift chamber as a high resolution focal plane detector for heavy ion spectroscopy with the Enge split-pole spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Kenneth Warren

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    the VDC chamber. In (a), the true equipotential distribution, numerically calculated using program SIMION, is shown. The applied cathode voltage was -9. 5 kV. Each line represents a potential difference of 400 V. In (b), the approximate field... designed for future heavy ion I spectroscopy applications in the split-pole spectrograph. The hybrid t detector will be capable of identifying heavy iona having masses through A - 20 and energies up to 35 MeV/amu to be available from the new K-500...

  7. HISTRAP: Proposal for a Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the physics capabilities of HISTRAP together with a brief description of the facility and a sampling of the beams which will be available for experimentation, and surveys some of the lines of investigation in the physics of multicharged ions, molecular ion spectroscopy, condensed beams, and nuclear physics that will become possible with the advent of HISTRAP. Details of the accelerator design are discussed, including computer studies of beam tracking in the HISTRAP lattice, a discussion of the HHIRF tandem and ECR/RFQ injectors, and a description of the electron beam cooling system. In the past three years, HISTRAP has received substantial support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory management and staff. The project has used discretionary funds to develop hardware prototypes and carry out design studies. Construction has been completed on a vacuum test stand which models 1/16 of the storage ring and has attained a pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr; a prototype rf cavity capable of accelerating beams up to 90 MeV/nucleon and decelerating to 20 keV/nucleon; and a prototype dipole magnet, one of the eight required for the HISTRAP lattice. This paper also contains a summary of the work on electron cooling carried out by one of our staff members at CERN. Building structures and services are described. Details of cost and schedule are also discussed. 77 refs.

  8. Elucidating the event-by-event flow fluctuations in heavy-ion collisions via the event shape selection technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Huo; Jiangyong Jia; Soumya Mohapatra

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of large event-by-event flow fluctuations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC provides an opportunity to study a broad class of flow observables. This paper explores the correlations among harmonic flow coefficients $v_n$ and their phases $\\Phi_n$, and the rapidity fluctuation of $v_n$. The study is carried out usin Pb+Pb events generated by the AMPT model with fixed impact parameter. The overall ellipticity/triangularity of events is varied by selecting on the eccentricities $\\epsilon_n$ or the magnitudes of the flow vector $q_n$ for n=2 and 3, respectively. The responses of the $v_n$, the event-plane correlations, and the rapidity fluctuations, to the change in $\\epsilon_n$ and $q_n$ are then systematized. Strong positive correlations are observed among all even harmonics $v_2, v_4$, and $v_6$ (all increase with $q_2$), between $v_2$ and $v_5$ (both increase with $q_2$) and between $v_3$ and $v_5$ (both increase with $q_3$), consistent with the effects of nonlinear collective response. In contrast, an anti-correlation is observed between $v_2$ and $v_3$ similar to that seen between $\\epsilon_2$ and $\\epsilon_3$. These correlation patterns are found to be independent of whether selecting on $q_n$ or $\\epsilon_n$, validating the ability of $q_n$ in selecting the initial geometry. A forward/backward asymmetry of $v_n(\\eta)$ is observed for events selected on $q_n$ but not on $\\epsilon_n$, reflecting dynamical fluctuations exposed by the $q_n$ selection. Many event-plane correlators show good agreement between $q_n$ and $\\epsilon_n$ selections, suggesting that their variations with $q_n$ are controlled by the change of $\\epsilon_n$ in the initial geometry. Hence these correlators may serve as promising observables for disentangling the fluctuations generated in various stages of the evolution of the matter created in heavy ion collisions.

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the local structure of heavy metal ions incorporated into electrodeposited nickel oxide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balasubramanian, M.; Melendres, C.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Mansour, A.N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bethesda, MD (United States). Carderock Div.] [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bethesda, MD (United States). Carderock Div.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of heavy metal ions into simulated corrosion films has been investigated using spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The films were formed by electrodeposition of the appropriate oxide (hydroxide) onto a graphite substrate. Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to determine the structure and composition of the host oxide film, as well as the local structure of the impurity ion. Results on the incorporation of Ce and Sr into surface films of Ni(OH){sub 2} and NiOOH are reported. Cathodically deposited Ni(OH){sub 2} was found to be mainly in the alpha form while anodically prepared NiOOH showed the presence of Ni{sup +2} and Ni{sup +4}. Cerium incorporated into Ni(OH){sub 2} exists as mixed Ce{sup +3} and Ce{sup +4} phases; a Ce{sup +4} species was found when Ce was codeposited with NiOOH. The structure of the Ce{sup +4} phase in anodic films appears similar to a Ce(OH){sub 4} standard. However, XAS, X-ray diffraction, and laser Raman measurements indicate that the latter chemical formulation is probably incorrect and that the material is really a disordered form of hydrous cerium oxide. The local structure of this material is similar to CeO{sub 2} but has much higher structural disorder. The significance of this finding on the question of the structure of Ce-based corrosion inhibitors in aluminum oxide films is pointed out. Moreover, the authors found it possible to form pure Ce oxide (hydroxide) films on graphite by both cathodic and anodic electrodeposition; their structures have also been elucidated. Strontium incorporated into nickel oxide films consists of Sr{sup +2} which is coordinated to oxygen atoms and is likely to exist as small domains of coprecipitated material.

  10. Effects of ion-neutral collisions on Alfven waves: The presence of forbidden zone and heavy damping zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, C. J. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Lee, L. C. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica, Nankang 115, Taiwan (China); Kuo, C. L. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Wang, C. B. [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Alfven waves are low-frequency transverse waves propagating in a magnetized plasma. We define the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub 0} as {omega}{sub 0}=kV{sub A}cos{theta}, where k is the wave number, V{sub A} is the Alfven speed, and {theta} is the angle between the wave vector and the ambient magnetic field. There are partially ionized plasmas in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasma systems, such as in the solar chromosphere, interstellar clouds, and the earth ionosphere. The presence of neutral particles may modify the wave frequency and cause damping of Alfven waves. The effects on Alfven waves depend on two parameters: (1) {alpha}=n{sub n}/n{sub i}, the ratio of neutral density (n{sub n}), and ion density (n{sub i}); (2) {beta}={nu}{sub ni}/{omega}{sub 0}, the ratio of neutral collisional frequency by ions {nu}{sub ni} to the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub 0}. Most of the previous studies examined only the limiting case with a relatively large neutral collisional frequency or {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1. In the present paper, the dispersion relation for Alfven waves is solved for all values of {alpha} and {beta}. Approximate solutions in the limit {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1 as well as {beta} Much-Less-Than 1 are obtained. It is found for the first time that there is a 'forbidden zone (FZ)' in the {alpha}-{beta} parameter space, where the real frequency of Alfven waves becomes zero. We also solve the wavenumber k from the dispersion equation for a fixed frequency and find the existence of a 'heavy damping zone (HDZ).' We then examine the presence of FZ and HDZ for Alfven waves in the ionosphere and in the solar chromosphere.

  11. Effects of compression and collective expansion on particle emission from central heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States))

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conditions under which compression occurs and collective expansion develops in energetic symmetric reactions of heavy nuclei are analyzed, together with their effects on emitted light baryons and pions. Within transport simulations, it is shown that shock fronts perpendicular to beam axis form in head-on reactions. The fronts separate hot compressed matter from normal matter and propagate into the projectile and target. As the impact parameter increases, the angle of inclination of the fronts relative to beam axis decreases, and in between the fronts a weak tangential discontinuity develops. Hot matter exposed to the vacuum in directions perpendicular to shock motion (and parallel to fronts) starts to expand sideways early within the reactions. Expansion in the direction of shock motion follows after the shocks propagate through nuclei, but due to the delay does not acquire the same strength. Expansion affects angular distributions, mean-energy components, shapes of spectra, and mean energies of different particles emitted into any one direction and further particle yields. Both the anisotropy in the expansion and a collective motion associated with the weak discontinuity affect the magnitude of sideward flow within the reaction plane. Differences in mean particle energy components in and out of the reaction plane in semicentral collisions depend sensitively on the relative magnitude of shock speed in normal matter and speed of sound in hot matter. The missing energy, considered in the past in association with low measured pion multiplicity in central reactions, may be identified with the energy of collective expansion. Relations are established which govern approximately the behavior of density and entropy in the compressed region in reactions with beam energy and impact parameter.

