Sample records for heavy element chemistry

  1. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  2. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  3. 2.10 Heavy Element Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. Super Heavy Element Discovery | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. Heavy Element Synthesis Reactions W. Loveland Oregon State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Why best? * National user facility for stable beams * Wide range of projectiles and energies and ability to handle heavy element targets. * New facilities (AGFA) * Ability to...

  6. Heavy-Ion Fusion Mechanism And Predictions Of Super-Heavy Elements Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Heavy-Ion Fusion Mechanism And Predictions Of Super-Heavy Elements Production Yasuhisa Abea University, Omsk, RU-644077, Russia Abstract. Fusion process is shown to firstly form largely deformed mono-ion Fusion; Fusion hindrance; Super-heavy elements; Cross section. PACS: 25.70, Jj, 25.70. Lm, 27.90. +b

  7. Heavy element nucleosynthesis in jets from collapsars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichirou [Department of Electronic Control, Kumamoto National College of Technology, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan); Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite libre de Bruxelles, CP226 Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Hashimoto, Masa-aki [Department of Physics, School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kotake, Kei [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi [Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate nucleosynthesis in collapsars, based on long-term, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rapidly rotating massive star of 40M{center_dot} during the core collapse. We have calculated detailed composition of magnetically driven jets ejected from the collapsars, in which the magnetic fields before the collapse, are uniform and parallel to the rotational axis of the star and the magnitudes of the fields, B0, are 1010 G or 1012 G. We follow the evolution of chemical composition up to about 4000 nuclides inside the jets from the collapse phase to the ejection phase through the jet generation phase with use of a large nuclear reaction network. We find that the r-process successfully operates in the jets from the collapsar of B0 = 1012 G, so that U and Th are synthesized abundantly. Abundance pattern inside the jets is similar to that of r-elements in the solar system. Furthermore, we find that p-nuclei are produced without seed nuclei: not only light p-nuclei, such as 74Se, 78Kr, 84Sr, and 92Mo, but also heavy p-nuclei, 113In, 115Sn, and 138La, can be abundantly synthesized in the jets. The amounts of p-nuclei in the ejecta are much greater than those in core-collapse supernovae (SNe). In particular, 92Mo, 113In, 115Sn, and 138La deficient in the SNe, are significantly produced in the ejecta. On the other hand, in the jets from the collapsar of B0 = 1010 G, the r-process cannot operate and 56Ni, 28Si, 32S, and 4He are abundantly synthesized in the jets, as in ejecta from inner layers of Type II supernovae. An amount of 56Ni is much smaller than that from SN 1987A.

  8. Advancing Chemistry with the Lanthanide and Actinide Elements Final Report, September 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, William John [Univ of California, Irvine

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to use the unique chemistry available from complexes of the lanthanides and actinides, as well as related heavy metals such as scandium, yttrium, and bismuth to advance chemistry in energy-related areas. The lanthanides and actinides have a combination of properties in terms of size, charge, electropositive character, and f valence orbitals that provides special opportunities to probe reactivity and catalysis in ways not possible with the other metals in the periodic table. We seek to discover reaction pathways and structural types that reveal new options in reaction chemistry related to energy. Identification of new paradigms in structure and reactivity should stimulate efforts to develop new types of catalytic processes that at present are not under consideration because either the transformation or the necessary intermediates are unknown. This project is one half of my laboratory’s DOE research which was split 50:50 between Catalysis and Heavy Element Chemistry programs in 2010. Hence, this report is for a half-project.

  9. Formation of super-heavy elements in astrophysical nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, Walter [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides is extremely important for the understanding of the r process of astrophysical nucleogenesis. For elements with Z>100 only neutron deficient isotopes (located to the left of the stability line) have been synthesized so far. The 'north-east' area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion reactions nor in fragmentation processes. Low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions are quite promising for the production and study of neutron-rich heavy nuclei including those located at the superheavy (SH) island of stability [1]. The neutron capture process is considered here as an alternative method for the production of SH nuclei. Requirements for the pulsed reactors of the next generation that could be used for the synthesis of long-living neutron rich SH nuclei are formulated. Formation of SH nuclei in supernova explosions is also discussed and the abundance of SH elements in nature is estimated.

  10. Nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultrarelativistic jets responsible for prompt and afterglow emission in gamma ray bursts are presumably driven by a central engine that consists of a dense accretion disk around a spinning black hole. We consider such engine, composed of free nucleons, electron-positron pairs, Helium nuclei, and cooled by neutrino emission. A significant number density of neutrons in the disk provide conditions for neutron rich plasma in the outflows and jets. Heavy nuclei are also formed in the accretion flow, at the distances 150-250 gravitational radii from the black hole. We study the process of nucleosynthesis in the GRB engine, depending on its physical properties. Our results may have important observational implications for the jet deceleration process and heavy elements observed in the spectra of GRB afterglows.

  11. Br-rich tips of calcified crab claws are less hard but more fracture resistant: A comparison of mineralized and heavy-element biological materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Robert A.

    of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China d Department of Chemistry the viscoelasticity of the material. We suggest that fracture resistance is of greater importance in smaller organisms cuticle. Bromine is one of a variety of heavy elements including zinc, iron, copper and manganese

  12. Neutrino-driven wind simulations and nucleosynthesis of heavy elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Arcones; F. -K. Thielemann

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino-driven winds, which follow core-collapse supernova explosions, present a fascinating nuclear astrophysics problem that requires understanding advanced astrophysics simulations, the properties of matter and neutrino interactions under extreme conditions, the structure and reactions of exotic nuclei, and comparisons against forefront astronomical observations. The neutrino-driven wind has attracted vast attention over the last 20 years as it was suggested to be a candidate for the astrophysics site where half of the heavy elements are produced via the r-process. In this review, we summarize our present understanding of neutrino-driven winds from the dynamical and nucleosynthesis perspectives. Rapid progress has been made during recent years in understanding the wind with improved simulations and better micro physics. The current status of the fields is that hydrodynamical simulations do not reach the extreme conditions necessary for the r-process and the proton or neutron richness of the wind remains to be investigated in more detail. However, nucleosynthesis studies and observations point already to neutrino-driven winds to explain the origin of lighter heavy elements, such as Sr, Y, Zr.

  13. The Solar Heavy Element Abundances: I. Constraints from Stellar Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delahaye, F; Delahaye, Franck; Pinsonneault, Marc

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest solar atmosphere models include non-LTE corrections and 3D hydrodynamic convection simulations. These models predict a significant reduction in the solar metal abundance, which leads to a serious conflict between helioseismic data and the predictions of solar interiors models. We demonstrate that the helioseismic constraints on the surface convection zone depth and helium abundance combined with stellar interiors models can be used to define the goodness of fit for a given chemical composition. After a detailed examination of the errors in the theoretical models we conclude that models constructed with the older solar abundances are consistent (seismic data. Models constructed with the proposed new low abundance scale are strongly disfavored, disagreeing at the 15 \\sigma level. We then use the sensitivity of the seismic properties to abundance changes to invert the problem and infer a seismic solar heavy element abundance mix with two components: meteoritic abundances, and th...

  14. A composite element bit design for magnetically encoded microcarriers for future combinatorial chemistry applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, David M.; Vyas, Kunal N.; Fernández-Pacheco, Amalio; Llandro, Justin; Palfreyman, Justin J.; Mitrelias, Thanos; Barnes, Crispin H. W.

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new composite element (CE) bit design for the magnetic bit encoding of suspended microcarriers, which has significant implications for library generation applications based on microfluidic combinatorial chemistry. The CE bit design...

  15. At an Elemental Crossroad: Investigating the Chemistry of Protactinium...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    metals such as iron whose chemistry is defined by its d electronic orbitals, or carbon s- and p- orbitals, the f- electronic orbitals are the defining characteristic of the...

  16. The Solar Heavy Element Abundances: I. Constraints from Stellar Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck Delahaye; Marc Pinsonneault

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest solar atmosphere models include non-LTE corrections and 3D hydrodynamic convection simulations. These models predict a significant reduction in the solar metal abundance, which leads to a serious conflict between helioseismic data and the predictions of solar interiors models. We demonstrate that the helioseismic constraints on the surface convection zone depth and helium abundance combined with stellar interiors models can be used to define the goodness of fit for a given chemical composition. After a detailed examination of the errors in the theoretical models we conclude that models constructed with the older solar abundances are consistent (seismic data. Models constructed with the proposed new low abundance scale are strongly disfavored, disagreeing at the 15 \\sigma level. We then use the sensitivity of the seismic properties to abundance changes to invert the problem and infer a seismic solar heavy element abundance mix with two components: meteoritic abundances, and the light metals CNONe. Seismic degeneracies between the best solutions for the elements arise for changes in the relative CNONe abundances and their effects are quantified. We obtain Fe/H=7.50+/-0.045+/-0.003(CNNe) and O/H=8.86+/-0.041+/-0.025(CNNe) for the relative CNNe in the GS98 mixture. The inferred solar oxygen abundance disagree with the abundance inferred from the 3D hydro models. Changes in the Ne abundance can mimic changes in O for the purposes of scalar constraints.Models constructed with low oxygen and high neon are inconsistent with the solar sound speed profile. The implications for the solar abundance scale are discussed.

  17. Fission and quasi-fission: insights into heavy element formation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinde, D. J.; Rietz, R. du; Rafiei, R.; Dasgupta, M.; Diaz-Torres, A. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Thomas, R. G. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); B.A.R.C., Mumbai (India)

    2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass-angle distributions carry detailed information on the characteristics of quasi-fission, and thus of the dynamics of heavy element formation reactions. Recent experimental results are presented and discussed.

  18. NO HEAVY-ELEMENT DISPERSION IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Judith G., E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu [Palomar Observatory, Mail Stop 249-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Although there have been recent claims that there is a large dispersion in the abundances of the heavy neutron capture elements in the old Galactic globular cluster M92, we show that the measured dispersion for the absolute abundances of four of the rare earth elements within a sample of 12 luminous red giants in M92 ({<=}0.07 dex) does not exceed the relevant sources of uncertainty. As expected from previous studies, the heavy elements show the signature of the r-process. Their abundance ratios are essentially identical to those of M30, another nearby globular cluster of similar metallicity.

  19. Galactic chemical evolution of heavy elements: from Barium to Europium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Travaglio; D. Galli; R. Gallino; M. Busso; F. Ferrini; O. Straniero

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We follow the chemical evolution of the Galaxy for elements from Ba to Eu, using an evolutionary model suitable to reproduce a large set of Galactic (local and non local) and extragalactic constraints. Input stellar yields for neutron-rich nuclei have been separated into their s-process and r-process components. The production of s-process elements in thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars of low mass proceeds from the combined operation of two neutron sources: the dominant reaction 13C(alpha,n)16O, which releases neutrons in radiative conditions during the interpulse phase, and the reaction 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg, marginally activated during thermal instabilities. The resulting s-process distribution is strongly dependent on the stellar metallicity. For the standard model discussed in this paper, it shows a sharp production of the Ba-peak elements around Z = Z_sun/4. Concerning the r-process yields, we assume that the production of r-nuclei is a primary process occurring in stars near the lowest mass limit for Type II supernova progenitors. The r-contribution to each nucleus is computed as the difference between its solar abundance and its s-contribution given by the Galactic chemical evolution model at the epoch of the solar system formation. We compare our results with spectroscopic abundances of elements from Ba to Eu at various metallicities (mainly from F and G stars) showing that the observed trends can be understood in the light of the present knowledge of neutron capture nucleosynthesis. Finally, we discuss a number of emerging features that deserve further scrutiny.

  20. Heavy Element Synthesis Reaction Mechanisms W. Loveland Oregon State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grazis, B.M. (ed.)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  2. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grazis, B.M. [ed.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  3. Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Ryan D. [Timken Company; Nixon, H. P. [Timken Company; Darragh, Craig V. [Timken Company; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Coffey, Dorothy W [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

  4. Predictions of Alpha Decay Half lives of Heavy and Superheavy Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Samanta; P. Roy Chowdhury; D. N. Basu

    2007-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical estimates for the lifetimes of several isotopes of heavy elements with Z=102-120 are presented by calculating the quantum mechanical tunneling probability in a WKB framework and using microscopic nucleus-nucleus potential obtained by folding the densities of interacting nuclei with the DDM3Y effective nuclear interaction. The $\\alpha$-decay half lives calculated in this formalism using the experimental $Q$-values are in good agreement over a wide range of experimental data. Half lives are also calculated using $Q$-values extracted from two mass formulae. The Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski (VSS) estimates of $\\alpha$-decay half lives with the same $Q$-values are presented for comparison. The half life calculations are found to be quite sensitive to the choice of $Q$-values. Comparison with the experimental data delineates the inadequacies of older mass predictions in the domain of heavy and superheavy elements as compared to the newer one by Muntian-Hofmann-Patyk-Sobiczewski, and highlights necessity of a more accurate mass formula which can predict $Q$-values with even higher precision.

  5. Determination of toxic elements in the ecological evaluation of metalliferous deposits of heavy oil and natural bitumens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, I.S.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Elements such as vanadium, nickel, zinc, arsenic, selenium, and mercury are present in highly toxic compounds in many workable deposits of heavy oil and natural bitumens. Refining this raw material and, especially, using the heavy residues as furnace fuel and as binding material for road paving, can lead to contamination of the environment unless measures are taken to remove the metals. Various investigations of the rare and disseminated elements in heavy oil and natural bitumens have encompassed a broad range of problems: (1) In refining, assessing the role of rare elements in technological processes in order to choose the optimal schemes for refining and improving the quality of petroleum products. (2) In protecting the environment and, in particular, identifying toxic compounds in fuel oils which, when burned at power stations, emit a substantial number of harmful substances into the atmosphere. (3) In determining commercial by-products, such as vanadium and nickel, in the petroleum and bitumen raw material.

  6. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of ± 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized ?- or ?-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an “endless” hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular weight molecule with the right kinetics. A novel hydrogen activation process has been developed

  7. Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. HEAVY-ELEMENT ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS D. V. Reames and C. K. Ng1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V.

    in distinguishing two underlying mechanisms of particle accel- eration that contribute to ``gradualHEAVY-ELEMENT ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS D. V. Reames and C. K. Ng1 NASA Goddard with 1 Z 82 in solar energetic particle (SEP) events observed at 2­10 MeV amu�1 during nearly 9 years

  10. Heavy Element Chemistry | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. A correlation between the heavy element content of transiting extrasolar planets and the metallicity of their parent stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan Guillot; Nuno C. Santos; Frédéric Pont; Nicolas Iro; Claudio Melo; Ignasi Ribas

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine extrasolar planets with masses between 110 and 430M are known to transit their star. The knowledge of their masses and radii allows an estimate of their composition, but uncertainties on equations of state, opacities and possible missing energy sources imply that only inaccurate constraints can be derived when considering each planet separately. Aims: We seek to better understand the composition of transiting extrasolar planets by considering them as an ensemble, and by comparing the obtained planetary properties to that of the parent stars. Methods: We use evolution models and constraints on the stellar ages to derive the mass of heavy elements present in the planets. Possible additional energy sources like tidal dissipation due to an inclined orbit or to downward kinetic energy transport are considered. Results: We show that the nine transiting planets discovered so far belong to a quite homogeneous ensemble that is characterized by a mass of heavy elements that is a relatively steep function of the stellar metallicity, from less than 20 earth masses of heavy elements around solar composition stars, to up to 100M for three times the solar metallicity (the precise values being model-dependant). The correlation is still to be ascertained however. Statistical tests imply a worst-case 1/3 probability of a false positive. Conclusions: Together with the observed lack of giant planets in close orbits around metal-poor stars, these results appear to imply that heavy elements play a key role in the formation of close-in giant planets. The large masses of heavy elements inferred for planets orbiting metal rich stars was not anticipated by planet formation models and shows the need for alternative theories including migration and subsequent collection of planetesimals.

  12. On the possible environmental effect in distributing heavy elements beyond individual gaseous halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sean D; Mulchaey, John S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of extended galaxy halo gas through HI and OVI absorption over two decades in projected distance at $z\\approx0.2$. The study is based on a sample of $95$ galaxies from a highly complete ($ > 80\\%$) survey of faint galaxies ($L > 0.1L_*$) with archival quasar absorption spectra and $53$ galaxies from the literature. A clear anti-correlation is found between HI (OVI) column density and virial radius normalized projected distance, $d/R_{\\rm h}$. Strong HI (OVI) absorption systems with column densities greater than $10^{14.0}$ ($10^{13.5}$) cm$^{-2}$ are found for $48$ of $54$ ($36$ of $42$) galaxies at $d R_{\\rm h}$ compared to isolated galaxies ($\\kappa_{\\rm OVI}\\approx0.13$ versus $0.04$) but no excess HI absorption. These findings suggest that environmental effects play a role in distributing heavy elements beyond the enriched gaseous halos of individual galaxies. Finally, we find that differential HI and OVI absorption between early- and late-type galaxies continues from $d < R_{\\rm h}$...

  13. Criticality Safety of Low-Enriched Uranium and High-Enriched Uranium Fuel Elements in Heavy Water Lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesic, Milan P

    2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The RB reactor was designed as a natural-uranium, heavy water, nonreflected critical assembly in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Yugoslavia, in 1958. From 1962 until 2002, numerous critical experiments were carried out with low-enriched uranium and high-enriched uranium fuel elements of tubular shape, known as the Russian TVR-S fuel assembly type, placed in various heavy water square lattices within the RB cylindrical aluminum tank. Some of these well-documented experiments were selected, described, evaluated, and accepted for inclusion in the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments', contributing to the preservation of a rather small number of heavy water benchmark critical experiments.

  14. THE HEAVY-ELEMENT COMPOSITION OF DISK INSTABILITY PLANETS CAN RANGE FROM SUB- TO SUPER-NEBULAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boley, Aaron C.; Payne, Matthew J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Helled, Ravit [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transit surveys combined with Doppler data have revealed a class of gas giant planets that are massive and highly enriched in heavy-elements (e.g., HD 149026b, GJ436b, and HAT-P-20b). It is tempting to consider these planets as validation of core accretion plus gas capture because it is often assumed that disk instability planets should be of nebular composition. We show in this paper, to the contrary, that gas giants that form by disk instability can have a variety of heavy-element compositions, ranging from sub- to super-nebular values. High levels of enrichment can be achieved through one or multiple mechanisms, including enrichment at birth, planetesimal capture, and differentiation plus tidal stripping. As a result, the metallicity of an individual gas giant cannot be used to discriminate between gas giant formation modes.

  15. Determination of the minimum masses of heavy elements in the envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Ulysse Marboeuf; Jonathan I. Lunine; Yann Alibert; Leigh N. Fletcher; Glenn S. Orton; Francoise Pauzat; Yves Ellinger

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the minimum mass of heavy elements required in the envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn to match the observed oversolar abundances of volatiles. Because the clathration efficiency remains unknown in the solar nebula, we have considered a set of sequences of ice formation in which the fraction of water available for clathration is varied between 0 and 100 %. In all the cases considered, we assume that the water abundance remains homogeneous whatever the heliocentric distance in the nebula and directly derives from a gas phase of solar composition. Planetesimals then form in the feeding zones of Jupiter and Saturn from the agglomeration of clathrates and pure condensates in proportions fixed by the clathration efficiency. A fraction of Kr and Xe may have been sequestrated by the H3+ ion in the form of stable XeH3+ and KrH3+ complexes in the solar nebula gas phase, thus implying the formation of at least partly Xe- and Kr-impoverished planetesimals in the feeding zones of Jupiter and Saturn. These planetesimals were subsequently accreted and vaporized into the hydrogen envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn, thus engendering volatiles enrichments in their atmospheres, with respect to hydrogen. Taking into account both refractory and volatile components, and assuming plausible molecular mixing ratios in the gas phase of the outer solar nebula, we show that it is possible to match the observed enrichments in Jupiter and Saturn, whatever the clathration efficiency. Our calculations predict that the O/H enrichment decreases from 6.7 to 5.6 times solar (O/H) in the envelope of Jupiter and from 18.1 to 15.4 times solar (O/H) in the envelope of Saturn with the growing clathration efficiency in the solar nebula.

  16. Yb-based heavy fermion compounds and field tuned quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mun, Eundeok

    2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation of this dissertation was to advance the study of Yb-based heavy fermion (HF) compounds especially ones related to quantum phase transitions. One of the topics of this work was the investigation of the interaction between the Kondo and crystalline electric field (CEF) energy scales in Yb-based HF systems by means of thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements. In these systems, the Kondo interaction and CEF excitations generally give rise to large anomalies such as maxima in {rho}(T) and as minima in S(T). The TEP data were use to determine the evolution of Kondo and CEF energy scales upon varying transition metals for YbT{sub 2}Zn{sub 20} (T = Fe, Ru, Os, Ir, Rh, and Co) compounds and applying magnetic fields for YbAgGe and YbPtBi. For YbT{sub 2}Zn{sub 20} and YbPtBi, the Kondo and CEF energy scales could not be well separated in S(T), presumably because of small CEF level splittings. A similar effect was observed for the magnetic contribution to the resistivity. For YbAgGe, S(T) has been successfully applied to determine the Kondo and CEF energy scales due to the clear separation between the ground state and thermally excited CEF states. The Kondo temperature, T{sub K}, inferred from the local maximum in S(T), remains finite as magnetic field increases up to 140 kOe. In this dissertation we have examined the heavy quasi-particle behavior, found near the field tuned AFM quantum critical point (QCP), with YbAgGe and YbPtBi. Although the observed nFL behaviors in the vicinity of the QCP are different between YbAgGe and YbPtBi, the constructed H-T phase diagram including the two crossovers are similar. For both YbAgGe and YbPtBi, the details of the quantum criticality turn out to be complicated. We expect that YbPtBi will provide an additional example of field tuned quantum criticality, but clearly there are further experimental investigations left and more ideas needed to understand the basic physics of field-induced quantum criticality in Yb-based systems.

  17. New Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Heavy Elements in Four Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roederer, Ian U.

    Elements heavier than the iron group are found in nearly all halo stars. A substantial number of these elements, key to understanding neutron-capture nucleosynthesis mechanisms, can only be detected in the near-ultraviolet. ...