  12. Experimental investigation and thermodynamic modeling of extraction of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by chelation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uyansoy, Hakki

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewater streams containing heavy metals are common in industry. To prevent the contamination of clean water sources, the Clean Water Act specifies limits on the heavy metal concentrations of industrial waste water. This creates a strong need...

  13. Implications of heavy-ion-induced satellite x-ray emission. III. Chemical effects in high resolution sulfur K/sub. cap alpha. / x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vane, C.R.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Kahane, S.; McDaniel, F.D.; Milner, W.T.; Raman, S.; Rosseel, T.M.; Slaughter, G.G.; Varghese, S.L.; Young, J.P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution (approx. 7 eV at 2.3 keV) sulfur K/sub ..cap alpha../ x-ray spectra have been obtained for a series of sulfur compound targets under heavy ion impact at the Holified Heavy Ion Facility. The spectra observed are dominated by a series of satellite peaks arising from varying degrees of L-shell ionization at the time of x-ray emission. Each spectral profile has been parameterized by a single variable p/sub L/, the apparent average L-shell ionization probability. Correlations are evident between p/sub L/ and the corresponding sulfur atom chemical environment. Much stronger correlations are however found for variations of some individual peak intensities with specific chemical parameters. Comparison of results for Ar/sup q+/ and Kr/sup q+/ projectiles shows that while L-shell ionization probability has increased, chemical sensitivity has apparently saturated.

  14. Gamma-Gamma Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a gamma collider, we need to discuss the laser optics in thegamma collider will be given later, coupled with some discussions of the requisite opticsoptics and an adequate laser for Compton conversion. With this approach, the luminosity for the gamma-

  15. Entrance-channel mass-asymmetry dependence of compound nucleus formation time in light heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szanto de Toledo, A. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica Nuclear-Laboratorio, Pelletron, Caixa Postal 66318-05389-970 Sao Paulo, (Brasil)] [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica Nuclear-Laboratorio, Pelletron, Caixa Postal 66318-05389-970 Sao Paulo, (Brasil); Carlson, B.V. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico da Aeronautica, Centro Tecnico Aerospacial, 12228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, (Brasil)] [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico da Aeronautica, Centro Tecnico Aerospacial, 12228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, (Brasil); Beck, C. [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Universite Louis Pasteur, Boite Postale 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)] [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Universite Louis Pasteur, Boite Postale 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Thoennessen, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The entrance-channel mass-asymmetry dependence of the compound nucleus formation time in light heavy-ion reactions has been investigated within the framework of semiclassical dissipative collision models. The model calculations have been applied successfully to the formation of the {sup 38}Ar compound nucleus as populated via the {sup 9}Be+{sup 29}Si, {sup 11}B+{sup 27}Al, {sup 12}C+{sup 26}Mg, and {sup 19}F+{sup 19}F entrance channels. The shape evolution of several other light composite systems appears to be consistent with the so-called {open_quote}{open_quote}Fusion Inhibition Factor{close_quote}{close_quote} which has been observed experimentally. As found previously in more massive systems for the fusion-evaporation process, the entrance-channel mass-asymmetry degree of freedom appears to determine the competition between the different mechanisms as well as the time scales involved. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the orbital momentum of the system created in non-central collisions. To study this effect, we investigate a three particle mixed harmonics azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho}-even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of this observable using the STAR detector in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 and 62 GeV. The results are presented as a function of collision centrality, particle separation in rapidity, and particle transverse momentum. A signal consistent with several of the theoretical expectations is detected in all four data sets. We compare our results to the predictions of existing event generators, and discuss in detail possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  17. Compositional analysis and depth profiling of thin film CrO{sub 2} by heavy ion ERDA and standard RBS: a comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khamlich, S., E-mail: skhamlich@gmail.com [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X 680, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); The African Laser Centre, CSIR campus, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria (South Africa); Msimanga, M., E-mail: mandla@tlabs.ac.za [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); iThemba LABS Gauteng, Private Bag 11, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, C.P.U.T., P.O. Box 1906, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); McCrindle, R. [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X 680, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Maaza, M. [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X 680, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); The African Laser Centre, CSIR campus, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) thin film has generated considerable interest in applied research due to the wide variety of its technological applications. It has been extensively investigated in recent years, attracting the attention of researchers working on spintronic heterostructures and in the magnetic recording industry. However, its synthesis is usually a difficult task due to its metastable nature and various synthesis techniques are being investigated. In this work a polycrystalline thin film of CrO{sub 2} was prepared by electron beam vaporization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} onto a Si substrate. The polycrystalline structure was confirmed through XRD analysis. The stoichiometry and elemental depth distribution of the deposited film were measured by ion beam nuclear analytical techniques heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), which both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Moreover, the analysis carried out highlights the importance of complementary usage of the two techniques to obtain a more complete description of elemental content and depth distribution in thin films. - Graphical abstract: Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films of CrO{sub 2} have been grown by e-beam evaporation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} target in vacuum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composition was determined by heavy ion-ERDA and RBS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HI-ERDA and RBS provided information on the light and heavy elements, respectively.

  18. In-medium NN cross sections determined from the nuclear stopping and collective flow in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yingxun [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275 (18), Beijing 102413 (China); Li Zhuxia [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275 (18), Beijing 102413 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Lanzhou Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academic of Science, Beijing 100080 (China); Danielewicz, Pawel [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In-medium nucleon-nucleon scattering cross sections are explored by comparing results of quantum molecular dynamics simulations to data on stopping and on elliptic and directed flow in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions. The comparison points to in-medium cross sections which are suppressed at low energies but not at higher energies. Positive correlations are found between the degree of stopping and the magnitudes of elliptic and directed flows.

  19. Study of the heavy flavour fractions in z+jets events from proton-antiproton collisions at energy = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastrandrea, Paolo; /Siena U.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model of field and particles is the theory that provides the best description of the known phenomenology of the particle physics up to now. Data collected in the last years, mainly by the experiments at the big particle accelerators (SPS, LEP, TEVATRON, HERA, SLAC), allowed to test the agreement between measurements and theoretical calculations with a precision of 10{sup -3} {divided_by} 10{sup -4}. The Standard Model is a Quantum Field Theory based on the gauge symmetry group SU(3){sub C} x SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} , with spontaneous symmetry breaking. This gauge group includes the color symmetry group of the strong interaction, SU(3){sub C}, and the symmetry group of the electroweak interactions, SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y}. The formulation of the Standard Model as a gauge theory guarantees its renormalizability, but forbids explicit mass terms for fermions and gauge bosons. The masses of the particles are generated in a gauge-invariant way by the Higgs Mechanism via a spontaneous breaking of the electroweak symmetry. This mechanism also implies the presence of a massive scalar particle in the mass spectrum of the theory, the Higgs boson. This particle is the only one, among the basic elements for the minimal formulation of the Standard Model, to have not been confirmed by the experiments yet. For this reason in the last years the scientific community has been focusing an increasing fraction of its efforts on the search of the Higgs boson. The mass of the Higgs boson is a free parameter of the Standard Model, but the unitarity of the theory requires values not higher than 1 TeV and the LEP experiments excluded values smaller than 115 GeV. To explore this range of masses is under construction at CERN the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider with a center of mass energy of 14 TeV and a 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} peak luminosity. According to the present schedule, this machine will start to provide collisions for the experiments at the end of 2008. In the meanwhile the only running accelerator able to provide collisions suitable for the search of the Higgs boson is the Tevatron at Fermilab, a proton-antiproton collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV working at 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 32}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} peak luminosity. These features make the Tevatron able for the direct search of the Higgs boson in the 115-200 GeV mass range. Since the coupling of the Higgs boson is proportional to the masses of the particles involved, the decay in b{bar b} has the largest branching ratio for Higgs mass < 135 GeV and thus the events Z/W + b{bar b} are the main background to the Higgs signal in the most range favored by Standard Model fits. In this thesis a new technique to identify Heavy Flavour quarks inside high - P{sub T} jets is applied to events with a reconstructed Z boson to provide a measurement of the Z+b and Z+c inclusive cross sections. The study of these channels represent also a test of QCD in high transferred momentum regime, and can provide information on proton pdf. This new Heavy Flavour identication technique (tagger) provides an increased statistical separation between b, c and light flavours, using a new vertexing algorithm and a chain of artificial Neural Networks to exploit as much information as possible in each event. For this work I collaborated with the Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' group working in the CDF II experiment at Tevatron, that has at first developed this tagger. After a brief theoretical introduction (chapter 1) and a description of the experimental apparatus (chapter 2), the tagger itself and its calibration procedure are described in chapter 3 and 4. The chapter 5 is dedicated to the event selection and the chapter 6 contains the results of the measurement and the study of the systematic errors.