  18. MOLYBDENUM, RUTHENIUM, AND THE HEAVY r-PROCESS ELEMENTS IN MODERATELY METAL-POOR MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFF STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Ruth C. [Astrophysical Advances, 607 Marion Place, Palo Alto, CA 94301 (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratios of elemental abundances observed in metal-poor stars of the Galactic halo provide a unique present-day record of the nucleosynthesis products of its earliest stars. While the heaviest elements were synthesized by the r- and s-processes, dominant production mechanisms of light trans-ironic elements were obscure until recently. This work investigates further our 2011 conclusion that the low-entropy regime of a high-entropy wind (HEW) produced molybdenum and ruthenium in two moderately metal-poor turnoff stars that showed extreme overabundances of those elements with respect to iron. Only a few, rare nucleosynthesis events may have been involved. Here we determine abundances for Mo, Ru, and other trans-Fe elements for 28 similar stars by matching spectral calculations to well-exposed near-UV Keck HIRES spectra obtained for beryllium abundances. In each of the 26 turnoff stars with Mo or Ru line detections and no evidence for s-process production (therefore old), we find Mo and Ru to be three to six times overabundant. In contrast, the maximum overabundance is reduced to factors of three and two for the neighboring elements zirconium and palladium. Since the overproduction peaks sharply at Mo and Ru, a low-entropy HEW is confirmed as its origin. The overabundance level of the heavy r-process elements varies significantly, from none to a factor of four, but is uncorrelated with Mo and Ru overabundances. Despite their moderate metallicity, stars in this group trace the products of different nucleosynthetic events: possibly very few events, possibly events whose output depended on environment, metallicity, or time.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory's Chemistry Division Presents Periodic Table of the Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    144.2 61 Pm (147) 62 Sm 150.4 63 Eu 152.0 64 Gd 157.3 65 Tb 158.9 66 Dy 162.5 67 Ho 164.9 68 Er 167.lanl.gov/periodic/ (1 of 3) [5/17/2001 4:06:20 PM] #12;Lanthanide Series* 58 Ce 140.1 59 Pr 140.9 60 Nd) [5/17/2001 4:06:20 PM] #12;about this resource A Periodic Table of the Elements at Los Alamos

  20. Spontaneous fission modes and lifetimes of super-heavy elements in the nuclear density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Staszczak; A. Baran; W. Nazarewicz

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifetimes of super-heavy (SH) nuclei are primarily governed by alpha decay and spontaneous fission (SF). Here we study the competing decay modes of even-even SH isotopes with 108 cold fusion" and "hot fusion" reactions. The region of long-lived SH nuclei is expected to be centered on $^{294}$Ds with a total half-life of ?1.5 days.

  1. HST Observations of Heavy Elements in Metal-Poor Galactic Halo Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. Cowan; Christopher Sneden; Timothy C. Beers; James E. Lawler; Jennifer Simmerer; James W. Truran; Francesca Primas; Jason Collier; Scott Burles

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new abundance determinations of neutron-capture elements Ge, Zr, Os, Ir, and Pt in a sample of 11 metal-poor (-3.1 56) elements. However, the large (and correlated) scatters of [Eu,Os,Ir,Pt/Fe] suggests that the heaviest neutron-capture r-process elements are not formed in all supernovae. In contrast, the Ge abundances of all program stars track their Fe abundances, very well. An explosive process on iron-peak nuclei (e.g., the alpha-rich freeze-out in supernovae), rather than neutron capture, appears to have been the dominant synthesis mechanism for this element at low metallicities -- Ge abundances seem completely uncorrelated with Eu.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Heavy Elements Program. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark. S. B.; Ewing, R.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In our first funding cycle, much time was spent developing protocols for characterizing and working with samples containing transuranium isotopes and obtaining preliminary experimental data on non-f-element systems.

  3. Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels...

  4. Trace element chemistry of coal bed natural gas produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Jackson; K.J. Reddy [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department of Renewable Resources

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal bed natural gas (CBNG) produced water is usually disposed into nearby constructed disposal ponds. Geochemistry of produced water, particularly trace elements interacting with a semiarid environment, is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to collect produced water samples at outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds and monitor pH, iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), boron (B), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), cadmium (Cd), and barium (Ba). Outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds were sampled from five different watersheds including Cheyenne River (CHR), Belle Fourche River (BFR), Little Powder River (LPR), Powder River (PR), and Tongue River (TR) within the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming from 2003 to 2005. Paired tests were conducted between CBNG outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds for each watershed. Results suggest that produced water from CBNG outfalls is chemically different from the produced water from corresponding disposal ponds. Most trace metal concentrations in the produced water increased from outfall to disposal pond except for Ba. In disposal ponds, Ba, As, and B concentrations increased from 2003 to 2005. Geochemical modeling predicted precipitation and dissolution reactions as controlling processes for Al, Cu, and Ba concentrations in CBNG produced water. Adsorption and desorption reactions appear to control As, Mo, and B concentrations in CBNG water in disposal ponds. Overall, results of this study will be important to determine beneficial uses (e.g., irrigation, livestock/wildlife water, and aquatic life) for CBNG produced water in the PRB, Wyoming. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Reduced quasifission competition in fusion reactions forming neutron-rich heavy elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hammerton; Z. Kohley; D. J. Hinde; M. Dasgupta; A. Wakhle; E. Williams; V. E. Oberacker; A. S. Umar; I. P. Carter; K. J. Cook; J. Greene; D. Y. Jeung; D. H. Luong; S. D. McNeil; C. S. Palshetkar; D. C. Rafferty; C. Simenel; K. Stiefel

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of mass-angle distributions (MADs) for Cr + W reactions, providing a wide range in the neutron-to-proton ratio of the compound system, (N/Z)CN, have allowed for the dependence of quasifission on the (N/Z)CN to be determined in a model-independent way. Previous experimental and theoretical studies had produced conflicting conclusions. The experimental MADs reveal an increase in contact time and mass evolution of the quasifission fragments with increasing (N/Z)CN, which is indicative of an increase in the fusion probability. The experimental results are in agreement with microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations of the quasifission process. The experimental and theoretical results favor the use of the most neutron-rich projectiles and targets for the production of heavy and superheavy nuclei.

  6. Reduced quasifission competition in fusion reactions forming neutron-rich heavy elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, K; Hinde, D J; Dasgupta, M; Wakhle, A; Williams, E; Oberacker, V E; Umar, A S; Carter, I P; Cook, K J; Greene, J; Jeung, D Y; Luong, D H; McNeil, S D; Palshetkar, C S; Rafferty, D C; Simenel, C; Stiefel, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of mass-angle distributions (MADs) for Cr + W reactions, providing a wide range in the neutron-to-proton ratio of the compound system, (N/Z)CN, have allowed for the dependence of quasifission on the (N/Z)CN to be determined in a model-independent way. Previous experimental and theoretical studies had produced conflicting conclusions. The experimental MADs reveal an increase in contact time and mass evolution of the quasifission fragments with increasing (N/Z)CN, which is indicative of an increase in the fusion probability. The experimental results are in agreement with microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations of the quasifission process. The experimental and theoretical results favor the use of the most neutron-rich projectiles and targets for the production of heavy and superheavy nuclei.

  7. The LLNL Heavy Element Facility -- Facility Management, Authorization Basis, and Readiness Assessment Lessons Learned in the Heavy Element Facility (B251) Transition from Category II Nuclear Facility to Radiological Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Brown, E; Gray, L

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents Facility Management, Readiness Assessment, and Authorization Basis experience gained and lessons learned during the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program (RRP). The RRP was tasked with removing contaminated glove boxes, radioactive inventory, and contaminated ventilation systems from the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The RRP was successful in its goal in April 2005 with the successful downgrade of B251 from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. The expertise gained and the lessons learned during the planning and conduct of the RRP included development of unique approaches in work planning/work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected'') and facility management. These approaches minimized worker dose and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. These lessons learned can help similar operational and management activities at other sites, including facilities restarting operations or new facility startup. B251 was constructed at LLNL to provide research areas for conducting experiments in radiochemistry using transuranic elements. Activities at B251 once included the preparation of tracer sets associated with the underground testing of nuclear devices and basic research devoted to a better understanding of the chemical and nuclear behavior of the transuranic elements. Due to the age of the facility, even with preventative maintenance, facility safety and experimental systems were deteriorating. A variety of seismic standards were used in the facility design and construction, which encompassed eight building increments constructed over a period of 26 years. The cost to bring the facility into compliance with the current seismic and other requirements was prohibitive, and simply maintaining B251 as a Category II nuclear facility posed serious cost considerations under a changing regulatory environment. Considering the high cost of maintenance and seismic upgrades, the RRP was created to mitigate the risk of dispersal of radioactive material during an earthquake by removing the radioactive materials inventory and glove box contamination. LLNL adopted the goal of reducing the hazard categorization of the Facility from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. To support the RRP, B251 transitioned from a standby to a fully operational Category II Nuclear Facility, compliant with current regulations. A work control process was developed, procedures were developed, Authorization Basis Documents were created, work plans were written, off-normal drills practiced, a large number of USQ reviews were conducted, and a ''Type II'' Readiness Assessment (RA) was conducted to restart operations. Subsequent RA's focused on specific operations. Finally, a four-step process was followed to reach Radiological Status: (1) Inventory Reduction and D&D activities reduced the inventory and radiological contamination of the facility below the Category III threshold (DOE-STD-1027), (2) Radiological Safety Basis Document (SBD aka HAR) was approved by NNSA, (3) the inventory control system for a Radiological Facility was implemented, and (4) verification by NNSA of radiological status was completed.

  8. Origin of the heavy elements in HD 140283. Measurement of europium abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mello, C Siqueira; Spite, M; Spite, F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HD 140283 is a nearby (V=7.7) subgiant metal-poor star, extensively analysed in the literature. Although many spectra have been obtained for this star, none showed a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio high enough to enable a very accurate derivation of abundances from weak lines. The detection of europium proves that the neutron-capture elements in this star originate in the r-process, and not in the s-process, as recently claimed in the literature. Based on the OSMARCS 1D LTE atmospheric model and with a consistent approach based on the spectrum synthesis code Turbospectrum, we measured the europium lines at 4129 {\\AA} and 4205 {\\AA}, taking into account the hyperfine structure of the transitions. The spectrum, obtained with a long exposure time of seven hours at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), has a resolving power of 81000 and a S/N ratio of 800 at 4100 {\\AA}. We were able to determine the abundance A(Eu)=-2.35 dex, compatible with the value predicted for the europium from the r-process. The abundance ...

  9. PII S0016-7037(00)00379-3 Geologic control of Sr and major element chemistry in Himalayan Rivers, Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garzione, Carmala N.

    , Nepal N. B. ENGLISH,* J. QUADE, P. G. DECELLES, and C. N. GARZIONE Department of Geology, University) Abstract--Our study of the Seti River in far western Nepal shows that the solute chemistry of the river

  10. Fuel Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion, and Emissions Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources...

  11. 147Chemistry Chemistry (Chem)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    147Chemistry Chemistry (Chem) Bayly Foundation PROFESSORS FRANCE, PLEVA ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS ALty A student may complete only one of the majors listed in the Department of Chemistry. The major in chemistry leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of 44 credits as follows: 1. Chemistry 111, 112

  12. HEAVY-ION FRACTIONATION IN THE IMPULSIVE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT OF 2002 AUGUST 20: ELEMENTS, ISOTOPES, AND INFERRED CHARGE STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Von Rosenvinge, T. T., E-mail: mark.e.wiedenbeck@jpl.nasa.go [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of heavy-ion elemental and isotopic composition in the energy range {approx}12-60 MeV nucleon{sup -1} are reported from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Isotope Spectrometer (ACE/SIS) instrument for the solar energetic particle (SEP) event of 2002 August 20. We investigate fractionation in this particularly intense impulsive event by examining the enhancements of elemental and isotopic abundance ratios relative to corresponding values in the solar wind. The elemental enhancement pattern is similar to those in other impulsive events detected by ACE/SIS and in compilations of average impulsive-event composition. For individual elements, the abundance of a heavy isotope (mass M {sub 2}) is enhanced relative to that of a lighter isotope (M{sub 1}) by a factor {approx}(M {sub 1}/M {sub 2}){sup {alpha}} with {alpha} {approx_equal} -15. Previous studies have reported elemental abundance enhancements organized as a power law in Q/M, the ratio of estimated ionic charge to mass in the material being fractionated. We consider the possibility that a fractionation law of this form could be responsible for the isotopic fractionation as a power law in the mass ratio and then explore the implications it would have for the ionic charge states in the source material. Assuming that carbon is fully stripped (Q{sub C} = 6), we infer mean values of the ionic charge during the fractionation process, Q{sub Z} , for a variety of elements with atomic numbers 7 {<=} Z {<=} 28. We find that Q{sub Fe} {approx_equal} 21-22, comparable to the highest observed values that have been reported at lower energies in impulsive SEP events from direct measurements near 1 AU. The inferred charge states as a function of Z are characterized by several step increases in the number of attached electrons, Z - Q{sub Z} . We discuss how this step structure, together with the known masses of the elements, might account for a variety of features in the observed pattern of elemental abundance enhancements. We also briefly consider alternative fractionation laws and the relationship between the charge states we infer in the source material and those derived from in situ observations.

  13. Oregon State University nuclear chemistry progress report, August 1, 1992--July 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loveland, W.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics related to nuclear chemistry: Element 110; synthesis of heavy nuclei with complete fusion reactions involving radioactive nuclear beams; the interaction of 21--44 MeV/nucleon Xe with Au; MeV/nucleon {sup 86}Kr with {sup 197}Au; intermediate energy Ar-Th collisions; target-like fragments from the interaction of 29 MeV/nucleon {sup 208}Pb with {sup 197}Au; the intermediate of 22 and 32 MeV/nucleon {sup 16}O with {sup 197}Au; Au projectile fragmentation at 20 MeV/nucleon; relativistic heavy ion research; and pulse height defect measurements for very heavy ions.

  14. KEPLER-15b: A HOT JUPITER ENRICHED IN HEAVY ELEMENTS AND THE FIRST KEPLER MISSION PLANET CONFIRMED WITH THE HOBBY-EBERLY TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Cochran, William D. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Brugamyer, Erik J. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark Centre for Star and Planet Formation, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Rowe, Jason [SETI Institute, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Lucas, Phillip [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Isaacson, Howard [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bryson, Steve; Howell, Steve B.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Haas, Michael R. [NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hansen, Terese [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Demory, Brice-Olivier [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Everett, Mark [NOAO, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); and others

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of Kepler-15b (KOI-128), a new transiting exoplanet detected by NASA's Kepler mission. The transit signal with a period of 4.94 days was detected in the quarter 1 (Q1) Kepler photometry. For the first time, we have used the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) to determine the mass of a Kepler planet via precise radial velocity (RV) measurements. The 24 HET/HRS RVs and 6 additional measurements from the Fibre-fed Echelle Spectrograph spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope reveal a Doppler signal with the same period and phase as the transit ephemeris. We used one HET/HRS spectrum of Kepler-15 taken without the iodine cell to determine accurate stellar parameters. The host star is a metal-rich ([Fe/H] = 0.36 {+-} 0.07) G-type main-sequence star with T{sub eff} = 5515 {+-} 124 K. The semi-amplitude K of the RV orbit is 78.7{sup +8.5}{sub -9.5} m s{sup -1}, which yields a planet mass of 0.66 {+-} 0.1 M{sub Jup}. The planet has a radius of 0.96 {+-} 0.06 R{sub Jup} and a mean bulk density of 0.9 {+-} 0.2 g cm{sup -3}. The radius of Kepler-15b is smaller than the majority of transiting planets with similar mass and irradiation level. This suggests that the planet is more enriched in heavy elements than most other transiting giant planets. For Kepler-15b we estimate a heavy element mass of 30-40 M{sub Circled-Plus }.

  15. The origins of light and heavy r-process elements identified by chemical tagging of metal-poor stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing interests in neutron star (NS) mergers as the origin of r-process elements have sprouted since the discovery of evidence for the ejection of these elements from a short-duration gamma-ray burst. The hypothesis of a NS merger origin is reinforced by a theoretical update of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers successful in yielding r-process nuclides with A>130. On the other hand, whether the origin of light r-process elements are associated with nucleosynthesis in NS merger events remains unclear. We find a signature of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers from peculiar chemical abundances of stars belonging to the Galactic globular cluster M15. This finding combined with the recent nucleosynthesis results implies a potential diversity of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers. Based on these considerations, we are successful in the interpretation of an observed correlation between [light r-process/Eu] and [Eu/Fe] among Galactic halo stars and accordingly narrow down the role of supernova nucleosynthesis in the r-process pr...

  16. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

  17. 148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry Prerequisite: Chemistry 242,syntheticmethodology,mod- ernsyntheticreactions,protectinggroups,naturalprod- uctssynthesis,andcombinatorialchemistry.France. Spring Chemistry 350 (3)--Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisites: Chemistry 250, 252, and 262. Anintro

  18. SOURCE REGIONS OF THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD AND VARIABILITY IN HEAVY-ION ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION IN GRADUAL SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Wang, Yi-Ming [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7680, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Tylka, Allan J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 672, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ng, Chee K. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Dietrich, William F., E-mail: yko@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil [Praxis, Inc., Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are those in which ions are accelerated to their observed energies by interactions with a shock driven by a fast coronal mass ejection (CME). Previous studies have shown that much of the observed event-to-event variability can be understood in terms of shock speed and evolution in the shock-normal angle. However, an equally important factor, particularly for the elemental composition, is the origin of the suprathermal seed particles upon which the shock acts. To tackle this issue, we (1) use observed solar-wind speed, magnetograms, and the potential-field source-surface model to map the Sun-L1 interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line back to its source region on the Sun at the time of the SEP observations and (2) then look for a correlation between SEP composition (as measured by Wind and Advanced Composition Explorer at ?2-30 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) and characteristics of the identified IMF source regions. The study is based on 24 SEP events, identified as a statistically significant increase in ?20 MeV protons and occurring in 1998 and 2003-2006, when the rate of newly emergent solar magnetic flux and CMEs was lower than in solar-maximum years, and the field-line tracing is therefore more likely to be successful. We find that the gradual SEP Fe/O is correlated with the field strength at the IMF source, with the largest enhancements occurring when the footpoint field is strong due to the nearby presence of an active region (AR). In these cases, other elemental ratios show a strong charge-to-mass (q/M) ordering (at least on average), similar to that found in impulsive events. Such results lead us to suggest that magnetic reconnection in footpoint regions near ARs bias the heavy-ion composition of suprathermal seed ions by processes qualitatively similar to those that produce larger heavy-ion enhancements in impulsive SEP events. To address potential technical concerns about our analysis, we also discuss efforts to exclude impulsive SEP events from our event sample.

  19. Atmospheric Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finlayson-Pitts, B. J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in our understanding of important chemistry and highlightedin our knowledge. In summary, the chemistry occurring in theBJ, Pitts JN, Jr (2000) Chemistry of the Upper and Lower

  20. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 11 Wiley Huetterties and C. M.Submitted to the Journal of Organometallic ChemistryCLUSTER CHEMISTRY Earl L. Muetterties TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY May

  1. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending July 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is reported on: chemistry of coal liquefaction, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures, geosciences, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of TRU elements and compounds, separations chemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, inorganic chemistry of hydrogen cycles, molten salt systems, and enhanced oil recovery. Separate abstracts were prepared for the sections dealing with coal liquefaction, TRU elements and compounds, separations, nuclear wastes, and enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

  2. 3, 37453768, 2003 Heavy hydrogen in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 3, 3745­3768, 2003 Heavy hydrogen in the stratosphere T. R¨ockmann et al. Title Page Abstract/3745/ © European Geosciences Union 2003 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Heavy hydrogen Heavy hydrogen in the stratosphere T. R¨ockmann et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  3. Super-Heavy Element Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer. .Energy8 Career DaySunShotSuper

  4. atmospheric heavy metal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  5. aquatic heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  6. assess heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  7. airborne heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  8. avoid heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  9. Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  10. Richard T. Oakley FRSC, Professor of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Interests: Synthesis and solid state transport properties of open shell inorganic and organic ring systems. Heavy atom radicals as multifunctional molecular conductors and magnetic materials. Academic Background: B.Sc., 1969, Honours Chemistry, University of British Columbia M.Sc., 1970, Inorganic Chemistry

  11. Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Theodore

    SYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S/explaining the trends in J as a function of altitude and solar zenith angle. The second involves analyzing real

  12. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been indexed by 11 separate chapters. The subjects covered are: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, materials chemistry, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, catalysis, electron spectroscopy, nuclear waste chemistry, heuristic modeling, and special topics. (PLG)

  13. Organophosphorus chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Paul R.

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    2087 Organophosphorus chemistry Paul R. Hanson Editorial Open Access Address: Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582, USA Email: Paul R. Hanson - phanson@ku.edu. Keywords: organophosphorus... Beilstein J. Org. Chem. 2014, 10, 2087–2088. doi:10.3762/bjoc.10.217 Received: 28 July 2014 Accepted: 06 August 2014 Published: 04 September 2014 This article is part of the Thematic Series "Organophosphorus chemistry" Guest Editor: P. R. Hanson © 2014...

  14. Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

  15. Heavy Quark Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul B. Mackenzie

    1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice calculations of heavy quark systems provide very good measures of the lattice spacing, a key element in recent determinations of the strong coupling constant using lattice methods. They also provide excellent testing grounds for lattice methods in general. I review recent phenomenological and technical developments in this field.