  20. Probing hot and dense matter production in heavy ion collisions via neutral mesons and photons with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astrid Morreale; for the ALICE collaboration

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key signatures of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) is the modification of hadron and direct photon spectra in heavy-ion collisions as compared to proton-proton (pp) collisions. Suppression of hadron production at high transverse momenta in heavy-ion collisions can be explained by the energy loss of the partons produced in the hard scattering processes which traverse the hot and dense QCD matter. The dependence of the observed suppression on the transverse momentum (pT) of the measured hadron towards higher pT is an important input for the theoretical understanding of jet quenching effects in the QGP and the nature of energy loss. Another key observable which has helped establish the energy loss picture, is high pT direct photon production for which no suppression is expected. For low pT photon production, it is expected that thermal sources will lead to enhancement of direct photons. We report an overview of photon and neutral meson production measurements by the ALICE experiment at the LHC in heavy-ion and pp collisions.

  1. Future of Jets, Heavy Flavor, and EM Probes at RHIC and RHIC II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John W. Harris

    2005-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Exciting results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have been presented at this Workshop. However, fundamental questions remain to be addressed in the future regarding whether the system is deconfined, chiral symmetry is restored, a color glass condensate exists in the initial state, and how the system evolves through eventual hadronization. Jets, heavy flavors and electromagnetic probes are sensitive to the initial high density stage of RHIC collisions, and should provide new insight. Significant additional capabilities will be added with a luminosity upgrade of RHIC (to RHIC II), upgrades of present detectors and a possible, new comprehensive detector at RHIC II.

  2. Photon collider Higgs factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Telnov

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

  3. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF PURE AMMONIA AND AMMONIA-WATER ICES INDUCED BY HEAVY IONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordalo, V.; Da Silveira, E. F. [Departamento de Fisica/Laboratorio do Acelerador Van de Graaff, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S. Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lv, X. Y.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Materiaux et la Photonique (CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie), CIMAP-CIRIL-GANIL, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Seperuelo Duarte, E., E-mail: vbordalo@fis.puc-rio.br [Grupo de Fisica e Astronomia, Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Lucio Tavares 1045, 26530-060 Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic rays are possibly the main agents to prevent the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surfaces in cold dense clouds. Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is one of the most abundant molecules present in dust ice mantles, with a concentration of up to 15% relative to water (H{sub 2}O). FTIR spectroscopy is used to monitor pure NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice samples as they are irradiated with Ni and Zn ion beams (500-600 MeV) at GANIL/France. New species, such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), diazene (N{sub 2}H{sub 2} isomers), molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were identified after irradiation of pure NH{sub 3} ices. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) are some of the products of the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice radiolysis. The spectral band at 6.85 {mu}m was observed after irradiation of both types of ice. Besides the likely contribution of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and amino (NH{sub 2}) radicals, data suggest a small contribution of NH{sub 2}OH to this band profile after high fluences of irradiation of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ices. The spectral shift of the NH{sub 3} ''umbrella'' mode (9.3 {mu}m) band is parameterized as a function of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratio in amorphous ices. Ammonia and water destruction cross-sections are obtained, as well as the rate of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O (1:10) ice compaction, measured by the OH dangling bond destruction cross-section. Ammonia destruction is enhanced in the presence of H{sub 2}O in the ice and a power law relationship between stopping power and NH{sub 3} destruction cross-section is verified. Such results may provide relevant information for the evolution of molecular species in dense molecular clouds.

  4. Experimental Cross Sections for Reactions of Heavy Ions and 208Pb, 209Bi, 238U, and 248Cm Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patin, Joshua B.

    2002-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the reactions between heavy ions and {sup 208}Pb, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 238}U, and {sup 248} Cm targets was performed to look at the differences between the cross sections of hot and cold fusion reactions. Experimental cross sections were compared with predictions from statistical computer codes to evaluate the effectiveness of the computer code in predicting production cross sections. Hot fusion reactions were studied with the MG system, catcher foil techniques and the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). 3n- and 4n-exit channel production cross sections were obtained for the {sup 238}U({sup 18}O,xn){sup 256-x}Fm, {sup 238}U({sup 22}Ne,xn){sup 260-x}No, and {sup 248}Cm({sup 15}N,xn){sup 263-x}Lr reactions and are similar to previous experimental results. The experimental cross sections were accurately modeled by the predictions of the HIVAP code using the Reisdorf and Schaedel parameters and are consistent with the existing systematics of 4n exit channel reaction products. Cold fusion reactions were examined using the BGS. The {sup 208}Pb({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 256-x}No, {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti,xn){sup 258-x}Rf, {sup 208}Pb({sup 51}V,xn){sup 259-x}Db, {sup 209}Bi({sup 50}Ti,xn){sup 259-x}Db, and {sup 209}Bi({sup 51}V,xn){sup 260-x}Sg reactions were studied. The experimental production cross sections are in agreement with the results observed in previous experiments. It was necessary to slightly alter the Reisdorf and Schaedel parameters for use in the HIVAP code in order to more accurately model the experimental data. The cold fusion experimental results are in agreement with current 1n- and 2n-exit channel systematics.

  5. Nuclear modification factor of nonphotonic electrons in heavy-ion collisions, and the heavy-flavor baryon-to-meson ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear modification factor R(AA) of nonphotonic electrons in Au + Au collisions at root(S)NN = 200 GeV is studied by considering the decays of heavy-flavor hadrons produced in a quark coalescence model. Although an enhanced Lambda(c)/D(0) ratio...

  6. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SECOND WORKSHOP ON EXPERIMENTS AND DETECTORS FOR A RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC), LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY, MAY 25-29, 1987

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Hans Georg

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0.1 seconds per track on a VAX 780, approximately linear into approximately 500 x VAX 780 speed (roughly a kiloVAX)coupled by Ethernet to a VAX online computer as. part of its

  7. HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siemens, P.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    461. 31. M. Sobel, P. Siemens, J. Bondorf and H. A. Bethe,275 (1978) 114. 33. P. J. Siemens and J. 0. Rasvnussen,1976) 1202. 36. P. J. Siemens and J. I. Kapusta, "Evidence

  8. Characterizing Heavy Ion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheir AtmosphericAnalysis ComplementedDevelop,

  9. Heavy-ion broad-beam and microprobe studies of single-event upsets in 0.20 um SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors and circuits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Karl (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Irwin, Timothy J. (Jackson & Tull Chartered Engineers, Washington, DC); Niu, Guofu (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Fodness, Bryan (SGT, Inc., Greenbelt, MD); Carts, Martin A. (Raytheon ITSS, Greenbelt, MD); Marshall, Paul W. (Brookneal, VA); Reed, Robert A. (NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD); Gilbert, Barry (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Randall, Barbara (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Prairie, Jason (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Riggs, Pam (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Pickel, James C. (PR& T, Inc., Fallbrook, CA); LaBel, Kenneth (NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD); Cressler, John D. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Krithivasan, Ramkumar (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Dodd, Paul Emerson; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining broad-beam circuit level single-event upset (SEU) response with heavy ion microprobe charge collection measurements on single silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors improves understanding of the charge collection mechanisms responsible for SEU response of digital SiGe HBT technology. This new understanding of the SEU mechanisms shows that the right rectangular parallele-piped model for the sensitive volume is not applicable to this technology. A new first-order physical model is proposed and calibrated with moderate success.

  10. Probable projectile-target combinations for the synthesis of super heavy nucleus $^{286}$112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Santhosh; V. Bobby Jose

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion cross sections for the reactions of all the projectile-target combinations found in the cold valleys of $^{286}$112 have been studied using scattering potential as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential, so as to predict the most probable projectile-target combinations in heavy ion fusion reactions for the synthesis of super heavy nucleus $^{286}$112. While considering the nature of potential pockets and half lives of the colliding nuclei, the systems $^{82}$Ge + $^{204}$Hg, $^{80}$Ge + $^{206}$Hg and $^{78}$Zn + $^{208}$Pb found in the deep cold valley region and the systems $^{48}$Ca+$^{238}$U, $^{38}$S+$^{248}$Cm and $^{44}$Ar+$^{242}$Pu in the cold valleys are predicted to be the better optimal projectile-target combinations for the synthesis of super heavy nucleus $^{286}$112.

  11. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  12. Correlation between balance energy and transition energy for symmetric colliding nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajni,; Kumar, Suneel; Puri, Rajeev K. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004, Punjab (India); Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the correlation between balance energy and transition energy of fragments in heavy-ion collisions for different systems at incident energies between 40 and 1200 MeV/nucleon using an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. With increasing incident energy, the elliptic flow shows a transition from positive (in-plane) to negative (out-of-plane) flow. This transition energy is found to depend on the size of the fragments, composite mass of the reacting system, and the impact parameter of the reaction. It has been observed that a reduced cross section can explain the experimental data. There is a correlation between transition energy and balance energy as their difference decreases with an increase in the total mass of colliding nuclei.

  13. Correlation between balance energy and transition energy for symmetric colliding nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajni; Suneel Kumar; Rajeev K. Puri

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the correlation between balance energy and transition energy of fragment in heavy-ion collisions for different systems at incident energies between 40 and 1200 MeV/nucleon using an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. With increasing incident energy, the elliptic flow shows a transition from positive (in-plane) to negative (out-of-plane) flow. This transition energy is found to depend on the size of fragments, composite mass of reacting system, and the impact parameter of reaction. It has been observed that reduced cross-section can explain the experimental data. There is a correlation between transition energy and balance energy as their difference decreases with increase in the total mass of colliding nuclei.

  14. Semi-classical Characters and Optical Model Description of Heavy Ion Scattering, Direct Reactions, and Fusion at Near-barrier Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Kim; W. Y. So; S. W. Hong; T. Udagawa

    2001-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach is proposed to calculate the direct reaction (DR) and fusion probabilities for heavy ion collisions at near-Coulomb-barrier energies as functions of the distance of closest approach D within the framework of the optical model that introduces two types of imaginary potentials, DR and fusion. The probabilities are calculated by using partial DR and fusion cross sections, together with the classical relations associated with the Coulomb trajectory. Such an approach makes it possible to analyze the data for angular distributions of the inclusive DR cross section, facilitating the determination of the radius parameters of the imaginary DR potential in a less ambiguous manner. Simultaneous $\\chi^{2}$-analyses are performed of relevant data for the $^{16}$O+$^{208}$Pb system near the Coulomb-barrier energy.

  15. A new scheme of causal viscous hydrodynamics for relativistic heavy-ion collisions: A Riemann solver for quark–gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao, E-mail: akamatsu@kmi.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)] [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nonaka, Chiho [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan) [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Takamoto, Makoto [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan) [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we present a state-of-the-art algorithm for solving the relativistic viscous hydrodynamics equation with the QCD equation of state. The numerical method is based on the second-order Godunov method and has less numerical dissipation, which is crucial in describing of quark–gluon plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We apply the algorithm to several numerical test problems such as sound wave propagation, shock tube and blast wave problems. In sound wave propagation, the intrinsic numerical viscosity is measured and its explicit expression is shown, which is the second-order of spatial resolution both in the presence and absence of physical viscosity. The expression of the numerical viscosity can be used to determine the maximum cell size in order to accurately measure the effect of physical viscosity in the numerical simulation.

  16. Role of Anharmonic Vibration on Heavy-ion Fusion Reaction and Large Angle Quasi-elastic Scattering of {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhammad, Zamrun F. [Jurusan Fisika, FMIPA Universitas Haluoleo, Kendari, Sulawesi Tenggara, 93232 (Indonesia); Hagino, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8576 (Japan)

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of double quadrupole and octupole phonon excitations of {sup 144}Sm nucleus on heavy-ion fusion reaction and large angle quasi-elastic scattering for {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm reaction using the coupled-channels approach. We explicitly taken into account the anharmonicites of nuclear vibrations using the sdf-interacting boson model. It is shown that the anhamronicities play an essential role in reproducing the experimental data of the fusion cross section as well as the fusion barrier distribution for this system. Also the quasi-elastic cross section is well reproduced in this way. However, the quasi-elastic barrier distribution has a high distinct peak which is smeared out in the experimental data. Our study indicates that the fusion and quasi-elastic barrier distribution for {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm system cannot be accounted for simultaneously with the standard coupled-channels formalism.

  17. The impact of energy conservation in transport models on the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ multiplicity ratio in heavy-ion collisions and the symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cozma, M D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate energy central heavy-ion collisions has been proposed as a suitable observable to constrain the high density dependence of the isovector part of the equation of state, with contradicting results. Using an upgraded version of the T\\"ubingen QMD transport model, which allows the conservation of energy at a local or global level by accounting for the potential energy of hadrons in two-body collisions and leading thus to particle production threshold shifts, we demonstrate that compatible constraints for the symmetry energy stiffness can be extracted from pion multiplicity and elliptic flow observables. Nevertheless, pion multiplicities are proven to be highly sensitive to the yet unknown isovector part of the in-medium $\\Delta$(1232) potential which hinders presently the extraction of meaningful information on the high density dependence of the symmetry energy. A solution to this problem together with the inclusion of contributions presently neglected, such as ...

  18. SOURCE REGIONS OF THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD AND VARIABILITY IN HEAVY-ION ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION IN GRADUAL SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Wang, Yi-Ming [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7680, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Tylka, Allan J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 672, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ng, Chee K. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Dietrich, William F., E-mail: yko@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil [Praxis, Inc., Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are those in which ions are accelerated to their observed energies by interactions with a shock driven by a fast coronal mass ejection (CME). Previous studies have shown that much of the observed event-to-event variability can be understood in terms of shock speed and evolution in the shock-normal angle. However, an equally important factor, particularly for the elemental composition, is the origin of the suprathermal seed particles upon which the shock acts. To tackle this issue, we (1) use observed solar-wind speed, magnetograms, and the potential-field source-surface model to map the Sun-L1 interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line back to its source region on the Sun at the time of the SEP observations and (2) then look for a correlation between SEP composition (as measured by Wind and Advanced Composition Explorer at ?2-30 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) and characteristics of the identified IMF source regions. The study is based on 24 SEP events, identified as a statistically significant increase in ?20 MeV protons and occurring in 1998 and 2003-2006, when the rate of newly emergent solar magnetic flux and CMEs was lower than in solar-maximum years, and the field-line tracing is therefore more likely to be successful. We find that the gradual SEP Fe/O is correlated with the field strength at the IMF source, with the largest enhancements occurring when the footpoint field is strong due to the nearby presence of an active region (AR). In these cases, other elemental ratios show a strong charge-to-mass (q/M) ordering (at least on average), similar to that found in impulsive events. Such results lead us to suggest that magnetic reconnection in footpoint regions near ARs bias the heavy-ion composition of suprathermal seed ions by processes qualitatively similar to those that produce larger heavy-ion enhancements in impulsive SEP events. To address potential technical concerns about our analysis, we also discuss efforts to exclude impulsive SEP events from our event sample.

  19. Photon collider at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valery Telnov

    2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy photon colliders (gamma-gamma, gamma-electron) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e+e- linear colliders. In this report we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case the gamma-gamma luminosity luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach (1/3)L_{e+e-}. Typical cross sections of interesting processes in gamma-gamma collisions are higher than those in e+e- collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in gamma-gamma collisions will be more than that in e+e- collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is ``an optical storage ring (optical trap)'' with diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based at TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  20. SETUP AND PERFORMANCE OF THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS FOR THE 2007 RUN WITH GOLD IONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GARDNER,C.; AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; BENJAMIN, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Gold ions for the 2007 run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are accelerated in the Tandem, Booster and AGS prior to injection into RHIC. The setup and performance of this chain of accelerators is reviewed with a focus on improvements in the quality of beam delivered to RHIC. In particular, more uniform stripping foils between Booster and AGS7 and a new bunch merging scheme in AGS have provided beam bunches with reduced longitudinal emittance for RHIC.

  1. Applying Effective Theories to Collider Phenomenology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovanesyan, Grigol

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theories to Collider Phenomenology by Grigol GagikovichTheories to Collider Phenomenology Copyright 2010 by GrigolTheories to Collider Phenomenology by Grigol Gagikovich

  2. Diffraction at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Lessons with ``soft`` hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy.

  3. Diffraction at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lessons with soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy.

  4. The Electron-Ion Collider Science Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard G. Milner

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time, physicists are in the position to precisely study a fully relativistic quantum field theory: Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD). QCD is a central element of the Standard Model and provides the theoretical framework for understanding the strong interaction. This demands a powerful new electron microscope to probe the virtual particles of QCD. Ab initio calculations using lattice gauge theory on the world's most powerful supercomputers are essential for comparison with the data. The new accelerator and computing techniques demand aggressive development of challenging, innovative technologies.