  16. Electronic Structure of the Heaviest Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uranium resemble those of these 4d and 5d elements and for this reason most of the textbooks and standard works on chemistry

  17. Position: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Grey Position: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Email: jkgrey@unm.edu Phone: 505.277.1658; Fax: 505.277.2609 Office: Clark Hall B70 Homepage: http://chemistry.unm.edu/faculty_web/jgrey Education B.S. in Chemistry, 1999, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI Ph.D. in Chemistry

  18. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. NewNew Science, Green Chemistry and Environmental Health.abstract.html 5. American Chemistry Council. 2003. Guide to

  19. UCLA CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Alex J.

    UCLA CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY ORIENTATION HANDBOOK 2012-2013 #12;Table of Contents Introduction .............................................................................................................................................2 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office ..................................................................................................3 Majors in Chemistry

  20. Actinide Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 IntroductionActinide Chemistry Actinide chemistry

  1. Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  2. Chemistry Division: Annual progress report for period ending March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into the following sections: coal chemistry; aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures; geochemistry of crustal processes to high temperatures and pressures; chemistry of advanced inorganic materials; structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials; chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds; separations chemistry; reactions and catalysis in molten salts; surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis; electron spectroscopy; chemistry related to nuclear waste disposal; computational modeling of security document printing; and special topics. (DLC)

  3. Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Terry

    #12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12 #12;First shell Second shell Third shell Hydrogen 1H Lithium 3Li Sodium 11Na Beryllium 4Be Magnesium energy Higher energy (a) A ball bouncing down a flight of stairs provides an analogy for energy levels

  4. Chemistry 106X -Fall 2010 General Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Chemistry 106X - Fall 2010 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 9 bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. by Kotz, Treichel, and Townsend-0-495-38703-9 Electronic Book - ISBN 978-0-495-68043-7 · OWL pin number for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1

  5. Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011) Instructor: Assistant Professor Mathew M. Maye Chemistry", 5th Edition, Freeman Press. Available at SU bookstore. The solution manual is optional. (Suggested for CHE611 Students pursuing Inorganic) Huheey, "Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure

  6. Chemistry 106X -Spring 2011 General Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Chemistry 106X - Spring 2011 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 1 and can be purchased in the UAF bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1 or 2 semester) · TurningPoint Technologies ResponseCard RF

  7. School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level Tutorial Groups 2013/14 Name Programme Tutor Ahmed, Zacher Medicinal Chemistry Arif, Saboor Chemistry Bagnall, Samuel Chemistry Barbara, David Chemistry Beaumont, Nicholas Chemistry Quinn, Michael J Chemistry Bennett, Matthew Chemistry Booth, Natalie

  8. CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM SEMESTER I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM SEMESTER ­ I Chemistry-I: Physical principles (2:1) Atomic structure-state approximation, Arrhenius equation and collision theory and catalysis. SEMESTER ­ II Chemistry-II: Structure orbital theory: polyatomic molecules - Walsh diagram; Main group chemistry: periodic properties, chemistry

  9. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  10. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    19. P. Anastas, J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory andto Advance New Science, Green Chemistry and EnvironmentalChronicle Extra: Guide to Green Jobs. Field with a Future.

  11. Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark, James E.

    Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems: From Nanoassemblies to Dynamic Materials" Presented by: Professor Stuart J. Rowan Case Western Reserve University Departmental Colloquium Friday, May 15, 2009 3:00 p.m. 502 Rieveschl #12;Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems

  12. Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ligand reactivity, and the chemical synthesis of coordination compounds and other "solid" state materials 1 Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2010) Instructor: Assistant Professor Mathew M. Maye: M-W 4:00-5:00, and by appointment Credits: 3 Text: (Required) Shriver & Atkins, "Inorganic Chemistry

  13. FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry Syracuse University The Department of Chemistry at Syracuse University invites applications for a tenure track faculty position at the Assistant Professor level in inorganic chemistry with specialization in materials chemistry (broadly defined

  14. Challenges in explosive nucleosynthesis of heavy elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinedo, Gabriel Martinez; Fischer, T.; Lohs, A.; Huther, L. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 2, 64289 Darmstadt, Germany and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerioneneforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerioneneforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 2, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 2, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a treatment of charged-current neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter that is consistent with the nuclear equation of state has a strong impact on the spectra of the neutrinos emitted during the deleptonization period of a protoneutron star formed in a core-collapse supernova. We compare results of simulations including and neglecting mean field effects on the neutrino opacities. Their inclusion reduces the luminosities of all neutrino flavors and enhances the spectral differences between electron neutrino and antineutrino. The magnitude of the difference depends on the equation of state and in particular on the symmetry energy at sub-nuclear densities. These modifications reduce the proton-to-nucleon ratio of the neutrino-driven outflow, increasing slightly their entropy. They are expected to have a substantial impact on the nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds, even though they do not result in conditions that favor an r-process. Contrarily to previous findings, our simulations show that the spectra of electron neutrinos remain substantially different from those of other (anti)neutrino flavors during the entire deleptonization phase of the protoneutron star. The obtained luminosity and spectral changes are also expected to have important consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations and neutrino detection on Earth.

  15. Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Chemistry Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science that underlies many technology. A chemistry degree gives you the understanding to contribute to our future in very topical areas) in Chemistry BSc (Hons) in Chemistry MChem (Hons) in Chemistry (with an industrial placement year) MChem (Hons

  16. New Applications of Gamma Spectroscopy: Characterization Tools for D&D Process Development, Inventory Reduction Planning & Shipping, Safety Analysis & Facility Management During the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Gray, L; Vellinger, R; West, M; Gaylord, R; Larson, J; Jones, G; Shingleton, J; Harris, L; Harward, N

    2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel applications of gamma ray spectroscopy for D&D process development, inventory reduction, safety analysis and facility management are discussed in this paper. These applications of gamma spectroscopy were developed and implemented during the Risk Reduction Program (RPP) to successfully downgrade the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. Non-destructive assay in general, gamma spectroscopy in particular, were found to be important tools in project management, work planning, and work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected''), minimizing worker dose, and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. Inventory reduction activities utilized gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy inventory, ingrowth of daughter products and the presence of process impurities; quantify inventory; prioritize work activities for project management; and to supply information to satisfy shipper/receiver documentation requirements. D&D activities utilize in-situ gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy contamination; quantify contamination levels and monitor the progress of decontamination efforts; and determine the point of diminishing returns in decontaminating enclosures and glove boxes containing high specific activity isotopes such as {sup 244}Cm and {sup 238}Pu. In-situ gamma spectroscopy provided quantitative comparisons of several decontamination techniques (e.g. TLC-free Stripcoat{trademark}, Radiac{trademark} wash, acid wash, scrubbing) and was used as a part of an iterative process to determine the appropriate level of decontamination and optimal cost to benefit ratio. Facility management followed a formal, rigorous process utilizing an independent, state certified, peer-reviewed gamma spectroscopy program, in conjunction with other characterization techniques, process knowledge, and historical records, to provide information for work planning, work prioritization, work control, and safety analyses (e.g. development of hold points, stop work points); and resulted in B251 successfully achieving Radiological status on schedule. Gamma spectroscopy helped to define operational approaches to achieve radiation exposure ALARA, e.g. hold points, appropriate engineering controls, PPE, workstations, and time/distance/shielding in the development of ALARA plans. These applications of gamma spectroscopy can be used to improve similar activities at other facilities.

  17. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  18. Chemistry of Low Mass Substellar Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katharina Lodders; Bruce Fegley, Jr

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    "Brown dwarfs" is the collective name for objects more massive than giant planets such as Jupiter but less massive than M dwarf stars. This review gives a brief description of the classification and chemistry of low mass dwarfs. The current spectral classification of stars includes L and T dwarfs that encompass the coolest known stars and substellar objects. The relatively low atmospheric temperatures and high total pressures in substellar dwarfs lead to molecular gas and condensate chemistry. The chemistry of elements such as C, N, O, Ti, V, Fe, Cr, and the alkali elements play a dominant role in shaping the optical and infrared spectra of the "failed" stars. Chemical diagnostics for the subclassifications are described.

  19. Computational Chemistry Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Joseph A; Murray-Rust, Peter; Tyrrell, Simon M; Zhang, Yong

    Computational Chemistry Robots ACS Sep 2005 Computational Chemistry Robots J. A. Townsend, P. Murray-Rust, S. M. Tyrrell, Y. Zhang jat45@cam.ac.uk Can high-throughput computation provide a reliable “experimental” resource for molecular...

  20. Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Chemistry Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science that underlies many technology. A chemistry degree allows you to understand and to contribute to our future. Chemistry is challenging: understanding the very fabric of matter is both stimulating and rewarding. Studying chemistry

  1. Chemistry Division Department of Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    1 Chemistry Division Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Illinois Institute-13 Chemistry Division invites nominations for Kilpatrick Fellowship for the academic year 2012's Chemistry Department from 1947­1960. Mary Kilpatrick was a chemistry faculty member from 1947

  2. Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact Endowment Fund To provide support for undergraduate biomedical research in the Department of Chemistry/or the purchase of supplies. Yes w/recommendation s from faculty Call goes out in February to all chemistry

  3. CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOKFOR STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOKFOR STUDENTS Millersville University Millersville, Pennsylvania in the ChemistryDepartment. It brings together material not collected in other places and is not meant Resources 2 Programs in Chemistry and The General Education Curriculum Record Form 3 The Major Requirements

  4. Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact to Chemistry and Biochemistry entering graduate students who have asked for consideration to serve as research@chem.sc.edu Hiram and Lawanda Allen Scholarship for Excellence in Chemistry This award is given to a graduating

  5. Adam Benoit Medicinal Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    #12;Adam Benoit Medicinal Chemistry Ph.D. Thesis Title: Synthesis and Evaluation of Acridine Country: United States #12;Amit Gangar Medicinal Chemistry Ph.D. Thesis Title: Design and Development Wagner Home Country: India #12;Dan Wang Medicinal Chemistry M.S. Thesis Title: Synthesis and Evaluation

  6. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neu, M.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK{sub a}s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 5.94, log{beta}{sub 120} = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 9.34, log{beta}{sub l20} = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is log{beta}{sub 110} = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of {sup 242}Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

  7. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

  8. Organic Chemistry 51B -Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions(s). Chapter 7: Nucleophilic Substitution + + NaOH CH3O- #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chapter 8: Elimination Reactions #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013

  9. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuelsTrace elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuels Coal Peat Heavy fuel oil Pet coke MSW RDF Wood Waste wood Waste paper Scrap tyres Sew. sludge Hg 0.02-3 ~0.07 .153 Behaviour of trace elements in coalBehaviour of trace elements in coal combustion flue gasescombustion flue

  10. TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    actinide chemistry, with a focus on coordination and organometallic uranium chemistry. Paula ColavitaTCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry

  11. Heavy metal biosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  12. CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009 Gautam Bhattacharyya, 363 Hunter Labs, phone: 656-1356 gautamb. This course does NOT have a separate laboratory meeting time. Course Goals CH 450 is the Chemistry Capstone to change. #12;CH 450 Spring, 2009 -2- Course Outline (Tentative) Journal due dates are designated each week

  13. ELEMENT 98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Street, K.,Jr.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W-7405-eng-48 Element 98 S. G. Thompson, K. Street, Jr. , A.3 ELliMENT 98 So Go Thompson, K. street, Jr. , A. Ghiorso

  14. Marquette University Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Analysis Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Inorganic Synthesis Lab #12;Our Curriculum Physical Chemistry Lecture.... Directly influence the lives of others? Develop new materials with enhanced flame- retardant properties

  15. CHEMISTRY 1010 CHEMISTRY, HUMANITY AND ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    day to add classes, select C/NC option or to audit a class is Jan. 23. 3. The last day to withdraw. The University of Utah seeks to provide equal access to its programs, services and activities for people: Chemistry 1010 aims to promote understanding of the basic environmental ingredients, energy, atoms

  16. INTERCOMPARISON STUDY OF ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN RAW AND SPENT OIL SHALES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minor Elements ~n Oil Shale and Oil-Shale Products. LERC RI-Analytical Chemistry of Oil Shale and Tar Sands. Advan. inH. Meglen. The Analysis of Oil-Shale Materials for Element

  17. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  18. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

  19. National Chemistry Week Theme: "Candy: The Sweet Side of Chemistry"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    National Chemistry Week Theme: "Candy: The Sweet Side of Chemistry" Super Science Saturday Saturday-on chemistry and science demonstrations! All students & families are welcome! Fun & educational for all ages! Sponsored by: American Chemical Society LSU Department of Chemistry LSU Athletic Department Free admission

  20. I. Required core Chemistry Courses (1905 & 1925) Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advisor: Advisee: I. Required core Chemistry Courses (1905 & 1925) Chemistry CH 111 PY 211 _____ PY 212 _____ (or PY 242 _____ or PY 252 ______) II. Chemistry Options (one required) 1905 (Concentration in Chemistry) Option A (2 advanced CH courses, 401 or higher, only one may

  1. Exploiting heavy oil reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

  2. United abominations: Density functional studies of heavy metal chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoendorff, George

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonyl and nitrile addition to uranyl (UO{sup 2}{sup 2+}) are studied. The competition between nitrile and water ligands in the formation of uranyl complexes is investigated. The possibility of hypercoordinated uranyl with acetone ligands is examined. Uranyl is studied with diactone alcohol ligands as a means to explain the apparent hypercoordinated uranyl. A discussion of the formation of mesityl oxide ligands is also included. A joint theory/experimental study of reactions of zwitterionic boratoiridium(I) complexes with oxazoline-based scorpionate ligands is reported. A computational study was done of the catalytic hydroamination/cyclization of aminoalkenes with zirconium-based catalysts. Techniques are surveyed for programming for graphical processing units (GPUs) using Fortran.

  3. Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA E-mail: zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu Y. Li, S. Wei Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar

  4. Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA E-mail: suying.wei@lamar.edu; zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu Q. He, Prof. S. Wei Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA

  5. Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00­12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

  6. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

  7. Definition of heavy oil and natural bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Definition and categorization of heavy oils and natural bitumens are generally based on physical or chemical attributes or on methods of extraction. Ultimately, the hydrocarbon's chemical composition will govern both its physical state and the extraction technique applicable. These oils and bitumens closely resemble the residuum from wholecrude distillation to about 1,000/degree/F; if the residuum constitutes at least 15% of the crude, it is considered to be heavy. In this material is concentrated most of the trace elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen, and metals, such as nickel and vanadium. A widely used definition separates heavy oil from natural bitumen by viscosity, crude oil being less, and bitumen more viscous than 10,000 cp. Heavy crude then falls in the range 10/degree/-20/degree/ API inclusive and extra-heavy oil less than 10/degree/ API. Most natural bitumen is natural asphalt (tar sands, oil sands) and has been defined as rock containing hydrocarbons more viscous than 10,000 cp or else hydrocarbons that may be extracted from mined or quarried rock. Other natural bitumens are solids, such as gilsonite, grahamite, and ozokerite, which are distinguished by streak, fusibility, and solubility. The upper limit for heavy oil may also be set at 18/degree/ API, the approximate limit for recovery by waterflood.

  8. Chemistry Student Handbook College of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Chemistry Student Handbook College of Science React. Science #12;Contents 2 Welcome to the Department of Chemistry 2 Course Advice 3 What is Chemistry? 4 Career Profiles in Chemistry 5 An Undergraduate Degree in Chemistry 6 Chemistry Streams 13 Chemistry Honours Programme 14 Research

  9. Chemistry at the Dirac Point of Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Santanu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Haddon, R. C. Covalent Chemistry for Graphene Electronics.P. K. ; Yang, J. X. The Chemistry of Graphene. J. Mater.R. C. Organometallic Chemistry of Extended Periodic ?-

  10. CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR)...

  11. New Technique Gives a Deeper Look into the Chemistry of Interfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Technique Gives a Deeper Look into the Chemistry of Interfaces Print A new technique developed at the ALS offers sub-nanometer depth resolution of every chemical element to be...

  12. Chemistry | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization ofChemistry and TransportChemistry of

  13. Chemistry | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry OxideChemistry Soft Matter

  14. Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    11/13/2014 1 Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry Sandy Sharp and Honghi Tran Symposium on Corrosion of a recovery boiler each cause their own forms of corrosion and cracking Understanding the origin of the corrosive conditions enables us to operate a boiler so as to minimize corrosion and cracking select

  15. Chemistry Portfolio (Revised August, 2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    at or above the 75th percentile on the American Chemical Society (ACS) Introductory Chemistry Exami- nation

  16. MAC 560 --Tropospheric Chemistry I Spring, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    chemistry · to learn the atmospheric chemistry behind well-known phenomena such as smog, acid rain.3. Sulfur chemistry and acid rain 5.4. Nitrogen chemistry 5.5. Organic acids 5.6. Ecological and structural

  17. HEAVY-ION RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY 1,2 Jacob I .RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY J I Fabrikant,

  18. Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012 Friday, March 16; 3:30 Seminar Hall (room 1315 Chemistry) Lost in Translation: How Regulators Use Science and How Scientists Can Help Bridge Gaps Stephanie to combine her Chemistry background with a legal education to improve the use of science in environmental

  19. Relativistic heavy ion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP).

  20. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

  1. Programmatic Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides acceptable methods of meeting the requirements of DOE O 151.1C for programmatic elements that sustain the emergency management program and maintain the readiness of the program to respond to an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-1, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-3.

  2. Polycylcic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH's) in dense cloud chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentine Wakelam; Eric Herbst

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtually all detailed gas-phase models of the chemistry of dense interstellar clouds exclude polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's). This omission is unfortunate because from the few studies that have been done on the subject, it is known that the inclusion of PAH's can affect the gas-phase chemistry strongly. We have added PAH's to our network to determine the role they play in the chemistry of cold dense cores. In the models presented here, we include radiative attachment to form PAH-, mutual neutralization between PAH anions and small positively-charged ions, and photodetachment. We also test the sensitivity of our results to changes in the size and abundance of the PAH's. Our results confirm that the inclusion of PAH's changes many of the calculated abundances of smaller species considerably. In TMC-1, the general agreement with observations is significantly improved contrary to L134N. This may indicate a difference in PAH properties between the two regions. With the inclusion of PAH's in dense cloud chemistry, high-metal elemental abundances give a satisfactory agreement with observations. As a result, we do not need to decrease the observed elemental abundances of all metals and we do not need to vary the elemental C/O ratio in order to produce large abundances of carbon species in TMC-1 (CP).

  3. CHEMISTRY AND STOICHIOMETRY OF WOOD LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, H.G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thereby converted into a heavy oil, soluble in such organicliquefaction product is a heavy oil or bitumen which would

  4. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  5. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  6. Response Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    397 ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES C thin evaporated foils of heavy rare earths (Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in three different chemical of high energy incident electrons (75 keV) transmitted through thin foils of yttric rare earth elements

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: atmospheric chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and atmospheric chemistry that is expected to benefit auto and engine manufacturers, oil and gas utilities, and other industries that employ combustion models. A paper...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: combustion chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and atmospheric chemistry that is expected to benefit auto and engine manufacturers, oil and gas utilities, and other industries that employ combustion models. A paper...

  10. agricultural chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Chemistry Honors in Chemistry Research Instructions (Seniors only) Materials Science Websites Summary: Department of Chemistry Honors in Chemistry Research Instructions...

  11. ALPHA-DECAY STUDIES IN THE HEAVY-ELEMENT REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hummel, John Philip

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ± 0.3 days. Various ion-chamber measurements of the alpha-of about· 0.1%. These ion-chamber measurements represent theis somewhat higher than the ion-chamber measurement quoted

  12. Magic nuclei unlock the secrets of heavy elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jones, Kate

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Kate Jones, an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee, describes her inquiries into the behavior of the somewhat enigmatic isotope tin-132.

  13. Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

  14. Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, William R.

    Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance Major I ­ Pre-professional (Medicine, Dentistry, Business, Law, Engineering) Major II ­ ACS Certified e.g. Graduate Study or Entry Level Chemistry Employment. Major III ­ Forensic Chemistry Major IV** ­ Biochemistry Option Chemistry Minor General Chemistry I & II

  15. Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors Spring 2012 (All arrangements are solely between.axelrod@mail.utexas.edu Organic Chemistry Chris Bates chrismbates@gmail.com General Chemistry Lecture/Lab Organic Chemistry Amy Bonaparte abonaparte@mail.utexas.edu General and Organic Chemistry Shelly Casciato slcasciato

  16. Chemistry UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Chemistry UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track Scholarship Rises. Freshman Year/ Fall Semester Cr) Honors Chemistry I 3 84.136 (H) Honors Chemistry II 3 84.123 (H) Honors Chemistry I Lab 1 84.124 (H) Honors Chemistry II Lab 1 92.131 Calculus I 4 92.132 Honors Calculus II 4 Hon 110 Honors FYSH (AH) 3 Gen

  17. Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Summer 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors Summer 2012 (All arrangements are solely between.axelrod@mail.utexas.edu Organic Chemistry Chris Bates chrismbates@gmail.com General Chemistry Lecture/Lab Organic Chemistry Amy Bonaparte abonaparte@mail.utexas.edu General and Organic Chemistry Shelly Casciato slcasciato

  18. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    What do we mean by a chemical element? A chemical element is matter, all of whose atoms are alike in having the same positive charge on the nucleus and the same number of extra-nuclear electrons. As we shall see in the following elemental review, the origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having an origin in antiquity, other elements having been discovered within the past few hundred years and still others have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements since these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature.

  19. BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken for graduation. Complete the following: Chem 111* Honors Principles of Chemistry Chem 112 Principles of Chemistry

  20. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCHUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCHUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry - ACS Certified Major of the following courses Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH4110 Pharmaceutical Chemistry: Drug Action 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4120 Pharmaceutical Chemistry: Drug

  1. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH1UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Polymers -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH1UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Polymers - ACS credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH4610 Intro to Polymer Science 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4620 Polymer Chemistry 3 CH1153 University Chemistry

  2. 2010 Environmental Bioinorganic Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachael Austin

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This interdisciplinary meeting will gather together scientists - structural biologists, chemists, geneticists, chemical and biological oceanographers, geochemists, and other specialist - who study the flows of essential and toxic elements through the environment and living systems, on timescales ranging from femptoseconds to eons. Of particular interest are the molecular mechanisms that govern element acquisition and use in organisms, and the tools and techniques used to study these phenomena. The aim of this community is to use these molecular-scale insights to understand the interconnected biotic and abiotic processes that shape the macroscopic environment and its development and change over a range of time scales.

  3. Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information Course Name Chemistry 3AL Course Instructor are online. Chemistry 3AL Syllabus https://elearning.berkeley.edu/AngelUploads/Content/2013SUC... 1 of 5 5

  4. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty...