  5. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Shboul, K. F. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Harilal, S. S., E-mail: hari@purdue.edu; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Costello, J. T. [School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)] [School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 5650871 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 5650871 (Japan); Hirooka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C{sub 2} dimers.

  6. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  7. Physics Reach at Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawczyk, Maria [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoz-dota 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics reach at future colliders is discussed, with focus on the Higgs sector. First we present the Standard Model and some results obtained at the existing high-energy hadron collider, Tevatron, together with the corresponding expectations for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which starts operating in 2008. Then we discuss important low energy measurements: the anomalous magnetic moment for muon and the leptonic B-decay together with b{yields}s{gamma}. Finally the potential of the planned e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider (ILC) and its possible option Photon Linear Collider (PLC), e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma}, is shortly presented.

  8. PHENIX recent heavy flavor results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanghoon Lim for the PHENIX collaboration

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects provide an important baseline for the interpretation of data in heavy ion collisions. Such effects include nuclear shadowing, Cronin effect, and initial patron energy loss, and it is interesting to study the dependence on impact parameter and kinematic region. Heavy quark production is a good measurement to probe the CNM effects particularly on gluons, since heavy quarks are mainly produced via gluon fusions at RHIC energy. The PHENIX experiment has experiment has ability to study the CNM effects by measuring heavy quark production in $d$$+$Au collisions at variety of kinematic ranges. Comparisons of heavy quark production at different rapidities allow us to study modification of gluon density function in the Au nucleus depending on momentum fraction. Furthermore, comparisons to the results from heavy ion collisions (Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu) measured by PHENIX provide insight into the role of CNM effects in such collisions. Recent PHENIX results on heavy quark production are discussed.

  9. Radiative Return Capabilities of a High-Energy, High-Luminosity $e^+e^-$ Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy $E_{CM}$ can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at $E_{CM}$ = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy $e^+e^-$ colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  10. Neutrinos and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deppisch, Frank F; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

  11. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Zisman

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 \\times 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance ("cooling"). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  12. Fusion-fission and quasifission in the reactions with heavy ions leading to the formation of Hs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kozulin, E. M. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm,{sup 36}S+{sup 238}U and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb leading to Hs isotopes have been measured. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs*, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U the considerable part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier the symmetric fragments originate mainly from fusion-fission process for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies. The pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities as a function of the fragment mass have been obtained for the reactions studied.

  13. Fission and quasifission modes in heavy-ion-induced reactions leading to the formation of Hs{sup *}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itkis, I. M.; Kozulin, E. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Chernysheva, E. V.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Goennenwein, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.; Hanappe, F.; Vardaci, E.; Goes Brennand, E. de [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics of the National Nuclear Center of Kazakhstan, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien and Universite de Strasbourg, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP229, B-1050 Bruxelles, Belgique (Belgium); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell'Universita di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual da Paraiba, 58109-753 Campina Grande (Brazil)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb have been measured. All reactions lead to Hs isotopes. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs{sup *}, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, leading to the formation of a similar compound nucleus, the main part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier fusion-fission is the main process leading to the formation of symmetric fragments for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies.

  14. Stability of nanoclusters in 14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened steel under heavy ion-irradiation by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; V. Shutthanandan; Y.Q. Wu

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 C, 450 C, and 600 C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of Ti–Y–O nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 1023 to 3.6 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

  15. Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Under Heavy Ion-irradiation By Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Jianchao; Wan, F.; Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd R.; Certain, Alicia G.; Shutthanandan, V.; Wu, Yaqiao

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 °C, 450 °C, and 600 °C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of Ti–Y–O nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 °C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 × 1023 to 3.6 × 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

  16. Commentary on A Conceptual Design of Transport Lines for a Heavy-Ion Inertial-Fusion Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.P.

    2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Some major system features are not stated but can be inferred. For example this is probably an engineering test facility, not a power plant driver, because the standoff from target to final magnet is only 5.0 m. The fusion target takes two-sided illumination with indirect drive using a total of 60 beam pulses: 10 pre-pulses (3.0 GeV) + 20 main pulses (4.0 GeV) from each side. On page 12 it's stated that the charge per beam pulse is 26.8 {micro}C, so we calculate pre-pulse: 20 x 3 GeV x 26.8 {micro}C = 1.608MJ, main pulse: 40 x 4 GeV x 26.8 {micro}C = 4.288MJ, total beam energy 5.896MJ. The beam ion mass ks 200 amu, so the species is Hg{sup +}. Therefore the mid-pulse velocities are: pre-pulse v = .1773c = 5.316 x 10{sup 7} m/s, main pulse v = .2040c = 6.114 x 10{sup 7} m/s, On page 12 it is stated that the pre-compression pulse length is L{sub 0} = 10.0m, and compression is by a 'factor of order 20'. They infer a final pulse length of about .5 m and final durations pre-pulse {tau} {approx} .5/5.316 x 10{sup 7} = 9.4 ns; main pulse {tau} {approx} .5/6.114 x 10{sup 7} = 8.2 ms. The magnetic rigidity of the beam ions is [B{rho}] = {gamma}m v/e = {l_brace} 112.0 T-m - prepulse/129.5 T-m - mainpulse{r_brace}.

  17. Gold Nanoparticle-Based Sensing of "Spectroscopically Silent" Heavy Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of aqueous heavy metal ions, including toxic metals such as lead, cadmium, and mercury, is describedLetters Gold Nanoparticle-Based Sensing of "Spectroscopically Silent" Heavy Metal Ions Youngjin Kim that by functionalizing metal nanoparticles with appropriate heavy-metal ion receptors, the particles might be coaxed

  18. Heavy flavour production in high-energy ep collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Katkov; for the H1; ZEUS Collaborations

    2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A selection of recent results on heavy quark production at the HERA collider by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations are presented with a focus on charmonium production in DIS, charm fragmentation and beauty production.

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - ablation ion trap Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Texas at Austin Collection: Physics 8 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven Summary: . High coupling...

  20. Net-baryon-, net-proton-, and net-charge kurtosis in heavy-ion collisions within a relativistic transport approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marlene Nahrgang; Tim Schuster; Michael Mitrovski; Reinhard Stock; Marcus Bleicher

    2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the potential of net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis measurements to investigate the properties of hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Contrary to calculations in a grand canonical ensemble we explicitly take into account exact electric and baryon charge conservation on an event-by-event basis. This drastically limits the width of baryon fluctuations. A simple model to account for this is to assume a grand-canonical distribution with a sharp cut-off at the tails. We present baseline predictions of the energy dependence of the net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis for central ($b\\leq 2.75$ fm) Pb+Pb/Au+Au collisions from $E_{lab}=2A$ GeV to $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV from the UrQMD model. While the net-charge kurtosis is compatible with values around zero, the net-baryon number decreases to large negative values with decreasing beam energy. The net-proton kurtosis becomes only slightly negative for low $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$.

  1. The impact of energy conservation in transport models on the $?^-/?^+$ multiplicity ratio in heavy-ion collisions and the symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Cozma

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate energy central heavy-ion collisions has been proposed as a suitable observable to constrain the high density dependence of the isovector part of the equation of state, with contradicting results. Using an upgraded version of the T\\"ubingen QMD transport model, which allows the conservation of energy at a local or global level by accounting for the potential energy of hadrons in two-body collisions and leading thus to particle production threshold shifts, we demonstrate that compatible constraints for the symmetry energy stiffness can be extracted from pion multiplicity and elliptic flow observables. Nevertheless, pion multiplicities are proven to be highly sensitive to the yet unknown isovector part of the in-medium $\\Delta$(1232) potential which hinders presently the extraction of meaningful information on the high density dependence of the symmetry energy. A solution to this problem together with the inclusion of contributions presently neglected, such as in-medium pion potentials and retardation effects, are needed for a final verdict on this topic.

  2. Symmetric Achromatic Low-Beta Collider Interaction Region Design Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, Vasiliy S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Johnson, Rolland P. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new symmetry-based concept for an achromatic low-beta collider interaction region design. A specially-designed symmetric Chromaticity Compensation Block (CCB) induces an angle spread in the passing beam such that it cancels the chromatic kick of the final focusing quadrupoles. Two such CCB?s placed symmetrically around an interaction point allow simultaneous compensation of the 1st-order chromaticities and chromatic beam smear at the IP without inducing significant 2nd-order aberrations. We first develop an analytic description of this approach and explicitly formulate 2nd-order aberration compensation conditions at the interaction point. The concept is next applied to develop an interaction region design for the ion collider ring of an electron-ion collider. We numerically evaluate performance of the design in terms of momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture. The advantages of the new concept are illustrated by comparing it to the conventional distributed-sextupole chromaticity compensation scheme.