  5. Heavy Quark production at HERA and Heavy Quark contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detlef Bartsch, University of Bonn on behalf of the ZEUS and H1 Collaborations · Introduction · Heavy 1500 0 100 200 300 400 electrons positrons low E HERA-1 HERA-2 Detlef Bartsch Heavy Quark production Detlef Bartsch Heavy Quark production at HERA, Feb. 23rd 2008 3 #12;pQCD approximations Massive scheme

  6. Calcination/dissolution chemistry development Fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The task {open_quotes}IPC Liaison and Chemistry of Thermal Reconstitution{close_quotes} is a $300,000 program that was conducted in Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Research and Development (EM-53) Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program supported under technical task plan (TTP) RL4-3-20-04. The principal investigator was Cal Delegard of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The task encompassed the following two subtasks related to the chemistry of alkaline Hanford Site tank waste: (1) Technical Liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Science (IPC/RAS) and its research into the chemistry of transuranic elements (TRU) and technetium (Tc) in alkaline media. (2) Laboratory investigation of the chemistry of calcination/dissolution (C/D) (or thermal reconstitution) as an alternative to the present reference Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment flowsheet, Enhanced Sludge Washing (ESW). This report fulfills the milestone for the C/D subtask to {open_quotes}Provide End-of-Year Report on C/D Laboratory Test Results{close_quotes} due 30 September 1995. A companion report, fulfilling the milestone to provide an end-of-year report on the IPC/RAS liaison, also has been prepared.

  7. Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies...

  8. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

  9. A chemistry tale of two carbons | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A chemistry tale of two carbons A chemistry tale of two carbons Released: September 03, 2012 Comprehensive field study of urban, natural emissions interacting to affect climate...

  10. Heavy Metal Islands | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat Transfer inoperation inElementHeavy

  11. PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Plants Chelating agents Pb hyperaccumulation Effects of pH on metal extraction Disposal options contaminants from soils Contaminants must be in harvestable portions of the plant (Wongkongkatep et al. 2003) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al

  12. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) conducts a broad spectrum of research intended to help improve the recovery efficiency from difficult to produce reservoirs including heavy oil and fractured low permeability systems. Our scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. The primary functions of the group are to conduct direction-setting research, transfer research results to industry, and educate and train students for careers in industry. Presently, research in SUPRI-A is divided into 5 main project areas. These projects and their goals include: (1) Multiphase flow and rock properties--to develop better understanding of the physics of displacement in porous media through experiment and theory. This category includes work on imbibition, flow in fractured media, and the effect of temperature on relative permeability and capillary pressure. (2) Hot fluid injection--to improve the application of nonconventional wells for enhanced oil recovery and elucidate the mechanisms of steamdrive in low permeability, fractured porous media. (3) Mechanisms of primary heavy oil recovery--to develop a mechanistic understanding of so-called ''foamy oil'' and its associated physical chemistry. (4) In-situ combustion--to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the insitu combustion process. (5) Reservoir definition--to develop and improve techniques for evaluating formation properties from production information. What follows is a report on activities for the past year. Significant progress was made in all areas.

  13. Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important inorganic complexants are expected to be carbonate/bicarbonate and hydroxide. There are also organic complexants in TRU waste with the potential to strongly influence actinide solubility. (3) Intrinsic and pseudo-actinide colloid formation - Many actinide species in their expected oxidation states tend to form colloids or strongly associate with non actinide colloids present (e.g., microbial, humic and organic). In this context, the relative importance of actinides, based on the TRU waste inventory, with respect to the potential release of actinides from the WIPP, is greater for plutonium and americium, and to less extent for uranium and thorium. The most important oxidation states for WIPP-relevant conditions are III and IV. We will present an update of the literature on WIPP-specific data, and a summary of the ongoing research related to actinide chemistry in the WIPP performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science (ACRSP) team located in Carlsbad, NM [Reed 2007, Lucchini 2007, and Reed 2006].

  14. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  15. Kent and Riegel's Handbook of industrial chemistry and biotechnology. 11th ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, James A. (ed.)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook provides extensive information on plastics, rubber, adhesives, textile fibers, pharmaceutical chemistry, synthetic organic chemicals, soaps and detergents, as well as various other major classes of industrial chemistry. There is detailed coverage of coal utilization technology, dyes and dye intermediates, chlor-alkali and heavy chemicals, paints and pigments, chemical explosives, propellants, petroleum and petrochemicals, natural gas, industrial gases, synthetic nitrogen products, fats and oils, sulfur and sulfuric acid, phosphorous and phosphates, wood products, and sweeteners. The chapter on coal is entitled: coal technology for power, liquid fuels and chemicals. 100 ills.

  16. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  17. National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is sponsoring two INTENSIVE six-week Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for undergraduates. Funding is provided by the US Department of Energy.

  18. National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    he Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is sponsoring two INTENSIVE six-week Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for undergraduates. Funding...

  19. 2010 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE JUNE 20 - 25, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHN LOCKEMEYER

    2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Inorganic Chemistry GRC is one of the longest-standing of the GRCs, originating in 1951. Over the years, this conference has played a role in spawning many other GRCs in specialized fields, due to the involvement of elements from most of the periodic table. These include coordination, organometallic, main group, f-element, and solid state chemistries; materials science, catalysis, computational chemistry, nanotechnology, bioinorganic, environmental, and biomedical sciences just to name a few. The 2010 Inorganic Chemistry GRC will continue this tradition, where scientists at all levels from academic, industrial, and national laboratories meet to define the important problems in the field and to highlight emerging opportunities through exchange of ideas and discussion of unpublished results. Invited speakers will present on a wide variety of topics, giving attendees a look at areas both inside and outside of their specialized areas of interest. In addition to invited speakers, the poster sessions at GRCs are a key feature of the conference. All conferees at the Inorganic Chemistry GRC are invited to present a poster on their work, and here the informal setting promotes the free exchange of ideas and fosters new relationships. As in previous years, we will offer poster presenters the opportunity to compete for one of several program spots in which they can give an oral presentation based on the subject matter of their poster. This is a great way to get your work noticed by the scientists attending the meeting, especially for those early in their career path such as junior faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, and those at comparable ranks. Anyone interested in participating in the poster competition should bring an electronic slide presentation and a small hard copy of their poster to submit to the committee.

  20. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  1. CHEMISTRY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMISTRY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry 2011 1. Framework) in Chemistry. Academic line and main subject areas of the degree The Bachelor's degree in Chemistry students a basic introduction to the Chemistry disciplines. In addition, the Bachelor's degree programme

  2. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  3. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  4. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion &...

  5. Characterization of electrodeposited elemental boron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)], E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in; Ananthasivan, K.; Ranganathan, R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Mittal, Vinit; Narasimhan, S.V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC (F), Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Elemental boron was produced through electrowinning from potassium fluoroborate dissolved in a mixture of molten potassium fluoride and potassium chloride. The characteristics of the electrodeposited boron (raw boron) as well as the water and acid-leached product (processed boron) were studied. The chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size of the boron powders were investigated. The morphology of the deposits was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical state of the matrix, as well as the impurity phases present in them, was established using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to interpret and understand the results obtained, a thermodynamic analysis was carried out. The gas-phase corrosion in the head space as well as the chemistry behind the leaching process were interpreted using this analysis. The ease of oxidation of these powders in air was investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled with thermogravimetry (TG). From the results obtained in this study it was established that elemental boron powder with a purity of 95-99% could be produced using a high temperature molten salt electrowinning process. The major impurities were found to be oxygen, carbon, iron and nickel.

  6. CHARTING THE NEW ELEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaborg, Glenn T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemistry in 1951 and is the codi:;coverer of 10 trans- uraniumchemistry entirely than had been predicted by Hahn, Strassmann, and the rest. It was chemically like uranium.

  7. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

  8. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo of LINAC The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a world-class particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory where physicists are exploring the most...

  11. Simplifying strong electronic correlations in uranium: Localized uranium heavy-fermion UM2Zn20 (M=Co,Rh) compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Jon

    Simplifying strong electronic correlations in uranium: Localized uranium heavy-fermion UM2Zn20 (M Atómica, 8400 Bariloche, Argentina 6 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware-field effects corroborate an ionic-like uranium electronic configura- tion in UM2Zn20. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.78

  12. Super Heavy Nuclei

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer. .Energy8 Career DaySunShotSuper Heavy

  13. 1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul H. Wine

    1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

  14. analytical chemistry organic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology 25 SYLLABUS for CHEMISTRY 2310 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 Chemistry Websites Summary: Discussion...

  15. applied chemistry organic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology 18 SYLLABUS for CHEMISTRY 2310 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 Chemistry Websites Summary: Discussion...

  16. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  17. Carbon Chemistry in interstellar clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryvonne Gerin; David Fosse; Evelyne Roueff

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss new developments of interstellar chemistry, with particular emphasis on the carbon chemistry. We confirm that carbon chains and cycles are ubiquitous in the ISM and closely chemically related to ea ch other, and to carbon. Investigation of the carbon budget in shielded and UV illuminated gas shows that the inventory of interstellar molecules is not complete and more complex molecules with 4 or more carbon atoms must be present. Finally we discuss the consequences for the evolution of clouds and conclude that the ubiquitous presence of carbon chains and cycles is not a necessary consequence of a very young age for interstellar clouds.

  18. Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry OxideChemistry Soft

  19. Thermal chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on rutile TiO2(110) . Thermal chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on rutile TiO2(110) . Abstract: The ultraviolet...

  20. Capturing Chemistry in XML/CML

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Joseph A; Adams, Sam; Goodman, Jonathan M; Murray-Rust, Peter; Waudby, Chris A

    Chemical Markup Language (CML) is an XML-conformant Schema that describes molecules, spectra, reactions, and computational chemistry. It is capable of capturing the chemistry in a variety of current publications and is becoming adopted by many...

  1. User Manual Frick Chemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    the atrium connects the laboratory wing with the administrative offices. This provides a light-filled space to make the new Frick Chemistry Laboratory (and the surrounding natural sciences neighborhood) one technologies that reduce energy demand and con- serve water. The design and construction teams have implemented

  2. Theoretical Chemistry Theory, Computation, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gherman, Benjamin F.

    1 23 Theoretical Chemistry Accounts Theory, Computation, and Modeling ISSN 1432-881X Volume 128). In order to explore the origin of this preference, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been-terminus of nascent eubacterial proteins during protein synthesis [1­4]. As PDF is essential for bacterial survival

  3. Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Annual Report 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report describes the research and staff accomplishments in 2000 for the EMSL Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Directorate.

  4. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  5. Technetium Chemistry Science Challenges in Environmental Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technetium Chemistry Science Challenges in Environmental Science and Waste Processing Workshop Sponsored by Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory Richland, Washington July...

  6. Chemistry / Biochemistry B.S. Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Nicholas

    Chemistry / Biochemistry B.S. Curriculum Freshman Chemistry CHE 133/133L, 134/134L; ENG 131, 132, BIO elective Sophomore Chemistry CHE 231/231L, 241/241L, 331/331L, 332/332L; MTH 233, 234; PHY 241 elective Junior Chemistry CHE 337/337L, 338/338L, 452/452L; CSC 101 or 201, ENG 273, Eng. Lit; Core

  7. Updated March 2011 Ph.D. Chemistry; Option in Chemistry Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Updated March 2011 Ph.D. Chemistry; Option in Chemistry Education University of New Hampshire below), or candidate can obtain MS at UNH on the way to the PhD with Option in Chemistry Education Cumulative exams are split between education and chemistry cores Professional presentation allowed in place

  8. Roadmap: Chemistry Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/LNHD for certification by the American Chemical Society CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM 10062 General

  9. BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering in major courses. --The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken in residence at BYU for this degree program. These hours may also go toward BYU

  10. Minor in Chemistry Handout1.doc (04/30/08) Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    Minor in Chemistry Handout1.doc (04/30/08) Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Student Academic.fleming@ucr.edu Minor in Chemistry Procedure: It is assumed that you have completed the requirements listed in section to Declare a Minor to Chemistry. Include the following: full name, student identification number, and email

  11. CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry Bachelor's degree programme provides graduates with the title Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Chemistry and Technology. Academic line and main subject areas of the degree The Bachelor's degree in Chemistry

  12. Roadmap: Chemistry Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 17-May-12/LNHD for certification by the American Chemical Society CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM 10062 General

  13. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH5UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Environmental -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH5UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Environmental - ACS credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 BL1040 Principles of Biology 4 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 BL3310 Environmental Microbiology 3 CH1153 University

  14. The School of Chemistry Handbook for Postgraduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    The School of Chemistry Handbook for Postgraduate Research Students 2013/14 School of Chemistry FACULTY OF MATHS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES #12;2 Welcome The School of Chemistry welcomes new postgraduate that is relevant for your time spent in the School, including information about facilities to support your research

  15. Chemistry Department Assessment Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    0 Chemistry Department Assessment May, 2006 Table of Contents Page Executive Summary 1 Prelude 1 Mission Statement and Learning Goals 1 Facilities 2 Staffing 3 Students: Chemistry Majors and Student Taking Service Courses Table: 1997-2005 graduates profile Table: GRE Score for Chemistry Majors, 1993

  16. Programmatic mission capabilities - chemistry and metallurgy research replacement (CMRR) project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunderson, L Nguyen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kornreich, Drew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wong, Amy S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    CMRR will have analysis capabilities that support all the nuclear-material programs and national security needs. CMRR will replace the aging CMR Building and provide a key component responsive infrastructure necessary to sustain all nuclear programs and the nuclear-weapons complex. Material characterization capabilities - evaluate the microstructures and properties of nuclear materials and provide experimental data to validate process and performance models. Analytical chemistry capabilities - provide expertise in chemical and radiochemical analysis of materials where actinide elements make up a significant portion of the sample.

  17. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers Bakhtin?s carnivalesque theory by analyzing comedic rhetoric performed by two comedic metal bands. Through the theories of Johan Huizinga and Mikhail Bakhtin, Chapter I: I Play Metal argues that heavy metal culture is a modern...

  18. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (4 Ledgewood Dr., Bedford, MA 01730); Smatlak, Donna L. (10 Village Hill Rd., Belmont, MA 02178); Cohn, Daniel R. (26 Walnut Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, MA 02167); Wittle, J. Kenneth (1740 Conestoga Rd., Chester Springs, PA 19425); Titus, Charles H. (323 Echo Valley La., Newton Square, PA 19072); Surma, Jeffrey E. (806 Brian La., Kennewick, WA 99337)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  19. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  20. Apollo 16: a trace element perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief summary of some inferences regarding the Apollo 16 site that can be arrived at from incompatible element-geochemical data is presented. We use a set of elements not exploited to address some of the questions about the geology of the Apollo 16 site and the evolution of the highlands crust. Others have recognized the great difficulty in disentangling the complex history of the highlands on the basis of petrographic and compositional data. We have previously attempted to reconcile a relatively few interelement relationships with information from many other sources. The Apollo 16 site and the significance of Apollo 16 samples have been examined from the perspectives of data on Cl, P, Ru and Os for the most part and also, in a few cases, data on the heavy metals Pb, Tl and Bi.

  1. DEGRADATION EVALUATION OF HEAVY WATER DRUMS AND TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Vormelker, P.

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy water with varying chemistries is currently being stored in over 6700 drums in L- and K-areas and in seven tanks in L-, K-, and C-areas. A detailed evaluation of the potential degradation of the drums and tanks, specific to their design and service conditions, has been performed to support the demonstration of their integrity throughout the desired storage period. The 55-gallon drums are of several designs with Type 304 stainless steel as the material of construction. The tanks have capacities ranging from 8000 to 45600 gallons and are made of Type 304 stainless steel. The drums and tanks were designed and fabricated to national regulations, codes and standards per procurement specifications for the Savannah River Site. The drums have had approximately 25 leakage failures over their 50+ years of use with the last drum failure occurring in 2003. The tanks have experienced no leaks to date. The failures in the drums have occurred principally near the bottom weld, which attaches the bottom to the drum sidewall. Failures have occurred by pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking and are attributable, in part, to the presence of chloride ions in the heavy water. Probable degradation mechanisms for the continued storage of heavy water were evaluated that could lead to future failures in the drum or tanks. This evaluation will be used to support establishment of an inspection plan which will include susceptible locations, methods, and frequencies for the drums and tanks to avoid future leakage failures.

  2. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  3. IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Thomas

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

  4. Modelling the sulphur chemistry evolution in Orion KL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esplugues, G B; Goicoechea, J R; Cernicharo, J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the sulphur chemistry evolution in the Orion KL along the gas and grain phases of the cloud. We investigate the processes that dominate the sulphur chemistry and to determine how physical and chemical parameters, such as the final star mass and the initial elemental abundances, influence the evolution of the hot core and of the surrounding outflows and shocked gas (the plateau). We independently modelled the chemistry evolution of both components using the time-dependent gas-grain model UCL_CHEM and considering two different phase calculations. Phase I starts with the collapsing cloud and the depletion of atoms and molecules onto grain surfaces. Phase II starts when a central protostar is formed and the evaporation from grains takes place. We show how the gas density, the gas depletion efficiency, the initial sulphur abundance, the shocked gas temperature and the different chemical paths on the grains leading to different reservoirs of sulphur on the mantles affect sulphur-bearing molecules at differ...

  5. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Heavy Sterile Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manimala Mitra; Goran Senjanovic; Francesco Vissani

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental rate of neutrinoless double beta decay can be saturated by the exchange of virtual sterile neutrinos, that mix with the ordinary neutrinos and are heavier than 200 MeV. Interestingly, this hypothesis is subject only to marginal experimental constraints, because of the new nuclear matrix elements. This possibility is analyzed in the context of the Type I seesaw model, performing also exploratory investigations of the implications for heavy neutrino mass spectra, rare decays of mesons as well as neutrino-decay search, LHC, and lepton flavor violation. The heavy sterile neutrinos can saturate the rate only when their masses are below some 10 TeV, but in this case, the suppression of the light-neutrino masses has to be more than the ratio of the electroweak scale and the heavy-neutrino scale; i.e., more suppressed than the naive seesaw expectation. We classify the cases when this condition holds true in the minimal version of the seesaw model, showing its compatibility (1) with neutrinoless double beta rate being dominated by heavy neutrinos and (2) with any light neutrino mass spectra. The absence of excessive fine-tunings and the radiative stability of light neutrino mass matrices, together with a saturating sterile neutrino contribution, imply an upper bound on the heavy neutrino masses of about 10 GeV. We extend our analysis to the Extended seesaw scenario, where the light and the heavy sterile neutrino contributions are completely decoupled, allowing the sterile neutrinos to saturate the present experimental bound on neutrinoless double beta decay. In the models analyzed, the rate of this process is not strictly connected with the values of the light neutrino masses, and a fast transition rate is compatible with neutrinos lighter than 100 meV.

  6. Heavy Flavour in a Nutshell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Lambert

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Moriond QCD brings together particle physicists of varied interests. This review and introduction to heavy flavour physics is aimed at those not in the heavy-flavour field to describe the motivation and methodology of precision flavour physics, and introduce the most tantalising searches for new physics. The LHC experiments are expected to make great inroads into constraining the new physics parameter space and discover the new physics which I will argue \\emph{must} be present to describe our observed universe.

  7. LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishiyama, K. I.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

  8. Finite Volume Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    FVE is closely related to the control volume finite element method ... simple stencils, to apply to a fairly wide range of fluid flow equations, to effectively treat.

  9. Crystal Chemistry of Th in Fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y Luo; J Rakovan; Y Tang; M Lupulescu; J Hughes; Y Pan

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the complementary use of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we present in this paper the first direct results on the site occupancy of thorium in the fluorapatite structure and the structural distortion created by its substitution. Structure refinements based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction data from synthetic Th-doped fluorapatite indicates that Th substitutes almost exclusively in the M2 site. A single-crystal X-ray study of natural fluorapatite from Mineville, New York, also indicated that substituting heavy scatterers (including Th) are concentrated in the apatite M2 site, but definitive site assignments of specific elements were not possible. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was used to probe the local structure of Th in the synthetic fluorapatite (single-crystal form) with a Th concentration of roughly 20000 ppm, as well as Th in the natural Mineville fluorapatite (powder form) with a Th concentration of {approx}2000 ppm. The EXAFS fitting results also indicate that Th partitions into the M2 site and yield a {approx}0.05-0.08 {angstrom} decrease of average M2-O bond distances associated with local structure distortions that are not obtainable from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  10. Minimal Seesaw Textures with Two Heavy Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srubabati Goswami; Atsushi Watanabe

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically analyze the Dirac and the Majorana mass matrices in seesaw models with two heavy right-handed neutrinos. We perform thorough classification of the vanishing matrix elements which are compatible with the results from the current neutrino oscillation experiments. We include the possibility of a non-diagonal Majorana mass matrix which leads to new solutions viable with data. In a basis where the Majorana mass matrix is diagonal, these solutions imply a Dirac matrix with specific relationships amongst its elements. We find that at the level of total 4 zeros together in the Dirac and the Majorana sectors, the mass matrices are almost consistent with the data but one mixing angle is predicted to be unsuitable. At the next level, i.e. with total 3 zeros, only seven patterns of mass matrices describe the experimental data well. The seven solutions have testable predictions for the future neutrino experiments. In particular, each solution has definite predictions about the observation of the 1-3 leptonic mixing angle and the effective mass measured in neutrino-less double beta decay. The solutions of the mass matrices contain novel texture forms and provide new insights into the lepton-generation structure. We also discuss possible connections between these textures and the tri-bimaximal mixing to search for symmetry principles behind the mass matrix structure.

  11. Minimal seesaw textures with two heavy neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Srubabati [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad -380009 (India); Watanabe, Atsushi [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically analyze the Dirac and the Majorana mass matrices in seesaw models with two heavy right-handed neutrinos. We perform thorough classification of the vanishing matrix elements which are compatible with the results from the current neutrino oscillation experiments. We include the possibility of a nondiagonal Majorana mass matrix which leads to new solutions viable with data. In a basis where the Majorana mass matrix is diagonal, these solutions imply a Dirac matrix with specific relationships amongst its elements. We find that at the level of total four zeros together in m{sub D} and M{sub R} the mass matrices are almost consistent with the data but one mixing angle is predicted to be unsuitable. At the next level, i.e. with total three zeros, only seven patterns of mass matrices describe the experimental data well. The seven solutions have testable predictions for the future neutrino experiments. In particular, each solution has definite predictions about the observation of the 1-3 leptonic mixing angle and the effective mass measured in neutrinoless double beta decay. The solutions of the mass matrices contain novel texture forms and provide new insights into the lepton-generation structure. We also discuss possible connections between these textures and the tri-bimaximal mixing to search for symmetry principles behind the mass matrix structure.

  12. Heavy Metal Contamination in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberian Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen-Gil, Susan M.; Ford, Jesse; Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Monetti, Matthew; Vlasova, Tamara; Landers, Dixon H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula. We analyzed heavy metal concentrations in lichen (Cetraria cucullata), moss (Hylocomium splendens), soils, lake sediment, freshwater fish (Salvelinus alpinus, Lota lota, and Coregonus spp.) and collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus) from 13 sites between 30 and 300 km from Norilsk. Element concentrations were low in both C. cucullata and H. splendens, although concentrations of Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, and Pb were significantly higher than those in Arctic Alaska, probably due to natural differences in the geochemical environments. Inorganic surface soils had significantly higher concentrations of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Mg than inorganic soils at depth, although a lake sediment core from the eastern Taimyr Peninsula indicated no recent enrichment by atmospherically transported elements. Tissue concentrations of heavy metals in fish and lemming were not elevated relative to other Arctic sites. Our results show that the impact of the Norilsk smelting complex is primarily localized rather than regional, and does not extend northward beyond 100 km.

  13. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

  14. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ce001musculus2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel...

  15. Chemistry Add-In for Word

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Joseph A

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Add-In (.NET) links a semantic chemistry engine (.NUMBO) through a command interface (CID) to a chemistry zone. Chemistry zones are textual or graphic renderings within a Word document (DOCX). All content and relationships are bound to CML... OOXML + CML •Data publication difficult and unsupported •Insufficient data to fully support research •Data preparation integrated into user workflow •Open Standards promote Open Semantic Science Domain aware software and semantic data allows...

  16. Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization of SelectiveBrownFirstU.S. DOEChemistry

  17. CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DIVISION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy FutureDepartmentCAIRSPlanning TimelineChemistry |CHARTERExponent,

  18. Better Enzymes for Biofuels and Green Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Better Enzymes for Biofuels and Green Chemistry: Solving the Cofactor Imbalance Problem Imbalances for the production of biofuels or other valuable chemicals. Though several research groups have re

  19. 2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Emily A

    2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The materials uploaded are meant to serve as final report on the funds provided by DOE-BES to help sponsor the 2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry.

  20. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods DOE 2011 Vehicle Technologies...

  1. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis General introduction to the electronic structure of organic materials with connection

  2. Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sébastien

  3. Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intro Chem and MatSci Apps Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26, 2012 L ast edited: 2014-06-02 08:56:54...

  4. Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    forensics, and consequence management," Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, 1-18 (2012). Magen E. Coleman, Evelyn M. Bond, W. Allen Moody, and Lav Tandon,...

  5. Heavy metal concentration in bay sediments of Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukue, Masaharu; Kato, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Takaaki [Tokai Univ., Shimizu (Japan); Yamasaki, Shoichi [Aoki Marine Ltd., Fukushima, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Because industry discharge wastes into the sea, marine sediments can be contaminated with various kinds of hazardous and toxic substances. This study discusses how the degree of pollution of heavy metals affects the marine sediments from Osaka Bay and Tokyo Bay. In this study, the concentrations of various metals, such as manganese, iron, aluminum, titanium, vanadium, copper, phosphorus, etc., were measured from sediment samples obtained from different sites in the bays. However, the results had to be corrected because background concentrations for each metal differ with site location and grain size characteristics. The large difference between background and individual concentrations at various soil depths indicates that the surface layers of the seabed are significantly polluted with some species of heavy metal and other elements.

  6. The role of top in heavy flavor physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, J.L. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implications of the massive top quark on heavy flavor transitions are explored. We review the generation of quark masses and mixings and the determination techniques, and present the status of the elements of the weak mixing matrix. Purely leptonic decays of heavy mesons are briefly summarized. We present a general introduction to flavor changing neutral currents and an extensive summary of radiative and other rare decay modes. The physics of neutral meson mixing is reviewed and applied to each meson system. We describe the phenomenology of CP violation and how it may be measured in meson decays. Standard Model predictions are given in each case and the effects of physics beyond the Standard Model are also discussed. Throughout, we contrast these transitions in the K and B meson systems to those in the D meson and top-quark sectors.

  7. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

  8. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6 AEC001: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

  9. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 AEC001: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

  10. CHEMISTRY 1 Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMISTRY 1 Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of --Chemistry This publication refers.imperial.ac.uk/pgprospectus. Chemistry Interests in chemistry at Imperial College cover physical, organic, inorganic, analytical, polymer and biological chemistry and chemical crystallography, as well as intersectional and medical topics

  11. Rev. 3/1/10 NEW.........Minor in Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    Rev. 3/1/10 NEW.........Minor in Chemistry The Department of Chemistry offers a minor in chemistry to students who wish to enhance their degrees with a strong concentration in this area. The Chemistry minor and enhances the records of students. The Chemistry minor provides a broad and general exposure

  12. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korton, George (Cincinnati, OH)

    2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure by encompassing the sides of the fuel element between the header plates.

  13. ADVANCED INORGANIC LABORATORY FALL 2008 CHEMISTRY 410 (CRN 11299:), CHEMISTRY 510 (CRN 11315)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    materials and announcements will be posted on the site. Required Text: "Synthesis and Technique in InorganicADVANCED INORGANIC LABORATORY ­ FALL 2008 CHEMISTRY 410 (CRN 11299:), CHEMISTRY 510 (CRN 11315 to a wide range of conceptual and practical (laboratory) inorganic chemistry. Because of the introductory

  14. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2 Problem 1: Nighttime loss of NOx in the lower troposphere proceeds by: 1 Air Pollution Physics and 2 only). Daniel Jacob, Atmospheric Chemistry #12;2 Problem 2: 2 2. Consider an air parcel ventilated

  15. Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMR Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) building supports research and experimental activities for plutonium and uranium analytical chemistry and metallurgy. In 1952, the first LANL CMR facility was completed. At that time

  16. Heavy flavour production at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Grelli; Andre Mischke

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will open a new era in high energy physics. The expected large cross section for heavy flavour production in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV will allow detailed studies of the production mechanisms and an extensive test of Quantum Chromodynamics. Since charm and beauty has been proposed as a good probe to study hot and dense QCD matter, the understanding of the production mechanisms in elementary proton-proton collisions is of primary importance as a reference for studies in heavy-ion collisions. In the early phase of LHC operation the experiments will focus on the investigation of the heavy flavour production mechanisms.

  17. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH3UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Secondary Education -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH3UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Secondary Education - 40 credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH3020 Laboratory Teaching Internship 2 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4810 Design/Oper of High School Chemistry

  18. Pionic Fusion of Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Horn; G. C. Ball; D. R. Bowman; W. G. Davies; D. Fox; A. Galindo-Uribarri; A. C. Hayes; G. Savard; L. Beaulieu; Y. Larochelle; C. St-Pierre

    1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first experimental observation of the pionic fusion of two heavy ions. The 12C(12C,24Mg)pi0 and 12C(12C,24Na)pi+ cross sections have been measured to be 208 +/- 38 and 182 +/- 84 picobarns, respectively, at E_cm = 137 MeV. This cross section for heavy-ion pion production, at an energy just 6 MeV above the absolute energy-conservation limit, constrains possible production mechanisms to incorporate the kinetic energy of the entire projectile-target system as well as the binding energy gained in fusion.

  19. Development of a heavy-ion identification method using a combined time-of-flight [delta]E-E technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanus, Roy Gene

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nagatani Identification of heavy-ion reaction products produced at the Texas A&H Variable Energy Cyclotron has been done primarily through the use of the AE-E detector telescope technique. The telescope is formed by placing two detectors together... of the partzcles eo their total initial energy, they can uniquely be identified. However, this technique for identification of heavy-ion reaction prod- ucts is adequate only for isotopes up through those of oxygen. Beyond oxygen, only element identification can...

  20. Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract) Adaptive Sensors Group Dublin City Foundation Ireland through the CLARITY CSET (www.clarity- centre.org), supplemented by significant project partners. The group's research strategy in materials chemistry research is to closely align activity

  1. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanton, J.S.; Tilson, P.A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing.

  2. Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants: Advanced Characterization and Thermodynamic Introduction to Municipal Solid Waste Incineration 2 Chapter 2 Plants Considered and Samples Collected 5 Chapter 3 Mapping of Ash Chemistry in MSWI Plants 8 Chapter 4 Advanced Characterization Methods 12 4

  3. Exploring Chemistry Using SMT Rolf Fagerberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flamm, Christoph

    Exploring Chemistry Using SMT Rolf Fagerberg1 , Christoph Flamm2 , Daniel Merkle1 , Philipp Peters1 power of Satisfiability Modulo Theory (SMT) solvers. We show results for an analysis of the Pentose in the usage of SMT for expressing search problems in chemistry, and in the generality of its resulting

  4. Chemistry 593: Stirling's Formula David Ronis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronis, David M.

    Chemistry 593: Stirling's Formula © David Ronis McGill University There is a simple way to obtain) Winter, 2014 #12;Chemistry 593 -2- Stirling's Formula which implies that ln(x!)x ln(x) - x + ln[(2 x)1/2 ]. (4') Clearly, for xO(1023 ), the last logarithm is negligible, and the simple form of Stirling

  5. advanced organic chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 SYLLABUS for CHEMISTRY 2310 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 Chemistry Websites Summary: Discussion...

  6. Title Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy J. Glauber

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I shall try to say a few words about two particular ways in which my own work has a certain relation to your work with heavy ions. My title is therefore "Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics".

  7. Heavy quark physics from LEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dornan, P.J. [Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of some of the latest results on heavy flavor physics from the LEP Collaborations is presented. The emphasis is on B physics, particularly new results and those where discrepancies is given of the many techniques which have been developed to permit these analyses.

  8. DIESEL/HEAVY The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    DIESEL/HEAVY EQUIPMENT The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance and repair of heavy equipment and trucks. Students will learn to work on electrical and air systems, diesel · Small Engines · Automotive Maintenance · Welding · Training for entry level heavy diesel equipment

  9. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH4UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Chemical Physics -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemistry I 3 PH4210 Electricity and Magnetism I 3 CH3511 Physical Chemistry Lab I 2 PH4510 Intro to Solid Analysis 5 General Education Requirements - 28 credits CH4310 Inorganic Chemistry I 3 UN1001 Perspectives

  10. Light-Quark Decays in Heavy Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faller, Sven

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider weak decays of heavy hadrons (bottom and charmed) where the heavy quark acts as a spectator. Theses decays are heavily phase-space suppressed but may become experimentally accessible in the near future. These decays are interesting as a QCD laboratory to study the behaviour of the light quarks in the colour-background field of the heavy spectator.

  11. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized...

  12. Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  13. NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences...

  14. June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 15, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0...

  15. Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale...

  16. analytical chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  17. analytical chemistry division: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  18. analytical chemistry biochemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  19. analytical chemistry dac: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  20. Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Chemistry SHARE Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An inventory of 2,300 batches of...

  1. Private Company Uses EERE-Supported Chemistry Model to Substantially...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Private Company Uses EERE-Supported Chemistry Model to Substantially Improve Combustion Engine Simulation Software Private Company Uses EERE-Supported Chemistry Model to...

  2. association chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design Zn: unusual coordination, charge distribution at transition states in...

  3. activation chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design Zn: unusual coordination, charge distribution at transition states in...

  4. applied chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design Zn: unusual coordination, charge distribution at transition states in...

  5. applied edman chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design Zn: unusual coordination, charge distribution at transition states in...

  6. ainse radiation chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design Zn: unusual coordination, charge distribution at transition states in...

  7. atropisomeric lactam chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design Zn: unusual coordination, charge distribution at transition states in...

  8. Distance-dependent radiation chemistry: Oxidation versus hydrogenation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distance-dependent radiation chemistry: Oxidation versus hydrogenation of CO in electron-irradiated H2OCOH2O ices. Distance-dependent radiation chemistry: Oxidation versus...

  9. High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the...

  10. applied inorganic chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bus.Admin.Public Admin. Chemical Engineering Chem. Eng.Comp. Sci. Chemistry Civil Engineering Heller, Barbara 6 Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined...

  11. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass...

  12. analytical chemistry general: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for students who have a prepared background in chemistry Ravikumar, B. 4 General syllabus for third-cycle studies in Technical Analytical Chemistry This syllabus has been...

  13. advanced physical chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    material listed extended material on chemical kinetcs. (The topics covered are in the Syllabus below.) This means that Raina, Ramesh 2 CHEMISTRY 521 GRADUATE PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY...

  14. atmospheric physical chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1999, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI Ph.D. in Chemistry 8 Course Syllabus ATMO 613: Advanced Atmospheric Chemistry (Spring 2014) Geosciences Websites Summary:...

  15. Plastic Bags to Batteries: A Green Chemistry Solution | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plastic Bags to Batteries: A Green Chemistry Solution Share Description Plastic bags are the scourge of roadsides, parking lots and landfills. But chemistry comes to the rescue At...

  16. MAY 14, 2008 Chemistry and environmental science professor receives Carroll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    MAY 14, 2008 Chemistry and environmental science professor receives Carroll College faculty award WAUKESHA, WIS.-- An associate professor of chemistry and environmental science has received an annual

  17. aggregation chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mission Statement The Sawyer Environmental Chemistry Research Laboratory is a multi industry. The Sawyer Environmental Chemistry Research Laboratory employs advanced analytical...

  18. applied chemistry division: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their independent research identity and become a chemistry research leader of the future. Funding for the most Oxford, University of 6 DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY...

  19. Substrate Changes Associated with the Chemistry of Self-Assembled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate Changes Associated with the Chemistry of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Silicon. Substrate Changes Associated with the Chemistry of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Silicon....

  20. New Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Studying Physical Chemistry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Studying Physical Chemistry of Atmospheric Heterogeneous Processes. New Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Studying Physical Chemistry of Atmospheric...

  1. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft Landing. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft...

  2. Induced biochemical interactions in immature and biodegraded heavy crude oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Shelenkova, L.; Zhou, W.M.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies in which selective chemical markers have been used to explore the mechanisms by which biocatalysts interact with heavy crude oils have shown that the biochemical reactions follow distinct trends. The term biocatalyst refers to a group of extremophilic microorganisms which, under the experimental conditions used, interact with heavy crude oils to (1) cause a redistribution of hydrocarbons, (2) cause chemical changes in oil fractions containing sulfur compounds and lower the sulfur content, (3) decrease organic nitrogen content, and (4) decrease the concentration of trace metals. Current data indicate that the overall effect is due to simultaneous reactions yielding products with relatively higher concentration of saturates and lower concentrations of aromatics and resins. The compositional changes depend on the microbial species and the chemistry of the crudes. Economic analysis of a potential technology based on the available data indicate that such a technology, used in a pre-refinery mode, may be cost efficient and promising. In the present paper, the background of oil biocatalysis and some recent results will be discussed.

  3. INDUCED BIOCHEMICAL INTERACTIONS IN IMMATURE AND BIODEGRADED HEAVY CRUDE OILS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; SHELENKOVA,L.; ZHOU,W.M.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies in which selective chemical markers have been used to explore the mechanisms by which biocatalysts interact with heavy crude oils have shown that the biochemical reactions follow distinct trends. The term biocatalyst refers to a group of extremophilic microorganisms which, under the experimental conditions used, interact with heavy crude oils to (1) cause a redistribution of hydrocarbons, (2) cause chemical changes in oil fractions containing sulfur compounds and lower the sulfur content, (3) decrease organic nitrogen content, and (4) decrease the concentration of trace metals. Current data indicate that the overall effect is due to simultaneous reactions yielding products with relatively higher concentration of saturates and lower concentrations of aromatics and resins. The compositional changes depend on the microbial species and the chemistry of the crudes. Economic analysis of a potential technology based on the available data indicate that such a technology, used in a pre-refinery mode, may be cost efficient and promising. In the present paper, the background of oil biocatalysis and some recent results will be discussed.

  4. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  5. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in Heavy Deformed Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge G. Hirsch; O. Castaños; P. O. Hess

    1994-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The zero neutrino mode of the double beta decay in heavy deformed nuclei is investigated in the framework of the pseudo SU(3) model, which has provided an accurate description of collective nuclear structure and predicted half-lives for the two neutrino mode in good agreement with experiments. In the case of $^{238}U$ the calculated zero neutrino half-life is at least three orders of magnitude greater than the two neutrino one, giving strong support of the identification of the radiochemically determined half-life as being the two neutrino double beta decay. For $^{150}Nd$ the zero neutrino matrix elements are of the order of magnitude of, but lesser than, those evaluated using the QRPA. This result confirms that different nuclear models produce similar zero neutrino matrix elements, contrary to the two neutrino case. Using these pseudo SU(3) results and the upper limit for the neutrino mass we estimate the $\\beta\\beta_{0\

  6. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zocher, Roy W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  7. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  8. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  9. Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry OxideChemistry ofChemistry

  10. Apollo 15 yellow impact glasses: Chemistry, petrology, and exotic origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delano, J.W.; Lindsley, D.H.; Ma, M.; Schmitt, R.A.

    1982-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Apollo 15 yellow impact glasses are characterized by moderate TiO/sub 2/ (approx.4.8%) and high abundances of the large ion lithophile elements (e.g., K, P, Hf, Th, REE). Since the chemistry of these glasses cannot be duplicated by any combination of local components presently known to occur at the Apollo 15 landing site, these yellow glasses seem to be exotic to that area. Chemical and petrologic constraints suggest that these samples were produced by impact melting of an immature mare regolith developed upon an unusual variety of mare basalt. We speculate that the target basalt were the youngest lava flows known to exist on the moon (i.e., Eratosphenian-age lavas in Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium). Specific tests are proposed for evaluating this provocative hypothesis.

  11. Ecosystem element cycling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Ecosystem element cycling Introduction An ecosystem consists of all the biological organisms and the physical environments they occupy together within a defined area [1]. The actual boundaries of an ecosystem are generally defined by researchers studying the ecosystem, who are usually interested in understanding

  12. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  13. Finite Element Analysis Skateboard Truck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De, Suvranu

    Finite Element Analysis Of a Skateboard Truck #12;2 Executive Summary: Engineering is and always is an element of the `truck,' which holds the wheels. Finite Element analysis will be conducted on this piece a combination of SolidWorks (for modeling) and ABAQUS (for finite element analysis). It is evident from

  14. DOLFIN: Automated Finite Element Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logg, Anders; Wells, G N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ´de´lec 1980]. (4) L2-conforming finite elements: (a) DGq, arbitrary degree discontinuous Lagrange elements; and (b) CR1, first degree Crouzeix–Raviart5 elements [Crouzeix and Raviart 1973]. Arbitrary combinations of the above elements may be used to define...

  15. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONSII. HEAVY

  16. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  17. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  18. Heavy metals and lead isotopes in sdB stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. O'Toole; U. Heber

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed abundance analysis of high-resolution ultraviolet echelle spectra of five subdwarf B stars obtained with HST-STIS The goal of our observations was to test the hypothesis that pulsations in sdBs are correlated to the surface abundances of iron-group elements. We study two pulsators and three non-pulsators and determined abundances for 25 elements including the iron group and even heavier elements such as tin and lead using LTE spectrum synthesis techniques. We find strong enrichments of heavy elements up to 2.9dex with respect to solar which are probably caused by atomic diffusion processes. No clear-cut correlation between pulsations and metal abundances becomes apparent. Abundances for lead isotopes are derived from very high resolution spectra using an UV line of triply ionised lead. As Pb terminates the s-process sequence Pb isotopic abundance ratios yield important constraints. It is very difficult to measure them in hot stars. For the first time we were able to measure them in two subluminous B stars and conclude that the 207Pb/208Pb is solar.

  19. Pollution of Natural Waters 1. Redox chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    . Eutrophication 4. Water treatment 1. Redox chemistry #15; Principle of equilibration of chemical system R Keq;sh and other aquatic life { Shift to anaerobic metabolic mechanisms #15; Eutrophication: agin

  20. CHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemistry of silica in Cerro Prieto brine may profitably be14 mg·l-1 AND SYNTHFTIC CERRO PRIETO BRINES High Ca We112Q.by the CFE Laboratory at Cerro Prieto and kindly provided to

  1. Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Chemistry The Computational Science that are distinct from already- required coursework. To receive a certificate in "Computational Science a solid base in problem solving using computation as a major tool for modeling complicated problems

  2. Eugene R. Zubarev Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubarev, Eugene

    , amphiphilic structures. Experimental: organic synthesis, polymerization, synthesis of inorganic nanocrystals-2005 Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University 2000-2002 Research Associate and supramolecular chemistry, molecular self-assembly, organic-inorganic hybrid structures, nanoparticle catalysts

  3. February 11, 1987 I Inorganic Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    Volume 26 Number 3 February 11, 1987 I Inorganic Chemistry 0 Copyright 1987 by the American uranium phthalocyanine derivatives have been crystallographically (I) (a) Kasuga, K.; Tsutsui, M. Coord

  4. Graduate Profile Chemistry & PhysiCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Profile Chemistry & PhysiCs "...I am helping to develop low-cost solar technology." Ricky to develop low-cost solar technology. The aim of my project is to achieve increased light absorption in thin

  5. Physics and chemistry of gas in discs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilling, Ian

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Protoplanetary discs set the initial conditions for planet formation. By combining observations with detailed modelling, it is possible to constrain the physics and chemistry in such discs. I have used the detailed ...