  3. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5,, supplment au n \\\\, Tome 37., Novembre 1*376,, page C5-227 THE HOLIFIELD HEAVY-ION RESEARCH FACILITY AT OAK RIDGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -227 THE HOLIFIELD HEAVY-ION RESEARCH FACILITY AT OAK RIDGE J. B. Ball, J. A. Martin, J. A., Biggerstaff, C M . Jones, R. S. Lord and R. L. Robinson (Paper presented by F. Plasil) Oak Ridge National Laboratory,* Oak construction at Oak Ridge. Résumé. Cet article décrit le nouvel accélérateur et laboratoire en construction à

  4. Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy baryon/meson ratios Lambda(c)/D(0) and Lambda(b)/(B) over bar (0) in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the quark coalescence model. For heavy baryons, we include production from coalescence of heavy quarks with free light quarks...

  5. Results from a Prototype MAPS Sensor Telescope and Readout Systemwith Zero Suppression for the Heavy Flavor Tracker at STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Ritter, Hans G.; Rose, AndrewA.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangming; Szelezniak, Michal A.; Thomas, James H.; Vu, Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard H.

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a three Mimostar-2 Monolithic Active PixelSensor (MAPS) sensor telescope prototype with an accompanying readoutsystem incorporating on-the-fly data sparsification. The system has beencharacterized and we report on the measured performance of the sensortelescope and readout system in beam tests conducted both at the AdvancedLight Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and inthe STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Thiseffort is part of the development and prototyping work that will lead toa vertex detector for the STAR experiment.

  6. Colliding neutrino beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard Schwienhorst

    2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    From several neutrino oscillation experiments, we understand now that neutrinos have mass. However, we really don't know what mechanism is responsible for producing this neutrino mass. Current or planned neutrino experiments utilize neutrino beams and long-baseline detectors to explore flavor mixing but do not address the question of the origin of neutrino mass. In order to answer that question, neutrino interactions need to be explored at much higher energies. This paper outlines a program to explore neutrinos and their interactions with various particles through a series of experiments involving colliding neutrino beams.

  7. Heavy-ion induced desorption of a TiZrV coated vacuum chamber bombarded with 5 MeV/u Ar{sup 8+} beam at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedlund, E.; Malyshev, O. B.; Westerberg, L.; Krasnov, A.; Semenov, A. S.; Leandersson, M.; Zajec, B.; Kollmus, H.; Bellachioma, M. C.; Bender, M.; Kraemer, A.; Reich-Sprenger, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 535, SE 751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 530, SE 751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Academician Lavrentiev Prospect, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Materials Physics, Royal Institute of Technology KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 530, SE 751 21 Uppsala, Sweden and 'Jozef Stefan' Institute, Jamova 39, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    TiZrV nonevaporable getter (NEG) coated vacuum chambers is a new vacuum technology which is already used in many particle accelerators worldwide. This coating is also of interest for heavy-ion accelerator vacuum chambers. Heavy-ion desorption yields from an activated as well as a CO saturated NEG coated tube have been measured with 5 MeV/u Ar{sup 8+} beam. The sticking probability of the NEG film was obtained by using the partial pressure ratios on two sides of the NEG coated tube. These ratios were compared to results of modeling of the experimental setup with test particle Monte Carlo and angular coefficient methods. The partial pressures inside the saturated NEG coated tube bombarded with heavy ions were up to 20 times larger than those inside the activated one. However, the partial pressure of methane remained the same. The value of the total desorption yield from the activated NEG coated tube is 2600 molecules/ion. The desorption yields after saturation for CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} were found to be very close to the yields measured after the activation, while CO increased by up to a factor of 5. The total desorption yield for the saturated tube is up to 7000 molecules/ion. The large value of the desorption yield of the activated NEG coated tube, an order of magnitude higher than the desorption yield from a stainless steel tube at normal incident angle, could be explained by the grazing incident angle.

  8. Results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pondrom, L.G. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA))

    1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for {bar p} + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1 {plus minus} 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z {yields} {bar q}q. Precision measurements of M{sub W} by UA2 and CDF give an average value M{sub W} = 80.13 {plus minus} 0.30 GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with measurements of M{sub Z} from LEP and SLC this number gives sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.227 {plus minus} 0.006, or m{sub top} = 130{sub {minus}60}{sup +40} GeV/c{sup 2} from the EWK radiative correction term {Delta}r. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above M{sub W}: m{sub top} > 89 GeV/c{sup 2} 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing E{sub T} signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range m{sub top} < 200 GeV/c{sup 2} look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  10. HEAVY-ION RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    converter. The computer (VAX 11-780) *is used to calculatedata is accomplished on a VAX 11-780 computer system.

  11. Higgs-boson production at the Photon Collider at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Niezurawski

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis feasibility of the precise measurement of the Higgs-boson production cross section gamma+gamma->higgs->b+bbar at the Photon Collider at TESLA is studied in detail. The study is based on the realistic luminosity spectra simulation. The heavy quark background is estimated using the dedicated code based on NLO QCD calculations. Other background processes, which were neglected in the earlier analyses, are also studied. Also the contribution from the overlaying events, gamma+gamma->hadrons, is taken into account. The non-zero beam crossing angle and the finite size of colliding bunches are included in the event generation. The analysis is based on the full detector simulation with realistic b-tagging, and the criteria of event selection are optimized separately for each considered Higgs-boson mass. For the Standard-Model Higgs boson with mass of 120 to 160 GeV the partial width \\Gamma(h->gamma+gamma)BR(h->b+bbar) can be measured with a statistical accuracy of 2.1-7.7% after one year of the Photon Collider running. The systematic uncertainties of the measurement are estimated to be of the order of 2%. For MSSM Higgs bosons A and H, for M_A=200-350 GeV and tan(beta)=7, the statistical precision of the cross-section measurement is estimated to be 8--34%, for four considered MSSM parameters sets. As heavy neutral Higgs bosons in this scenario may not be discovered at LHC or at the first stage of the e+e- collider, an opportunity of being a discovery machine is also studied for the Photon Collider.

  12. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  13. DEDICATED HEAVY ION MEDICAL ACCELERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gough, R.A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lancaster, R.B. Yourd, Pre~,Accelerator A w·ideroe~,Basedcarbon beam medical accelerator facility. N "' . ,;j "' ::lEat the MARIA Workshop III: Accelerator Systems for Relat ic

  14. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , on behalfCURRICULUMTemperature

  15. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , on behalfCURRICULUMTemperatureII:

  16. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , on

  17. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , onLight particle clusterization

  18. Respiratory motion management using audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy of synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion beam delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Pengbo; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Yan, Yuanlin [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Qiang, E-mail: liqiang@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Zhao, Ting; Fu, Tingyan; Shen, Guosheng [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To efficiently deliver respiratory-gated radiation during synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion radiotherapy, a novel respiratory guidance method combining a personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system, breath hold (BH), and synchrotron-based gating was designed to help patients synchronize their respiratory patterns with synchrotron pulses and to overcome typical limitations such as low efficiency, residual motion, and discomfort. Methods: In-house software was developed to acquire body surface marker positions and display BFB, gating signals, and real-time beam profiles on a LED screen. Patients were prompted to perform short BHs or short deep breath holds (SDBH) with the aid of BFB following a personalized standard BH/SDBH (stBH/stSDBH) guiding curve or their own representative BH/SDBH (reBH/reSDBH) guiding curve. A practical simulation was performed for a group of 15 volunteers to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Effective dose rates (EDRs), mean absolute errors between the guiding curves and the measured curves, and mean absolute deviations of the measured curves were obtained within 10%–50% duty cycles (DCs) that were synchronized with the synchrotron’s flat-top phase. Results: All maneuvers for an individual volunteer took approximately half an hour, and no one experienced discomfort during the maneuvers. Using the respiratory guidance methods, the magnitude of residual motion was almost ten times less than during nongated irradiation, and increases in the average effective dose rate by factors of 2.39–4.65, 2.39–4.59, 1.73–3.50, and 1.73–3.55 for the stBH, reBH, stSDBH, and reSDBH guiding maneuvers, respectively, were observed in contrast with conventional free breathing-based gated irradiation, depending on the respiratory-gated duty cycle settings. Conclusions: The proposed respiratory guidance method with personalized BFB was confirmed to be feasible in a group of volunteers. Increased effective dose rate and improved overall treatment precision were observed compared to conventional free breathing-based, respiratory-gated irradiation. Because breathing guidance curves could be established based on the respective average respiratory period and amplitude for each patient, it may be easier for patients to cooperate using this technique.

  19. [New technology for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1992-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

  20. EIS-0138: Superconducting Super Collider

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of constructing the Superconducting Super Collider, a large proton accelerator, at each of seven alternative locations.

  1. Energy Lossand Flow of Heavy Quarks in Au+Au Collisions at root-s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soltz, R; Klay, J; Enokizono, A; Newby, J; Heffner, M; Hartouni, E

    2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured electrons with 0.3 < p{sub rmT} < 9 GeV/c at midrapidity (|y| < 0.35) from heavy flavor (charm and bottom) decays in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} relative to p+p collisions shows a strong suppression in central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial energy loss of heavy quarks in the medium produced at RHIC energies. A large azimuthal anisotropy, v{sub 2}, with respect to the reaction plane is observed for 0.5 < p{sub rmT} < 5 GeV/c indicating non-zero heavy flavor elliptic flow. A simultaneous description of R{sub AA}(p{sub rmT}) and v{sub 2}(p{sub rmT}) constrains the existing models of heavy-quark rescattering in strongly interacting matter and provides information on the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, a viscosity to entropy density ratio close to the conjectured quantum lower bound, i.e. near a perfect fluid, is suggested.

  2. Metagenomic Insights into Evolution of a Heavy Metal-Contaminated Groundwater Microbial Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemme, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acetone). Finally, toxic heavy metal stress has resulted inby exporting toxic organics from the cell. (iv) Heavy metalheavy metal ions are relatively simple, typically involving: (a) conversion of the ion to a less toxic

  3. Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scale transport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to controlled thermonuclear fusion which uses intense ion orto controlled thermonuclear fusion energy to commercialFusion Energy (MFE) is the approach to controlled thermonuclear

  4. Muon collider interaction region design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexahin, Y.I.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Alexakhin, V.Y.; /Dubna, JINR

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design of a muon collider interaction region (IR) presents a number of challenges arising from low {beta}* < 1 cm, correspondingly large beta-function values and beam sizes at IR magnets, as well as the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. As a consequence, the designs of the IR optics, magnets and machine-detector interface are strongly interlaced and iterative. A consistent solution for the 1.5 TeV c.o.m. muon collider IR is presented. It can provide an average luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} with an adequate protection of magnet and detector components.

  5. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

  6. ALICE potential for heavy-flavour physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Dainese

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where lead nuclei will collide at the unprecedented c.m.s. energy of 5.5 TeV per nucleon-nucleon pair, will offer new and unique opportunities for the study of the properties of strongly interacting matter at high energy density over extended volumes. We will briefly explain why heavy-flavour particles are well-suited tools for such a study and we will describe how the ALICE experiment is preparing to make use of these tools.

  7. Open heavy flavor production at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. P. Suaide

    2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of heavy flavor production in relativistic heavy ion collisions is an extreme experimental challenge but provides important information on the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) created in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Heavy-quarks are believed to be produced in the initial stages of the collision, and are essential on the understanding of parton energy loss in the dense medium created in such environment. Moreover, heavy-quarks can help to investigate fundamental properties of QCD in elementary p+p collisions. In this work we review recent results on heavy flavor production and their interaction with the hot and dense medium at RHIC.

  8. Colliding axisymmetric pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An exact solution is found describing the collision of axisymmetric pp-waves with M=0. They are impulsive in character and their coordinate singularities become point curvature singularities at the boundaries of the interaction region. The solution is conformally flat. Concrete examples are given, involving an ultrarelativistic black hole against a burst of pure radiation or two colliding beam- like waves.

  9. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yagmur Tourun

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  10. Heavy-quark correlations in deep-inelastic electroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. W. Harris; J. Smith

    1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have completed the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD corrections to the virtual-photon exclusive differential cross sections for heavy quark production in deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering, i.e. $e + P \\rightarrow Q + \\overline{Q} + X$. Using these results, we have computed distributions which are sensitive to correlations among the heavy quark, the heavy antiquark, and the associated jet. Some predictions for charm and bottom heavy quark production at the electron-proton collider HERA are presented.

  11. Simulation and optimization of a 10 A electron gun with electrostatic compression for the electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.; Beebe, E. N.; Raparia, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the current density of the electron beam in the ion trap of the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) in BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility would confer several essential benefits. They include increasing the ions' charge states, and therefore, the ions' energy out of the Booster for NASA applications, reducing the influx of residual ions in the ion trap, lowering the average power load on the electron collector, and possibly also reducing the emittance of the extracted ion beam. Here, we discuss our findings from a computer simulation of an electron gun with electrostatic compression for electron current up to 10 A that can deliver a high-current-density electron beam for EBIS. The magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap is formed with a magnetic shield surrounding the gun electrodes and the residual magnetic field on the cathode is (5 Division-Sign 6) Gs. It was demonstrated that for optimized gun geometry within the electron beam current range of (0.5 Division-Sign 10) A the amplitude of radial beam oscillations can be maintained close to 4% of the beam radius by adjusting the injection magnetic field generated by a separate magnetic coil. Simulating the performance of the gun by varying geometrical parameters indicated that the original gun model is close to optimum and the requirements to the precision of positioning the gun elements can be easily met with conventional technology.

  12. Conventional power sources for colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M.A.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 ..mu..sec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 ..mu..sec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 ..mu..sec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths.

  13. Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 217 Toxic Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution problem. Heavy metals are especially toxic because their ions are water-soluble and readily taken up by the body. Once in the body

  14. Constraining scenarios of the soft/hard transition for the pion electromagnetic form factor with expected data of 12-GeV Jefferson Lab experiments and of the Electron-Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troitsky, S V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown previously [PRD 88 (2013) 093005, arXiv:1310.1770] that a non-perturbative relativistic constituent-quark model for the $\\pi$-meson electromagnetic form factor allows for a quantitative description of the soft/hard transition, resulting in the correct Quantum-Chromodynamical asymptotics, including normalization, from the low-energy data without further parameter tuning. This happens universally whenever the constituent-quark mass is switched off. The energy range where the transition happens is therefore determined by the quark-mass running at intermediate energies and is not tightly constrained theoretically. Here we consider possible ways to pin down this energy range with coming experimental data. We demonstrate that expected experimental uncertainties of the 12-GeV Jefferson-Lab data are larger than the span of predictions of the model, so these data might be used for testing the model but not for determination of the soft/hard transition scale. Contrary, the projected Electron-Ion Colli...

  15. Search for anomalous heavy-flavor quark production in association with W bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Jabeen, S.; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for anomalous production of heavy-flavor quark jets in association with W bosons at the Fermilab Tevatron p(p) over bar Collider in final states in which the heavy-flavor quark content is enhanced by requiring ...

  16. Emission characteristics and dynamics of the stagnation layer in colliding laser produced plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Emission characteristics and dynamics of the stagnation layer in colliding laser produced plasmas P been investigated using time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopies and spectrally and angularly resolved fast imaging. The emission results highlight a difference in neutral atom and ion

  17. Heavy flavor production in the STAR experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Trzeciak; for the STAR Collaboration

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, recent STAR heavy flavor measurements in proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions are highlighted. We report studies of open charm mesons, reconstructed directly from hadronic decay products, and studies of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor hadrons. We also present J/$\\psi$ measurements via the di-electron decay channel at various collision systems and energies. In Au+Au collisions the energy dependence of J/$\\psi$ production measured at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV is shown. Finally, prospects of heavy flavor measurements with the STAR detector upgrades are discussed.

  18. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  19. Twistor Spinoffs for Collider Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Lance

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Finding the adding up of Feynman diagrams tedious? Hidden symmetries found in the sums of diagrams suggest there is a better way to predict the results of particle collisions - in the past two years, spin-offs of a new theory, known as the Twistor String Theory, have led to the development of efficient alternatives to Feynman diagrams which can be useful for work at the Tevatron, the LHC and for future research at the International Linear Collider. Come see what this 'twistor' is all about!