  6. Chemistry in Higher What's available and where is the info?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    Chemistry in Higher Education What's available and where is the info? What does studying chemistry? Where does it lead and what might a chemistry career look like? Dr. David Read, Director of Outreach 2013 #12;310 (294) HE courses with chemistry offered as a single subject hosted at 53 universities 699

  7. Chemistry 100 Fall 2011 Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Chemistry 100 ­ Fall 2011 Page 1 of 5 The World of Chemistry ­ Course Syllabus Instructor Kirkwood Hall 212 Texts: Required: Chemistry in Context (CC) Course information is online through OnCourse. Course Objective(s): The primary goal of this course is to teach you about the chemistry that surrounds

  8. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.A. Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.A. Chemistry College of Sciences www.unlv.edu/chemistry Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Chemistry Career

  9. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Chemistry College of Sciences www.unlv.edu/chemistry Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising Chemistry Career Options

  10. Chemistry Major and Minor www.chem.pitt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Chemistry Major and Minor www.chem.pitt.edu Revised: 10/2012 Chemistry is the most central disease, and processes to provide energy for societal needs. Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role design and ceramics. The bachelor's degree in chemistry consists of core courses in four primary areas

  11. ISSN 1463-9076 Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    on structural a London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University College London, London

  12. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH2UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Biochemistry -ACS Certified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the following courses 3 CH1122 University Chemistry - Studio Lab II 5 BL3300 Introduction to Genomics 3 CH1130

  13. Finite-element discretization of a linearized 2 -D model for lubricated oil transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Finite-element discretization of a linearized 2 - D model for lubricated oil transportation V acts as a lubricant by coating the wall of the pipeline, thus preventing the oil from adhering is devoted to the numerical simulation of a linearized model for the lubricated trans- portation of heavy

  14. Ramon Eritja Nucleic Acid Chemistry Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritort, Felix

    Ramon Eritja Nucleic Acid Chemistry Group Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology Dpt. IRB Barcelona nanoparticle assemblies. #12;The DNA can be used as template for the fabrication of silver nanowires between;Preparation of thiol-functionalized arrays N N O NH S-St Bu N N O NH S-St Bu N N O NH S-St BuO DMT-O O P O N

  15. Chemistry 365: Stirling's Formula David Ronis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronis, David M.

    Chemistry 365: Stirling's Formula © David Ronis McGill University There is a simple way to obtain;Chemistry 365 -2- Stirling's Formula x!(2 )1/2 xx+1/2 e-x , (4) which implies that ln(x!)x ln(x) - x + ln[(2 of Stirling's formula ln(x!)x[ln(x) - 1], is obtained. With a little extra effort you can work out the next

  16. Exhaust Phosphorous Chemistry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGenerationEducationalChemistry Exhaust Phosphorous Chemistry

  17. Stephen L. Morgan, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, 2014. 1 Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    "that is "similar to gasoline in flammability," said Rick L. Danheiser, professor of chemistry and chairStephen L. Morgan, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, 2014. 1 Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry The University of South Carolina USC Chemistry & Biochemistry Safety

  18. Determination of the CKM Element V(Ub)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortin, Dominique; /Victoria U.

    2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The precise determination of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| is crucial in testing the Standard Model mechanism for CP violation. From a sample of 88 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector, charmless semileptonic B decays are selected using simultaneous requirements on the electron energy, E{sub e}, and the invariant mass squared of the electron-neutrino pair, q{sup 2}. The partial branching fraction, unfolded for detector effects, is determined in a region of the q{sup 2}-E{sub e} plane where the dominating semileptonic decays to charm mesons are highly suppressed. Theoretical calculations based on the Heavy Quark Expanion allows for a determination of |V{sub ub}| = (3.95 {+-} 0.27{sub -0.42}{sup +0.58} {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -3}, where the errors represent experimental, heavy quark parameters and theoretical uncertainties, respectively.

  19. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. ace01musculus.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review...

  20. Sem. Chemistry Materials Science Electrical Engineering Miscellaneous CP Introduction to General Chemistry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Sem. Chemistry Materials Science Electrical Engineering Miscellaneous CP Introduction to General & Inorganic Materials Chemistry (4 CP) Energy Science and Technology I (5 CP) Surfaces/Interfaces/ Heterogen. Catalysis/ Electrocatalysis (5 CP) Materials Science II (5 CP) Energy Science and Technology II ( 5 CP

  1. Inorganic water chemistry 71 Chapter 4 -Inorganic Water Chemistry of the Boulder Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inorganic water chemistry 71 Chapter 4 - Inorganic Water Chemistry of the Boulder Creek Watershed Creek Watershed, Colorado were determined on a suite of water samples collected during high and low flow sixteen stream sites, twelve tributaries/inflows, and Saint Vrain Creek. The most upstream site was above

  2. Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program helps heavy oil consumers move toward sustainable development while improving their competitive position by reducing their consumption. Financial assistance is offered to carry out...

  3. Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Wei Qiu

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

  4. Heavy flavor production in the STAR experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Trzeciak; for the STAR Collaboration

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, recent STAR heavy flavor measurements in proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions are highlighted. We report studies of open charm mesons, reconstructed directly from hadronic decay products, and studies of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor hadrons. We also present J/$\\psi$ measurements via the di-electron decay channel at various collision systems and energies. In Au+Au collisions the energy dependence of J/$\\psi$ production measured at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV is shown. Finally, prospects of heavy flavor measurements with the STAR detector upgrades are discussed.

  5. Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a future in which vehicle automation technologies are ableto support the heavy vehicle automation including PrecisionCommittee on Vehicle-Highway Automation, and the attendees

  6. Isospin Splittings of Doubly Heavy Baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Guo, Feng-Kun; /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.; Hanhart, Christoph; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich; Meissner, Ulf-G.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The SELEX Collaboration has reported a very large isospin splitting of doubly charmed baryons. We show that this effect would imply that the doubly charmed baryons are very compact. One intriguing possibility is that such baryons have a linear geometry Q-q-Q where the light quark q oscillates between the two heavy quarks Q, analogous to a linear molecule such as carbon dioxide. However, using conventional arguments, the size of a heavy-light hadron is expected to be around 0.5 fm, much larger than the size needed to explain the observed large isospin splitting. Assuming the distance between two heavy quarks is much smaller than that between the light quark and a heavy one, the doubly heavy baryons are related to the heavy mesons via heavy quark-diquark symmetry. Based on this symmetry, we predict the isospin splittings for doubly heavy baryons including {Xi}{sub cc}, {Xi}{sub bb} and {Xi}{sub bc}. The prediction for the {Xi}{sub cc} is much smaller than the SELEX value. On the other hand, the {Xi}{sub bb} baryons are predicted to have an isospin splitting as large as (6.3 {+-} 1.7) MeV. An experimental study of doubly bottomed baryons is therefore very important to better understand the structure of baryons with heavy quarks.

  7. Rare Earth Elements: A Tool for Understanding the Behaviour of Trivalent Actinides in the Geosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buil, Belen; Gomez, Paloma; Garralon, Antonio; Turrero, M. Jesus [Medioambiente, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid, 28040 (Spain)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined in groundwaters, granite and fracture fillings in a restored uranium mine. The granitoids normalized REE patterns of groundwaters show heavy rare earth elements (HREE)-enrichment and positive Eu anomalies. This suggests that the REE are fractionated during leaching from the source rocks by groundwaters. Preferential leaching of HREE would be consistent with the greater stability of their aqueous complexes compared to those of the light rare earth elements (LREE), together with the dissolution of certain fracture filling minerals, dissolution/alteration of phyllosilicates and colloidal transport. (authors)

  8. Thematic Questions about Chemical Elements Nature of the chemical elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Environment Element Synthesis: Exploration of Chemical Fundamentals Element Synthesis and Isotopes · Elemental thorium uranium Relativeabundance(Si=106)Relative Abundance in the Sun · non-uniform trend G302.protons 90 234Th 145 #12;5 Alpha Decay - Loss of He Atom · Decay of Uranium-238 to Thorium-234 G302

  9. Heavy Ions - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNot Logged3 HanfordHarry S.Heat PumpsHeavy

  10. SECTION II. HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONSII. HEAVY ION

  11. Heavy Actinides | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat Transfer inoperation in timeHeavy

  12. Large Component QCD and Theoretical Framework of Heavy Quark Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Liang Wu

    2006-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a large component QCD derived directly from full QCD by integrating over the small components of quark fields with $|{\\bf p}| < E + m_Q$, an alternative quantization procedure is adopted to establish a basic theoretical framework of heavy quark effective field theory (HQEFT) in the sense of effective quantum field theory. The procedure concerns quantum generators of Poincare group, Hilbert and Fock space, anticommutations and velocity super-selection rule, propagator and Feynman rules, finite mass corrections, trivialization of gluon couplings and renormalization of Wilson loop. The Lorentz invariance and discrete symmetries in HQEFT are explicitly illustrated. Some new symmetries in the infinite mass limit are discussed. Weak transition matrix elements and masses of hadrons in HQEFT are well defined to display a manifest spin-flavor symmetry and $1/m_Q$ corrections. A simple trace formulation approach is explicitly demonstrated by using LSZ reduction formula in HQEFT, and shown to be very useful for parameterizing the transition form factors via $1/m_Q$ expansion. As the heavy quark and antiquark fields in HQEFT are treated on the same footing in a fully symmetric way, the quark-antiquark coupling terms naturally appear and play important roles for simplifying the structure of transition matrix elements, and for understanding the concept of `dressed heavy quark' - hadron duality. In the case that the `longitudinal' and `transverse' residual momenta of heavy quark are at the same order of power counting, HQEFT provides a consistent approach for systematically analyzing heavy quark expansion in terms of $1/m_Q$. Some interesting features in applications of HQEFT to heavy hadron systems are briefly outlined.

  13. Quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greco, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly give an elementary introduction to the expansion of the Early Universe till when the phase transition of the quark-gluon plasma to a hadronic matter takes place. Then we describe some main element of the study of QGP by mean of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC's)

  14. Neutron-capture elements in the metal-poor globular cluster M15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaori Otsuki; Satoshi Honda; Wako Aoki; Toshitaka Kajino; Grant J. Mathews

    2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on observations of six giants in the globular cluster M15 (NGC 7078) using the Subaru Telescope to measure neutron-capture elemental abundances. Our abundance analyses based on high-quality blue spectra confirm the star-to-star scatter in the abundances of heavy neutron-capture elements (e.g., Eu), and no significant s-process contribution to them, as was found in previous studies. We have found, for the first time, that there are anti-correlations between the abundance ratios of light to heavy neutron-capture elements ([Y/Eu] and [Zr/Eu]) and heavy ones (e.g., Eu). This indicates that light neutron-capture elements in these stars cannot be explained by only a single r-process. Another process that has significantly contributed to the light neutron-capture elements is required to have occurred in M15. Our results suggest a complicated enrichment history for M15 and its progenitor.

  15. Standard guide for establishing a quality assurance program for analytical chemistry laboratories within the nuclear industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide covers the establishment of a quality assurance (QA) program for analytical chemistry laboratories within the nuclear industry. Reference to key elements of ANSI/ISO/ASQC Q9001, Quality Systems, provides guidance to the functional aspects of analytical laboratory operation. When implemented as recommended, the practices presented in this guide will provide a comprehensive QA program for the laboratory. The practices are grouped by functions, which constitute the basic elements of a laboratory QA program. 1.2 The essential, basic elements of a laboratory QA program appear in the following order: Section Organization 5 Quality Assurance Program 6 Training and Qualification 7 Procedures 8 Laboratory Records 9 Control of Records 10 Control of Procurement 11 Control of Measuring Equipment and Materials 12 Control of Measurements 13 Deficiencies and Corrective Actions 14

  16. Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project of accounting for real-world driving performance within heavy truck analyses. The Program is being led by Oak to collect 104 channels of information at 100Hz. Another industry partner, Michelin Tires, was interested

  17. The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , describes R&D needs for heavy-ion accelerator, target and chamber R&D. 44 pages. Defines goals and criteria tasks) - ion accelerator technologies - chamber and maintenance technologies - pulsed power technologiesThe Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy Grant Logan

  18. Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its shortcomings, and its relevance to HCCI. Section 3 discusses the effects of fuel volatility on fuel and air mixing and the consequences it has on HCCI. The effects of alcohol fuels on HCCI performance, and specifically the effects that they have on the operable speed/load range, are reviewed in Section 4. Finally, conclusions are drawn in Section 5.

  19. Analysis of residuum desulfurization by size exclusion chromatography with element specific detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Biggs, W.R. (Chevron Research Co., Richmond, CA (USA))

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important aspect of residuum upgrading is the fate of heteroatomic elements - N, S, Ni, V - during processing. Because these elements are usually in concentration in residua, new process technologies are under development to handle their removal. Understanding the removal mechanism(s) for the heteroatoms could lead to better process options. In this regard, the authors recently reported on the size profile changes of Ni- and V-containing components in heavy residua during thermal hydroprocessing and fixed-bed catalytic hydroprocessing. Using size exclusion chromatography and element specific detection by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry (SEC-ICP), they observed characteristic metal profiles which depended on the processing conditions. They have now turned their attention to the behavior of sulfur during hydroprocessing. This report summarizes preliminary results in a study of S compounds in heavy residua, and their behavior during thermal hydroprocessing.

  20. Heavy quark production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Bishai

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy quark production cross-sections, correlations and polarizations have been measured at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) using 118 pb{sup -1} of data collected from the 1992 to 1995 Run I of the Fermilab Tevatron. There is still disagreement between theoretical predictions of bottom and charm hadro-production cross-sections and the Run I results. The observed transverse momentum spectrum of the prompt J/{psi} production polarization is still not understood. Run II of the Tevatron began in July of 2001 and the CDF Run II detector [11] has collected 70 pb{sup -1} of physics quality data since January 2002. Large statistics of onia states have been collected. Exclusive B meson decay modes have been reconstructed and the SVT level 2 displaced track trigger has produced large samples of D mesons. The prompt charm and b {yields} cX fractions in both charmonium and D meson samples have been measured. Run II is now poised to greatly enhance the knowledge of heavy quark production dynamics well beyond the reach of the Run I detector.

  1. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Borissov

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the $p \\bar p$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy $b$- and $c$-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays $B^0, B^0_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in $B_s \\to J\\psi \\phi$ decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in $D^0 \\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the $B_s \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  2. Performance Characteristics of Lithium-ion Batteries of Various Chemistries for Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andrew; Miller, Marshall

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whether any of the lithium battery chemistries can meetgeneral the higher cost lithium battery chemistries have thecosts for various lithium battery chemistries Electrode

  3. Reduction Chemistry of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: Toward New Reactivity and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenliang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Chemistry of Rare Earths; Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. ,and Chemistry of Rare Earths; Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. ,and Chemistry of Rare Earths; Gschneidner, K. A. , Bünzli,

  4. The CEBAF Element Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theodore Larrieu, Christopher Slominski, Michele Joyce

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the inauguration of the CEBAF Element Database (CED) in Fall 2010, Jefferson Lab computer scientists have taken a step toward the eventual goal of a model-driven accelerator. Once fully populated, the database will be the primary repository of information used for everything from generating lattice decks to booting control computers to building controls screens. A requirement influencing the CED design is that it provide access to not only present, but also future and past configurations of the accelerator. To accomplish this, an introspective database schema was designed that allows new elements, types, and properties to be defined on-the-fly with no changes to table structure. Used in conjunction with Oracle Workspace Manager, it allows users to query data from any time in the database history with the same tools used to query the present configuration. Users can also check-out workspaces to use as staging areas for upcoming machine configurations. All Access to the CED is through a well-documented Application Programming Interface (API) that is translated automatically from original C++ source code into native libraries for scripting languages such as perl, php, and TCL making access to the CED easy and ubiquitous.

  5. Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Print Wednesday, 27 September 2006 00:00 Heavy-fermion systems are...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion &...

  7. Simulation of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion W. M.et al. , “Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion,”et al. , "Chamber Transport of `Foot' Pulses for Heavy-Ion

  8. QCD Radiation off Heavy Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torbjörn Sjöstrand

    2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An algorithm for an improved description of final-state QCD radiation is introduced. It is matched to the first-order matrix elements for gluon emission in a host of decays, for processes within the Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric extension thereof.

  9. 954 NATURE CHEMISTRY | VOL 4 | NOVEMBER 2012 | www.nature.com/naturechemistry in your element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    and some of the more common platinum-group metals. The back seat of an automobile could easily accommodate that it rivals diamond as the least compressible of all known substances. Osmium can be mixed with other platinum, a colourless solid used as a stain in microscopy and in fingerprin

  10. Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, C.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

  11. Chemistry and physics of the heaviest elements at UC Berkeley and LBNL: An overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitsche, Heino

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL- This abstract was prepared for an invited presentationelements at UC Berkeley and LBNL: An overview Heino Nitsche,National Laboratory's (LBNL) 88-inch Cyclotron using the

  12. Major element chemistry in inner alpine snowpacks (Aosta Valley Region, NW Italy) Gianluca Filippa a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Mark W.

    Centre on Natural Risks in Mountain and Hilly Enviroments) Università degli Studi di Torino, via L. Da. In the Aosta Valley, local biogenic pollution rather than long-range transport may contribute substantially of strong anthropogenic pollution or dust deposition. Due to the fact that inner alpine valleys cover a non

  13. STUDIES IN THE NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY OF PLUTONIUM, AMERICIUM, AND CURIUM AND MASSES OF THE HEAVIEST ELEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Richard Alois

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies. The promethium~europium separation factor withexception of cerium and europium, for which other methods ofiodine, barium, cerium, and europium carrier solutions were

  14. Lattice studies of hadrons with heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Aubin

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I will discuss recent developments in lattice studies of hadrons composed of heavy quarks. I will mostly cover topics which are at a state of direct comparison with experiment, but will also discuss new ideas and promising techniques to aid future studies of lattice heavy quark physics.

  15. Relativistic heavy ion research. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP).

  16. Heavy ion, recirculating linac, design optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, D.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Godlove, T.F. (FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax Station, VA (United States))

    1991-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost optimization is important to the development of high-current, heavy-ion accelerators for power production based on inertial confinement fusion. Two heavy-ion, recirculating linac configurations are examined that eliminate the necessity to provide reset pulses for the cores used in the linac induction accelerating modules. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Liaison activities with the Institute of Physcial Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Midyear report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1996-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The task `IPC/RAS Liaison and Tank Waste Testing` is a program being conducted in fiscal year (FY) 1996 with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, EM-53 Efficient Separations and Processing (ESP) Crosscutting Program, under the technical task plan (TTP) RLA6C342. The principal investigator is Cal Delegard of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The task involves a technical liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) and their DOE-supported investigations into the fundamental and applied chemistry of the transuranium elements (primarily neptunium, plutonium, and americium) and technetium in @ine media. The task has three purposes: 1. Providing technical information and technical direction to the IPC/RAS. 2. Disseminating IPC/RAS data and information to the DOE technical community. 3. Verifying IPC/RAS results through laboratory testing and comparison with published data.

  18. Structure, chemistry, and properties of mineral nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waychunas, G.A.; Zhang, H.; Gilbert, B.

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticle properties can depart markedly from their bulk analog materials, including large differences in chemical reactivity, molecular and electronic structure, and mechanical behavior. The greatest changes are expected at the smallest sizes, e.g. 10 nm and below, where surface effects are expected to dominate bonding, shape and energy considerations. The precise chemistry at nanoparticle interfaces can have a profound effect on structure, phase transformations, strain, and reactivity. Certain phases may exist only as nanoparticles, requiring transformations in chemistry, stoichiometry and structure with evolution to larger sizes. In general, mineralogical nanoparticles have been little studied.

  19. Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization ofChemistry and Transport Chemistry

  20. Chemistry: Theory - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization ofChemistry and TransportChemistryTheory

  1. Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry Oxide InterfacesChemistry

  2. Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry OxideChemistry of

  3. Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry OxideChemistry

  4. Heavy photon search experiment at JLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanyan, S. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Collaboration: HPS Collaboration

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab will search for new heavy vector boson(s), aka 'heavy photons', in the mass range of 20 MeV/c{sup 2} to 1000 MeV/c{sup 2} using the scattering of high energy, high intensity electron beams off a high Z target. The proposed measurements will cover the region of parameter space favored by the muon g-2 anomaly, and will explore a significant region of parameter space, not only at large couplings (??/? > 10{sup ?7}), but also in the regions of small couplings, down to ??/??10{sup ?10}. The excellent vertexing capability of the Si-tracker uniquely enables HPS to cover the small coupling region. Also, HPS will search for heavy photons in an alternative to the e{sup +}e{sup ?} decay mode, in the heavy photon's decay to ?{sup +}??.

  5. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has a composite cladding having a substrate and a metal barrier metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of the substrate so that the metal barrier forms a shield between the substrate and the nuclear fuel material held within the cladding. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of a low neutron absorption metal of substantially pure zirconium. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the substrate from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  6. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has an improved composite cladding comprised of a moderate purity metal barrier of zirconium metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The metal barrier forms a shield between the alloy tube and a core of nuclear fuel material enclosed in the composite cladding. There is a gap between the cladding and the core. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the composite cladding and has low neutron absorption characteristics. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the alloy tube from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  7. Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a variable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line.

  8. Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, C.

    1987-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a determinable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line. 4 figs.

  9. Element abundances in solar energetic particles: two physical processes, two abundance patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abundances of elements comprising solar energetic particles (SEPs) come with two very different patterns. Historically called "impulsive" and "gradual" events, they have been studied for 40 years, 20 years by the Wind spacecraft. Gradual SEP events measure coronal abundances. They are produced when shock waves, driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), accelerate the ambient coronal plasma; we discuss the average abundances of 21 elements that differ from corresponding solar photospheric abundances by a well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the element. The smaller impulsive ("3He-rich") SEP events are associated with magnetic reconnection involving open field lines from solar flares or jets that also eject plasma to produce accompanying CMEs. These events produce striking heavy-element abundance enhancements, relative to coronal abundances, by an average factor of 3 at Ne, 9 at Fe, and 900 for elements with 76 0.1 are even more strongly associated with narrow, slow CMEs, cooler coro...

  10. Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Print Heavy-fermion systems are characterized by electrons with extremely large effective masses. The corresponding...

  11. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efthimion, P.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

  13. NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation This report provides the results of an...

  14. Design and Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Design and Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Poster presentation at the...

  15. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems; Adsorption and Application. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological...

  16. Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Presentation...

  17. Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ALTERNATIVE. EVERY Advanced Natural Gas Engine Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Dr. Mostafa M Kamel Dr. Mostafa M...

  18. WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for...

  19. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission...

  20. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  1. Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles with Control Technologies for Reduced Diesel Exhaust Emissions Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy-Duty...

  2. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  3. Heavy quark physics from SLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers preliminary measurements from SLD on heavy quark production at the Z{sup 0}, using 150,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays accumulated during the 1993-1995 runs. A measurement of R{sub b} with a lifetime double tag is presented. The high electron beam polarization of the SLC is employed in the direct measurement of the parity-violating parameters A{sub b} and A{sub c} by use of the left-right forward-backward asymmetry. The lifetimes of B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mesons have been measured by two analyses. The first identifies semileptonic decays of B mesons with high (p,p{sub t}) leptons; the second analysis isolates a sample of B meson decays with a two-dimensional impact parameter tag and reconstructs the decay length and charge using a topological vertex reconstruction method.

  4. Role of clay minerals on the carbonate chemistry in a marine clay formation Lerouge C., Grangeon S., Mazurek M., Wille G.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Role of clay minerals on the carbonate chemistry in a marine clay formation Lerouge C., Grangeon S., Mazurek M., Wille G. Samples from different levels of the Opalinus clay formation at Benken were studied. At the scale of the formation, the trace element content in calcite is anticorrelated with clay content

  5. Innovative Structural and Joining Concepts for Lightweight Design of Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacky C. Prucz; Samir N. Shoukry; Gergis W. William

    2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in the area of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) have brought these materials to a maturity stage where the technology is ready for transition to large-volume production and commercialization. The new materials seem to allow the fabrication of higher quality parts at less than 50 percent of the weight as compared to steel, especially when they are selectively reinforced with carbon, silicon carbide, or aluminum oxide fibers. Most of the developments in the MMC materials have been spurred, mainly by applications that require high structural performance at elevated temperatures, the heavy vehicle industry could also benefit from this emerging technology. Increasing requirements of weight savings and extended durability are the main drivers for potential insertion of MMC technology into the heavy vehicle market. Critical elements of a typical tractor-trailer combination, such as highly loaded sections of the structure, engine components, brakes, suspensions, joints and bearings could be improved through judicious use of MMC materials. Such an outcome would promote the DOE's programmatic objectives of increasing the fuel efficiency of heavy vehicles and reducing their life cycle costs and pollution levels. However, significant technical and economical barriers are likely to hinder or even prevent broad applications of MMC materials in heavy vehicles. The tradeoffs between such expected benefits (lower weights and longer durability) and penalties (higher costs, brittle behavior, and difficult to machine) must be thoroughly investigated both from the performance and cost viewpoints, before the transfer of MMC technology to heavy vehicle systems can be properly assessed and implemented. MMC materials are considered to form one element of the comprehensive, multi-faceted strategy pursued by the High Strength/Weight Reduction (HS/WR) Materials program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for structural weight savings and quality enhancements in heavy vehicles. The research work planed for the first year of this project (June 1, 2003 through May 30, 2004) focused on a theoretical investigation of weight benefits and structural performance tradeoffs associated with the design, fabrication, and joining of MMC components for heavy-duty vehicles. This early research work conducted at West Virginia University yielded the development of integrated material-structural models that predicted marginal benefits and significant barriers to MMC applications in heavy trailers. The results also indicated that potential applications of MMC materials in heavy vehicles are limited to components identified as critical for either loadings or weight savings. Therefore, the scope of the project was expanded in the following year (June 1, 2004 through May 30, 2005) focused on expanding the lightweight material-structural design concepts for heavy vehicles from the component to the system level. Thus, the following objectives were set: (1) Devise and evaluate lightweight structural configurations for heavy vehicles. (2) Study the feasibility of using Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for critical structural components and joints in heavy vehicles. (3) Develop analysis tools, methods, and validated test data for comparative assessments of innovative design and joining concepts. (4) Develop analytical models and software for durability predictions of typical heavy vehicle components made of particulate MMC or fiber-reinforced composites. This report summarizes the results of the research work conducted during the past two years in this projects.

  6. ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER-SCIENCE GEOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS PHYSICS STATISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC- ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER-SCIENCE GEOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS PHYSICS STATISTICS HEALTHCARE BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC-ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY C H HEALTHCARE BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC-ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER

  7. 5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques, January IAP 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabacco, Sarah

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students ...

  8. Microfluidics for High School Chemistry Students Melissa Hemling,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weibel, Douglas B.

    Microfluidics for High School Chemistry Students Melissa Hemling,, John A. Crooks,§ Piercen M present a laboratory experiment that introduces high school chemistry students to microfluidics while microfluidic systems using nonspecialized equipment that is available in high school classrooms and reagents

  9. Linking local air pollution to global chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Monika.; Wang, Chien.; Webster, Mort David.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    We have incorporated a reduced-form urban air chemistry model in MIT's 2D-LO coupled chemistry-climate model. The computationally efficient reduced-form urban model is derived from the California Institute of Technology-Carnegie ...

  10. analytical chemistry laboratory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: 12;12;A BRIEF HISTORY THE ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY DIVISION OF OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY 1950 hiembers of the Chemistry Division R-on: J. A. Swartout In...

  11. Forrest S. Schultz, PhD Professor of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    to support programs in Nanoscience, Biotechnology, Computer and Electrical Engineering and Plastics with the Chemistry Department to most effectively meet the challenge of a growing demand for chemistry courses

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin-Madison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    ­ Material damage · Ecosystem Impacts ­ Nutrients ­ Toxics · Climate Change #12;ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRYENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin-Madison Optimizing University of Wisconsin-Madison #12;ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin

  13. Reaction sequence of metallopetroporphyrins during heavy residuum upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Biggs, W.R.; Bezman, S.A.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors analyzed the metallopetroporphyrins and the metallo-nonporphyrins during thermal and catalytic upgrading of heavy residua. By size exclusion chromatography with element specific detection (SEC-HPLC-ICP), they found thermal treatment reduces the size of the remaining metal-containing compounds, while catalytic treatment preferentially removes the metal-containing molecules in the size range of the catalyst pore. In both cases the metallopetroporphyrins process easily. By applying column chromatography and UV-vis spectroscopy, we have been able to detect and quantitate some of the probable intermediates of the demetallation sequence for vanadyl petroporphyrins. These results show the demetallation pathway is probably through the reduction of the porphyrins to chlorins and other reduced species. These results are in agreement with metalloporphyrin model compound work seen in the literature.

  14. Safety Training Policy Virginia Tech Chemistry Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Safety Training Policy Virginia Tech Chemistry Department Approved by the Executive Committee on 06 at specific training sessions or programs is mandatory. Tenure-track faculty members may choose their level research are exempt, as their safety training is incorporated into their laboratory courses. The first step

  15. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, C.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atmospheric Chemistry was held at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island, June 13-18, 1999. The conference was well attended with 151 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  16. Chemical Transport Policy Virginia Tech Chemistry Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Chemical Transport Policy Virginia Tech Chemistry Department This policy was enacted. The purpose of this policy is to ensure the safety of personnel transporting chemicals and anyone who might be affected by a problem occurring during such transport. The policy also helps to shield stockroom personnel

  17. Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    R EVISED PAG E PR O O FS ia617 Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations Jason L . In such cases, 0 is said to be spin contaminated owing to incorporation of higher spin state character of Iron­Sulfur ia618 Clusters). It is important to note that while spin-contaminated and broken

  18. Mathematical Review for Physical Chemistry 1. Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kirk A.

    Mathematical Review for Physical Chemistry Outline: 1. Integration (a) Important Integrals (b) Tricks for evaluating integrals 2. Derivatives (a) Important derivatives (b) Tricks 3. Expansions 4 dierentials 6. Properties of Logs 7. Review of Trigonometry 1 Integration: 1.1 Integrals you should know: 1

  19. Environmental Analytical Chemistry (ENERGY, POWER AND ENVIRONMENT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    /or irrational emotions rather than by the sound scientific principles. Since its large-scale introduction half using sound scientific principles. Chemistry occupies central position in discussion of any production sites (movie: Hanford today) 11/2-4 Nuclear Energy production (civilian); Safe reactor designs 11

  20. CHEM 4170, Medicinal Chemistry University of Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    CHEM 4170, Medicinal Chemistry University of Missouri Computer Graphics Visualization of Proteins "pockets" or "clefts" on the surface of their macromolecular targets. A favorable free energy of binding the best way to visualize these structures is using computer graphics. In this assignment, we will use

  1. 128 Department of Chemistry Graduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on nanocapsules, nanocrystals, curcurmin and PAHs for physical and biophysical studies; fluorescence sensing in physical and biophysical chemistry; new methods for depollution of water contaminated by organic pollutants for the degradation of pesticides and chlorinated organic compounds in water; renewable energy, biosensing

  2. Adam D. McFarland Chemistry Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janssen, Michel

    Involving Sulfur Compounds@ 2001 M.S., Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 2004 Ph Northwestern University, Department of Materials Science. Present Design and Construction of a low temperature optical ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope. 1999-2004 Teaching Assistant Northwestern

  3. The Influence of Chemistry, Production and Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and their interaction on leaf litter chemistry and decomposition in pure stands of aspen (Populus tremuloides) and mixed stands of birch (Betula pa- pyrifera) and aspen at the Aspen Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment in the second year. For aspen litter but not mixed birch-aspen litter, decomposition rates were negatively

  4. Ice chemistry in starless molecular cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during core collapse period is responsible for high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H, and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of...

  5. Chemistry 180, Section 1 Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    -mail: mmccarroll@chem.siu.edu Text Beer: Tap into the Art and Science of Brewing By Charles Bamforth Oxford 218 Course Description The course covers the science and chemistry of beer and brewing. The history of beer and brewing will be introduced to follow the evolution of beer as a food and beverage, including

  6. Chemistry 181, Section 1 Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    to CHEM 180, The Chemistry of Beer and Brewing. The laboratory will cover various aspects of beer of the various style categories of beer, using the Beer Judge Certificate Program (BJCP) Style Guideline, working in brewing beer from base ingredients using common homebrewing techniques and laboratory scale experiments

  7. Exploring Tuning Strategies for Quantum Chemistry Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosonkina, Masha

    to an efficient execution. General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure (GAMESS), used for ab-initio molecular quantum chemistry calculations, uses NICAN for dynamically making adaptations so as to improve calculations. These calculations include a wide range of Hartree-Fock (HF) wave function (RHF, ROHF, UHF, GVB

  8. Chemistry and Society December 16, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viola, Ronald

    Chemistry and Society Final Exam December 16, 2011 Answer all multiple choice questions (Part I energy content per gram? A. gasoline B. propane C. hard coal D. hydrogen 3. Which of the following chains 14. A higher octane rating means smoother burning gasoline. Octane rating is increased by: A

  9. 1Fractions and Chemistry Because molecules and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1Fractions and Chemistry Because molecules and atoms come in 'integer' packages, the ratios of gasoline (ethane) are combined with 7 molecules of oxygen you get 4 molecules of carbon dioxide and 6;1 Answer Key Problem 1 - What makes your car go: When 2 molecules of gasoline (ethane) are combined with 7

  10. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  11. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    in Chemistry or a related field and at least one year of additional research training such as postdoctoral

  12. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry Biorenewable Polymers 8833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    Biorefinery b. Pretreatment Chemistry Lignocellulosics c. SSF/CBP Conversion of Biomass to BioEthanol d. Third

  13. Department of Chemistry | Center for Catalytic HydrocarbonFunctionali...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry Faculty & Research Outreach Programs Graduate Studies Events & Seminars Undergraduate Studies Contact Us Faculty & Research > Research Centers & Programs > Center for...

  14. Supramolecular Chemistry DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905460

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angewandte Chemie Supramolecular Chemistry DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905460 Porous Capsules {(M)M5}12FeIII 30 (M = MoVI , WVI ): Sphere Surface Supramolecular Chemistry with 20 Ammonium Ions, Related Solution materials scientific aspects;[1] for general aspects of the chemistry, see referen- ces [1­3d

  15. School of Chemistry FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    School of Chemistry FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES CHEMISTRYPOSTGRADUATE MASTERS DEGREES #12;WWW.CHEM.LEEDS.AC.UK 02 School of Chemistry // MASTERS PROGRAMMES contents 03 Welcome 04 Study and Accommodation 19 Visit Us #12;SCHOOLOFCHEMISTRY 03 Welcome to the School of Chemistry The School warmly welcomes

  16. Course Syllabus: Chem W1A General Chemistry Course Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Course Syllabus: Chem W1A General Chemistry Course Information Course Number Chemistry W1A Course) Themed Problems.3. Participation in the discussion forums.4. Chem W1A General Chemistry Syllabus https Syllabus https://elearning.berkeley.edu/AngelUploads/Content/2013SUC... 2 of 10 5/28/13 10:13 AM #12;We

  17. INTERNATIONAL PERCEPTIONS OF THE UK CHEMISTRY RESEARCH BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medical Research Council INTERNATIONAL PERCEPTIONS OF THE UK CHEMISTRY RESEARCH BASE Chemistry advances in many areas. Chemistry research underpins a wide range of activities that benefit society also thank our colleagues from the Medical Research Council (MRC), the Biotechnology and Biological

  18. CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, FALL, 2013 (Updated 8/1/13)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    in Chemistry 61. Techniques in synthesis, spectroscopy, and reactivity studies. Applications of inorganic compounds in synthesis, catalysis, materials sciences, and biology. One laboratory, one lecture, one and chemistry of materials. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation. Only one of Chemistry 1, 11, or 16

  19. Chemistry at IIT: Where Can It Take You?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Chemistry at IIT: Where Can It Take You? CCHEMISTRY CCHEMISTRY To Learn More and How To Apply http://www.iit.edu/csl/pathways/ Undergraduate Admissions: http://www.iit.edu/undergrad_admission/ 800.448.2329 The IIT Legacy in Chemistry opportunities, help you steer your course. The IIT chemistry program is approved by the American Chemical

  20. Chemistry B.S. Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Chemistry B.S. Fall--First Year · CHEM 130 Chemical Principles I* · CHEM 145 Freshman Seminar · CHEM 222 Intro to Quant Analysis · CHEM 245 Sophomore Seminar · CHEM 329 Organic Chemistry I · MATH 264 Calculus III · LSP coursework Fall--Third Year · CHEM 345 Junior Seminar · CHEM 323/324 Physical Chemistry

  1. Ris National Laboratory Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory Postprint Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department Year 2007 Paper Højgaard Jensen1, Jørgen B. Bilde-Sørensen3, Mogens Mogensen1 1Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry-Sørensen3 , Mogens Mogensen1 1 Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department, Risø National Laboratory

  2. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Collisional energy loss of heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Meistrenko; Andre Peshier; Jan Uphoff; Carsten Greiner

    2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a transport approach for heavy quarks in a quark-gluon plasma, which is based on improved binary collision rates taking into account quantum statistics, the running of the QCD coupling and an effective screening mass adjusted to hard-thermal loop calculations. We quantify the effects of in-medium collisions by calculating the heavy flavor nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow for RHIC energies, which are comparable to radiative effects. We also derive an analytic formula for the mean collisional energy loss of an energetic heavy quark in a streaming quark gluon plasma.

  4. Resistive hydrogen sensing element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for providing a hydrogen sensing element with a more robust exposed metallization by application of a discontinuous or porous overlay to hold the metallization firmly on the substrate. An apparatus includes: a substantially inert, electrically-insulating substrate; a first Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and completely covered by a substantially hydrogen-impermeable layer so as to form a reference resistor on the substrate; a second Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and at least a partially accessible to a gas to be tested, so as to form a hydrogen-sensing resistor; a protective structure disposed upon at least a portion of the second Pd containing metallization and at least a portion of the substrate to improve the attachment of the second Pd containing metallization to the substrate while allowing the gas to contact said the second Pd containing metallization; and a resistance bridge circuit coupled to both the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The circuit determines the difference in electrical resistance between the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The hydrogen concentration in the gas may be determined. The systems and methods provide advantages because adhesion is improved without adversely effecting measurement speed or sensitivity.

  5. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, Darryl D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Elliott, John P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins porjecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array.

  6. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, D.D.; Elliott, J.P.

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins projecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array. 5 figs.

  7. ME 872 -Finite Element Methods Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Alejandro

    Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis (Dover Civil and Mechanical Engineering problems Special topics: Lagrange multipliers, adaptive finite elements, sensitivity analysis, nonlinearME 872 - Finite Element Methods Spring 2014 Catalog Description: Theory and application

  8. Lon A. Porter, Jr., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter Jr., Lon A.

    Nanotechnology, Industrial Inorganic Chemistry, Materials Chemistry, Forensic Chemistry, and Chemistry, Business in the synthesis of exotic new materials and utilization of cutting edge fabrication/characterization methods Fellowship · Graduated in August 2003 with a Ph. D. in inorganic chemistry, as related to inorganic chemistry

  9. Implications of Elemental Abundances in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuji Tsujimoto

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Unusual elemental abundance patterns observed for stars belonging to nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are discussed. Analysis of the [alpha/H] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams where alpha represents Mg or average of alpha-elements reveals that Fe from Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) does not contribute to the stellar abundances in the dSph galaxies where the member stars exhibit low alpha/Fe ratios except for the most massive dSph galaxy, the Sagitarrius. The more massive dwarf (irregular) galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, also have an SNe Ia signature in the stellar abundances. These findings suggest that the condition of whether SNe Ia contribute to chemical evolution in dwarf galaxies is likely to depend on the mass scale of galaxies. Unusual Mg abundances in some dSph stars are also found to be the origin of the large scatter in the [Mg/Fe] ratios and responsible for a seemingly decreasing [Mg/Fe] feature with increasing [Fe/H]. In addition, the lack of massive stars in the dSph galaxies does not satisfactorily account for the low-alpha signature. Considering the assemblage of deficient elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, and Zn), all of which are synthesized in pre-SN massive stars and in SN explosions, the low-alpha signature appears to reflect the heavy-element yields of massive stars with smaller rotation compared to solar neighborhood stars.

  10. Chemical and nuclear properties of lawrencium (element 103) and hahnium (element 105)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.A.

    1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical and nuclear properties of Lr and Ha have been studied, using 3-minute {sup 260}Lr and 35-second {sup 262}Ha. The crystal ionic radius of Lr{sup 3+} was determined by comparing its elution position from a cation-exchange resin column with those of lanthanide elements having known ionic radii. Comparisons are made to the ionic radii of the heavy actinides, Am{sup 3+} through Es{sup 3+}, obtained by x-ray diffraction methods, and to Md{sup 3+} and Fm{sup 3+} which were determined in the same manner as Lr{sup 3+}. The hydration enthalpy of {minus}3622 kJ/mol was calculated from the crystal ionic radius using an empirical form of the Born equation. Comparisons to the spacings between the ionic radii of the heaviest members of the lanthanide series show that the 2Z spacing between Lr{sup 3+} and Md{sup 3+} is anomalously small, as the ionic radius of Lr{sup 3+} of 0.0886 nm is significantly smaller than had been expected. The chemical properties of Ha were determined relative to the lighter homologs in group 5, Nb and Ta. Group 4 and group 5 tracer activities, as well as Ha, were absorbed onto glass surfaces as a first step toward the determination of the chemical properties of Ha. Ha was found to adsorb on surfaces, a chemical property unique to the group 5 elements, and as such demonstrates that Ha has the chemical properties of a group 5 element. A solvent extraction procedure was adapted for use as a micro-scale chemical procedure to examine whether or not Ha displays eka-Ta-like chemical under conditions where Ta will be extracted into the organic phase and Nb will not. Under the conditions of this experiment Ha did not extract, and does not show eka-Ta-like chemical properties.

  11. Matrix elements of one-body and two-body operators between arbitrary HFB multi-quasiparticle states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing-Li Hu; Zao-Chun Gao; Y. S. Chen

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new formulae for the matrix elements of one-body and two-body physical operators in compact forms, which are applicable to arbitrary Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov wave functions, including those for multi-quasiparticle excitations. The test calculations show that our formulae may substantially accelerate the process of symmetry restoration when applied to the heavy nuclear system.

  12. Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Daegil

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -heavy oil, and oil shale. Tremendous amounts of heavy oil resources are available in the world. Fig. 1.1 shows the total world oil reserves, and indicates that heavy oil, extra heavy oil, and bitumen make up about 70% of the world?s total oil resources...

  13. Altered states: Effects of diagenesis on fossil tooth chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, M.J.; Schoeninger, M.J.; Barker, W.W.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of modern and fossil teeth from northern and central Kenya, using the ion microprobe, electron microprobe, and transmission electron microscope, confirms that fossil tooth chemistry is controlled not only by the diagenetic precipitation of secondary minerals but also by the chemical alteration of the biogenic apatite. Increases in the concentrations of Fe, Mn, Si, Al, Ba, and possibly Cu in fossil vs. modern teeth reflect mixtures of apatite and secondary minerals. These secondary minerals occur in concentrations ranging from {approximately}0.3% in enamel to {approximately}5% in dentine and include sub-{micro}m, interstitial Fe-bearing manganite [(Fe{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 3+})O(OH)], and smectite. The pervasive distribution and fine grain size of the secondary minerals indicate that mixed analyses of primary and secondary material are unavoidable in in situ methods, even in ion microprobe spots only 10 {micro}m in diameter, and that bulk chemical analyses are severely biased. Increases in other elements, including the rare earth elements, U, F, and possibly Sr apparently reflect additional alteration of apatite in both dentine and enamel. Extreme care will be required to separate secondary minerals from original biogenic apatite for paleobiological or paleoclimate studies, and nonetheless bulk analyses of purified apatite may be suspect. Although the PO{sub 4} component of teeth seems resistant to chemical alteration, the OH component is extensively altered. This OH alteration implies that bulk analyses of fossil tooth enamel for oxygen isotope composition may be systematically biased by {+-}1%, and seasonal records of oxygen isotope composition may be spuriously shifted, enhanced, or diminished.

  14. Magnetic fluctuations and heavy electron superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, M.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic fluctuation self-energy based on neutron scattering data is used to calculate mass renormalizations, and superconducting critical temperatures and order parameters, for various heavy electron metals.

  15. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The position is a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop) located in Kent, Washington, and will be responsible for the safe and efficient operation of a field garage performing...

  16. Partonic coalescence in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a covariant coalescence model, we study hadron production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from both soft partons in the quark-gluon plasma and hard partons in minijets. Including transverse flow of soft partons and independent...

  17. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    progress with more modest near-term budgets. #12;Slide 5 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National requirement: modest growth of HIFS-VNL budget from present 7.7 M$/yr to ~16M$/yr, including suppo

  18. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Oeschler; Hans Georg Ritter; Nu Xu

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review hadron production in heavy ion collisions with emphasis on pion and kaon production at energies below 2 AGeV and on partonic collectivity at RHIC energies.

  19. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND HEAVY-ION FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokstad, R.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Structure and Heavy-Ton Fusion* A series of lecturesthe cross section for fusion in the experiments consideredEffects g in III. Subharrier Fusion Cross Sections for Light

  20. HEAVY-ION IMAGING APPLIED TO MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy particles rat h er than the vax~at1.on 1n t h e x-rayprograms on the a PDPll-34 and VAX- 780 computers. The image

  1. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    line- of-sight damage from target debris, neutron and gamma radiation. · Target injection: Heavy ions-liquid-protected target chambers with 30 yr lifetimes. · Robust final optics: Focusing magnets for ion beams avoid direct

  2. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Biodiesel Chemistry, Carbon Footprint and Regional Fuelof Biodiesel Chemistry, Carbon Footprint and Regional Fuelof Biodiesel Chemistry, Carbon Footprint and Regional Fuel

  3. Magnetization curves of sintered heavy tungsten alloys for applications in MRI-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolling, Stefan [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Oborn, Bradley M. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia)] [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia); Horvat, Joseph [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and School of Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia)] [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and School of Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Due to the current interest in MRI-guided radiotherapy, the magnetic properties of the materials commonly used in radiotherapy are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, measurement results for the magnetization (BH) curves of a range of sintered heavy tungsten alloys used in radiation shielding and collimation are presented. Methods: Sintered heavy tungsten alloys typically contain >90?% tungsten and <10?% of a combination of iron, nickel, and copper binders. Samples of eight different grades of sintered heavy tungsten alloys with varying binder content were investigated. Using a superconducting quantum interference detector magnetometer, the induced magnetic momentm was measured for each sample as a function of applied external field H{sub 0} and the BH curve derived. Results: The iron content of the alloys was found to play a dominant role, directly influencing the magnetizationM and thus the nonlinearity of the BH curve. Generally, the saturation magnetization increased with increasing iron content of the alloy. Furthermore, no measurable magnetization was found for all alloys without iron content, despite containing up to 6% of nickel. For two samples from different manufacturers but with identical quoted nominal elemental composition (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe), a relative difference in the magnetization of 11%–16% was measured. Conclusions: The measured curves show that the magnetic properties of sintered heavy tungsten alloys strongly depend on the iron content, whereas the addition of nickel in the absence of iron led to no measurable effect. Since a difference in the BH curves for two samples with identical quoted nominal composition from different manufacturers was observed, measuring of the BH curve for each individual batch of heavy tungsten alloys is advisable whenever accurate knowledge of the magnetic properties is crucial. The obtained BH curves can be used in FEM simulations to predict the magnetic impact of sintered heavy tungsten alloys.

  4. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  5. ? Production in Heavy Ion Collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Zhou; Nu Xu; Pengfei Zhuang

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the {\\Upsilon} production in heavy ion collisions at LHC energy in the frame of a dynamical transport approach. Both the initial production and in-medium regeneration and both the cold and hot nuclear matter effects are included in the calculations. In comparison with the ground state {\\Upsilon}(1s), the excited state {\\Upsilon}(2s) is much more sensitive to the heavy quark potential at finite temperature.

  6. Probing the Symmetry Energy with Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang; Y. Zhang; P. Danielewicz; M. Famiano; Z. Li; A. W. Steiner

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints on the EoS for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) at supra-saturation densities have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities. Comparisons are made to other available constraints.

  7. RELATIVISTIC MODIFICATIONS OF COVALENT BONDING IN HEAVY ELEMENTS: CALCULATIONS FOR TlH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Science, U. Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. s. Department ofEnergy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48 DISCLAIMER This document

  8. Solar heavy element abundance: constraints from frequency separation ratios of low-degree p modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William J. Chaplin; Aldo M. Serenelli; Sarbani Basu; Yvonne Elsworth; Roger New; Graham A. Verner

    2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We use very precise frequencies of low-degree solar-oscillation modes measured from 4752 days of data collected by the Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) to derive seismic information on the solar core. We compare these observations to results from a large Monte Carlo simulation of standard solar models, and use the results to constrain the mean molecular weight of the solar core, and the metallicity of the solar convection zone. We find that only a high value of solar metallicity is consistent with the seismic observations. We can determine the mean molecular weight of the solar core to a very high precision, and, dependent on the sequence of Monte Carlo models used, find that the average mean molecular weight in the inner 20% by radius of the Sun ranges from 0.7209 to 0.7231, with uncertainties of less than 0.5% on each value. Our lowest seismic estimate of solar metallicity is Z=0.0187 and our highest is Z=0.0239, with uncertainties in the range of 12--19%. Our results indicate that the discrepancies between solar models constructed with low metallicity and the helioseismic observations extend to the solar core and thus cannot be attributed to deficiencies in the modeling of the solar convection zone.

  9. Gas-phase structures of molecules containing heavy p-block elements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wann, Derek A

    Gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) is the method of choice for determining the structures of molecules containing between two and 100 atoms, free from intermolecular interaction. However, for many molecules it becomes necessary to augment...

  10. Concentrations of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB's), Chlorinated Pesticides, and Heavy Metals and Other Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's(PCB's), total DDT (DDT), chlor danecompounds,hexachlorobenzene(HCB), dieldrin, mirex, toxaphene, and hexachlor concentrations (PCB's and DDT were an order of magnitude lower) than those found in animals from the St. Lawrence.79 ± 0.56 mg/kg wet mass, and DDT averaged 1.35 ± 0.73 and 0.59 ± 0.45 mg/kg in males and females

  11. PIK M.S. Onegin Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute 2015 Super Heavy Elements Symposium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and4/26/11:Tel.: #001-408-927-2461; fax:February 2000

  12. Folden Group - Heavy Element Nuclear and Radiochemistry at Texas A&M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProofWorkingEnergy

  13. Chemistry and materials science research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The research reported here in summary form was conducted under the auspices of Weapons-Supporting Research (WSR) and Institutional Research and Development (IR D). The period covered is the first half of FY90. The results reported here are for work in progress; thus, they may be preliminary, fragmentary, or incomplete. Research in the following areas are briefly described: energetic materials, tritium, high-Tc superconductors, interfaces, adhesion, bonding, fundamental aspects of metal processing, plutonium, synchrotron-radiation-based materials science, photocatalysis on doped aerogels, laser-induced chemistry, laser-produced molecular plasmas, chemistry of defects, dta equipment development, electronic structure study of the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of Al-Li Alloys, and the structure-property link in sub-nanometer materials.

  14. International symposium on oilfield chemistry: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains 66 papers presented at the symposium related to the following topics in oil field chemistry: waste treatment of produced waters; methods for enhanced recovery of petroleum (mainly surfactants, polymers, and carbon dioxide injection); cement hydration and additives; drilling fluid stability; paraffin deposition in wells and pipelines; scale control and corrosion inhibitors; displacement fluid wettability and environmental transport; fracturing fluids; formation damage; asphaltene removal; and plugging agents. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. The Chemistry of Flammable Gas Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZACH, J.J.

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The document collects information from field instrumentation, laboratory tests, and analytical models to provide a single source of information on the chemistry of flammable gas generation at the Hanford Site. It considers the 3 mechanisms of formation: radiolysis, chemical reactions, and thermal generation. An assessment of the current models for gas generation is then performed. The results are that the various phenomena are reasonably understood and modeled compared to field data.

  16. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1998 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    Name: -1- CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1998 Professor Walba Third Hour Exam November 19, 1998 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) PLEASE read the questions carefully! This is a closed-book "open model" exam. You may use for scratch. H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

  17. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    Name: -1- CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba Third Hour Exam November 16, 2000 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) PLEASE read the questions carefully! This is a closed-book "open model" exam. You may use for scratch. H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

  18. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    Name: -1- CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 2000 Professor Walba Second Hour Exam October 26, 2000 scores: 1) 2) 3) 4) PLEASE read the questions carefully! This is a closed-book "open model" exam. You may use for scratch. H He Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Ne Cl Ar Br I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

  19. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having their origin in antiquity. Still other elements have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements, because these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature. The names of the elements come from many sources including mythological concepts or characters; places, areas or countries; properties of the element or its compounds, such as color, smell or its inability to combine; and the names of scientists. There are also some miscellaneous names as well as some obscure names for particular elements. The claim of discovery of an element has varied over the centuries. Many claims, e.g., the discovery of certain rare earth elements of the lanthanide series, involved the discovery of a mineral ore from which an element was later extracted. The honor of discovery has often been accorded not to the person who first isolated the element but to the person who discovered the original mineral itself, even when the ore was impure and contained many elements. The reason for this is that in the case of these rare earth elements, the ''earth'' now refers to oxides of a metal not to the metal itself. This fact was not realized at the time of their discovery, until the English chemist Humphry Davy showed that earths were compounds of oxygen and metals in 1808. In the early discoveries, the atomic weight of an element and spectral analysis of the element were not available. Later both of these elemental properties would be required before discovery of the element would be accepted. In general, the requirements for discovery claims have tightened through the years and claims that were previously accepted would no longer meet the minimum constraints now imposed. There are cases where the honor of discovery is not given to the first person to actually discover the element but to the first person to claim the discovery in print. If a publication was delayed, the discoverer has often historically been ''scooped'' by another scientist.

  20. Inorganic Chemistry Solutions to Semiconductor Nanocrystal Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarado, Samuel R. [Ames Laboratory; Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Ruberu, T. Purnima A. [Ames Laboratory; Tavasoli, Elham [Ames Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The optoelectronic and chemical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals heavily depend on their composition, size, shape and internal structure, surface functionality, etc. Available strategies to alter these properties through traditional colloidal syntheses and ligand exchange methods place a premium on specific reaction conditions and surfactant combinations. In this invited review, we apply a molecular-level understanding of chemical precursor reactivity to reliably control the morphology, composition and intimate architecture (core/shell vs. alloyed) of semiconductor nanocrystals. We also describe our work aimed at achieving highly selective, low-temperature photochemical methods for the synthesis of semiconductor–metal and semiconductor–metal oxide photocatalytic nanocomposites. In addition, we describe our work on surface modification of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots using new approaches and methods that bypass ligand exchange, retaining the nanocrystal's native ligands and original optical properties, as well as on spectroscopic methods of characterization useful in determining surface ligand organization and chemistry. Using recent examples from our group and collaborators, we demonstrate how these efforts have lead to faster, wider and more systematic application of semiconductor nanocrystal-based materials to biological imaging and tracking, and to photocatalysis of unconventional substrates. We believe techniques and methods borrowed from inorganic chemistry (including coordination, organometallic and solid state chemistry) have much to offer in reaching a better understanding of the synthesis, functionalization and real-life application of such exciting materials as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, rods, tetrapods, etc.).

  1. Extending Penning trap mass measurements with SHIPTRAP to the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hofmann, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany and Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Duellmann, Ch. E. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz, Germany and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Eibach, M. [Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Eliseev, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Hessberger, F. P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Ramirez, E. Minaya [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Nesterenko, D. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, 188300 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); and others

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Penning-trap mass spectrometry of radionuclides provides accurate mass values and absolute binding energies. Such mass measurements are sensitive indicators of the nuclear structure evolution far away from stability. Recently, direct mass measurements have been extended to the heavy elements nobelium (Z=102) and lawrencium (Z=103) with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. The results probe nuclear shell effects at N=152. New developments will pave the way to access even heavier nuclides.

  2. Role of short range correlations on nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, R. [Department of Applied Physics, B. B. Ambedkar University, Lucknow - 226025 (India); Chaturvedi, K. [Department of Physics, Bundelkhand University, Jhansi-284128 (India); Rath, P. K. [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India); Raina, P. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Ropar, Rupnagar - 140001, Punjab (India)

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing four different parametrization of the pairing plus multipolar type of effective two-body interaction and three different parametrizations of Jastrow-type of short range correlations, the uncertainties in the nuclear transition matrix elements due to the exchange of light as well as heavy Majorana neutrino for the 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} transition of neutrinoless positron {beta}{beta} decay are estimated in the PHFB model.

  3. Diversity of abundance patterns of neutron-capture elements in very metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, Misa; Ishimaru, Yuhri [International Christian University 10-2, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Aoki, Wako; Wanajo, Shinya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of Very Metal-Poor stars indicate that there are at least two sites to r-process; “weak r-process” and “main r-process”. A question is whether these two are well separated or there exists a variation in the r-process. We present the results of abundance analysis of neutron-capture elements in the two Very Metal-Poor stars HD107752 and HD110184 in the Milky Way halo observed with the Subaru Telescope HDS. The abundance patterns show overabundace at light n-capture elements (e.g. Sr, Y), inferring the element yielding of weak r-process, while heavy neutron-capture elements (e.g. Ba, Eu) are deficient; however, the overabundance of light ones is not as significant as that previously found in stars representing the weak r-process (e.g. HD122563; Honda et al. 2006). Our study show diversity in the abundance patterns from light to heavy neutron-capture elements in VMP stars, suggesting a variation in r-process, which may depend on electron fraction of environment.

  4. Direct imaging of light elements by annular dark-field aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotnyk, Andriy, E-mail: andriy.lotnyk@iom-leipzig.de; Poppitz, David; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Rauschenbach, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we show that an annular dark-field detector in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope allows the direct observation of light element columns in crystalline lattices. At specific imaging conditions, an enhancement of the intensities of light element columns in the presence of heavy element columns is observed. Experimental results are presented for imaging the nitrogen and carbon atomic columns at the GaN-SiC interface and within the GaN and SiC compounds. The crystal polarity of GaN at the interface is identified. The obtained findings are discussed and are well supported by image simulations.

  5. Energy loss, hadronization and hadronic interactions of heavy flavors in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Shanshan; Bass, Steffen A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a theoretical framework to describe the evolution of heavy flavors produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The in-medium energy loss of heavy quarks is described using our modified Langevin equation that incorporates both quasi-elastic scatterings and the medium-induced gluon radiation. The space-time profiles of the fireball is described by a (2+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics simulation. A hybrid model of fragmentation and coalescence is utilized for heavy quark hadronization, after which the produced heavy mesons together with the soft hadrons produced from the bulk QGP are fed into the hadron cascade UrQMD model to simulate the subsequent hadronic interactions. We find that the medium-induced gluon radiation contributes significantly to heavy quark energy loss at high $p_\\mathrm{T}$; heavy-light quark coalescence enhances heavy meson production at intermediate $p_\\mathrm{T}$; and scatterings inside the hadron gas further suppress the $D$ meson $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ at large $p_\\mathrm{T}$ and e...

  6. Method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Reber, Edward L.; Rohde, Kenneth W.

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting an element is disclosed and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which depicts, at least in part, a test region having boundaries, and which has a small amount of the element to be detected; providing a calculation which detects the small amount of the element to be detected; and providing a moving window and performing the calculation within the moving window, and over a range of possible window boundaries within the test region to determine the location of the optimal test region within the gamma-ray spectrum.

  7. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  8. I. Bloch, DESY/Hamburg University -CIPANP, Puerto Rico 30.5.-03.06.'06 1Heavy Quarks at HERA Heavy Quark ProductionHeavy Quark Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Bloch, DESY/Hamburg University - CIPANP, Puerto Rico 30.5.-03.06.'06 1Heavy Quarks at HERA Heavy, Puerto Rico 30.5.-03.06.'06 2Heavy Quarks at HERA HERA: ep collisions within H1 & ZEUS 920 GeV protons920/Hamburg University - CIPANP, Puerto Rico 30.5.-03.06.'06 3Heavy Quarks at HERA H1&ZEUS integrated Luminosity: 96

  9. Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy-Oil Recovery Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanford University; Department of Energy Resources Engineering Green Earth Sciences

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report and technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2007 for the project 'Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy Oil Recovery Techniques', DE-FC26-04NT15526. Critical year 3 activities of this project were not undertaken because of reduced funding to the DOE Oil Program despite timely submission of a continuation package and progress on year 1 and 2 subtasks. A small amount of carried-over funds were used during June-August 2007 to complete some work in the area of foamed-gas mobility control. Completion of Year 3 activities and tasks would have led to a more thorough completion of the project and attainment of project goals. This progress report serves as a summary of activities and accomplishments for years 1 and 2. Experiments, theory development, and numerical modeling were employed to elucidate heavy-oil production mechanisms that provide the technical foundations for producing efficiently the abundant, discovered heavy-oil resources of the U.S. that are not accessible with current technology and recovery techniques. Work fell into two task areas: cold production of heavy oils and thermal recovery. Despite the emerging critical importance of the waterflooding of viscous oil in cold environments, work in this area was never sanctioned under this project. It is envisioned that heavy oil production is impacted by development of an understanding of the reservoir and reservoir fluid conditions leading to so-called foamy oil behavior, i.e, heavy-oil solution gas drive. This understanding should allow primary, cold production of heavy and viscous oils to be optimized. Accordingly, we evaluated the oil-phase chemistry of crude oil samples from Venezuela that give effective production by the heavy-oil solution gas drive mechanism. Laboratory-scale experiments show that recovery correlates with asphaltene contents as well as the so-called acid number (AN) and base number (BN) of the crude oil. A significant number of laboratory-scale tests were made to evaluate the solution gas drive potential of West Sak (AK) viscous oil. The West Sak sample has a low acid number, low asphaltene content, and does not appear foamy under laboratory conditions. Tests show primary recovery of about 22% of the original oil in place under a variety of conditions. The acid number of other Alaskan North Slope samples tests is greater, indicating a greater potential for recovery by heavy-oil solution gas drive. Effective cold production leads to reservoir pressure depletion that eases the implementation of thermal recovery processes. When viewed from a reservoir perspective, thermal recovery is the enhanced recovery method of choice for viscous and heavy oils because of the significant viscosity reduction that accompanies the heating of oil. One significant issue accompanying thermal recovery in cold environments is wellbore heat losses. Initial work on thermal recovery found that a technology base for delivering steam, other hot fluids, and electrical heat through cold subsurface environments, such as permafrost, was in place. No commercially available technologies are available, however. Nevertheless, the enabling technology of superinsulated wells appears to be realized. Thermal subtasks focused on a suite of enhanced recovery options tailored to various reservoir conditions. Generally, electrothermal, conventional steam-based, and thermal gravity drainage enhanced oil recovery techniques appear to be applicable to 'prime' Ugnu reservoir conditions to the extent that reservoir architecture and fluid conditions are modeled faithfully here. The extent of reservoir layering, vertical communication, and subsurface steam distribution are important factors affecting recovery. Distribution of steam throughout reservoir volume is a significant issue facing thermal recovery. Various activities addressed aspects of steam emplacement. Notably, hydraulic fracturing of horizontal steam injection wells and implementation of steam trap control that limits steam entry into hor

  10. Heavy flavours in heavy-ion collisions: quenching, flow and correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Beraudo; A. De Pace; M. Monteno; M. Nardi; F. Prino

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the quenching, elliptic flow and azimuthal correlations of heavy flavour particles in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions obtained through the POWLANG transport setup, developed in the past to study the propagation of heavy quarks in the Quark-Gluon Plasma and here extended to include a modeling of their hadronization in the presence of a medium. Hadronization is described as occurring via the fragmentation of strings with endpoints given by the heavy (anti-)quark Q(Qbar) and a thermal parton qbar(q) from the medium. The flow of the light quarks is shown to affect significantly the R_AA and v_2 of the final D mesons, leading to a better agreement with the experimental data. The approach allows also predictions for the angular correlation between heavy-flavour hadrons (or their decay electrons) and the charged particles produced in the fragmentation of the heavy-quark strings.

  11. Elliptic flow and energy loss of heavy quarks in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uphoff, Jan; Fochler, Oliver; Greiner, Carsten [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Xu, Zhe [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The space-time propagation of heavy quarks in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is studied within the partonic transport model Boltzmann approach of multiparton scatterings (BAMPS). In this model heavy quarks interact with the partonic medium via binary scatterings. The cross sections for these interactions are calculated with leading-order perturbative QCD, but feature a more precise Debye screening derived within the hard thermal loop approximation and obey the running of the coupling. Within this framework the elliptic flow and the nuclear modification factor of heavy quarks are computed for the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies and compared to available experimental data. It is found that binary scatterings alone cannot reproduce the data and therefore radiative corrections have to be taken into account.

  12. Elemental ABAREX -- a user's manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    ELEMENTAL ABAREX is an extended version of the spherical optical-statistical model code ABAREX, designed for the interpretation of neutron interactions with elemental targets consisting of up to ten isotopes. The contributions from each of the isotopes of the element are explicitly dealt with, and combined for comparison with the elemental observables. Calculations and statistical fitting of experimental data are considered. The code is written in FORTRAN-77 and arranged for use on the IBM-compatible personal computer (PC), but it should operate effectively on a number of other systems, particularly VAX/VMS and IBM work stations. Effort is taken to make the code user friendly. With this document a reasonably skilled individual should become fluent with the use of the code in a brief period of time.

  13. Environmental research on actinide elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  14. High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  15. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effects, driven by fuel chemistry and fluid dynamics, andeffects, driven by fuel chemistry and fluid dynamics, and

  16. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralization on heavy-ion fusion chamber transport,” totechniques for heavy ion fusion chamber transport,” Nucl.liquid heavy-ion fusion target chambers,” Fusion Technol.

  17. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Abstract: Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a...

  18. Cooperative Research in C1 Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    C1 chemistry refers to the conversion of simple carbon-containing materials that contain one carbon atom per molecule into valuable products. The feedstocks for C1 chemistry include natural gas, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methanol and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Synthesis gas, or syngas, is produced primarily by the reaction of natural gas, which is principally methane, with steam. It can also be produced by gasification of coal, petroleum coke, or biomass. The availability of syngas from coal gasification is expected to increase significantly in the future because of increasing development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation. Because of the abundance of remote natural gas, the advent of IGCC, and environmental advantages, C1 chemistry is expected to become a major area of interest for the transportation fuel and chemical industries in the relatively near future. The CFFLS will therefore perform a valuable national service by providing science and engineering graduates that are trained in this important area. Syngas is the source of most hydrogen. Approximately 10 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of hydrogen are manufactured annually in the world. Most of this hydrogen is currently used for the production of ammonia and in a variety of refining and chemical operations. However, utilization of hydrogen in fuel cells is expected to grow significantly in the next century. Syngas is also the feedstock for all methanol and Fischer-Tropsch plants. Currently, world consumption of methanol is over 25 million tons per year. There are many methanol plants in the U.S. and throughout the world. Methanol and oxygenated transportation fuel products play a significant role in the CFFLS C1 program. Currently, the only commercial Fischer-Tropsch plants are overseas, principally in South Africa (SASOL). However, new plants are being built or planned for a number of locations. One possible location for future F-T plant development in the U.S. is in the Alaskan oil fields.

  19. Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milam, David

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

  20. Environmental Chemistry Division annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research activities making up the programs in the Environmental Chemistry Division of the Department of Applied Science are presented. Some of the more significant accomplishments during 1989 are described and plans for 1990 are discussed briefly. Publications for the period are listed and abstracts are provided. Research objectives and principal investigators are given for each of the active programs. A list of personnel and collaborators during the past year is presented. The support distribution of FY 1989 is approximately 85% from the Department of Energy (65% Office of Health and Environmental Research), and 15% other agencies (principally from the Electric Power Research Institute).