  20. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  1. Probing Higgs Boson Interactions At Future Colliders.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswal, Sudhansu Sekhar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??We present in this thesis a detailed analysis of Higgs boson interactions at future colliders. In particular we examine, in a model independent way, the… (more)

  2. Subcritical Fission Reactor Based on Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. F. Ginzburg

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The beams of Linear Collider after main collision can be utilized to build an accelerator--driven sub--critical reactor.

  3. Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facilityl.

  4. Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facility.

  5. Looking for hints of a reconstructible seesaw model at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulab Bambhaniya; Srubabati Goswami; Subrata Khan; Partha Konar; Tanmoy Mondal

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the production of heavy neutrinos at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through the dominant s-channel production mode as well as the vector boson fusion (VBF) process. We consider the TeV scale minimal linear seesaw model containing two heavy singlets with opposite lepton number. This model is fully reconstructible from oscillation data apart from an overall normalization constant which can be constrained from meta-stability of the electroweak vacuum and bounds coming from lepton flavor violation (LFV) searches. Dirac nature of heavy neutrinos in this model implies suppression of the conventional same-sign-dilepton signal at the LHC. We analyze the collider signatures with tri-lepton final state and missing transverse energy as well as VBF type signals which are characterized by two additional forward tagged jets. Our investigation reveals that due to stringent constraints on light-heavy mixing coming from LFV and meta-stability bounds, the model can be explored only for light to moderate mass range of heavy neutrinos. We also note that in case of a positive signal, flavor counting of the final tri-lepton channel can give information about the mass hierarchy of the light neutrinos.

  6. Hadron colliders (SSC/LHC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, A.W. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Palmer, R.B. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (United States); Evans, L.; Gareyte, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Siemann, R.H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The nominal SSC and LHC designs should operate conservatively at luminosities up to 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This luminosity is dictated by the event rates that can be handled by the detectors. However, this limit is event dependent (e.g. it does not take much of a detector to detect the event pp {yields} elephant; all one needs is extremely high luminosity). As such, it is useful to explore the possibility of going beyond the 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} level. Such exploration will also improve the accelerator physics understanding of pp collider designs. If the detector limitations are removed, the first accelerator limits occur when the luminosity is at the level of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. These accelerator limits will first be reviewed. The authors will then continue on to explore even higher luminosity as the ultimate limit of pp colliders. Accelerator technologies needed to achieve this ultimate luminosity as well as the R and D needed to reach it are discussed.

  7. Stochastic cooling in muon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to {approximately}10{sup 3} for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW.

  8. Elimination of influence of neutron-skin size difference of initial colliding nuclei in Pb+Pb collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Gao-Feng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model using as an input nucleon density profiles from Hartree-Fock calculations based on a modified Skyrme-like (MSL) model, we study how to eliminate the influence of neutron-skin size difference of initial colliding nuclei in probing the nuclear symmetry energy. Within the current experimental uncertainty range of neutron-skin size of $^{208}$Pb, the Pb+Pb collisions are performed in semicentral and peripheral collisions with impact parameters of 5 and 9fm and at beam energies from 50 MeV/nucleon to 1000 MeV/nucleon, respectively. It is shown that combination of neutron and proton collective flows, i.e., neutron-proton differential elliptic flow, neutron-proton elliptic flow difference, neutron-proton differential transverse flow and neutron-proton transverse flow difference, can effectively eliminate the effects of neutron-skin size difference and thus can be as useful sensitive observables in probing nuclear matter symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions...

  9. Experimental Cross Sections for Reactions of Heavy Ions and sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb, sup 2 sup 0 sup 9 Bi, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, and sup 2 sup 4 sup 8 Cm Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patin, J B

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the reactions between heavy ions and sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb, sup 2 sup 0 sup 9 Bi, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, and sup 2 sup 4 sup 8 Cm targets was performed to look at the differences between the cross sections of hot and cold fusion reactions. Experimental cross sections were compared with predictions from statistical computer codes to evaluate the effectiveness of the computer code in predicting production cross sections. Hot fusion reactions were studied with the MG system, catcher foil techniques and the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). 3n- and 4n-exit channel production cross sections were obtained for the sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U( sup 1 sup 8 O,xn) sup 2 sup 5 sup 6 sup - sup x Fm, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U( sup 2 sup 2 Ne,xn) sup 2 sup 6 sup 0 sup - sup x No, and sup 2 sup 4 sup 8 Cm( sup 1 sup 5 N,xn) sup 2 sup 6 sup 3 sup - sup x Lr reactions and are similar to previous experimental results. The experimental cross sections were accurately modeled by the predictions of the HIVAP code using the Reisdorf ...

  10. GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roblin, Yves [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Terzic, Balsa [JLAB; Aturban, Mohamed A. [Old Dominion University; Ranjan, D. [Old Dominion University; Zubair, Mohammed [Old Dominion University

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

  11. Multifragmentation at the balance energy of mass asymmetric colliding nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supriya Goyal

    2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the quantum molecular dynamics model, we study the role of mass asymmetry of colliding nuclei on the fragmentation at the balance energy and on its mass dependence. The study is done by keeping the total mass of the system fixed as 40, 80, 160, and 240 and by varying the mass asymmetry of the ($\\eta$ = $\\frac{A_{T}-A_{P}}{A_{T}+A_{P}}$; where $A_{T}$ and $A_{P}$ are the masses of the target and projectile, respectively) reaction from 0.1 to 0.7. Our results clearly indicate a sizeable effect of the mass asymmetry on the multiplicity of various fragments. The mass asymmetry dependence of various fragments is found to increase with increase in total system mass (except for heavy mass fragments). Similar to symmetric reactions, a power law system mass dependence of various fragment multiplicities is also found to exit for large asymmetries.

  12. Bottomonium production at root s(NN)=200 GeV and root s(NN)=5.5 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandchamp, L.; Lumpkins, S.; Sun, D.; van Hees, H.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    theory framework to evaluate the time evolution of bottomonia in heavy-ion reactions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider within an expanding fireball model. Although bottom quarks are assumed to be exclusively...

  13. Modeling Multi-Metal Ion Exchange in Biosorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    , may serve as a means for purifying industrial wastewaters that contain toxic heavy metal ions heavy metals often through ion exchange. This biosorption can be used for purification of metalModeling Multi-Metal Ion Exchange in Biosorption S I L K E S C H I E W E R A N D B O H U M I L V O

  14. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS ISSUES FOR FUTURE ELECTRON-ION COLLIDERS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07) (See4AJ01)59AJ76)74AJ01)BROWNE,8 - MarchACCELERATOR

  15. The Large Hadron Electron Collider Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Klein

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the Large Hadron Electron Collider, the LHeC, is being prepared, to which an introduction was given for the plenary panel discussion on the future of deep inelastic scattering held at DIS09. This is briefly summarised here. The CDR will comprise designs of the ep/eA collider, based on ring and linear electron accelerators, of the interaction region, designed for simultaneous $ep$ and $pp$ operation, of a new, modular detector, and it will present basics on the physics motivation for a high luminous Tera scale electron-nucleon collider as a complement to the LHC.

  16. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  17. Superconducting solenoids for the Muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    muon collider has superconducting solenoids as an integralLBNL-44303 SCMAG-690 Superconducting Solenoids for the MuonDE-AC03-76SFOOO98. J Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon

  18. PHYSICS AT HIGH LUMINOSITY MUON COLLIDERS AND A FACILITY OVERVIEW.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included.

  19. Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierschenk, Thomas [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Giulian, Raquel [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Afra, Boshra [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Rodriguez, Matias D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Schauries, D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Mudie, Stephen [Australian Synchrotron] [Australian Synchrotron; Pakarinen, Olli H [ORNL] [ORNL; Djurabekova, Flyura [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Osmani, Orkhan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany] [University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany; Medvedev, Nikita [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany] [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Rethfield, Baerbel [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany] [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Ridgway, Mark C [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Kluth, Patrick [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent with remnants of a high density liquid structure was revealed by small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Ion track dimensions dier for as-implanted and relaxed Si as attributed to dierent microstructures and melting temperatures. The identication and characterisation of ion tracks in amorphous Si yields new insight into mechanisms of damage formation due to swift heavy ion irradiation in amorphous semiconductors.

  20. EXTRACTION COMPRESSION AND ACCELERATION OF HIGH LINE CHARGE DENSITY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on compression of heavy ion beams for creating high energyet al, “Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy DensityPulsed Solenoid for Intense Ion Beam Transport,” these Proc: