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1

2.10 Heavy Element Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sole effort addressing the fundamental science of the transuranium elements. Social Impact: This research helps DOE carry out what is perhaps its most important and...

2

Heavy Element Chemistry | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Heavy Element Chemistry Heavy Element Chemistry Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Scientific Highlights Reports & Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Heavy Element Chemistry Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This activity supports basic research in the chemistry of the heavy elements, focused on the actinides, but also includes the transactinide elements and some fission products. The unique molecular bonding of these elements is explored using experiment and theory to elucidate electronic and molecular structure as well as reaction thermodynamics. Emphasis is placed on resolving the f-electron challenge; the chemical and physical

3

Computing Heavy Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable calculations of the structure of heavy elements are crucial to address fundamental science questions such as the origin of the elements in the universe. Applications relevant for energy production, medicine, or national security also rely on theoretical predictions of basic properties of atomic nuclei. Heavy elements are best described within the nuclear density functional theory (DFT) and its various extensions. While relatively mature, DFT has never been implemented in its full power, as it relies on a very large number (~ 10^9-10^12) of expensive calculations (~ day). The advent of leadership-class computers, as well as dedicated large-scale collaborative efforts such as the SciDAC 2 UNEDF project, have dramatically changed the field. This article gives an overview of the various computational challenges related to the nuclear DFT, as well as some of the recent achievements.

Schunck, N; Kortelainen, M; McDonnell, J; Mor, J; Nazarewicz, W; Pei, J; Sarich, J; Sheikh, J; Staszczak, A; Stoitsov, M; Wild, S M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Computing Heavy Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable calculations of the structure of heavy elements are crucial to address fundamental science questions such as the origin of the elements in the universe. Applications relevant for energy production, medicine, or national security also rely on theoretical predictions of basic properties of atomic nuclei. Heavy elements are best described within the nuclear density functional theory (DFT) and its various extensions. While relatively mature, DFT has never been implemented in its full power, as it relies on a very large number (~ 10^9-10^12) of expensive calculations (~ day). The advent of leadership-class computers, as well as dedicated large-scale collaborative efforts such as the SciDAC 2 UNEDF project, have dramatically changed the field. This article gives an overview of the various computational challenges related to the nuclear DFT, as well as some of the recent achievements.

N. Schunck; A. Baran; M. Kortelainen; J. McDonnell; J. Mor; W. Nazarewicz; J. Pei; J. Sarich; J. Sheikh; A. Staszczak; M. Stoitsov; S. M. Wild

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

Super Heavy Element Discovery | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Super Heavy Element Discovery SHARE Super Heavy Element Discovery The location of the Transactinides (super-heavy elements) shown on the Periodic Table. ORNL is internationally...

6

Spectroscopy of Very Heavy Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in spectroscopic techniques have meant that heavy nuclei in the upper right-hand corner of the nuclear chart have become amenable to detailed study. This detailed spectroscopic data can provide a stringent test for current nuclear structure theories. Experiments to investigate the structure of nuclei in the region of {sup 254}No can yield information concerning moments of inertia, stability against fission with rotation, single-particle properties, excitation energies of two quasi-particle states, and so on. A brief overview of the techniques used and recent results from studies in the region of {sup 254}No are presented, along with a summary of future developments which will allow further advances to be made.

Greenlees, P. T.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Ketelhut, S.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Ackermann, D.; Hessberger, F.-P. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Butler, P. A.; Gray-Jones, C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)] (and others)

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

Understanding the chemistry relating heavy crude feedstock with product slate and quality: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The differences in composition between conventional and heavy petroleum bring forth a group of problems affecting processing, blending, storage, and use. Typical problems include: catalyst poisoning and deactivation; high hydrogen consumption in processing; fouling of catalytic cracking units; intermediate stream instability, compatibility, and corrosiveness; higher probability of toxicity and mutagenicity of products; unpredictable product slate; inaccurate process designs; high process energy requirements; and product instability, corrosiveness, and failure to meet specifications. All of these point to the need for a better understanding of the chemistry of the heavy crudes, and an adequate data base for the design of new processes. The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) has initiated a program for developing the technology background necessary to make the transition to a heavy oil-based industry. This program is concerned with composition of heavy oils and fractions derived from them, thermodynamics of compounds occurring in or produced from heavy oil, processing, and product quality. Although each of these is addressed by projects with individual goals, they fit together and support each other in combining to form a technical foundation for heavy oil refining technology. Although the chemistry of heavy oils (the compounds and their reactions) is the unifying element, the purpose is to provide technology for the engineering developments necessary to produce our transportation fuel requirements from heavy oils. 94 refs., 59 figs., 73 tabs.

Sutterfield, D.; Brinkman, D.W.; Good, W.D.; Anderson, R.P.; Wells, J.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

VIDEOS: History of Nuclear Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2007 ... Topic Summary: The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry, ACS. Collection of brief videos on the discoveries of several heavy elements

9

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Availability Technology Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Express Licensing Metal aminoboranes Express Licensing Nanocrystalsol-gel...

10

ALPHA-DECAY STUDIES IN THE HEAVY-ELEMENT REGION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mihelich. , Enet:gy Levels of Plutonium-239 Populated by thethe Nuclear Chemistry of Plutonium, Ame ricium, and CuriumThe mass analysis of the plutonium sample was made by Dr. M,

Hummel, John Philip

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Express Licensing Energy Efficient Synthesis Of Boranes Express Licensing Fabrication Of Multilayered Thin Films Via Spin-Assembly Express Licensing...

12

Chemistry of the heaviest elements--one atom at a time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In keeping with the goal of the Viewpoint series of the Journal of Chemical Education, this article gives a 75-year perspective of the chemistry of the heaviest elements, including a 50-year retrospective view of past developments, a summary of current research achievements and applications, and some predictions about exciting, new developments that might be envisioned within the next 25 years. A historical perspective of the importance of chemical separations in the discoveries of the transuranium elements from neptunium (Z=93) through mendelevium (Z=101) is given. The development of techniques for studying the chemical properties of mendelevium and still heavier elements on the basis of measuring the radioactive decay of a single atom (''atom-at-a-time'' chemistry) and combining the results of many separate experiments is reviewed. The influence of relativistic effects (expected to increase as Z{sup 2}) on chemical properties is discussed. The results from recent atom-at-a-time studies of the chemistry of the heaviest elements through seaborgium (Z=106) are summarized and show that their properties cannot be readily predicted based on simple extrapolation from the properties of their lighter homologues in the periodic table. The prospects for extending chemical studies to still heavier elements than seaborgium are considered and appear promising.

Hoffman, Darleane C.; Lee, Diana M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Chemistry Elements of Chemistry in a New Systematic Order Containing all the Modern Discoveries, Mr.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o Antoine Lavoisier is well known for his investigations of water and air, the discovery that they had component parts rather than being single elements, as well as the discovery that oxygen was necessary for combustion, overturning earlier phlogiston theory. Lavoisiers career was cut short in 1794, when his aristocratic background and position as a tax collector caused him to be identified as a traitor to the Republic. He was found guilty and guillotined. Just a year and a half later, when the Reign of Terror had ended, Lavoisier was exonerated. The Great Distillation, Brunschwig, 1532, Distillation and pharmacological therapeutics by a

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Formation of superheavy elements in heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cold fusion reactions related to 208Pb and 209Bi targets leading to superheavy elements (SHE) with Z=104-112 have been successfully considered in our model recently. Here we briefly discuss this model and extend our consideration to fusion reactions between similar target and projectile. The reactions between weakly deformed target close to Pb and 76Ge, 82Se projectiles are also studied. The available experimental cross-sections are well described. The nucleus-nucleus interaction potential for reactions leading to SHEs are shortly discussed.

Vitali Denisov

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

15

NEW HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF HEAVY ELEMENTS IN FOUR METAL-POOR STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elements heavier than the iron group are found in nearly all halo stars. A substantial number of these elements, key to understanding neutron-capture nucleosynthesis mechanisms, can only be detected in the near-ultraviolet. We report the results of an observing campaign using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope to study the detailed heavy-element abundance patterns in four metal-poor stars. We derive abundances or upper limits from 27 absorption lines of 15 elements produced by neutron-capture reactions, including seven elements (germanium, cadmium, tellurium, lutetium, osmium, platinum, and gold) that can only be detected in the near-ultraviolet. We also examine 202 heavy-element absorption lines in ground-based optical spectra obtained with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle Spectrograph on the Magellan-Clay Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory and the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer on the Keck I Telescope on Mauna Kea. We have detected up to 34 elements heavier than zinc. The bulk of the heavy elements in these four stars are produced by r-process nucleosynthesis. These observations affirm earlier results suggesting that the tellurium found in metal-poor halo stars with moderate amounts of r-process material scales with the rare earth and third r-process peak elements. Cadmium often follows the abundances of the neighboring elements palladium and silver. We identify several sources of systematic uncertainty that must be considered when comparing these abundances with theoretical predictions. We also present new isotope shift and hyperfine structure component patterns for Lu II and Pb I lines of astrophysical interest.

Roederer, Ian U.; Thompson, Ian B. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Lawler, James E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sobeck, Jennifer S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Cowan, John J. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Frebel, Anna [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ivans, Inese I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Schatz, Hendrik [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Sneden, Christopher [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Source Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Catalysts Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum...

17

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Chemistry Top Journals Journal of the American Chemical Society Angewandte Chemie & Angewandte Chemie, international edition in English Chemical Communications Chemical...

18

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry Print Chemical science at the ALS encompasses a broad range of approaches and specializations, including surfaces/interfaces, catalysis, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, and physical chemistry. By one estimate, nearly 80% of all chemical reactions in nature and in human technology take place at boundaries between phases, i.e., at surfaces or interfaces. Atomic- and molecular-scale studies are needed to develop a thorough understanding of the relationships between surface properties and parameters relevant to potential applications and devices. Catalysts play a central role in processes relevant to energy, the environment, and biology. Researchers are working to develop cheaper and smarter catalysts that are fine tuned to accelerate reactions that, for example, drive fuel-refinement, sweep toxins from emissions, or convert starch to sugar.

19

Astron. Nachr. / AN 335, No. 1, 1 9 (2014) / DOI This.is/not.aDOI High resolution study of the abundance pattern of the heavy elements in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the abundance pattern of the heavy elements in very metal-poor field stars. M. Spite1, and F. Spite1 GEPI, Nucleosynthesis. The abundances of heavy elements in EMP stars are not well explained by the simple view of the r-poor matter. The abundances found in the CEMP- r+s stars reflect the transfer of heavy elements

Recanati, Catherine

20

Prospecting for Heavy Elements with Future Far-IR/Submillimeter Observatories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the cosmic history of element synthesis it will be important to obtain extinction-free measures of the heavy element contents of high-redshift objects and to chart two monumental events: the collapse of the first metal-free clouds to form stars, and the initial seeding of the universe with dust. The information needed to achieve these objectives is uniquely available in the far-infrared/submillimeter (FIR/SMM) spectral region. Following the Decadal Report and anticipating the development of the Single Aperture Far-IR (SAFIR) telescope and FIR/SMM interferometry, we estimate the measurement capabilities of a large-aperture, background-limited FIR/SMM observatory and an interferometer on a boom, and discuss how such instruments could be used to measure the element synthesis history of the universe.

Leisawitz, D T; Kashlinsky, A; Lawrence, C R; Mather, J C; Moseley, S H; Rinehart, S A; Silverberg, R F; Yorke, H W

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Constraints on AGB models from the heavy-element composition of presolar SiC grains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presolar SiC grains formed around Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars during their carbon-rich phase and contain heavy elements in trace amounts showing the signature of the slow neutron capture process (s process). Thanks to recent advances in analysis techniques, SiC data now provide extremely precise information on neutron capture cross sections and AGB models. For example, high-precision data for Mo in single SiC grains indicate that a revision of the 95Mo neutron capture cross section is needed, while data for Zr indicates that the 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg reaction cannot be a dominant neutron source for the s process in AGB stars. We present model predictions for the composition of Fe-peak elements in AGB stars. These elements could be analysed in the near future thus providing further stringent constraints to our understanding of AGB stars.

M. Lugaro; A. M. Davis; R. Gallino; M. R. Savina; M. J. Pellin

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

22

Heavy Element Dispersion in the Metal-Poor Globular Cluster M92  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dispersion among the light elements is common in globular clusters (GCs), while dispersion among heavier elements is less common. We present detection of r-process dispersion relative to Fe in 19 red giants of the metal-poor GC M92. Using spectra obtained with the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the WIYN Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, we derive differential abundances for 21 species of 19 elements. The Fe-group elements, plus Y and Zr, are homogeneous at a level of 0.07-0.16 dex. The heavy elements La, Eu, and Ho exhibit clear star-to-star dispersion spanning 0.5-0.8 dex. The abundances of these elements are correlated with one another, and we demonstrate that they were produced by r-process nucleosynthesis. This r-process dispersion is not correlated with the dispersion in C, N, or Na in M92, indicating that r-process inhomogeneities were present in the gas throughout star formation. The r-process dispersion is similar to that previously observed in the metal-poor GC M15, but its origin in M...

Roederer, Ian U

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

HEAVY-ELEMENT DISPERSION IN THE METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92  

SciTech Connect

Dispersion among the light elements is common in globular clusters (GCs), while dispersion among heavier elements is less common. We present detection of r-process dispersion relative to Fe in 19 red giants of the metal-poor GC M92. Using spectra obtained with the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the WIYN Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, we derive differential abundances for 21 species of 19 elements. The Fe-group elements, plus Y and Zr, are homogeneous at a level of 0.07-0.16 dex. The heavy-elements La, Eu, and Ho exhibit clear star-to-star dispersion spanning 0.5-0.8 dex. The abundances of these elements are correlated with one another, and we demonstrate that they were produced by r-process nucleosynthesis. This r-process dispersion is not correlated with the dispersion in C, N, or Na in M92, indicating that r-process inhomogeneities were present in the gas throughout star formation. The r-process dispersion is similar to that previously observed in the metal-poor GC M15, but its origin in M15 or M92 is unknown at present.

Roederer, Ian U. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sneden, Christopher, E-mail: iur@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

Evans, Ryan D. [Timken Company; Nixon, H. P. [Timken Company; Darragh, Craig V. [Timken Company; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Coffey, Dorothy W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Actinide Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Actinide Chemistry Actinide Chemistry Actinide Chemistry Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise David Gallimore Actinide Analytical Chemistry Email Rebecca Chamberlin Actinide Analytical Chemistry Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email Along with the lanthanides, they are often called "the f-elements" because they have valence electrons in the f shell. Actinide chemistry serves a critical role in addressing global threats Project Description At Los Alamos, scientists are using actinide analytical chemistry to identify and quantify the chemical and isotopic composition of materials. Since the Manhattan Project, such work has supported the Laboratory's

26

The Entire Chemistry Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Archives Chemistry Archives Chemistry Archives, Since November 1991 Table of Contents: When entropy = 0, does atomic motion stop? When H2O and methanol mix Heavy element names Radon Bee's wax CFC's and ozone depletion Solar cells and Phosphorous vs Chlorophyll B Aromaticity Hypercolor t-shirt Bonds for tie dye Soda POP General chemistry questions Tyndall Effect Silicon chips Molecules and cancer Acetylene safety Picric acid Buckyballs Piezoelectric Weak pennies Extracting fats Anti-oxidants Batteries & chemicals Hydrogen, can it be an isotope? Can soda conduct electricity? pH What is the biggest molecule? Smallest molecule Metallic zinc as catalyst Bond order in carbon bonds Packing of crystal structure Advantages, disadvantages of chloroform Coloring oil Free-radicals Acid-Base reaction

27

Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized ?- or ?-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an endless hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular weight molecule with the right kinetics. A novel hydrogen activation process has been developed

David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized ?- or ?-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an endless hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular weight molecule with the right kinetics. A novel hydrogen activation process has been developed

David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Development of an odd-Z-projectile reaction for heavy element synthesis: 208Pb(64Ni, n)271Ds and 208Pb(65Cu, n)272111  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of heavy elements in cold fusion reactions which have very23.60. +e, 27.90. +b Cold nuclear fusion reactions have been

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Helioseismic Constraints on the Solar Ne/O Ratio and Heavy Element Abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the constraints imposed by helioseismic data on the solar heavy element abundances. In prior work we argued that the measured depth of the surface convection zone R_CZ and the surface helium abundance Y_surf were good metallicity indicators which placed separable constraints on light metals (CNONe) and the heavier species with good relative meteoritic abundances. The resulting interiors-based abundance scale was higher than some published studies based on 3D model atmospheres at a highly significant level. In this paper we explore the usage of the solar sound speed in the radiative interior as an additional diagnostic, and find that it is sensitive to changes in the Ne/O ratio even for models constructed to have the same R_CZ and Y_surf. Three distinct helioseismic tests (opacity in the radiative core, ionization in the convection zone, and the core mean molecular weight) yield consistent results. Our preferred O, Ne and Fe abundances are 8.86 +/-0.04, 8.15 +/-0.17 and 7.50 +/-0.05 respectively. Th...

Delahaye, F; Pinsonneault, L; Zeippen, C J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Criticality Safety of Low-Enriched Uranium and High-Enriched Uranium Fuel Elements in Heavy Water Lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RB reactor was designed as a natural-uranium, heavy water, nonreflected critical assembly in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Yugoslavia, in 1958. From 1962 until 2002, numerous critical experiments were carried out with low-enriched uranium and high-enriched uranium fuel elements of tubular shape, known as the Russian TVR-S fuel assembly type, placed in various heavy water square lattices within the RB cylindrical aluminum tank. Some of these well-documented experiments were selected, described, evaluated, and accepted for inclusion in the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments', contributing to the preservation of a rather small number of heavy water benchmark critical experiments.

Pesic, Milan P

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

New Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Heavy Elements in Four Metal-Poor Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elements heavier than the iron group are found in nearly all halo stars. A substantial number of these elements, key to understanding neutron-capture nucleosynthesis mechanisms, can only be detected in the near-ultraviolet. ...

Roederer, Ian U.

33

Spontaneous fission modes and lifetimes of super-heavy elements in the nuclear density functional theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lifetimes of super-heavy (SH) nuclei are primarily governed by alpha decay and spontaneous fission (SF). Here we study the competing decay modes of even-even SH isotopes with 108 cold fusion" and "hot fusion" reactions. The region of long-lived SH nuclei is expected to be centered on $^{294}$Ds with a total half-life of ?1.5 days.

A. Staszczak; A. Baran; W. Nazarewicz

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

34

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Heavy Elements Program. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

In our first funding cycle, much time was spent developing protocols for characterizing and working with samples containing transuranium isotopes and obtaining preliminary experimental data on non-f-element systems.

Clark. S. B.; Ewing, R.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Glann Seaborg's Contributions to Heavy Element Science and the Periodic Table  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In celebrating the centennial anniversary of the birth of Glenn T. Seaborg it is fitting that we recount and pay tribute to his legacy. Many know of the scientific accomplishments of this man who became a legend and anyone who has attended his lectures can attest to how informative, educational, and entertaining he was. He had a beguiling and whimsical sense of humor and used this to drive home his points and share his passion and quest for discovery. The periodic table is a fundamental cornerstone of science and remains a central unifying principal. Seaborg was the architect of the actinide series of elements and their proper placement in the periodic table and co-discoverer of ten transuranium elements - one of which bears his name, element 106, seaborgium. The work and achievements of this Nobel laureate have touched the lives of many and his legacy will continue for generations to come.

Hobart, David E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

36

HEAVY ELEMENT ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF UO$sub 2$ FUEL IRRADIATED IN THE VBWR. Report No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Slightly enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel, irradiated in the Vallecitos Boiling Water Reactor (VBWR), with exposures ranging from 100 Mwd/t to 3200 Mwd/t was analyzed for heavy element isotopic composition and compared with computed data. The primary objective of this program is to obtain improved data on the changes in nuclear characteristics with burnup of UO/sub 2/ fuel in a boiling water reactor. This information is important in both evaluating the economics of a given reactor design and also in providing a sounder physics basis for improving reactor designs to minimize the resuiting fuel costs. Uranium oxide pellets, with an enrichment of 2.8 atom percent, were analyzed at several axial positions along the fuel rod, spanning the void (steam fraction) range of 0 to 30%. The isotopic composition for each pellet was computed, utilizing a general fuel cycle depletion code. Results of the analysis of the comparison of the measured and computed data indicate that the total amount of Pu computed is consistently lower than that implied from the measurement by approximately 10%, and the percentage difference between the measured and computed data increases slightly with exposure. One rod was irradiated near a control rod which was approximately 25% inserted. As expected, since no control rod effects were included in the calcuiation, the measured data in that region of the rod shows a greater Pu production per Mwd/t than computed. Physical effects which might explain the small, but apparentiy consistent, differences between the measured and computed data were postulated. It is concluded that the observed differences are the result of a substantial underestimate of void fraction and small uncertainties in fuel exposure and cross sections. (auth)

Hackney, M.R.; Ruiz, C.P.

1962-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

37

A Periodic Table of the Elements at Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory's Chemistry Division Presents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with this unstable element is 0.07 second 268 Mt. Mendelevium - the atomic number is 101 and the chemical symbol of California lab in Berkeley, California under Glenn T. Seaborg in 1958, who used #12;the nuclear reaction 253 Es(4 He,2n)255 Md and the nuclear reaction 253 Es(4 He,n) 256 Md. The longest half-life associated

Clement, William P.

38

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

CLUSTER CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 11 Wiley Huetterties and C. M.Submitted to the Journal of Organometallic ChemistryCLUSTER CHEMISTRY Earl L. Muetterties TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY May

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. IV. THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: {alpha}, Fe-PEAK, LIGHT, AND HEAVY ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

We present detailed chemical abundances in eight clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We measure abundances of 22 elements for clusters spanning a range in age of 0.05-12 Gyr, providing a comprehensive picture of the chemical enrichment and star formation history of the LMC. The abundances were obtained from individual absorption lines using a new method for analysis of high-resolution (R {approx} 25,000), integrated-light (IL) spectra of star clusters. This method was developed and presented in Papers I, II, and III of this series. In this paper, we develop an additional IL {chi}{sup 2}-minimization spectral synthesis technique to facilitate measurement of weak ({approx}15 mA) spectral lines and abundances in low signal-to-noise ratio data (S/N {approx} 30). Additionally, we supplement the IL abundance measurements with detailed abundances that we measure for individual stars in the youngest clusters (age < 2 Gyr) in our sample. In both the IL and stellar abundances we find evolution of [{alpha}/Fe] with [Fe/H] and age. Fe-peak abundance ratios are similar to those in the Milky Way (MW), with the exception of [Cu/Fe] and [Mn/Fe], which are sub-solar at high metallicities. The heavy elements Ba, La, Nd, Sm, and Eu are significantly enhanced in the youngest clusters. Also, the heavy to light s-process ratio is elevated relative to the MW ([Ba/Y] >+0.5) and increases with decreasing age, indicating a strong contribution of low-metallicity asymptotic giant branch star ejecta to the interstellar medium throughout the later history of the LMC. We also find a correlation of IL Na and Al abundances with cluster mass in the sense that more massive, older clusters are enriched in the light elements Na and Al with respect to Fe, which implies that these clusters harbor star-to-star abundance variations as is common in the MW. Lower mass, intermediate-age, and young clusters have Na and Al abundances that are lower and more consistent with LMC field stars. Our results can be used to constrain both future chemical evolution models for the LMC and theories of globular cluster formation.

Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cameron, Scott A. [Science Department, 3000 College Heights Blvd., Cerro Coso Community College, Ridgecrest, CA 93555 (United States); McWilliam, Andrew, E-mail: jcolucci@ucolick.org, E-mail: rab@ucolick.org, E-mail: scameron@cerrocoso.edu, E-mail: andy@ociw.edu [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101-1292 (United States)

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. ... see all Nuclear Analytical Chemistry news ... ...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

42

Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the V{sub tb} element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W{prime}. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30{sub -1.20}{sup +0.98} pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9{sigma} Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0{sigma}, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |V{sub tb}| 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W{prime} using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W{prime} with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W{prime} {yields} t{bar b}, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W{prime}{sub L} with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W{prime}{sub R}) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is lighter or heavier than W{prime}{sub R}; and M(W{prime}{sub L+R}) > 915 GeV.

Pangilinan, Monica; /Brown U.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees  

SciTech Connect

The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the V{sub tb} element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W{prime}. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30{sub -1.20}{sup +0.98} pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9{sigma} Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0{sigma}, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |V{sub tb}| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |V{sub tb}| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W{prime} using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W{prime} with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W{prime} {yields} t{bar b}, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W{prime}{sub L} with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W{prime}{sub R}) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is lighter or heavier than W{prime}{sub R}; and M(W{prime}{sub L+R}) > 915 GeV.

Pangilinan, Monica; /Brown U.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending July 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Research is reported on: chemistry of coal liquefaction, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures, geosciences, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of TRU elements and compounds, separations chemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, inorganic chemistry of hydrogen cycles, molten salt systems, and enhanced oil recovery. Separate abstracts were prepared for the sections dealing with coal liquefaction, TRU elements and compounds, separations, nuclear wastes, and enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Medicinal chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal chemistry Name: Jason A Stamm Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I am a senior chemistry major interested in going to grad school, specifically for...

46

The Search for "Heavy" Elements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of California, Berkeley. Edwin McMillan and Philip Abelson observed Np while studying fission products produced in the bombardment of 238U with thermal neutrons. They found a...

47

Nuclear chemistry. Annual report, 1974  

SciTech Connect

The 1974 Nuclear Chemistry Annual Report contains information on research in the following areas: nuclear science (nuclear spectroscopy and radioactivity, nuclear reactions and scattering, nuclear theory); chemical and atomic physics (heavy ion-induced atomic reactions, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy and hyperfine interactions); physical, inorganic, and analytical chemistry (x-ray crystallography, physical and inorganic chemistry, geochemistry); and instrumentation. Thesis abstracts, 1974 publication titles, and an author index are also included. Papers having a significant amount of information are listed separately by title. (RWR)

Conzett, H.E.; Edelstein, N.M.; Tsang, C.F. (eds.)

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

It's Elemental - The Element Bromine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selenium Selenium Previous Element (Selenium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Krypton) Krypton The Element Bromine [Click for Isotope Data] 35 Br Bromine 79.904 Atomic Number: 35 Atomic Weight: 79.904 Melting Point: 265.95 K (-7.2°C or 19.0°F) Boiling Point: 331.95 K (58.8°C or 137.8°F) Density: 3.11 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for stench, bromos. Say what? Bromine is pronounced as BRO-meen. History and Uses: The only nonmetallic element that is a liquid at normal room temperatures, bromine was produced by Carl Löwig, a young chemistry student, the summer before starting his freshman year at Heidelberg. When he showed his

50

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been indexed by 11 separate chapters. The subjects covered are: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, materials chemistry, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, catalysis, electron spectroscopy, nuclear waste chemistry, heuristic modeling, and special topics. (PLG)

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Exoplanet Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characteristic chemistry of terrestrial planets and, in particular, of giant planets rich and poor in He and H2 are described.

Lodders, Katharina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Computational Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and numerical tools to quantify uncertainties for computational quantum chemistry. ... Results appear in the issue of The Journal of Chemical Physics. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

53

Nations Work Together to Discover New Element | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nations Work Together to Discover New Element Nations Work Together to Discover New Element Stories of Discovery & Innovation Nations Work Together to Discover New Element Enlarge Photo Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Berkelium-249, contained in the greenish fluid in the tip of the vial, was crucial to the experiment that discovered element 117. It was made in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When the californium-252 radioisotope was discovered, there were no known practical uses for it, but now it is widely used in industry and medicine. 03.28.11 Nations Work Together to Discover New Element The discovery of element 117 increases evidence for the "island of stability" in super-heavy nuclei, opening new frontiers of chemistry. A new element took its position on the Periodic Table in 2010 after a long research

54

Radiotracer Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiotracer Chemistry Radiotracer Chemistry Radiotracer chemistry is focused on the short lived positron emitters. New radiotracer chemistry and molecular targeting strategies are being developed to increase the complexity and diversity of molecular probes (small molecules and plant hormones) for imaging applications. We emphasize C-11 chemistry because the substitution of stable carbon with carbon-11 provides the opportunity to measure and quantify the distribution and kinetics of physiologically relevant substrates and signaling molecules without altering the biological properties of the parent molecule. Recent accomplishments include the development of miniaturized automated systems for the production of C-11 precursor molecules, the synthesis of C-11 labeled azaleic acid and the radiolabeling of auxin for studies of their movement and metabolism in the whole plant in vivo.

55

It's Elemental - The Element Barium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cesium Cesium Previous Element (Cesium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Lanthanum) Lanthanum The Element Barium [Click for Isotope Data] 56 Ba Barium 137.327 Atomic Number: 56 Atomic Weight: 137.327 Melting Point: 1000 K (727°C or 1341°F) Boiling Point: 2170 K (1897°C or 3447°F) Density: 3.62 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 2 Group Name: Alkaline Earth Metal What's in a name? From the Greek word for heavy, barys. Say what? Barium is pronounced as BAR-ee-em. History and Uses: Barium was first isolated by Sir Humphry Davy, an English chemist, in 1808 through the electrolysis of molten baryta (BaO). Barium is never found free in nature since it reacts with oxygen in the air, forming barium oxide

56

Chemistry Central Journal Commentary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial chemistry and chemoecology are linked together to realize a modern and sustainable chemistry

Peter Saling; Peter Saling

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Heavy Vehicle Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

58

NEWTON's Chemistry Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Videos Do you have a great chemistry videos? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: Steve Marsden's Chemistry Resources The Periodic Table of Videos The University...

59

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. NewNew Science, Green Chemistry and Environmental Health.abstract.html 5. American Chemistry Council. 2003. Guide to

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

NEWTON's Chemistry References  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry References Do you have a great chemistry reference link? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Reference Links: Steve Marsden's Chemistry Resources Steve Marsden's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Element_team_looks_for_magic_number.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EWSLINE EWSLINE N A LOOK AT NTS BEFORE NUCLEAR TESTING WHAT'S INSIDE PAGE 3 - page 4 PAGE 6 HOME CAMPAIGN BUILDS MOMENTUM Published for the employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory October 27, 2006 Vol. 31, No. 21 HANS BETHE AWARD FOR JIM WILSON PAGE 5 Getting to the bottom of the. . . periodic table Newsline 4 October 27, 2006 SCIENCE NEWS By Anne M. Stark Newsline staff writer It could be dubbed voyage to the bottom of the periodic table of elements. That's the journey that the Heavy Element Group in the Chemistry, Materials and Life Sciences Directorate is on. And they recently came one step closer as they joined with Russian scientists to discover the newest superheavy ele- ment, element 118. LLNL scientists collabo-

62

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle. managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle 07/07 Brookhaven National Laboratory Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multipurpose research institution located on a 5,300-acre site on Long Island, New York. Six Nobel Prize-winning discoveries have been made at Brookhaven Lab. The Laboratory operates large-scale scientific facilities and performs research in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, applied science, and

63

Educational Chemistry Games  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Games Do you have a great chemistry game? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Games: Nobelprize.org's Chemistry Games Nobelprize.org's Chemistry Games Nobelprize.org,...

64

Star formation at very low metallicity. I: Chemistry and cooling at low densities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simplified chemical and thermal model designed to allow computationally efficient study of the thermal evolution of metal-poor gas within large numerical simulations. Our main simplification is the neglect of the molecular chemistry of the heavy elements. The only molecular chemistry retained within the model is the formation and destruction of molecular hydrogen. Despite this major simplification, the model allows for accurate treatment of the thermal evolution of the gas within a large volume of parameter space. It is valid for temperatures 50 solar. In gas with a metallicity Z = 0.1 Z_solar, and in the absence of an incident ultraviolet radiation field, it is valid for hydrogen number densities n_H solar, or if a strong ultraviolet radiation field is present, then the model remains accurate up...

Glover, S C O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Optimal Tracking of Distributed Heavy Hitters and Hong Kong, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Tracking of Distributed Heavy Hitters and Quantiles Ke Yi HKUST Hong Kong, China yike heavy hitters and quantiles in the distributed streaming model. The heavy hitters and quantiles are two the universe U = {1, . . . , u}. For a given 0 1, the -heavy hitters are those elements of A whose frequency

Yi, Ke "Kevin"

67

A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg  

SciTech Connect

A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10{sup 9} (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10{sup 6} (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10{sup 12} (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min{sup -1}; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the detection limit to 131 ppb. These elements in lower concentrations can also be measured in the CRDS mode when a compact laser source is available to be integrated into the spectrometer in the future. This exploratory study demonstrates a new instrument platform using an OES-CRDS dual-mode technique for potential field applications.

Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang Chuji [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, Starkville, Mississippi 39759 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

ALS Chemistry Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Chemistry Lab Print ALS Chemistry Labs The ALS Chemistry Labs are located in the User Support Building (15-130) and in Building 6 (6-2233)*. These spaces are dedicated for...

69

ALS Chemistry Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Lab Print ALS Chemistry Labs The ALS Chemistry Labs are located in the User Support Building (15-130) and in Building 6 (6-2233)*. These spaces are dedicated for...

70

Chemistry Applications at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Applications Gaussian 09 Gaussian 09 is a connected series of programs for performing semi-empirical, density functional theory and ab initio molecular orbital...

71

Chemistry Department Seminar Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Department Seminar Schedule Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555 This page shows future Chemistry Department seminars and those that have taken place within the past six...

72

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19. P. Anastas, J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory andto Advance New Science, Green Chemistry and EnvironmentalChronicle Extra: Guide to Green Jobs. Field with a Future.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) Meeting 2013 - A Federal Green Chemistry Forum. ...

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

76

Environmental Chemistry of Arsenic: A Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arsenic is an element of significant interest to energy companies because of its occurrence in coal ash and its potential for release and migration in groundwater. This report summarizes technical information on the environmental chemistry of arsenic assembled from an extensive literature review. In particular, the report provides an in-depth look at the three most important sets of geochemical reactions relevant to understanding the environmental chemistry of arsenic -- precipitation-dissolution, reduct...

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

The International Year of Chemistry 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemistry our life our future The International Year of Chemistry 2011 Analytical Chemistry Related associations Marketing ...

78

Challenges in explosive nucleosynthesis of heavy elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that a treatment of charged-current neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter that is consistent with the nuclear equation of state has a strong impact on the spectra of the neutrinos emitted during the deleptonization period of a protoneutron star formed in a core-collapse supernova. We compare results of simulations including and neglecting mean field effects on the neutrino opacities. Their inclusion reduces the luminosities of all neutrino flavors and enhances the spectral differences between electron neutrino and antineutrino. The magnitude of the difference depends on the equation of state and in particular on the symmetry energy at sub-nuclear densities. These modifications reduce the proton-to-nucleon ratio of the neutrino-driven outflow, increasing slightly their entropy. They are expected to have a substantial impact on the nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds, even though they do not result in conditions that favor an r-process. Contrarily to previous findings, our simulations show that the spectra of electron neutrinos remain substantially different from those of other (anti)neutrino flavors during the entire deleptonization phase of the protoneutron star. The obtained luminosity and spectral changes are also expected to have important consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations and neutrino detection on Earth.

Pinedo, Gabriel Martinez; Fischer, T.; Lohs, A.; Huther, L. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 2, 64289 Darmstadt, Germany and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerioneneforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerioneneforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 2, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 2, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

DEPOSITION OF TOXIC TRACE ELEMENTS AND HEAVY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on sub-micrometer (ie, fine) particles was emitted from oil-fired power plants. Likewise, sele- nium is a marker of coal combustion particles; Zn ...

1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

The transuranium elements: From neptunium and plutonium to element 112  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in the 1930`s, both chemists and physicists became interested in synthesizing new artificial elements. The first transuranium element, Np, was synthesized in 1940. Over the past six decades, 20 transuranium elements have been produced. A review of the synthesis is given. The procedure of naming the heavy elements is also discussed. It appears feasible to produce elements 113 and 114. With the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator, it should be possible to reach the superheavy elements in the region of the spherical Z=114 shell, but with fewer neutrons than the N=184 spherical shell. 57 refs, 6 figs.

Hoffman, D.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

It's Elemental - The Element Fermium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Einsteinium Previous Element (Einsteinium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Mendelevium) Mendelevium The Element Fermium Click for Isotope Data 100 Fm Fermium 257...

82

It's Elemental - The Element Neptunium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Previous Element (Uranium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Plutonium) Plutonium The Element Neptunium Click for Isotope Data 93 Np Neptunium 237 Atomic...

83

It's Elemental - The Element Ruthenium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technetium Previous Element (Technetium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhodium) Rhodium The Element Ruthenium Click for Isotope Data 44 Ru Ruthenium 101.07 Atomic...

84

It's Elemental - The Element Actinium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radium Previous Element (Radium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Thorium) Thorium The Element Actinium Click for Isotope Data 89 Ac Actinium 227 Atomic Number: 89...

85

Adsorption of the Lighter Homologs of Element 104 and Element 105 on DGA Resin from Various Mineral Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of studying transactinide elements is to further understand the fundamental principles that govern the periodic table. The current periodic table arrangement allows for the prediction of the chemical behavior of elements. The correct position of a transactinide element can be assessed by investigating its chemical behavior and comparing it to that of the homologs and pseudo-homologs of a transactinide element. Homologs of a transactinide element are the elements in the same group of the periodic table as the transactinide. A pseudo-homolog of a transactinide element is an element with a similar main oxidation state and similar ionic radius to the transactinide element. For example, the homologs of rutherfordium, Rf, are titanium, zirconium and hafnium (Ti, Zr and Hf); the pseudo homologs of Rf are thorium, Th, and plutonium, Pu. Understanding the chemical behavior of a transactinide element compared to its homologs and pseudo-homologs also allows for the assessment of the role of relativistic effects. Relativistic effects occur when the velocity of the s orbital electrons closest to the nucleus approaches the speed of light. These electrons approach the speed of light because they have no orbital momentum. This causes two effects, first there is in a decrease in Bohr radius of the inner electronic orbitals because of this there is an increase in particle mass. A contraction of outer s and p orbitals is also seen. The contraction of these orbitals results in an energy destabilization of the outer most shell, in the case of transactinides this would be the 5f and 6d orbitals. The outer most d shell and all f shells can also experience a radial expansion due to these orbitals being screened from the effective nuclear charge. Another relativistic effect is the 'spin-orbit splitting' for p, d and f orbitals into j = 1 {+-} 1/2 states. Where j is the total angular momentum vector and 1 is angular quantum number. All of these effects have the same order of magnitude and increase roughly according to Z. This feature is what makes studying the heavy elements so interesting because the chemical properties of transactinide elements should strongly exhibit these effects. For this work the terms heavy element and transactinide elements will be used interchangeably and are defined as elements with an atomic number greater than 103, Z > 103. In order to study the transactinide elements they must be isolated once they have been produced and transported to a chemistry apparatus. The transactinide elements are produced either via 'hot' or 'cold' fusion reactions. 'Hot' fusion reactions result in excitation energies of the compound nucleus of 40-50 MeV and occur when an actinide target nuclei fuse with a projectile with A 40). Hot fusion generally leads to neutron rich isotopes and cold fusion tends to produce a compound nucleus that emits 1-2 neutrons upon de-excitation. If a sufficiently thin target is employed, then the products of the nuclear reaction will recoil out of the target and can either be transported to the chemistry setup, e.g. using a gas jet, or trapped by implementing them on a catcher. An example for a catcher setup using a copper block as a catcher is described here. The copper block is placed behind the target during the irradiation and all nuclei recoiling from the target position will implant themselves in the block. The copper block is subsequently dismounted and sputter cleaned. It is then shaved with a micro-lathe. The 7-10 {micro}m copper shavings are then subjected to chemical separation. The copper is dissolved in aqua regia. Lanthanum carrier is added to the aqua regia to precipitate tri-, tetra- and penta- valent cations when ammonium hydroxide is added. The precipitate is then washed and converted to the nitrate form. This solution is then added onto a cation exchange

Bennett, M E; Sudowe, R

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

86

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1970). tpresent address: Chemistry Department, University ofSept. 1970); Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report, 1969,S. G. Thompson, in Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Computational Chemistry | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHARE Computational Chemistry Computational Chemistry at ORNL uses principles of computer science and mathematics and the results of theoretical physics and chemistry to...

88

Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.  

SciTech Connect

Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

public/private investment in green chemistry research andinvestment in cleaner chemical technologies, known collectively as greenGREEN CHEMISTRY AND WORKERS / most hazardous chemicals on the market (closing the safety gap) will spur investment

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

NUMERICAL VERIFICATION OF EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY  

SciTech Connect

A numerical tool is in an advanced state of development to compute the equilibrium compositions of phases and their proportions in multi-component systems of importance to the nuclear industry. The resulting software is being conceived for direct integration into large multi-physics fuel performance codes, particularly for providing boundary conditions in heat and mass transport modules. However, any numerical errors produced in equilibrium chemistry computations will be propagated in subsequent heat and mass transport calculations, thus falsely predicting nuclear fuel behaviour. The necessity for a reliable method to numerically verify chemical equilibrium computations is emphasized by the requirement to handle the very large number of elements necessary to capture the entire fission product inventory. A simple, reliable and comprehensive numerical verification method is presented which can be invoked by any equilibrium chemistry solver for quality assurance purposes.

Piro, Markus [Royal Military College of Canada; Lewis, Brent [Royal Military College of Canada; Thompson, Dr. William T. [Royal Military College of Canada; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Role of Chemistry in 718-Type Alloys Allvac718Plus Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: 718, 718Plus, Chemistry, MeChaniCal Properties, Thermal StaBility, Waspaloy. Abstract. The role of important alloying elements in 718Ytype alloys (...

92

Analytical Chemistry Databases and Links  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical chemistry websites, humor, Material Safety Data Sheets,Patent Information, and references. Analytical Chemistry Databases and Links Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDiffer

93

Fuel Chemistry Preprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the following symposia titles: advances in fuel cell research; biorefineries - renewable fuels and chemicals; chemistry of fuels and emerging fuel technologies; fuel processing for hydrogen production; membranes for energy and fuel applications; new progress in C1 chemistry; research challenges for the hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage; SciMix fuel chemistry; and ultraclean transportation fuels.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment  

SciTech Connect

The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK{sub a}s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 5.94, log{beta}{sub 120} = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 9.34, log{beta}{sub l20} = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is log{beta}{sub 110} = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of {sup 242}Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

Neu, M.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An inventory of 2,300 batches of enriched stable isotopes of 53 different Elements with a list...

96

Chemistry of Low Mass Substellar Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Brown dwarfs" is the collective name for objects more massive than giant planets such as Jupiter but less massive than M dwarf stars. This review gives a brief description of the classification and chemistry of low mass dwarfs. The current spectral classification of stars includes L and T dwarfs that encompass the coolest known stars and substellar objects. The relatively low atmospheric temperatures and high total pressures in substellar dwarfs lead to molecular gas and condensate chemistry. The chemistry of elements such as C, N, O, Ti, V, Fe, Cr, and the alkali elements play a dominant role in shaping the optical and infrared spectra of the "failed" stars. Chemical diagnostics for the subclassifications are described.

Katharina Lodders; Bruce Fegley, Jr

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

97

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Phytoremediation of Trace Elements by Wetland Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some plants naturally absorb and hyperaccumulate trace elements in their tissues. In a process known as phytoremediation, scientists are harnessing this ability to remove toxic heavy metals and trace elements from contaminated soils and waters. This screening program quantified the capacity of various wetland plant species for removing trace elements from polluted water.

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cermic Chemistry.qrk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science and Technology Center develops both aque- ous and non-aqueous chemical synthesis routes to generate highly controlled...

100

Chemistry Dept. Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities As a research organization within a National Laboratory, the Chemistry Department operates research facilities that are available to other researchers as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids).

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

BNL Chemistry Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Academy of Arts and Sciences In Memoriam: Carol Creutz Women @ Energy: Joanna Fowler Electrocatalysis Pays Tribute to BNL Scientist Radoslav Adzic All Chemistry...

103

Forensic Database Chemistry & Toxicology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A free online commercial chemistry and biology reference tool that searches ... Rashida Weathers DEA Mid-Atlantic Laboratory Director 301.583.3200. ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Chemistry Dept. Research Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Programs in the Chemistry Department Artificial Photosynthesis Catalysis: Reactivity and Structure Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics Electron- and Photo-Induced Processes for...

105

Chemistry Department Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures (c). Laser Safety Information: (d). Chemistry Department Laser Safety Guidelines Operational Work Planning (a). Training waiver (b). Staff Shop Posting Local...

106

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

work was published in the international edition of the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie. http:www.lanl.govnewsroomnews-releases2012November11.26-hanson-catalysis.php...

107

NWChem and Actinide Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACTINIDE CHEMISTRY MEETS COMPUTATION ACTINIDE CHEMISTRY MEETS COMPUTATION Capturing how contaminants migrate across groundwater-surface water inter- faces is a challenge that researchers at the Department of Energy's EMSL-the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory-are rising to. This challenge, a top priority for waste cleanup efforts at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, and other parts of the DOE weapons complex, is being addressed using NWChem, a computational chemistry package developed at EMSL that is designed to run on high-performance parallel supercomputers, such as EMSL's Chinook. NWChem is enabling breakthrough discoveries in actinide behavior and chemistry, in part because it allows researchers to accurately model the dynamical formation, speciation, and redox chemistry of actinide complexes in realistic complex mo-

108

It's Elemental - The Element Lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Helium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Beryllium) Beryllium The Element Lithium Click for Isotope Data 3 Li Lithium 6.941 Atomic Number: 3 Atomic Weight: 6.941...

109

HEAVY-ION RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In: Biological and Medical Research with Accelerated Heavyeds. Biological and Medical Research with Accelerated HeavyIn: Biological and Medical Research with Accelerated Heavy

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

It's Elemental - The Element Plutonium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Element (Americium) Americium The Element Plutonium Click for Isotope Data 94 Pu Plutonium 244 Atomic Number: 94 Atomic Weight: 244 Melting Point: 913 K (640C or...

111

Cultural Influences on the Discipline of Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the history of humankind, people have engaged in activities we associate in some way with chemistry. But people have done so within a framework of their own culture, not within a Western science cultural framework in which the discipline of chemistry exists. To understand the cultural framework of chemistry taught in universities today, we need to step out of the comfort of our own scientific culture we live in today. In other words, the cultural influences on chemistry are found by looking at alternative cultures. I am following the old adage, If you want to learn about water, dont ask a fish. History is a convenient vehicle to help us understand cultural influences. Because our scientific culture today has strong Greek roots, let me first explore Aristotles ideas about matter and then follow those ideas when they are placed in a different culture, Arabic culture, for instance. We shall then see what gets lost in translation between Greek and Arabic cultures. This discovery will shed light on some cultural influences on todays chemistry and will have direct implications for the instruction of students. Greek Culture Aristotles ideas about matter rejected an atomic-like model of matter in favour of a continuum model. His model is summarized by Figure 1, representing the four elements, which when combined in various proportions produce different qualities of matter.

Dr. Glen; S. Aikenhead

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

United abominations: Density functional studies of heavy metal chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonyl and nitrile addition to uranyl (UO{sup 2}{sup 2+}) are studied. The competition between nitrile and water ligands in the formation of uranyl complexes is investigated. The possibility of hypercoordinated uranyl with acetone ligands is examined. Uranyl is studied with diactone alcohol ligands as a means to explain the apparent hypercoordinated uranyl. A discussion of the formation of mesityl oxide ligands is also included. A joint theory/experimental study of reactions of zwitterionic boratoiridium(I) complexes with oxazoline-based scorpionate ligands is reported. A computational study was done of the catalytic hydroamination/cyclization of aminoalkenes with zirconium-based catalysts. Techniques are surveyed for programming for graphical processing units (GPUs) using Fortran.

Schoendorff, George

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

114

FUNDAMENTAL CHEMISTRY OF HEAVY OIL W. V. Steele  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the technology for commercially viable hydrogen-powered fuel cells to power the nation with no pollution to refineries in the U.S. Emphasis was placed on finding the degrees of condensation and substitution

115

Block Heavy Hitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e study a natural generalization of the heavy hitters problem in thestreaming context. We term this generalization *block heavy hitters* and define it as follows. We are to stream over a matrix$A$, and report all *rows* ...

Andoni, Alexandr

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

116

Chemistry Department Seminar Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive of Chemistry Department Seminars Archive of Chemistry Department Seminars See also: recent Department seminars Friday, July 27, 2012 "Precise Design of Donor-Acceptor Interface based on Microphase Segregated Nanostructure" Sadayuki Asaoka, Kyoto Institute of Technology Hosted by Dr. John Miller 11:00 AM, Room 300, Chemistry Bldg. 555 Thursday, April 26, 2012 ""NOx Catalysis from the Bottom Up"" Dr. William F. Schneider, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame Hosted by Ping Liu 11:00 AM, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555 Friday, April 13, 2012 "High-energy resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy for catalysis and materials chemistry" Olga Safonova, Swiss Light Source & Energy Dept. at Paul Scherrer Institute Hosted by Dario Stacchiola

117

BNL Chemistry Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Dept. Bldg. 555A Brookhaven National Lab P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973-5000 Ph: (631)344-4301 Fax: (631)344-5815 Radoslav Adzic, Vyacheslov Volcov, Lijun Wu, Wei An, Jia...

118

Cycle Chemistry Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring fossil plant component availability and reliability. This report, which describes formal cycle chemistry improvement programs at nine utilities, will assist utilities in achieving significant operation and maintenance cost reductions.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

119

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

work was published in the international edition of the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie. http:www.lanl.gov newsroomnews-releases2012November11.26-hanson-catalysis.php...

120

State of Knowledge on Mercury Chemistry in Power Plant Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical transformations may occur in the flue gas plume of coal-fired power plants (CFPP) that convert reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) into gaseous elemental mercury (GEM). Since the chemical form of inorganic Hg determines its solubility in water and therefore its deposition rate, understanding this chemistry has important implications for emission control. This fact sheet summarizes the state-of-knowledge of mercury chemistry, kinetics, and thermodynamics in CFPP plumes.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

SC e-journals, Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chemistry Chemistry Accounts of Chemical Research Accreditation and Quality Assurance ACS Chemical Biology ACS Nano Acta Biotheoretica Acta Materialia Acta Neuropathologica Adsorption Advanced Engineering Materials Advances in Physical Chemistry - OAJ AlChE Journal Amino Acids Analyst Analytica Chimica Acta Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry Analytical Biochemistry Analytical Chemistry Analytical Sciences - OAJ Angewandte Chemie - International Edition Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry Annual Review of Biochemistry Annual Review of Biophysics Annual Review of Materials Research Annual Review of Physical Chemistry Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Applied Geochemistry Applied Radiation and Isotopes Applied Surface Science Applied Thermal Engineering Aquatic Geochemistry

122

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

It's Elemental - Element Concentration Game  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

symbols of the elements. After you have had time to study the cards, the computer will flip them over and ask you to find a particular element. Click on the card that contains...

124

Adsorption of the Lighter Homologs of Element 104 and Element 105 on DGA Resin from Various Mineral Acids  

SciTech Connect

The goal of studying transactinide elements is to further understand the fundamental principles that govern the periodic table. The current periodic table arrangement allows for the prediction of the chemical behavior of elements. The correct position of a transactinide element can be assessed by investigating its chemical behavior and comparing it to that of the homologs and pseudo-homologs of a transactinide element. Homologs of a transactinide element are the elements in the same group of the periodic table as the transactinide. A pseudo-homolog of a transactinide element is an element with a similar main oxidation state and similar ionic radius to the transactinide element. For example, the homologs of rutherfordium, Rf, are titanium, zirconium and hafnium (Ti, Zr and Hf); the pseudo homologs of Rf are thorium, Th, and plutonium, Pu. Understanding the chemical behavior of a transactinide element compared to its homologs and pseudo-homologs also allows for the assessment of the role of relativistic effects. Relativistic effects occur when the velocity of the s orbital electrons closest to the nucleus approaches the speed of light. These electrons approach the speed of light because they have no orbital momentum. This causes two effects, first there is in a decrease in Bohr radius of the inner electronic orbitals because of this there is an increase in particle mass. A contraction of outer s and p orbitals is also seen. The contraction of these orbitals results in an energy destabilization of the outer most shell, in the case of transactinides this would be the 5f and 6d orbitals. The outer most d shell and all f shells can also experience a radial expansion due to these orbitals being screened from the effective nuclear charge. Another relativistic effect is the 'spin-orbit splitting' for p, d and f orbitals into j = 1 {+-} 1/2 states. Where j is the total angular momentum vector and 1 is angular quantum number. All of these effects have the same order of magnitude and increase roughly according to Z. This feature is what makes studying the heavy elements so interesting because the chemical properties of transactinide elements should strongly exhibit these effects. For this work the terms heavy element and transactinide elements will be used interchangeably and are defined as elements with an atomic number greater than 103, Z > 103. In order to study the transactinide elements they must be isolated once they have been produced and transported to a chemistry apparatus. The transactinide elements are produced either via 'hot' or 'cold' fusion reactions. 'Hot' fusion reactions result in excitation energies of the compound nucleus of 40-50 MeV and occur when an actinide target nuclei fuse with a projectile with A < 40, where A is the atomic mass number. 'Cold' fusion results in excitation energies of 10-15 MeV. Cold fusion conditions tend to occur when a target of a spherical nuclei (Pb or Bi) is bombarded with a heavy projectile (A > 40). Hot fusion generally leads to neutron rich isotopes and cold fusion tends to produce a compound nucleus that emits 1-2 neutrons upon de-excitation. If a sufficiently thin target is employed, then the products of the nuclear reaction will recoil out of the target and can either be transported to the chemistry setup, e.g. using a gas jet, or trapped by implementing them on a catcher. An example for a catcher setup using a copper block as a catcher is described here. The copper block is placed behind the target during the irradiation and all nuclei recoiling from the target position will implant themselves in the block. The copper block is subsequently dismounted and sputter cleaned. It is then shaved with a micro-lathe. The 7-10 {micro}m copper shavings are then subjected to chemical separation. The copper is dissolved in aqua regia. Lanthanum carrier is added to the aqua regia to precipitate tri-, tetra- and penta- valent cations when ammonium hydroxide is added. The precipitate is then washed and converted to the nitrate form. This solution is then added onto a cation exchange

Bennett, M E; Sudowe, R

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

125

HEAVY WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes uranium fuel elements and a liquid coolant is described. The fuel elements are in the form of elongated tubes and are disposed within outer tubes extending through a tank containing heavy water, which acts as a moderator. The ends of the fuel tubes are connected by inlet and discharge headers, and liquid bismuth is circulated between the headers and through the fuel tubes for cooling. Helium is circulated through the annular space between the outer tubes in the tank and the fuel tubes to cool the water moderator to prevent boiling. The fuel tubes are covered with a steel lining, and suitable control means, heat exchange means, and pumping means for the coolants are provided to complete the reactor assembly.

Szilard, L.

1958-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

Guide to Chemistry Dept  

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Guide to the Chemistry Building Guide to the Chemistry Building The main Chemistry building (Building 555) has been designed to make adequate facilities available for research and to provide an informal atmosphere for free exchange among Department members. There are public areas, shared laboratories, shared office space, and privately assigned places. A newcomer to the building should become familiar with locations of the key areas. Stairs and Elevators - Building 555 The central main staircase and a passenger elevator are for personnel traffic only. Each wing has a staircase. There is a rear staircase for traffic directly to service areas. The building has a freight elevator at the rear core. Flammable material, chemicals, solvents, gas cylinders, etc. can be transported in the freight elevator but not in the passenger elevator. Do not ride with gas cylinders or dewars charged with cryogens as the presence of these in a confined space introduces a suffocation hazard.

127

High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

Martin, Ronald L. (La Grange, IL); Arnold, Richard C. (Chicago, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Greening Up Cross-Coupling Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

today. Insofar as green chemistry is concerned, however,Handbook of organopalladium chemistry for organic synthesis.Hanefeld U (2007) Green chemistry and catalysis. Wiley-VCH,

Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Abela, Alexander R.; Bokovi?, arko V.; Nishikata, Takashi; Duplais, Christophe; Krasovskiy, Arkady

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

THE COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

48 and the cluster chemistry by the The nickel and platinumL. Muetterties Department of Chemistry, Lawrence Berkeleyphenomenon in metal surface chemistry. Ultra high vacuw:n

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Nuclear Chemistry at BNL 1947-66  

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Chemistry in the Chemistry Department. The National Laboratories were spawned from the Manhattan Project. Not coincidentally, nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics burgeoned...

131

It's Elemental - The Element Europium  

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Samarium Samarium Previous Element (Samarium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gadolinium) Gadolinium The Element Europium [Click for Isotope Data] 63 Eu Europium 151.964 Atomic Number: 63 Atomic Weight: 151.964 Melting Point: 1095 K (822°C or 1512°F) Boiling Point: 1802 K (1529°C or 2784°F) Density: 5.24 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: none Group Name: Lanthanide What's in a name? Named after the continent of Europe. Say what? Europium is pronounced as yoo-RO-pee-em. History and Uses: Europium was discovered by Eugène-Antole Demarçay, a French chemist, in 1896. Demarçay suspected that samples of a recently discovered element, samarium, were contaminated with an unknown element. He was able to produce

132

It's Elemental - The Element Potassium  

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Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium The Element Potassium [Click for Isotope Data] 19 K Potassium 39.0983 Atomic Number: 19 Atomic Weight: 39.0983 Melting Point: 336.53 K (63.38°C or 146.08°F) Boiling Point: 1032 K (759°C or 1398°F) Density: 0.89 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word potash. Potassium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for alkali, kalium. Say what? Potassium is pronounced as poh-TASS-ee-em. History and Uses: Although potassium is the eighth most abundant element on earth and comprises about 2.1% of the earth's crust, it is a very reactive element

133

It's Elemental - The Element Sulfur  

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Phosphorus Phosphorus Previous Element (Phosphorus) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Chlorine) Chlorine The Element Sulfur [Click for Isotope Data] 16 S Sulfur 32.065 Atomic Number: 16 Atomic Weight: 32.065 Melting Point: 388.36 K (115.21°C or 239.38°F) Boiling Point: 717.75 K (444.60°C or 832.28°F) Density: 2.067 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the Sanskrit word sulvere and the Latin word sulphurium. Say what? Sulfur is pronounced as SUL-fer. History and Uses: Sulfur, the tenth most abundant element in the universe, has been known since ancient times. Sometime around 1777, Antoine Lavoisier convinced the rest of the scientific community that sulfur was an element. Sulfur is a

134

It's Elemental - The Element Magnesium  

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Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum The Element Magnesium [Click for Isotope Data] 12 Mg Magnesium 24.3050 Atomic Number: 12 Atomic Weight: 24.3050 Melting Point: 923 K (650°C or 1202°F) Boiling Point: 1363 K (1090°C or 1994°F) Density: 1.74 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 2 Group Name: Alkaline Earth Metal What's in a name? For Magnesia, a district in the region of Thessaly, Greece. Say what? Magnesium is pronounced as mag-NEE-zhi-em. History and Uses: Although it is the eighth most abundant element in the universe and the seventh most abundant element in the earth's crust, magnesium is never found free in nature. Magnesium was first isolated by Sir Humphry Davy, an

135

Definition of heavy oil and natural bitumen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Definition and categorization of heavy oils and natural bitumens are generally based on physical or chemical attributes or on methods of extraction. Ultimately, the hydrocarbon's chemical composition will govern both its physical state and the extraction technique applicable. These oils and bitumens closely resemble the residuum from wholecrude distillation to about 1,000/degree/F; if the residuum constitutes at least 15% of the crude, it is considered to be heavy. In this material is concentrated most of the trace elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen, and metals, such as nickel and vanadium. A widely used definition separates heavy oil from natural bitumen by viscosity, crude oil being less, and bitumen more viscous than 10,000 cp. Heavy crude then falls in the range 10/degree/-20/degree/ API inclusive and extra-heavy oil less than 10/degree/ API. Most natural bitumen is natural asphalt (tar sands, oil sands) and has been defined as rock containing hydrocarbons more viscous than 10,000 cp or else hydrocarbons that may be extracted from mined or quarried rock. Other natural bitumens are solids, such as gilsonite, grahamite, and ozokerite, which are distinguished by streak, fusibility, and solubility. The upper limit for heavy oil may also be set at 18/degree/ API, the approximate limit for recovery by waterflood.

Meyer, R.F.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Home / Chemistry / Chemistry (general) Angewandte Chemie International Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOURNALS Home / Chemistry / Chemistry (general) Angewandte Chemie International Edition See Also: Angewandte Chemie Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim View all previous titles

Jo, Moon-Ho

137

Keeping up with detergent chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detergent industry is highly competitive, mostly recession proof, and, thanks to chemistry, always changing ever so slightly. It has been years, however, since cleaning chemistry has been the driving force in detergent innovation. Instead, the environm

138

Integrated Solutions in Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paths best traveled Choose from a portfolio of comprehensive, interlinked, intuitive and accessible chemistry resources Paths best traveled Choose from a comprehensive portfolio of interlinked, intuitive and accessible resources www.info.sciencedirect.com/solutions www.elsevier.com/chemistrysolutions ELSEVIERS

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

It's Elemental - The Element Nitrogen  

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Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen The Element Nitrogen [Click for Isotope Data] 7 N Nitrogen 14.0067 Atomic Number: 7 Atomic Weight: 14.0067 Melting Point: 63.15 K (-210.00°C or -346.00°F) Boiling Point: 77.36 K (-195.79°C or -320.44°F) Density: 0.0012506 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words nitron and genes, which together mean "saltpetre forming." Say what? Nitrogen is pronounced as NYE-treh-gen. History and Uses: Nitrogen was discovered by the Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. It is the fifth most abundant element in the universe and makes up

140

It's Elemental - The Element Sodium  

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Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium The Element Sodium [Click for Isotope Data] 11 Na Sodium 22.98976928 Atomic Number: 11 Atomic Weight: 22.98976928 Melting Point: 370.95 K (97.80°C or 208.04°F) Boiling Point: 1156 K (883°C or 1621°F) Density: 0.97 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word soda and from the Medieval Latin word sodanum, which means "headache remedy." Sodium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for sodium carbonate, natrium. Say what? Sodium is pronounced as SO-dee-em. History and Uses: Although sodium is the sixth most abundant element on earth and comprises

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

It's Elemental - The Element Francium  

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Radon Radon Previous Element (Radon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radium) Radium The Element Francium [Click for Isotope Data] 87 Fr Francium 223 Atomic Number: 87 Atomic Weight: 223 Melting Point: 300 K (27°C or 81°F) Boiling Point: Unknown Density: Unknown Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 7 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal Radioactive What's in a name? Named for the country of France. Say what? Francium is pronounced as FRAN-see-em. History and Uses: Francium was discovered by Marguerite Catherine Perey, a French chemist, in 1939 while analyzing actinium's decay sequence. Although considered a natural element, scientists estimate that there is no more than one ounce of francium in the earth's crust at one time. Since there is so little

142

It's Elemental - The Element Indium  

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Cadmium Cadmium Previous Element (Cadmium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tin) Tin The Element Indium [Click for Isotope Data] 49 In Indium 114.818 Atomic Number: 49 Atomic Weight: 114.818 Melting Point: 429.75 K (156.60°C or 313.88°F) Boiling Point: 2345 K (2072°C or 3762°F) Density: 7.31 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 13 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the bright indigo line in its spectrum. Say what? Indium is pronounced as IN-dee-em. History and Uses: Indium was discovered by the German chemists Ferdinand Reich and Hieronymus Theodor Richter in 1863. Reich and Richter had been looking for traces of the element thallium in samples of zinc ores. A brilliant indigo line in

143

It's Elemental - The Element Neon  

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Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium The Element Neon [Click for Isotope Data] 10 Ne Neon 20.1797 Atomic Number: 10 Atomic Weight: 20.1797 Melting Point: 24.56 K (-248.59°C or -415.46°F) Boiling Point: 27.07 K (-246.08°C or -410.94°F) Density: 0.0008999 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 18 Group Name: Noble Gas What's in a name? From the Greek word for new, neos. Say what? Neon is pronounced as NEE-on. History and Uses: Neon was discovered by Sir William Ramsay, a Scottish chemist, and Morris M. Travers, an English chemist, shortly after their discovery of the element krypton in 1898. Like krypton, neon was discovered through the

144

It's Elemental - The Element Technetium  

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Molybdenum Molybdenum Previous Element (Molybdenum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Ruthenium) Ruthenium The Element Technetium [Click for Isotope Data] 43 Tc Technetium 98 Atomic Number: 43 Atomic Weight: 98 Melting Point: 2430 K (2157°C or 3915°F) Boiling Point: 4538 K (4265°C or 7709°F) Density: 11 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none Radioactive and Artificially Produced What's in a name? From the Greek word for artificial, technetos. Say what? Technetium is pronounced as tek-NEE-she-em. History and Uses: Technetium was the first artificially produced element. It was isolated by Carlo Perrier and Emilio Segrè in 1937. Technetium was created by bombarding molybdenum atoms with deuterons that had been accelerated by a

145

It's Elemental - The Element Cobalt  

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Iron Iron Previous Element (Iron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nickel) Nickel The Element Cobalt [Click for Isotope Data] 27 Co Cobalt 58.933195 Atomic Number: 27 Atomic Weight: 58.933195 Melting Point: 1768 K (1495°C or 2723°F) Boiling Point: 3200 K (2927°C or 5301°F) Density: 8.86 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 9 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word for goblin or evil spirit, kobald and the Greek word for mine, cobalos. Say what? Cobalt is pronounced as KO-bolt. History and Uses: Cobalt was discovered by Georg Brandt, a Swedish chemist, in 1739. Brandt was attempting to prove that the ability of certain minerals to color glass blue was due to an unknown element and not to bismuth, as was commonly

146

It's Elemental - The Element Oxygen  

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Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine The Element Oxygen [Click for Isotope Data] 8 O Oxygen 15.9994 Atomic Number: 8 Atomic Weight: 15.9994 Melting Point: 54.36 K (-218.79°C or -361.82°F) Boiling Point: 90.20 K (-182.95°C or -297.31°F) Density: 0.001429 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the greek words oxys and genes, which together mean "acid forming." Say what? Oxygen is pronounced as OK-si-jen. History and Uses: Oxygen had been produced by several chemists prior to its discovery in 1774, but they failed to recognize it as a distinct element. Joseph

147

It's Elemental - The Element Manganese  

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Chromium Chromium Previous Element (Chromium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Iron) Iron The Element Manganese [Click for Isotope Data] 25 Mn Manganese 54.938045 Atomic Number: 25 Atomic Weight: 54.938045 Melting Point: 1519 K (1246°C or 2275°F) Boiling Point: 2334 K (2061°C or 3742°F) Density: 7.3 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for magnet, magnes. Say what? Manganese is pronounced as MAN-ge-nees. History and Uses: Proposed to be an element by Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1774, manganese was discovered by Johan Gottlieb Gahn, a Swedish chemist, by heating the mineral pyrolusite (MnO2) in the presence of charcoal later that year.

148

It's Elemental - The Element Titanium  

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Scandium Scandium Previous Element (Scandium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Vanadium) Vanadium The Element Titanium [Click for Isotope Data] 22 Ti Titanium 47.867 Atomic Number: 22 Atomic Weight: 47.867 Melting Point: 1941 K (1668°C or 3034°F) Boiling Point: 3560 K (3287°C or 5949°F) Density: 4.5 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 4 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word Titans, the mythological "first sons of the Earth." Say what? Titanium is pronounced as tie-TAY-nee-em. History and Uses: Titanium was discovered in 1791 by the Reverend William Gregor, an English pastor. Pure titanium was first produced by Matthew A. Hunter, an American metallurgist, in 1910. Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the

149

It's Elemental - The Element Phosphorus  

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Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur The Element Phosphorus [Click for Isotope Data] 15 P Phosphorus 30.973762 Atomic Number: 15 Atomic Weight: 30.973762 Melting Point: 317.30 K (44.15°C or 111.47°F) Boiling Point: 553.65 K (280.5°C or 536.9°F) Density: 1.82 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for light bearing, phosphoros. Say what? Phosphorus is pronounced as FOS-fer-es. History and Uses: In what is perhaps the most disgusting method of discovering an element, phosphorus was first isolated in 1669 by Hennig Brand, a German physician and alchemist, by boiling, filtering and otherwise processing as many as 60

150

It's Elemental - The Element Cerium  

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Lanthanum Lanthanum Previous Element (Lanthanum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Praseodymium) Praseodymium The Element Cerium [Click for Isotope Data] 58 Ce Cerium 140.116 Atomic Number: 58 Atomic Weight: 140.116 Melting Point: 1071 K (798°C or 1468°F) Boiling Point: 3697 K (3424°C or 6195°F) Density: 6.770 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: none Group Name: Lanthanide What's in a name? Named for the asteroid Ceres. Say what? Cerium is pronounced as SER-ee-em. History and Uses: Cerium was discovered by Jöns Jacob Berzelius and Wilhelm von Hisinger, Swedish chemists, and independently by Martin Heinrich Klaproth, a German chemist, in 1803. Cerium is the most abundant of the rare earth elements

151

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Neptunium  

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Uranium Previous Element (Uranium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Plutonium) Plutonium Isotopes of the Element Neptunium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

152

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Nobelium  

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Mendelevium Previous Element (Mendelevium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Lawrencium) Lawrencium Isotopes of the Element Nobelium Click for Main Data Most of the...

153

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Fermium  

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Einsteinium Previous Element (Einsteinium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Mendelevium) Mendelevium Isotopes of the Element Fermium Click for Main Data Most of the...

154

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sulfur  

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Phosphorus Previous Element (Phosphorus) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Chlorine) Chlorine Isotopes of the Element Sulfur Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

155

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Argon  

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Chlorine Previous Element (Chlorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Potassium) Potassium Isotopes of the Element Argon Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data...

156

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Ruthenium  

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Technetium Previous Element (Technetium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhodium) Rhodium Isotopes of the Element Ruthenium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

157

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Molybdenum  

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Niobium Previous Element (Niobium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Technetium) Technetium Isotopes of the Element Molybdenum Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

158

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Protactinium  

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Thorium Previous Element (Thorium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Uranium) Uranium Isotopes of the Element Protactinium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data...

159

Chemistry Dept. Research Programs  

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Chemistry Department Overview: Chemistry Department Overview: While the subjects of chemical research in the Chemistry Department are diverse, several predominant themes span traditional research fields and research groups. These themes include: artificial photosynthesis, charge transfer for energy conversion, chemistry with ionizing radiation, catalysis and surface science, nanoscience, combustion, and nuclear chemistry. Artificial Photosynthesis This program addresses major issues hindering progress in photoinduced catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, water splitting, and small molecule activation using an integrated experimental and theoretical approach that offers fundamental insights into the underlying photochemical processes. One thrust investigates factors controlling reductive half-reactions. Among these are: (1) searching for visible-light absorbers to couple with electron transfer and/or catalytic processes; (2) avoiding high-energy intermediates through multi-electron, multi-proton processes; (3) using earth-abundant metals, or metal complexes that have bio-inspired or non-innocent ligands to achieve low-energy pathways via second-coordination sphere interactions or redox leveling; (4) adopting water as the target solvent and the source of protons and electrons; and (5) immobilizing catalysts on electrode or semiconductor surfaces for better turnover rates and frequencies. Another thrust investigates water oxidation, focusing on photoelectrolysis processes occurring in band-gap-narrowed semiconductor and catalyst components by: (i) tuning semiconductors to control their light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities; (ii) developing viable catalysts for the four-electron water oxidation process; (iii) immobilizing the homogenous catalysts and metal oxide catalysts on electrodes and/or metal-oxide nanoparticles; and (iv) exploring the interfacial water-decomposition reactions using carriers generated by visible-light irradiation with the goal of understanding semiconductorccatalystcwater charge transport.

160

It's Elemental - The Element Tungsten  

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melting point of all metallic elements and is used to make filaments for incandescent light bulbs, fluorescent light bulbs and television tubes. Tungsten expands at nearly the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

It's Elemental - The Element Darmstadtium  

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Roentgenium The Element Darmstadtium Click for Isotope Data 110 Ds Darmstadtium 281 Atomic Number: 110 Atomic Weight: 281 Melting Point: Unknown Boiling Point: Unknown...

162

It's Elemental - The Element Berkelium  

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Californium The Element Berkelium Click for Isotope Data 97 Bk Berkelium 247 Atomic Number: 97 Atomic Weight: 247 Melting Point: 1323 K (1050C or 1922F) Boiling...

163

Report of the Ad Hoc Panel on heavy ion facilities  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the USAEC, the President of the National Academy of Sciences appointed an Ad Hoc Panel under the NAS-NRC Committee on Nuclear Science to make an intensive study of various aspects of the science and technology involved in heavy ion research in light of the needs of the national program in this field. In particular, the panel was asked to formulate and evaluate various options for the development of heavy ion facilities that would include an appropriate accelerator complex capable of producing heavy ion beams and the ancillary apparatus required for experimental exploitation. Also, the Panel was asked to evaluate the current status and potentialities of the Super HILAC and Bevalac accelerators of the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley. Results of the study are presented. Topics include heavy ions in nuclear physics and chemistry, atomic physics, heavy ions and astro and space physics, materials science and solid state, and biomedicine. The state of the technology related to the choice of a heavy ion accelerator system is reviewed, and the various possible choices are reviewed including the large tandem accelerator, tandem- cyclotron systems, and linear accelerators. The upgrading of existing facilities (Super HILAC, Bevalac, and PPA) is discussed. Cost estimates for various heavy ion facilities are briefly discussed. (WHK)

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

It's Elemental - The Element Astatine  

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Polonium Polonium Previous Element (Polonium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radon) Radon The Element Astatine [Click for Isotope Data] 85 At Astatine 210 Atomic Number: 85 Atomic Weight: 210 Melting Point: 575 K (302°C or 576°F) Boiling Point: Unknown Density: about 7 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen Radioactive What's in a name? From the Greek word for unstable, astatos. Say what? Astatine is pronounced as AS-teh-teen or as AS-teh-ten. History and Uses: Astatine was produced by Dale R. Carson, K.R. MacKenzie and Emilio Segrè by bombarding an isotope of bismuth, bismuth-209, with alpha particles that had been accelerated in a device called a cyclotron. This created

165

It's Elemental - The Element Chromium  

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Vanadium Vanadium Previous Element (Vanadium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Manganese) Manganese The Element Chromium [Click for Isotope Data] 24 Cr Chromium 51.9961 Atomic Number: 24 Atomic Weight: 51.9961 Melting Point: 2180 K (1907°C or 3465°F) Boiling Point: 2944 K (2671°C or 4840°F) Density: 7.15 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for color, chroma. Say what? Chromium is pronounced as KROH-mee-em. History and Uses: Chromium was discovered by Louis-Nicholas Vauquelin while experimenting with a material known as Siberian red lead, also known as the mineral crocoite (PbCrO4), in 1797. He produced chromium oxide (CrO3) by mixing

166

It's Elemental - The Element Iron  

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Manganese Manganese Previous Element (Manganese) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Cobalt) Cobalt The Element Iron [Click for Isotope Data] 26 Fe Iron 55.845 Atomic Number: 26 Atomic Weight: 55.845 Melting Point: 1811 K (1538°C or 2800°F) Boiling Point: 3134 K (2861°C or 5182°F) Density: 7.874 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word iron. Iron's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for iron, ferrum. Say what? Iron is pronounced as EYE-ern. History and Uses: Archaeological evidence suggests that people have been using iron for at least 5000 years. Iron is the cheapest and one of the most abundant of all metals, comprising nearly 5.6% of the earth's crust and nearly all of the

167

It's Elemental - The Element Molybdenum  

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Niobium Niobium Previous Element (Niobium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Technetium) Technetium The Element Molybdenum [Click for Isotope Data] 42 Mo Molybdenum 95.96 Atomic Number: 42 Atomic Weight: 95.96 Melting Point: 2896 K (2623°C or 4753°F) Boiling Point: 4912 K (4639°C or 8382°F) Density: 10.2 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for lead, molybdos. Say what? Molybdenum is pronounced as meh-LIB-deh-nem. History and Uses: Molybdenum was discovered by Carl Welhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist, in 1778 in a mineral known as molybdenite (MoS2) which had been confused as a lead compound. Molybdenum was isolated by Peter Jacob Hjelm in 1781. Today,

168

It's Elemental - The Element Cesium  

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Xenon Xenon Previous Element (Xenon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Barium) Barium The Element Cesium [Click for Isotope Data] 55 Cs Cesium 132.9054519 Atomic Number: 55 Atomic Weight: 132.9054519 Melting Point: 301.59 K (28.44°C or 83.19°F) Boiling Point: 944 K (671°C or 1240°F) Density: 1.93 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the Latin word for sky blue, caesius. Say what? Cesium is pronounced as SEE-zee-em. History and Uses: Cesium was discovered by Robert Wilhelm Bunsen and Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, German chemists, in 1860 through the spectroscopic analysis of Durkheim mineral water. They named cesium after the blue lines they observed in its

169

It's Elemental - The Element Iridium  

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Osmium Osmium Previous Element (Osmium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Platinum) Platinum The Element Iridium [Click for Isotope Data] 77 Ir Iridium 192.217 Atomic Number: 77 Atomic Weight: 192.217 Melting Point: 2719 K (2446°C or 4435°F) Boiling Point: 4701 K (4428°C or 8002°F) Density: 22.42 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 9 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for rainbow, iris. Say what? Iridium is pronounced as i-RID-ee-em. History and Uses: Iridium and osmium were discovered at the same time by the British chemist Smithson Tennant in 1803. Iridium and osmium were identified in the black residue remaining after dissolving platinum ore with aqua regia, a mixture

170

It's Elemental - The Element Platinum  

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Iridium Iridium Previous Element (Iridium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gold) Gold The Element Platinum [Click for Isotope Data] 78 Pt Platinum 195.084 Atomic Number: 78 Atomic Weight: 195.084 Melting Point: 2041.55 K (1768.4°C or 3215.1°F) Boiling Point: 4098 K (3825°C or 6917°F) Density: 21.46 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 10 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Spainsh word for silver, platina. Say what? Platinum is pronounced as PLAT-en-em. History and Uses: Used by the pre-Columbian Indians of South America, platinum wasn't noticed by western scientists until 1735. Platinum can occur free in nature and is sometimes found in deposits of gold-bearing sands, primarily those found in

171

It's Elemental - The Element Arsenic  

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Germanium Germanium Previous Element (Germanium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Selenium) Selenium The Element Arsenic [Click for Isotope Data] 33 As Arsenic 74.92160 Atomic Number: 33 Atomic Weight: 74.92160 Melting Point: 1090 K (817°C or 1503°F) Boiling Point: 887 K (614°C or 1137°F) Density: 5.776 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Latin word arsenicum, the Greek word arsenikon and the Arabic word Az-zernikh. Say what? Arsenic is pronounced as AR-s'n-ik. History and Uses: Although arsenic compounds were mined by the early Chinese, Greek and Egyptian civilizations, it is believed that arsenic itself was first identified by Albertus Magnus, a German alchemist, in 1250. Arsenic occurs

172

It's Elemental - The Element Gold  

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Platinum Platinum Previous Element (Platinum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Mercury) Mercury The Element Gold [Click for Isotope Data] 79 Au Gold 196.966569 Atomic Number: 79 Atomic Weight: 196.966569 Melting Point: 1337.33 K (1064.18°C or 1947.52°F) Boiling Point: 3129 K (2856°C or 5173°F) Density: 19.282 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 11 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Sanskrit word Jval and the Anglo-Saxon word gold. Gold's chemical symbol comes from the the latin word for gold, aurum. Say what? Gold is pronounced as GOLD. History and Uses: An attractive and highly valued metal, gold has been known for at least 5500 years. Gold is sometimes found free in nature but it is usually found

173

It's Elemental - The Element Rhenium  

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Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium The Element Rhenium [Click for Isotope Data] 75 Re Rhenium 186.207 Atomic Number: 75 Atomic Weight: 186.207 Melting Point: 3459 K (3186°C or 5767°F) Boiling Point: 5869 K (5596°C or 10105°F) Density: 20.8 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for the Rhine River, Rhenus. Say what? Rhenium is pronounced as REE-nee-em. History and Uses: Rhenium was discovered by the German chemists Ida Tacke-Noddack, Walter Noddack and Otto Carl Berg in 1925. They detected rhenium spectroscopically in platinum ores and in the minerals columbite ((Fe, Mn, Mg)(Nb, Ta)2O6),

174

It's Elemental - The Element Copper  

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Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc The Element Copper [Click for Isotope Data] 29 Cu Copper 63.546 Atomic Number: 29 Atomic Weight: 63.546 Melting Point: 1357.77 K (1084.62°C or 1984.32°F) Boiling Point: 2835 K (2562°C or 4644°F) Density: 8.933 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 11 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word cuprum, which means "from the island of Cyprus." Say what? Copper is pronounced as KOP-er. History and Uses: Archaeological evidence suggests that people have been using copper for at least 11,000 years. Relatively easy to mine and refine, people discovered methods for extracting copper from its ores at least 7,000 years ago. The

175

It's Elemental - The Element Gadolinium  

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Europium Europium Previous Element (Europium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Terbium) Terbium The Element Gadolinium [Click for Isotope Data] 64 Gd Gadolinium 157.25 Atomic Number: 64 Atomic Weight: 157.25 Melting Point: 1586 K (1313°C or 2395°F) Boiling Point: 3546 K (3273°C or 5923°F) Density: 7.90 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: none Group Name: Lanthanide What's in a name? Named for the mineral gadolinite which was named after Johan Gadolin, a Finnish chemist. Say what? Gadolinium is pronounced as GAD-oh-LIN-ee-em. History and Uses: Spectroscopic evidence for the existence of gadolinium was first observed by the Swiss chemist Jean Charles Galissard de Marignac in the minerals

176

It's Elemental - The Element Mercury  

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Gold Gold Previous Element (Gold) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Thallium) Thallium The Element Mercury [Click for Isotope Data] 80 Hg Mercury 200.59 Atomic Number: 80 Atomic Weight: 200.59 Melting Point: 234.32 K (-38.83°C or -37.89°F) Boiling Point: 629.88 K (356.73°C or 674.11°F) Density: 13.5336 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the planet Mercury. Mercury's chemical symbol comes from the Greek word hydrargyrum, which means "liquid silver." Say what? Mercury is pronounced as MER-kyoo-ree. History and Uses: Mercury was known to the ancient Chinese and Hindus and has been found in 3500 year old Egyptian tombs. Mercury is not usually found free in nature

177

It's Elemental - The Element Hafnium  

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Lutetium Lutetium Previous Element (Lutetium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tantalum) Tantalum The Element Hafnium [Click for Isotope Data] 72 Hf Hafnium 178.49 Atomic Number: 72 Atomic Weight: 178.49 Melting Point: 2506 K (2233°C or 4051°F) Boiling Point: 4876 K (4603°C or 8317°F) Density: 13.3 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 4 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for the city of Copenhagen, Hafnia. Say what? Hafnium is pronounced as HAF-neeem. History and Uses: Hafnium was discovered by Dirk Coster, a Danish chemist, and Charles de Hevesy, a Hungarian chemist, in 1923. They used a method known as X-ray spectroscopy to study the arrangement of the outer electrons of atoms in

178

It's Elemental - The Element Boron  

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Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon The Element Boron [Click for Isotope Data] 5 B Boron 10.811 Atomic Number: 5 Atomic Weight: 10.811 Melting Point: 2348 K (2075°C or 3767°F) Boiling Point: 4273 K (4000°C or 7232°F) Density: 2.37 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 13 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Arabic word Buraq and the Persian word Burah, which are both words for the material "borax." Say what? Boron is pronounced as BO-ron. History and Uses: Boron was discovered by Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac and Louis-Jaques Thénard, French chemists, and independently by Sir Humphry Davy, an English chemist,

179

It's Elemental - The Element Thorium  

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Actinium Actinium Previous Element (Actinium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Protactinium) Protactinium The Element Thorium [Click for Isotope Data] 90 Th Thorium 232.03806 Atomic Number: 90 Atomic Weight: 232.03806 Melting Point: 2023 K (1750°C or 3182°F) Boiling Point: 5061 K (4788°C or 8650°F) Density: 11.72 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 7 Group Number: none Group Name: Actinide Radioactive What's in a name? Named for the Scandinavian god of war, Thor. Say what? Thorium is pronounced as THOR-ee-em or as THO-ree-em. History and Uses: Thorium was discovered by Jöns Jacob Berzelius, a Swedish chemist, in 1828. He discovered it in a sample of a mineral that was given to him by the Reverend Has Morten Thrane Esmark, who suspected that it contained an

180

It's Elemental - The Element Osmium  

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Rhenium Rhenium Previous Element (Rhenium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Iridium) Iridium The Element Osmium [Click for Isotope Data] 76 Os Osmium 190.23 Atomic Number: 76 Atomic Weight: 190.23 Melting Point: 3306 K (3033°C or 5491°F) Boiling Point: 5285 K (5012°C or 9054°F) Density: 22.57 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for a smell, osme. Say what? Osmium is pronounced as OZ-mee-em. History and Uses: Osmium and iridium were discovered at the same time by the British chemist Smithson Tennant in 1803. Osmium and iridium were identified in the black residue remaining after dissolving platinum ore with aqua regia, a mixture

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181

It's Elemental - The Element Antimony  

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Tin Tin Previous Element (Tin) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tellurium) Tellurium The Element Antimony [Click for Isotope Data] 51 Sb Antimony 121.760 Atomic Number: 51 Atomic Weight: 121.760 Melting Point: 903.78 K (630.63°C or 1167.13°F) Boiling Point: 1860 K (1587°C or 2889°F) Density: 6.685 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words anti and monos, which together mean "not alone." Antimony's chemical symbol comes from its historic name, Stibium. Say what? Antimony is pronounced as AN-the-MOH-nee. History and Uses: Antimony has been known since ancient times. It is sometimes found free in nature, but is usually obtained from the ores stibnite (Sb2S3) and

182

Chemistry Department Directory  

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Chemistry Staff Directory Chemistry Staff Directory Last Name, First Phone E-mail Note: All listed phone extensions are in the format of (631) 344-xxxx. Adzic, Radoslav 4522 adzic@bnl.gov Akimov, Alexey No Entry akimov@bnl.gov An, Wei 4317 weian@bnl.gov Anselmini, James 4399 anselmini@bnl.gov Baber, Ashleigh 4317 ababer@bnl.gov Badiei, Yosra 4360 ybadiei@bnl.gov Bak, Seong Min BAK 3663 smbak@bnl.gov Bakalis, Jin No Entry jbakalis@bnl.gov Bird, Matthew 4331 mbird@bnl.gov Cabelli, Diane 4361 cabelli@bnl.gov Camillone III, Nicholas 4412 nicholas@bnl.gov Chen, Jingguang 2655 jgchen@bnl.gov Chen, Wei-Fu 4360 wfchen@bnl.gov Concepcion, Javier 4369 jconcepc@bnl.gov Cook, Andrew 4782 acook@bnl.gov Cumming, James 4338 cumming@bnl.gov Duan, Lele 4357 lduan@bnl.gov Ertem, Mehmed No Entry mzertem@bnl.gov

183

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Chemistry of transuranium elements in salt-base repository  

SciTech Connect

The mobility and potential release of actinides into the accessible environment continues to be the key performance assessment concern of nuclear repositories. Actinide, in particular plutonium speciation under the wide range of conditions that can exist in the subsurface is complex and depends strongly on the coupled effects of redox conditions, inorganic/organic complexation, and the extent/nature of aggregation. Understanding the key factors that define the potential for actinide migration is, in this context, an essential and critical part of making and sustaining a licensing case for a nuclear repository. Herein we report on recent progress in a concurrent modeling and experimental study to determine the speciation of plutonium, uranium and americium in high ionic strength Na-CI-Mg brines. This is being done as part of the ongomg recertification effort m the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The oxidation-state specific solubility of actinides were established in brine as function of pC{sub H+}, brine composition and the presence and absence of organic chelating agents and carbonate. An oxidation-state invariant analog approach using Nd{sup 3+} and Th{sup 4+} was used for An{sup 3+} and An{sup 4+} respectively. These results show that organic ligands and hydrolysis are key factors for An(III) solubility, hydrolysis at pC{sub H+} above 8 is predominate for An(IV) and carbonates are the key factor for U(VI) solubility. The effect of high ionic strength and brine components measured in absence of carbonates leads to measurable increased in overall solubility over analogous low ionic strength groundwater. Less is known about the bioreduction of actinides by halo-tolerant microorganisms, but there is now evidence that bioreduction does occur and is analogous, in many ways, to what occurs with soil bacteria. Results of solubility studies that focus on Pitzer parameter corrections, new species (e.g. borate complexation), and the thermodynamic parameters for modeling are discussed.

Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ams, D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

185

arXiv:1202.4910v2[cs.DS]8May2012 Distributed Private Heavy Hitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arXiv:1202.4910v2[cs.DS]8May2012 Distributed Private Heavy Hitters Justin Hsu Sanjeev Khanna Aaron the heavy hitters problem while preserving differential privacy in the fully distributed local model. The heavy hitters problem is to find the identity of the most common element shared amongst the n parties

Pennsylvania, University of

186

It's Elemental - The Element Promethium  

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(Samarium) Samarium The Element Promethium Click for Isotope Data 61 Pm Promethium 145 Atomic Number: 61 Atomic Weight: 145 Melting Point: 1315 K (1042C or 1908F) Boiling...

187

It's Elemental - The Element Cadmium  

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(Indium) Indium The Element Cadmium Click for Isotope Data 48 Cd Cadmium 112.411 Atomic Number: 48 Atomic Weight: 112.411 Melting Point: 594.22 K (321.07C or 609.93F)...

188

It's Elemental - The Element Praseodymium  

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Today, praseodymium is primarily obtained through an ion exchange process from monazite sand ((Ce, La, Th, Nd, Y)PO4), a material rich in rare earth elements. Praseodymium's...

189

It's Elemental - The Element Neodymium  

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Today, neodymium is primarily obtained from through an ion exchange process monazite sand ((Ce, La, Th, Nd, Y)PO4), a material rich in rare earth elements. Neodymium makes up...

190

It's Elemental - The Element Samarium  

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1879. Today, samarium is primarily obtained through an ion exchange process from monazite sand ((Ce, La, Th, Nd, Y)PO4), a material rich in rare earth elements that can contain as...

191

It's Elemental - The Element Lanthanum  

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Today, lanthanum is primarily obtained through an ion exchange process from monazite sand ((Ce, La, Th, Nd, Y)PO4), a material rich in rare earth elements that can contain as...

192

It's Elemental - The Element Lutetium  

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(Hafnium) Hafnium The Element Lutetium Click for Isotope Data 71 Lu Lutetium 174.9668 Atomic Number: 71 Atomic Weight: 174.9668 Melting Point: 1936 K (1663C or 3025F)...

193

It's Elemental - The Element Holmium  

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(Erbium) Erbium The Element Holmium Click for Isotope Data 67 Ho Holmium 164.93032 Atomic Number: 67 Atomic Weight: 164.93032 Melting Point: 1747 K (1474C or 2685F)...

194

It's Elemental - The Element Zinc  

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Copper Copper Previous Element (Copper) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gallium) Gallium The Element Zinc [Click for Isotope Data] 30 Zn Zinc 65.38 Atomic Number: 30 Atomic Weight: 65.38 Melting Point: 692.68 K (419.53°C or 787.15°F) Boiling Point: 1180 K (907°C or 1665°F) Density: 7.134 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word zink. Say what? Zinc is pronounced as ZINK. History and Uses: Although zinc compounds have been used for at least 2,500 years in the production of brass, zinc wasn't recognized as a distinct element until much later. Metallic zinc was first produced in India sometime in the 1400s by heating the mineral calamine (ZnCO3) with wool. Zinc was rediscovered by

195

It's Elemental - The Element Chlorine  

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Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon The Element Chlorine [Click for Isotope Data] 17 Cl Chlorine 35.453 Atomic Number: 17 Atomic Weight: 35.453 Melting Point: 171.65 K (-101.5°C or -150.7°F) Boiling Point: 239.11 K (-34.04°C or -29.27°F) Density: 0.003214 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for greenish yellow, chloros. Say what? Chlorine is pronounced as KLOR-een or as KLOR-in. History and Uses: Since it combines directly with nearly every element, chlorine is never found free in nature. Chlorine was first produced by Carl Wilhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist, when he combined the mineral pyrolusite (MnO2) with

196

It's Elemental - The Element Fluorine  

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Oxygen Oxygen Previous Element (Oxygen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Neon) Neon The Element Fluorine [Click for Isotope Data] 9 F Fluorine 18.9984032 Atomic Number: 9 Atomic Weight: 18.9984032 Melting Point: 53.53 K (-219.62°C or -363.32°F) Boiling Point: 85.03 K (-188.12°C or -306.62°F) Density: 0.001696 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Latin and French words for flow, fluere. Say what? Fluorine is pronounced as FLU-eh-reen or as FLU-eh-rin. History and Uses: Fluorine is the most reactive of all elements and no chemical substance is capable of freeing fluorine from any of its compounds. For this reason, fluorine does not occur free in nature and was extremely difficult for

197

Program Operations Plan. Atmospheric Chemistry Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) was initiated in 1991 to coordinate DOE`s university and federal-laboratory atmospheric-chemistry research, and to focus these efforts on national and international information requirements in the atmospheric-chemistry field. This Program Operations Plan describes the structure and vision of the effort designed to fulfill these needs, and is divided into two major components. The first of these is a Strategic Plan, which outlines the ACP`s rationale, objectives, and vision, and describes its products that are anticipated over a future ten-year period. Although based on realistic appraisals of goals that are attainable given the financial, material, and intellectual resources of the ACP community, this Strategic Plan does not describe these resources themselves. The second component of the Program Operations Plan, the Implementation Plan, deals directly with these resource considerations. As such it focuses on practical implementation of Strategic-Plan elements at the individual research institutions, the anticipated scientific contributions of these groups, and their coordination within the ACP. In contrast to the Strategic Plan, this Implementation Plan extends only five years into the future.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

Bean, R.W.

1963-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the same time. Capable of accelerating 70 trillion protons with every pulse, and heavy ions such as gold and iron, the AGS receives protons and other ions from the AGS...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry Resources with Additional Information Henry Taube Chuck Painter/Stanford News Service Henry Taube, a Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, at Stanford University, received the 1983 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his work on the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions, especially in metal complexes" Taube 'received a doctorate from the University of California-Berkeley in 1940 and was an instructor there from 1940-41. "I became deeply interested in chemistry soon after I came to Berkeley," Taube recalled. ... He joined the Cornell University faculty in 1941, becoming a naturalized United States citizen in 1942, and then moved in 1946 to the University of Chicago where he remained until 1961. A year later he joined the Stanford faculty as professor of chemistry, a position he held until 1986, when he became professor emeritus. ...

202

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970  

SciTech Connect

Papers are presented for the following topics: (1) Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Properties - (a) Nuclear Spectroscopy and Radioactivity; (b) Nuclear Reactions and Scattering; (c) Nuclear Theory; and (d) Fission. (2) Chemical and Atomic Physics - (a) Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy; and (b) Hyperfine Interactions. (3) Physical, Inorganic, and Analytical Chemistry - (a) X-Ray Crystallography; (b) Physical and Inorganic Chemistry; (c) Radiation Chemistry; and (d) Chemical Engineering. (4) Instrumentation and Systems Development.

Authors, Various

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Thorium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Elements Next Element (Protactinium) Protactinium Isotopes of the Element Thorium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

205

It's Elemental - The Element Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thallium Thallium Previous Element (Thallium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Bismuth) Bismuth The Element Lead [Click for Isotope Data] 82 Pb Lead 207.2 Atomic Number: 82 Atomic Weight: 207.2 Melting Point: 600.61 K (327.46°C or 621.43°F) Boiling Point: 2022 K (1749°C or 3180°F) Density: 11.342 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 14 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word lead. Lead's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for waterworks, plumbum. Say what? Lead is pronounced as LED. History and Uses: Lead has been known since ancient times. It is sometimes found free in nature, but is usually obtained from the ores galena (PbS), anglesite (PbSO4), cerussite (PbCO3) and minum (Pb3O4). Although lead makes up only

206

It's Elemental - The Element Iodine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tellurium Tellurium Previous Element (Tellurium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Xenon) Xenon The Element Iodine [Click for Isotope Data] 53 I Iodine 126.90447 Atomic Number: 53 Atomic Weight: 126.90447 Melting Point: 386.85 K (113.7°C or 236.7°F) Boiling Point: 457.55 K (184.4°C or 364.0°F) Density: 4.93 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for violet, iodes. Say what? Iodine is pronounced as EYE-eh-dine or as EYE-eh-din. History and Uses: Iodine was discovered by the French chemist Barnard Courtois in 1811. Courtois was extracting sodium and potassium compounds from seaweed ash. Once these compounds were removed, he added sulfuric acid (H2SO4) to

207

Base Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Principal effects of superalloy base elements on alloy characteristics...to γ? or γ? Requires fcc stabilizer Cobalt prices have been known to be volatile in the past. Suitable for creep-resistant applications with low stresses or

208

Supported organometallic complexes: Surface chemistry, spectroscopy, and catalysis  

SciTech Connect

The long-range goal of this project is to elucidate and understand the surface chemistry and catalytic properties of well-defined, highly-reactive organometallic molecules (principally based upon abundant actinide, lanthanide, and early transition elements) adsorbed on metal oxides and halides. The nature of the adsorbed species is probed by a battery of chemical and physicochemical techniques, to understand the nature of the molecular-surface coordination chemistry and how this can give rise to extremely high catalytic activity. A complementary objective is to delineate the scope and mechanisms of the heterogeneous catalytic reactions, as well as to relate them both conceptually and functionally to model systems generated in solution.

Marks, T.J.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

Sparks, Donald L.

210

It's Elemental - The Periodic Table of Elements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

following primary sources were used in the creation of this site: Physical Data: CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 77th Edition Historical and Usage Information: CRC Handbook...

211

Badly Shaped Elements (BadlyShapedElements)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... shaped elements. Synopsis. BadlyShapedElements ( threshold ). Details. Base class: SkelModTargets; Parameters: threshold The threshold shape ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

212

FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

1961-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Standard Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   ASTM standards applicable to element-level testing of composites...Composite Plates Subjected to a Distributed Load Plate flexure D 6484 Open-Hole Compression Strength of Polymer Matrix Composites Open-hole compression strength Z 5370Z Compression After Impact Strength of Fiber-Resin Composites Compression after impact Z 7225Z Mixed Mode I-Mode II...

214

Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art chemistry programs help to ensure the continued operation of open cooling water systems while mitigating corrosion and fouling mechanisms. This document, Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline, prepared by a committee of industry experts, reflects field and laboratory data on corrosion and fouling issues of open cooling systems.BackgroundService Water System Chemical Addition Guideline (Electric Power Research Institute ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) studies oil recovery mechanisms relevant to thermal and heavy-oil production. The scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. In August of 2000 we received funding from the U. S. DOE under Award No. DE-FC26-00BC15311 that completed December 1, 2003. The project was cost shared with industry. Heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o} API) is an underutilized energy resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods. Heating reduces oil viscosity dramatically. Hence, thermal recovery is especially important because adding heat, usually via steam injection generally improves displacement efficiency. The objectives of this work were to improve our understanding of the production mechanisms of heavy oil under both primary and enhanced modes of operation. The research described spanned a spectrum of topics related to heavy and thermal oil recovery and is categorized into: (1) multiphase flow and rock properties, (2) hot fluid injection, (3) improved primary heavy-oil recovery, (4) in-situ combustion, and (5) reservoir definition. Technology transfer efforts and industrial outreach were also important to project effort. The research tools and techniques used were quite varied. In the area of experiments, we developed a novel apparatus that improved imaging with X-ray computed tomography (CT) and high-pressure micromodels etched with realistic sandstone roughness and pore networks that improved visualization of oil-recovery mechanisms. The CT-compatible apparatus was invaluable for investigating primary heavy-oil production, multiphase flow in fractured and unfractured media, as well as imbibition. Imbibition and the flow of condensed steam are important parts of the thermal recovery process. The high-pressure micromodels were used to develop a conceptual and mechanistic picture of primary heavy-oil production by solution gas drive. They allowed for direct visualization of gas bubble formation, bubble growth, and oil displacement. Companion experiments in representative sands and sandstones were also conducted to understand the mechanisms of cold production. The evolution of in-situ gas and oil saturation was monitored with CT scanning and pressure drop data. These experiments highlighted the importance of depletion rate, overburden pressure, and oil-phase chemistry on the cold production process. From the information provided by the experiments, a conceptual and numerical model was formulated and validated for the heavy-oil solution gas drive recovery process. Also in the area of mechanisms, steamdrive for fractured, low permeability porous media was studied. Field tests have shown that heat injected in the form of steam is effective at unlocking oil from such reservoir media. The research reported here elucidated how the basic mechanisms differ from conventional steamdrive and how these differences are used to an advantage. Using simulations of single and multiple matrix blocks that account for details of heat transfer, capillarity, and fluid exchange between matrix and fracture, the importance of factors such as permeability contrast between matrix and fracture and oil composition were quantified. Experimentally, we examined the speed and extent to which steam injection alters the permeability and wettability of low permeability, siliceous rocks during thermal recovery. Rock dissolution tends to increase permeability moderately aiding in heat delivery, whereas downstream the cooled fluid deposits silica reducing permeability. Permeability reduction is not catastrophic. With respect to wettability, heat shifts rock wettability toward more water wet conditions. This effect is beneficial for the production of heavy and medium gravity oils as it improves displacement efficiency. A combination of analytical and numerical studies was used to examine the efficiency of reservoir heating using nonconventional wells such as horizontal and multi

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Synthetic and Mechanistic publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Dave Thorn Chemistry Program Manager Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email "Research into alternative forms of energy, of which biofuels is a key component, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Energy security is vital to our future national security and the efficient functioning of our market economy." -LANL Director Charles McMillan Harshini Mukundan, Hongzhi Xie, Aaron S. Anderson, W. Kevin Grace, John E. Shively, and Basil I. Swanson, "Optimizing a waveguide-based sandwich immunoassay for tumor biomarkers: Evaluating fluorescent labels and functional surfaces," Bioconjugate Chemistry 20(2), 222-230 (2009).

217

2010 Environmental Bioinorganic Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interdisciplinary meeting will gather together scientists - structural biologists, chemists, geneticists, chemical and biological oceanographers, geochemists, and other specialist - who study the flows of essential and toxic elements through the environment and living systems, on timescales ranging from femptoseconds to eons. Of particular interest are the molecular mechanisms that govern element acquisition and use in organisms, and the tools and techniques used to study these phenomena. The aim of this community is to use these molecular-scale insights to understand the interconnected biotic and abiotic processes that shape the macroscopic environment and its development and change over a range of time scales.

Rachael Austin

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

Chemistry Department Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration Administration A. Harris, Chair (631) 344-4301 alexh@bnl.gov G. Hall, Deputy Chair (631) 344-4376 gehall@bnl.gov S. McAlary, Deputy BES Manager (631) 344-4305 mcalary2@bnl.gov J. Petterson, Senior Administrative Assistant (631) 344-4302 jpetter@bnl.gov Administrative Support Includes budgeting, procurement activities, foreign/domestic travel, seminars and general administrative concerns. Guest Appointments and Personnel matters should be referred to the Department's Senior Administrative Assistant. L. Sallustio (631) 344-4303 lsallust@bnl.gov Building and Stockroom Maintain the Chemistry Department stockroom and provide technical and building support to the staff. Information on the BNL Chemical Management Inventory system is available through the stockroom. Click here to view

219

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. A 3-D chemistry-transport model has been applied to the Mexico City metropolitan area to investigate the origin of elevated levels of non-fossil (NF) carbonaceous aerosols observed in this highly urbanized region. High time resolution measurements of the fine aerosol concentration and composition, and 12 or 24 h integrated 14 C measurements of aerosol modern carbon have been performed in and near Mexico City during the March 2006 MILAGRO field experiment. The non-fossil carbon fraction (fNF), which is lower than the measured modern fraction (fM) due to the elevated 14 C in the atmosphere caused by nuclear bomb testing, is estimated from the measured fM and the source-dependent information on modern carbon enrichment. The fNF contained in PM1 total carbon analyzed by a US team (f TC

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nanomaterials Chemistry Group - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Selected Research and Development Projects The Nanomaterials Chemistry Group at Chemical Sciences Division, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts fundamental research related to synthesis and characterization of nanoscopic materials as well as ionic liquids for fundamental investigation of separation and catalysis processes. This group also conducts the applied research related to the applications of nanomaterials in advanced scintillators for radiation sensing, catalysts for fuel cells, radioactive tracers for medical imaging, novel electrodes for energy storage, and sensing devices for biological agents. Extensive synthesis capabilities exist within the group for preparation of mesoporous materials (oxides and carbons), low-dimensional materials (e.g., quantum dots and nanowires), sol-gel materials, inorganic and hybrid monoliths (e.g., membranes), and nanocatalysts. Solvothermal, ionothermal, templating synthesis, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods are extensively utilized in the group for tailored synthesis of nanostructured materials. An array of techniques for characterizing physical and chemical properties related to separation and catalysis are in place or are currently being developed. This research program also takes advantage of the unique resources at ORNL such as small-angle x-ray scattering, small-angle neutron scattering at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), structural analysis by a variety of electron microscopes (SEM, TEM, STEM, HRTEM) and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. A wide variety of other facilities for routine and novel techniques are also utilized including the Center for Nanophase Materials Science. Computational chemistry tools are employed to understand experimental results related to separation and other interfacial chemical processes and design better nanomaterials and ionic liquids. Commonly used methods include first principles density functional theory (DFT) and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) techniques.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Silane discharge ion chemistry  

SciTech Connect

Silane dc, rf, and dc proximity discharges have been studied using mass spectroscopic measurements of the positive ions as a detailed diagnostic for the type of discharge used to produce hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells. The properties and quality of these films depends in a very complex way upon the interactions of the many reactive neutral and ion species in the discharge. Qualitative models of the ion chemical processes in these discharges have been developed from experimental measurements. Knowledge of the ion-molecule and electron-molecule collision cross sections is important to any attempt at understanding silane discharge chemistry. Consequently, the electron impact ionization cross sections for silane and disilane have been measured and for comparison purposes also for methane and ethane. In addition, the rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of He , Ne , and Ar with silane, disilane, methane, and ethane have been measured as these are important to understanding discharges in inert gas-silane mixtures. A detailed quantitative model of the cathode sheath region of a silane dc discharge has been developed by extending the best recent calculation of the electron motion in the sheath to a self-consistent form which includes the ion motion. This model is used with comparison of silane dc discharge data to diagnose the ion chemistry occurring in the sheath region of silane dc discharge. The understanding of the discharge ion chemical processes that have been gained in this study represent an important step toward understanding the chemical and physical processes leading to film growth.

Chatham, R.H. III

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Solenoid transport for heavy ion fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport for Heavy Ion Fusion* Edward Lee** LawrenceHm Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Abstract Solenoid transport ofseveral stages of a heavy ion fusion driver. In general this

Lee, Edward

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Materials, Chemistry and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials, Chemistry and Energy Sciences Two people holding a solar cell outdoors Materials, chemistry and energy sciences are central to many of today's most critical technical...

224

Chemistry and Material Sciences Codes at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry and Material Sciences Codes Chemistry and Material Sciences Codes at NERSC April 6, 2011 & ast edited: 2012-02-24 15:12:59...

225

BNL Center for Radiation Chemistry Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department | Photo- and Radiation Chemistry | Group Members Welcome to the Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Radiation Chemistry Research LEAF Logo CRCR Logo Graphic Pop-up...

226

Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Chemistry & Chemical Engineerin...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Chemistry research photo Sandia's Combustion Research Facility pioneered the use of chemical-imaging tools, such as laser diagnostics, for...

227

Identifying heavy Higgs bosons  

SciTech Connect

Two techniques for identifying heavy Higgs bosons produced at SSC energies are discussed. In the first, the Higgs boson decays into ZZ, with one Z decaying into an e-pair or ..mu..-pair and the other into a neutrino pair. In the second, the production of the Higgs boson by WW fusion is tagged by detecting the quarks that produced the bremsstrahlung virtual W's. The associated Higgs decay is identified by one leptonic and one hadronic decay. Both methods appear capable of finding a heavy Higgs boson provided the SSC design parameters are achieved. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Cahn, R.N.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Heavy ion fusion--Using heavy ions to make electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Proc. of the Inertial Fusion Science and ApplicationsP. Abbott, P. F. Peterson, Fusion Science and Technology 44March 1520, 2004 Heavy Ion Fusion Using Heavy Ions to Make

Celata, C.M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Preparation of Building Material Using Elemental Sulfur and Heavy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Furthermore, when NaOH is applied as an additive in the process of ... Effect of Processes in Degraded Decoloration of Frying Oil Treated with Brazilian Clays ... Novel Technology for Wastewater Treatment by Biologics in Hydrometallurgical ... Study on the EMD Residue and Shale for Preparing Solidification Brick.

230

THE SOLAR HEAVY ELEMENT ABUNDANCES. II. CONSTRAINTS FROM STELLAR ATMOSPHERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of the bulk metal abundance of the Sun derived from the latest generation of model atmospheres are significantly lower than the earlier standard values. In Paper I, we demonstrated that helioseismic data combined with stellar interiors theory set strong bounds on the solar metal abundance. The seismically derived abundances are inconsistent with the low photospheric abundances if the quoted errors in the atmospheric models (of order 0.05 dex) are correct. In this paper, we undertake a critical analysis of the solar metallicity and its uncertainty from a model atmospheric perspective, focusing on CNO. We argue that the non-LTE (NLTE) corrections for abundances derived from atomic features are overestimated in the recent abundance studies, while systematic errors in the absolute abundances are underestimated. In general, abundances derived from molecular features are lower than those derived from atomic features for the three-dimensional hydro models, while a weaker trend in the opposite direction tends to hold for abundances derived from one-dimensional models. If we adopt the internal consistency between different indicators as a measure of goodness of fit, we obtain intermediate abundances [C/H] = 8.44 +- 0.06, [N/H] = 7.96 +- 0.10 and [O/H] = 8.75 +- 0.08. The errors reflect the fact that both the high and low scales are internally consistent within the errors, and they are too large to conclude that there is a solar abundance problem. However, the center-to-limb continuum flux variations predicted in the simulations appear to be inconsistent with solar data based on recently published work. This would favor the traditional thermal structure and lead to high CNO abundances of (8.52, 7.96, 8.80) close to the seismic scale. We argue that further empirical tests of NLTE corrections and the thermal structure are required for precise absolute abundances. The sensitivity of the simulations to spatial resolution and systematic errors in the underlying atmospheric physics should also be examined, and these effects may lead to an overestimate of the impact of convective overshooting on the thermal structure of the outer layers of the solar atmosphere. The uncertainties in the solar oxygen also imply that strong conclusions about the absence of solar beryllium depletion cannot be made.

Pinsonneault, M. H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Delahaye, Franck [CEA, IRFU, Serv. Astrophys., F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS) Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS) IBA Table (HTML) | IBA Table (135KB GIF) | IBA Table (1.2MB PDF) | IBA Table (33MB TIF) | Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS) | Virtual Lab Tour (6MB) Description of Technique: HIBS is used to detect ultra-trace levels of heavy impurities on the surface of a Si wafer. HIBS has advantages over TXRF, including: Improved sensitivity for most elements Quantifying composition without standards Measurement on rough surfaces. HIBS is accomplished by focusing a 120 keV beam of C+ions onto a small spot at the wafer's surface. The backscattered ions are collected by a time-of-flight (TOF) detector array with a large solid angle. The flight time of the backscattered C identifies the near-surface impurities and the

232

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the behaviour of oil and gas prices and the fruits of future exploration. The rate of technological progress. How optimistic are you that the North Sea remains a viable source of oil and gas? A) Our new researchNorth Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen

Levi, Ran

233

Heavy Hadron Form Factor Relations for $m_c\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First order power corrections to current matrix elements between heavy meson or $\\Lambda_\\Q$ baryon states are shown to vanish at the zero recoil point to all orders in QCD. Five relations among the six form factors that parametrize the semileptonic decay $\\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda_c e \\overline{\

Peter Cho; Benjamin Grinstein

1992-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

DEVELOPMENTS IN HEAVY QUARKONIUM SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ 1­ DEVELOPMENTS IN HEAVY QUARKONIUM SPECTROSCOPY Written May 2012 by S. Eidelman (Budker Inst. Navas (Univ. Granada), and C. Patrignani (Univ. Genova, INFN). A golden age for heavy quarkonium physics at HERA and the Tevatron matured; and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC opened a window on the deconfinement

235

Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important inorganic complexants are expected to be carbonate/bicarbonate and hydroxide. There are also organic complexants in TRU waste with the potential to strongly influence actinide solubility. (3) Intrinsic and pseudo-actinide colloid formation - Many actinide species in their expected oxidation states tend to form colloids or strongly associate with non actinide colloids present (e.g., microbial, humic and organic). In this context, the relative importance of actinides, based on the TRU waste inventory, with respect to the potential release of actinides from the WIPP, is greater for plutonium and americium, and to less extent for uranium and thorium. The most important oxidation states for WIPP-relevant conditions are III and IV. We will present an update of the literature on WIPP-specific data, and a summary of the ongoing research related to actinide chemistry in the WIPP performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science (ACRSP) team located in Carlsbad, NM [Reed 2007, Lucchini 2007, and Reed 2006].

Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

237

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) conducts a broad spectrum of research intended to help improve the recovery efficiency from difficult to produce reservoirs including heavy oil and fractured low permeability systems. Our scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. The primary functions of the group are to conduct direction-setting research, transfer research results to industry, and educate and train students for careers in industry. Presently, research in SUPRI-A is divided into 5 main project areas. These projects and their goals include: (1) Multiphase flow and rock properties--to develop better understanding of the physics of displacement in porous media through experiment and theory. This category includes work on imbibition, flow in fractured media, and the effect of temperature on relative permeability and capillary pressure. (2) Hot fluid injection--to improve the application of nonconventional wells for enhanced oil recovery and elucidate the mechanisms of steamdrive in low permeability, fractured porous media. (3) Mechanisms of primary heavy oil recovery--to develop a mechanistic understanding of so-called ''foamy oil'' and its associated physical chemistry. (4) In-situ combustion--to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the insitu combustion process. (5) Reservoir definition--to develop and improve techniques for evaluating formation properties from production information. What follows is a report on activities for the past year. Significant progress was made in all areas.

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Mendelevium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nobelium) Nobelium Isotopes of the Element Mendelevium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained...

239

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Neptunium) Neptunium Isotopes of the Element Uranium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

240

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Beryllium) Beryllium Isotopes of the Element Lithium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Helium) Helium Isotopes of the Element Hydrogen Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

242

AVIRIS Canopy Chemistry Data (ACCP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canopy Chemistry Data Canopy Chemistry Data The ORNL DAAC has added a data set to its holdings from the Accelerated Canopy Chemistry Program (ACCP). The new data set is entitled "Site AVIRIS Images, 1992 (ACCP)." ACCP was an investigation to determine the theoretical and empirical basis for remote sensing of nitrogen and lignin concentrations in vegetation canopies of various ecosystems in the United States. Ten AVIRIS image scenes over selected ACCP sites were acquired in 1992. Pixels that coincided with ACCP field sites were extracted, and surface reflectance values were calculated. The purpose of the data set was to measure spectra of naturally occurring canopies where the chemical constituents were measured. The ORNL DAAC also holds ACCP data related to leaf chemistry, seedling

243

Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

244

An Improved Raindrop Chemistry Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrometer allowing size-fractional chemical analysis of raindrops has been described previously by the authors. Modifications to this raindrop chemistry spectrometer now allow improved performance in windy conditions. Instrument ...

Stuart G. Bradley; Stephen J. Adams; C. David Stow; Stephen J. de Mora

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Frontiers of Chemistry for Americium and Curium  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The discoveries of americium and curium were made only after Seaborg had formulated his actinide concept in order to design the chemistry needed to separate them from irradiated /sup 239/Pu targets. Their discoveries thus furnished the first clear-cut evidence that the series exists and justified Seaborg`s bold assumption that even though Th and Pa appeared to presage a following 6d series, the pattern established by the periodic table after Cs and Ba would be repeated exactly after Fr and Ra. That is to say, a new 5f element rare earth series (the actinides) would follow Ac in the same way the 4f rare earth series (the lanthanides) follows La. The consequences of the resulting half-filled 5f/sup 7/ shell at Cm were originally presented by Seaborg as a test of his hypothesis. Recent research is outlined that substantiates Seaborg`s predictions in new and definitive ways.

Keller, O. L. Jr.

1984-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

246

Characterizing Heavy Ion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ion Heavy Ion Reactions in the 1980's Is there Treasure at the end of the Rainbow? & What happens and how do different modes compete? John Schiffer One of the three research areas for ATLAS, as stated in a 1984 document to Congress: Are there some new marvelous symmetries, hidden in resonances in heavier nuclei, beyond 12 C+ 12 C and its immediate vicinity? (s.c. linac work, pre-ATLAS) Other attempts to chase the rainbow 180 o elastic scattering of 12 C on 40 Ca shows structure Fusion of 16 O on 40 Ca does not. In the end, it seemed that these structures were sometimes present in alpha-particle nuclei, but almost never in others. Some optimists, continued the pursuit. We also looked at the total fusion cross section in systems that showed resonances in scattering.

247

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

Ray Johnson

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

NEW EXPERIMENTAL INSIGHTS INTO THE PRODUCTION OF SUPER-HEAVY ELEMENTS USING HEAVY ION REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. M. F. US Blann; US ERDA Report C00-3494-29, Rochester,Rev. C _U, 508 (1975); ERDA Report C00-3494-32, "Overlaid

Otto, R.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Heavy Ions - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ions Heavy Ions Heavy ions used at the BASE Facility are accelerated in the form of "cocktails," named because of the fact that several heavy ions with the same mass-to-charge ratio are sent into the Cyclotron, which accelerates the ions while acting as a precision mass separator. The Control Room Operator then uses Cyclotron frequency to select only the desired ion, a process that takes about 2 minutes. We provide four standard cocktails: 4.5, 10, 16, and 30 MeV/nucleon. Depending on the cocktail, LETs from 1 to 100 MeV/(mg/cm^2) and flux levels of up to 1E7 ions/cm2-sec are available. Parts are tested in our vacuum chamber, and can be remotely positioned horizontally, vertically, or rotationally (y and z axes) with the motion table. An alignment laser is available to ensure the part is in the center of the beam. Mounting hardware is readily available. 12xBNC (F-F), 2x25-pin D (F-M or M-F), 4x40-pin flat ribbon (M-M), 4x50-pin flat ribbon (M-M), 12xSMA (F-F), and 2xEthernet vacuum feedthroughs are mounted upon request. (The 4x40-pin and 4x50-pin flat ribbon connectors are wired straight across, so you will need a F-F adapter to correct the pin numbers to normal.) Holes are provided through the cave shielding blocks for connecting additional test equipment, with a distance of approximately 10 feet from vacuum feedthrough to the top of the shielding block.

250

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Chemistry Central Journal Commentary Molecular biology: Self-sustaining chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Molecular biology is an established interdisciplinary field within biology that deals fundamentally with the function of any nucleic acid in the cellular context. The molecular biology section in Chemistry Central Journal focusses on the genetically determined chemistry and biochemistry occuring in the cell. How can thousands of chemical reactions interact smoothly to maintain the life of cells, even in a variable environment? How is this self-sustaining system achieved? These are questions that should be answered in the light of molecular biology and evolution, but with the application of biophysical, physico-chemical, analytical and preparative technologies. As the Section Editor for the molecular biology section in Chemistry Central Journal, I hope to receive manuscripts that present new approaches aimed at better answering and shedding light upon these fascinating questions related to the chemistry of livings cells. Molecular biology in Chemistry Central Journal At the outset, let me pose two important questions: Why

Paul Wrede

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

INTERCOMPARISON STUDY OF ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN RAW AND SPENT OIL SHALES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor Elements ~n Oil Shale and Oil-Shale Products. LERC RI-Analytical Chemistry of Oil Shale and Tar Sands. Advan. inFischer Assay of Standard Oil-Shale Sample. Preprints, Div.

Fox, J.P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron Imaging Archaeopteryx specimens are important but extremely rare fossils. Due to their possession of both reptilian (jaws with teeth, long bony tail) and avian (feathered wings) characters, Archaeopteryx has been crucial in the development of Darwinian evolution. Despite their importance, no Archaeopteryx specimen has ever been chemically analyzed. This in large part may be explained by the analytical obstacles which preclude applying standard methods to such valuable specimens; destructive sampling is not an option and most non-destructive methods cannot handle large specimens. Furthermore, mapping using conventional methods is far too slow to enable chemical zonation to be reasonably determined. Mapping of trace element chemistry is of tremendous interest, however, because it opens a window into understanding several critical questions about Archaeopteryx in particular, and about fossil specimens in general. Preserved trace chemistry in bones and soft tissue may be remnants of the living organism, and therefore may give insight into life processes of extinct organisms. When mapping includes the embedding rock matrix, mass transfer between the fossil and the matrix can be constrained, hence giving information about mode of preservation. Chemical analysis can also resolve artefacts of the curation process. Finally, accurate chemical maps can also be useful for directing future work by highlighting regions that may be promising for other types of analysis including structural methods (CT, diffraction) or techniques that use other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum (infra-red).

254

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical issues...

255

COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL COMPLEXES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molecular coordination chemistry of CH3NC has been reported.features of this surface chemistry. ACKNOw"LEDGMENTS The1980 Catalysis~ COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND

Muetterties, E.L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Heavy Truck Engine Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

Nelson, Christopher

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

257

Pyrochemical separations chemistry of plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recovery and purification of plutonium involves interesting chemistry. Currently in use are several high temperature processes based on redox reactions. These processes include direct oxide reduction which uses calcium to reduce the oxide to the free metal and electrorefining which is used as a final purification step. The chemical research group at Rocky Flats is currently investigating the use of an aluminum/magnesium alloy to remove the ionic plutonium from the salts used in the above named processes. The results of this study along with an overview of pyrochemical plutonium processing chemistry will be presented.

Bynum, R.V.; Navratil, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

PHOSPHORUS CHEMISTRY IN THE SHOCKED REGION L1157 B1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the evolution of phosphorus-bearing species in one-dimensional C-shock models. We find that the abundances of P-bearing species depend sensitively on the elemental abundance of P in the gas phase and on the abundance of N atoms in the pre-shock gas. The observed abundance of PN and the non-detection of PO toward L1157 B1 are reproduced in C-shock models with shock velocity v = 20 km s{sup -1} and pre-shock density n(H{sub 2}) 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, if the elemental abundance of P in the gas phase is {approx}10{sup -9} and the N-atom abundance is n(N)/n{sub H} {approx}10{sup -5} in the pre-shock gas. We also find that P-chemistry is sensitive to O- and N-chemistry because N atoms are destroyed mainly by OH and NO. We identify the reactions of O-bearing and N-bearing species that significantly affect P-chemistry.

Aota, T.; Aikawa, Y. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

259

CHEMISTRY 213B: Introductory Physical Chemistry I. General Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and applications 9.4 Lecture 21. Chemical equilibrium 11 February 25 - March 1: STUDY BREAK Lecture 22. Chemical Chemistry. Supplementary Texts 1. P. A. Rock, Chemical Thermodynamics. 2. Gordon M. Barrow, Physical of gases 2 Lecture 3. Empirical properties of liquids and solids 5 Lecture 4. Molecular basis: Kinetic

Ronis, David M.

260

Technology Analysis - Heavy Vehicle Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the GPRA benefits estimates for EERE's Vehicle Technologies Program's heavy vehicle technology research activities. Argonne researchers develop the benefits analysis using four...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DEDICATED HEAVY ION MEDICAL ACCELERATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. , ,8iological and Medical Research with Acceleratedet al. , "Biological and Medical Research with J\\cceleratedic Heavy Ions in Medical and Scientific Research, Edmonton,

Gough, R.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Heavy Ion Fusion development plan  

SciTech Connect

Some general cnsiderations in the fusion development program are given. The various factors are considered that must be determined before heavy ion fusion can be assessed. (MOW)

Maschke, A.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Very high energy heavy-ion accelerators  

SciTech Connect

A review is given of various programs for building heavy ion accelerators. Topics discussed are (1) options of reaching very high energies with heavy ions; (2) present performance of the superHILAC and the Bevalac; (3) heavy ion sources; (4) applications of heavy ion accelerators outside of basic research; and (5) reliability and operating costs of heavy ion sources. (PMA)

Grunder, H.A.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I). Johannes Ull~.ich, in Bio-Organic Chc! mistry Qiinrtcr-sodium E. A. Shneour, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly2, Edwige Tyszkiewicz, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Qnarterly

Various

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Monday, 25 February 2013 15:59 Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are...

266

Boron chemistry reported in Chemical Reviews  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

813chemistry 03282013 Boron chemistry reported in Chemical Reviews Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly A ball-and-stick structural model of...

267

THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterization of aerosols." in Nature. Aim. and MethodsLAWRENCE THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY T. NovakovTHE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY* T. Novakov Lawrence

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Computing Policy Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Policy Department of Chemistry Michigan Technological University This document describes the rules and regulations concerning the acquisition, provision, maintenance, and use of the computing established by: · Michigan Internet Provider, MERIT: (http://www.merit.edu/) · MTU Computer Advisory Committee

Honrath, Richard E.

269

Chemistry Monitoring and Control for Fuel Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water chemistry has been identified as a known or potential contributing cause in recent corrosion-induced fuel failures and anomalies such as fuel crud spallation and enhanced nodular corrosion. The 2004 revision of the BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines (EPRI report 1008192) addressed these concerns by recommending tighter chemistry control limits and additional monitoring for contaminants and additives that can have an adverse effect on fuel cladding corrosion. The revision focused on chemistry control fo...

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

270

Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Annual Report 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report describes the research and staff accomplishments in 2000 for the EMSL Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Directorate.

Grate, Jay W.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ivaco Rolling Mills LP, Chemistry Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ivaco Rolling Mills LP, Chemistry Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200143-0. Address and Contact Information: Highway 17 ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

273

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Cycle Chemistry Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective monitoring of the purity of water and steam is an integral part of any productive cycle chemistry monitoring program. The Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry guidelines identified a group of core monitoring parameters that are considered the minimum requirements. Meeting these requirements is part of EPRI's cycle chemistry benchmarking criteria for HRSGs. In addition to the core parameters, many chemistry parameters might need to be ...

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Modeling biochemical pathways using an artificial chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial chemistries are candidates for methodologies that model and design biochemical systems. If artificial chemistries can deal with such systems in beneficial ways, they may facilitate activities in the new area of biomolecular engineering. In ... Keywords: Artificial chemistry, biochemical pathways, biomolecular engineering, modularity, reasoning, scalability

Kazuto Tominaga; Yoshikazu Suzuki; Keiji Kobayashi; Tooru Watanabe; Kazumasa Koizumi; Koji Kishi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Heavy Machine Shop | Central Fabrication Services | Brookhaven...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Machine Shop Heavy Machine Shop The Heavy Machine Shop facility is located in building 479, and may be accessed by the main door on the north face or front of the building....

276

Heavy crude oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The oil crisis of the past decade has focused most of the attention and effort of researchers on crude oil resources, which are accepted as unrecoverable using known technology. World reserves are estimated to be 600-1000 billion metric tons, and with present technology 160 billion tons of this total can be recovered. This book is devoted to the discussion of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques, their mechanism and applicability to heavy oil reservoirs. The book also discusses some field results. The use of numerical simulators has become important, in addition to laboratory research, in analysing the applicability of oil recovery processes, and for this reason the last section of the book is devoted to simulators used in EOR research.

Okandan, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

International team discovers element 117 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

team discovers element 117 team discovers element 117 International team discovers element 117 April 6, 2010 - 12:14pm Addthis An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. "The discovery of element 117 is the culmination of a decade-long journey to expand the periodic table and write the next chapter in heavy element research," said Academician Yuri Oganessian, scientific leader of the

278

International team discovers element 117 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International team discovers element 117 International team discovers element 117 International team discovers element 117 April 6, 2010 - 12:14pm Addthis An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. "The discovery of element 117 is the culmination of a decade-long journey to expand the periodic table and write the next chapter in heavy element research," said Academician Yuri Oganessian, scientific leader of the

279

SYNCHROTRONS FOR HEAVY IONS - BEVALAC EXPERIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy Ions ir. Medical and Scientific Research", Edmonton,Heavy Ions in Medical and Scientific Research" Edmonton,vigorous medical and nuclear science research groups. The

Grunder, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Glimpse of heavy electrons reveals "hidden order"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glimpse of heavy electrons reveals "hidden order" Glimpse of heavy electrons reveals "hidden order" The remarkable breakthrough helps validate theory behind the observed increase...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

BNL Photo- and Radiation Chemistry Group Members  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Radiation Chemistry Group and Radiation Chemistry Group Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory Staff Diane E. Cabelli Redox chemistry of high oxidation state transition-metal complexes, particularly CuIII, MnIII/MnIV; Superoxide chemistry in aqueous solutions: dismutation of superoxide radical; copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and model compounds. Andrew R. Cook Excited state structure, dynamics and electron transfer reactions of a variety of organic radicals in both low temperature matrices and room temperature solutions using radiation chemistry techniques. Robert A. Crowell Ultrafast reaction phenomena. Etsuko Fujita Photochemistry of transition-metal complexes, small molecule activation by high- and low-oxidation state metal complexes; and biomimetic chemistry of porphyrins and enzymes.

282

(Chemistry of the global atmosphere)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

Marland, G.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cold Controlled Chemistry Roman Krems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Possible applications of cold controlled chemistry #12; #¢¡ ©£¡ ! # %¢ ¥¤6#¢¡§¦ # ¤¨¤§! # ¤§¦ Centrifugal processes remains a significant challenge..." Paul Brumer, DAMOP 2007, Bulletin of the APS #12;Thermal gas is difficult to control #12;Low temperature gas under external fieldE #12;E BLow temperature gas

Krems, Roman

284

IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

E. Thomas

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Programmatic mission capabilities - chemistry and metallurgy research replacement (CMRR) project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CMRR will have analysis capabilities that support all the nuclear-material programs and national security needs. CMRR will replace the aging CMR Building and provide a key component responsive infrastructure necessary to sustain all nuclear programs and the nuclear-weapons complex. Material characterization capabilities - evaluate the microstructures and properties of nuclear materials and provide experimental data to validate process and performance models. Analytical chemistry capabilities - provide expertise in chemical and radiochemical analysis of materials where actinide elements make up a significant portion of the sample.

Gunderson, L Nguyen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kornreich, Drew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wong, Amy S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

286

Heavy ion fusion--Using heavy ions to make electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a practical fusion power reactor. HIF is the only fusionenter the reactor chamber, and focus Heavy Ion Fusion ontoengineering test reactor. The promise of fusion as a power

Celata, C.M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Heavy Ion Colliders at Heavy Ion Colliders Theory Drivers & View from LHC Urs Achim Wiedemann CERN PH-TH NSAC Implementation Subcommittee Hearings 7 September 2012 Heavy Ion Physics - Main Tools of Theorists Understanding properties of hot and dense matter from the elementary interactions in QCD High Energy Physics String Theory Computational Physics Fluid Dynamics Dissipative fluid dynamic description * Based on: E-p conservation: 2 nd law of thermodynamics: * Sensitive to properties of matter that are calculated from first principles in quantum field theory - EOS: and sound velocity - transport coefficients: shear , bulk viscosity, conductivities ...

288

Chemistry and Materials Science Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's mission is as clear today as it was in 1952 when the Laboratory was founded--to ensure our country's national security and the safety and reliability of its nuclear deterrent. As a laboratory pursuing applied science in the national interest, we strive to accomplish our mission through excellence in science and technology. We do this while developing and implementing sound and robust business practices in an environment that emphasizes security and ensures our safety and the safety of the community around us. Our mission as a directorate derives directly from the Laboratory's charter. When I accepted the assignment of Associate Director for Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS), I talked to you about the need for strategic balance and excellence in all our endeavors. We also discussed how to take the directorate to the next level. The long-range CMS strategic plan presented here was developed with this purpose in mind. It also aligns with the Lab's institutional long-range science and technology plan and its 10-year facilities and infrastructure site plan. The plan is aimed at ensuring that we fulfill our directorate's two governing principles: (1) delivering on our commitments to Laboratory programs and sponsors, and (2) anticipating change and capitalizing on opportunities through innovation in science and technology. This will require us to attain a new level of creativity, agility, and flexibility as we move forward. Moreover, a new level of engagement in partnerships with other directorates across the Laboratory as well as with universities and other national labs will also be required. The group of managers and staff that I chartered to build a strategic plan identified four organizing themes that define our directorate's work and unite our staff with a set of common goals. The plan presented here explains how we will proceed in each of these four theme areas: (1) Materials properties and performance under extreme conditions--Fundamental investigations of the properties and performance of states of matter under extreme dynamic, environmental, and nanoscale conditions, with an emphasis on materials of interest to Laboratory programs and mission needs. (2) Chemistry under extreme conditions and chemical engineering to support national security programs--Insights into the chemical reactions of energetic materials in the nuclear stockpile through models of molecular response to extreme conditions of temperature and pressure, advancing a new technique for processing energetic materials by using sol-gel chemistry, providing materials for NIF optics, and furthering developments to enhance other high-power lasers. (3) Science supporting national objectives at the intersection of chemistry, materials science, and biology--Multidisciplinary research for developing new technologies to combat chemical and biological terrorism, to monitor changes in the nation's nuclear stockpile, and to enable the development and application of new physical-science-based methodologies and tools for fundamental biology studies and human health applications. (4) Applied nuclear science for human health and national security: Nuclear science research that is used to develop new methods and technologies for detecting and attributing nuclear materials, assisting Laboratory programs that require nuclear and radiochemical expertise in carrying out their missions, discovering new elements in the periodic table, and finding ways of detecting and understanding cellular response to radiation.

Rhodie, K B; Mailhiot, C; Eaglesham, D; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Turpin, L S; Allen, P G

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

289

Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys  

SciTech Connect

A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

DEGRADATION EVALUATION OF HEAVY WATER DRUMS AND TANKS  

SciTech Connect

Heavy water with varying chemistries is currently being stored in over 6700 drums in L- and K-areas and in seven tanks in L-, K-, and C-areas. A detailed evaluation of the potential degradation of the drums and tanks, specific to their design and service conditions, has been performed to support the demonstration of their integrity throughout the desired storage period. The 55-gallon drums are of several designs with Type 304 stainless steel as the material of construction. The tanks have capacities ranging from 8000 to 45600 gallons and are made of Type 304 stainless steel. The drums and tanks were designed and fabricated to national regulations, codes and standards per procurement specifications for the Savannah River Site. The drums have had approximately 25 leakage failures over their 50+ years of use with the last drum failure occurring in 2003. The tanks have experienced no leaks to date. The failures in the drums have occurred principally near the bottom weld, which attaches the bottom to the drum sidewall. Failures have occurred by pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking and are attributable, in part, to the presence of chloride ions in the heavy water. Probable degradation mechanisms for the continued storage of heavy water were evaluated that could lead to future failures in the drum or tanks. This evaluation will be used to support establishment of an inspection plan which will include susceptible locations, methods, and frequencies for the drums and tanks to avoid future leakage failures.

Mickalonis, J.; Vormelker, P.

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Post Production Heavy Oil Operations: A Case for Partial Upgrading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transportation of heavy oil is a pressing problem. Various methods have been devised to mitigate the reluctance to flow of these highly dense and viscous oils. This study is focused on evaluating a case for post-production partial upgrading of heavy oil. Specifically, we analyze the impact of visbreaking, a mild thermal cracking method, on the economic and energy demands of the post-production process. Using conservative modeling techniques and principles we find significant cost and energy savings can potentially result out of visbreaking. Cost savings result as a consequence of reduced diluent usage. Even the most conservative modeling scenario under consideration exhibits significant cost savings in the form of reduced diluent usage; these savings not only offset operational costs but provide short payback periods on capital expenditures. Additionally, the lower gravity blend resulting from visbreaking can also bring about energy and cost savings in pipeline transportation and positively impact the heavy oil value chain from the producer to a refinery or regional upgrading facility. From this basic analysis of the potential of visbreaking, we can recommend investing resources to study its viability in the field. Using this analysis as a tipping off point and with a detailed look at the chemistry of the oil in question it is possible to make a very viable case for visbreaking. In a similar vein, this analysis can serve as a guide in making a case for other partial upgrading methods as well.

Lokhandwala, Taher

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

STATUS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE.  

SciTech Connect

During discussions within the Inorganic Chemistry Division Committee, that dealt with the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements and the official IUPAC position on its presentation, the following question was raised. When the various chemical elements are presented, each with their appropriate atomic weight value, how should the radioactive elements be presented? The Atomic Weights Commission has treated this question in a number of different ways during the past century, almost in a random manner. This report reviews the position that the Commission has taken as a function of time, as a prelude to a discussion in Ottawa about how the Commission should resolve this question for the future.

HOLDEN,N.E.

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

In-Package Chemistry Abstraction  

SciTech Connect

This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model that uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model that is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed waste packages that contain both high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor that diffuses into the waste package, and (2) seepage water that enters the waste package from the drift as a liquid. (1) Vapor Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H2O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Water Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package. TSPA-LA uses the vapor influx case for the nominal scenario for simulations where the waste package has been breached but the drip shield remains intact, so all of the seepage flow is diverted from the waste package. The chemistry from the vapor influx case is used to determine the stability of colloids and the solubility of radionuclides available for transport by diffusion, and to determine the degradation rates for the waste forms. TSPA-LA uses the water influx case for the seismic scenario, where the waste package has been breached and the drip shield has been damaged such that seepage flow is actually directed into the waste package. The chemistry from the water influx case that is a function of the flow rate is used to determine the stability of colloids and the solubility of radionuclides available for transport by diffusion and advection, and to determine the degradation rates for the CSNF and HLW glass. TSPA-LA does not use this model for the igneous scenario. Outputs from the in-package chemistry model implemented inside TSPA-LA include pH, ionic strength, and total carbonate concentration. These inputs to TSPA-LA will be linked to the following principle factors: dissolution rates of the CSNF and HLWG, dissolved concentrations of radionuclides, and colloid generation.

E. Thomas

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

The physics of heavy flavors  

SciTech Connect

We review the physics of heavy quark flavors, including weak decays, onium, tau leptons, mixing, the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, and CP violation in B decay. 36 refs., 12 figs.

Gilman, F.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

indicate that collisions of small particles with large gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider may be serving up miniscule servings of hot quark-gluon plasma. RHIC...

296

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider website has moved to www.bnl.govrhicdefault.asp Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics. Last...

297

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Photo of LINAC The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a world-class particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory where physicists are exploring the most fundamental forces and properties of matter and the early universe. RHIC accelerates beams of particles (e.g., the nuclei of heavy atoms such as gold) to nearly the speed of light, and smashes them together to recreate a state of matter thought to have existed immediately after the Big Bang some 13.8 billion years ago. STAR and PHENIX, two large detectors located around the 2.4-mile-circumference accelerator, take "snapshots" of these collisions to reveal a glimpse of the basic constituents of visible matter, quarks and gluons. Understanding matter at

298

LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

Kishiyama, K. I.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ames Lab Plays Elemental Role in New PBS Special | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab Plays Elemental Role in New PBS Special Lab Plays Elemental Role in New PBS Special Ames Lab Plays Elemental Role in New PBS Special April 4, 2012 - 2:34pm Addthis New York Times technology correspondent David Pogue -- host of NOVA’s popular “Making Stuff” series -- takes viewers on a quest to understand chemistry and all of the materials of life: the 118 unique elements that make up the amazing periodic table, including the 90 naturally-occurring elements and those created by scientists. | Photo courtesy of PBS. New York Times technology correspondent David Pogue -- host of NOVA's popular "Making Stuff" series -- takes viewers on a quest to understand chemistry and all of the materials of life: the 118 unique elements that make up the amazing periodic table, including the 90 naturally-occurring

300

Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ultrafast lasers have been used to enable multiplex CARS spectroscopy with a clear sensitivity advantages over conventional Raman spectroscopy ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... supported experiments to examine the repeatability of pre-flashover fire patterns generated by short-duration fires from natural gas, gasoline, and ...

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

302

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Appendix C Analytical Chemistry Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Chemistry Data This page intentionally left blank Contents Section Analytical Data for Deleted Contaminants of Concern ............................................................. C1.O Mol~tezuma Creek Hardness Dat Surface Water Copper Data Summa ................ CI-9 Surface Water Radium-228 Dat Surface Water Radon-222 Data Summary ....................... ....................................... . . . . . . . . . . . C l - I 2 Alluvial Ground Water Aln~noniuu~ as Nitrogen Data Summary ....................... . . . ................................ Cl-15 Alluvial Ground Water Cobalt Data Summary ........... Alluvial Ground Water Copper Data Sumrl Alluvial Ground Water Lead Data Su~nmary ................................. C1-19 Alluvial Ground Water Lead-210 Data Sutl~rnary

304

Advancing manufacturing through computational chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The capabilities of nanotechnology and computational chemistry are reaching a point of convergence. New computer hardware and novel computational methods have created opportunities to test proposed nanometer-scale devices, investigate molecular manufacturing and model and predict properties of new materials. Experimental methods are also beginning to provide new capabilities that make the possibility of manufacturing various devices with atomic precision tangible. In this paper, we will discuss some of the novel computational methods we have used in molecular dynamics simulations of polymer processes, neural network predictions of new materials, and simulations of proposed nano-bearings and fluid dynamics in nano- sized devices.

Noid, D.W.; Sumpter, B.G.; Tuzun, R.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials uploaded are meant to serve as final report on the funds provided by DOE-BES to help sponsor the 2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry.

Carter, Emily A

2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Chemistry and Technology of Magnesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 20, 2007 ... In 17 chapters, The Chemistry and Technology of Magnesia covers a wide variety of topics that range from history to economic geology, mining,...

307

Chemistry of Addition-Type Polyimides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...of polyimides are shown in 6and Fig. 5The basic chemistry of the PE series of imide oligomers is illustrated

308

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are drawing attention in many areas of catalysis as scientists attempt to reduce...

309

Charge Carrier Chemistry in Nanoscopic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Defect chemistry is explored in space charge zones with emphasis on mesoscopic situations. After a general overview two representative

310

Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intro Chem and MatSci Apps Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26, 2012 L ast edited: 2013-05-28 15:53:12...

311

BNL Photo- and Radiation Chemistry Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chemistry, and photophysics; energy transduction by electron-transfer reactions; and energy storage through chemical transformations. Theoretical and experimental efforts are...

312

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids).

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Detection Science Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national...

314

Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sbastien

Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions of ionizing radiation and photons with ionic liquids is strongly needed. However, the radiation chemistry...

317

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement - Nuclear Facility...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement - Nuclear Facility (CMRR-NF SEIS) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

318

The Materials Project: Combining Quantum Chemistry Calculations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Materials Project: Combining Quantum Chemistry Calculations with Supercomputing Centers for New Materials Discovery Speaker(s): Anubhav Jain Date: December 18, 2012 - 12:00pm...

319

WEB: The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... The American Chemical Society's website "The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry" provides 12 videos related to the history of nuclear...

320

Supported organometallic complexes: Surface chemistry, spectroscopy, and catalysis. Progress report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The long-range goal of this project is to elucidate and understand the surface chemistry and catalytic properties of well-defined, highly-reactive organometallic molecules (principally based upon abundant actinide, lanthanide, and early transition elements) adsorbed on metal oxides and halides. The nature of the adsorbed species is probed by a battery of chemical and physicochemical techniques, to understand the nature of the molecular-surface coordination chemistry and how this can give rise to extremely high catalytic activity. A complementary objective is to delineate the scope and mechanisms of the heterogeneous catalytic reactions, as well as to relate them both conceptually and functionally to model systems generated in solution.

Marks, T.J.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Onderwerpscodes Chemie -Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry -Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie -Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Onderwerpscodes Chemie - Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie - Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy Gang . kast - Aisle . bookcase 01 Algemeen 01 chemie 05 Physical chemistry 10.08 - 06 Chemische binding 06 Chemical bonding 10.13 - 07 Anorganische

Galis, Frietson

322

Coupled chemistry/climate issues  

SciTech Connect

Driven by both natural and anthropogenic causes, the distributions of trace chemical species in the atmosphere has altered the natural state of the chemical distribution and, the authors believe, the climate system. A clear example of this change and its effect on climate is through tropospheric ozone. Evidence shows that over the last decade tropospheric ozone has increased, probably caused by increasing concentrations and emissions of CH{sub 4}, CO, NO{sub x}, and NMHCs (nonmethane hydrocarbons). Tropospheric ozone is photochemically produced when nitrogen oxides react in the presence of carbon monoxide, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons and sunlight. The chemistry of ozone and NO{sub x} is also closely associated with the hydroxyl radical (OH), which governs the atmospheric lifetime of a number of species, including CH{sub 4} and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which are major greenhouse gases and which affect the chemical balance of the stratosphere. Increases in the concentrations of CO and CH{sub 4} can lead to decreased concentrations of OH and a positive feedback on the atmospheric lifetimes of CO and methane. The same would occur for other greenhouse gases and for some of the important reactions which form aerosols in the troposphere. This would further enhance the concentrations of the gases and accelerate the radiative effects from these greenhouse species, strongly affecting climate and the accurate prediction of climate. It is believed that warmer climates will also increase the amount of water in the atmosphere, thereby providing another chemistry feedback on OH.

Rotman, D.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Global Climate Research Div.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

Liqiang Wei

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Magnesium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum Isotopes of the Element Magnesium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 24 78.99% STABLE 25 10.00% STABLE 26 11.01% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 19 4.0 picoseconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 20 90.8 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission ~ 27.00% 21 122 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 32.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay < 0.50%

325

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Chlorine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon Isotopes of the Element Chlorine [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 35 75.76% STABLE 37 24.24% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 28 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 29 < 20 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 30 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 31 150 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.70% 32 298 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

326

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Potassium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium Isotopes of the Element Potassium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 39 93.2581% STABLE 40 0.0117% 1.248×10+9 years 41 6.7302% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 32 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 33 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 34 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 35 178 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.37% 36 342 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

327

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine Isotopes of the Element Oxygen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 16 99.757% STABLE 17 0.038% STABLE 18 0.205% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 12 1.139×10-21 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available 13 8.58 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 14 70.620 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 15 122.24 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 16 STABLE - - 17 STABLE - - 18 STABLE - - 19 26.88 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

328

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Gallium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Previous Element (Zinc) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Germanium) Germanium Isotopes of the Element Gallium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 69 60.108% STABLE 71 39.892% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 56 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 57 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 58 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 59 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 60 70 milliseconds Electron Capture 98.40%

329

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

330

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Neon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium Isotopes of the Element Neon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 20 90.48% STABLE 21 0.27% STABLE 22 9.25% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 16 9×10-21 seconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 17 109.2 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay No Data Available Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 18 1.6670 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 19 17.22 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 20 STABLE - -

331

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Copper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc Isotopes of the Element Copper [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 63 69.15% STABLE 65 30.85% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 52 No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 53 < 300 nanoseconds Electron Capture No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 54 < 75 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 55 27 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 15.0% 56 93 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

332

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Boron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon Isotopes of the Element Boron [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 10 19.9% STABLE 11 80.1% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 6 No Data Available Double Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 7 3.255×10-22 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 8 770 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 100.00% 9 8.439×10-19 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Double Alpha Decay 100.00%

333

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Tungsten  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tantalum Tantalum Previous Element (Tantalum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhenium) Rhenium Isotopes of the Element Tungsten [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 180 0.12% >= 6.6×10+17 years 182 26.50% STABLE 183 14.31% > 1.3×10+19 years 184 30.64% STABLE 186 28.43% > 2.3×10+19 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 157 275 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 158 1.25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 158m 0.143 milliseconds Isomeric Transition No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 159 7.3 milliseconds Alpha Decay ~ 99.90%

334

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Radon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Astatine Astatine Previous Element (Astatine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Francium) Francium Isotopes of the Element Radon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Radon has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 193 1.15 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 194 0.78 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195 6 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195m 5 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 196 4.4 milliseconds Alpha Decay 99.90% Electron Capture ~ 0.10% 197 53 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 197m 25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 198 65 milliseconds Alpha Decay No Data Available

335

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boron Boron Previous Element (Boron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nitrogen) Nitrogen Isotopes of the Element Carbon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 12 98.93% STABLE 13 1.07% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 8 1.981×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay No Data Available 9 126.5 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 61.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 38.40% 10 19.308 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 11 20.334 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 12 STABLE - -

336

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Rhenium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium Isotopes of the Element Rhenium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 185 37.40% STABLE 187 62.60% 4.33×10+10 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 159 No Data Available No Data Available No Data Available 160 0.82 milliseconds Proton Emission 91.00% Alpha Decay 9.00% 161 0.44 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay <= 1.40% 161m 14.7 milliseconds Alpha Decay 93.00% Proton Emission 7.00% 162 107 milliseconds Alpha Decay 94.00% Electron Capture 6.00%

337

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 31 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 24 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 25 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 26 43.7 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data Available 27 260 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with

338

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Francium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radon Radon Previous Element (Radon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radium) Radium Isotopes of the Element Francium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Francium has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 199 12 milliseconds Alpha Decay > 0.00% Electron Capture No Data Available 200 49 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 201 62 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 201m 19 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 202 0.30 seconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 202m 0.29 seconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 203 0.55 seconds Alpha Decay <= 100.00% 204 1.8 seconds Alpha Decay 92.00%

339

NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boron-10 containing reactor control element wherein the boron-10 is dispersed in a matrix material is describeri. The concentration of boron-10 in the matrix varies transversely across the element from a minimum at the surface to a maximum at the center of the element, prior to exposure to neutrons. (AEC)

Beaver, R.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.

1962-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

340

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory search U.S. Department of Energy logo Home RHIC Science News Images Videos For Scientists Björn Schenke 490th Brookhaven Lecture, 12/18 Join Björn Schenke of Brookhaven Lab's Physics Department for the 490th Brookhaven Lecture, titled 'The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions,' on Wednesday, Dec. 18, at 4 p.m. in Berkner Hall. droplets Tiny Drops of Hot Quark Soup-How Small Can They Be? New analyses indicate that collisions of small particles with large gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider may be serving up miniscule servings of hot quark-gluon plasma. RHIC Physics RHIC is the first machine in the world capable of colliding ions as heavy as gold. The Spin Puzzle RHIC is the world's only machine capable of colliding beams of polarized

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CMVRTC: Heavy Truck Duty Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heavy truck duty cycle (HTDC) project heavy truck duty cycle (HTDC) project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project was initiated in 2004 and is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies Program. ORNL designed the research program to generate real-world-based duty cycle data from trucks operating in long-haul operations and was designed to be conducted in three phases: identification of parameters to be collected, instrumentation and pilot testing, identification of a real-world fleet, design of the data collection suite and fleet instrumentation, and data collection, analysis, and development of a duty cycle generation tool (DCGT). ANL logo dana logo michelin logo Schrader logo This type of data will be useful for supporting energy efficiency

342

Jet quenching and heavy quarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jet quenching and more generally physics at high transverse momentum P_T scales is a cornerstone of the heavy-ion physics program at the LHC. In this work, the current understanding of jet quenching in terms of a QCD shower evolution being modified by the surrounding medium is reviewed along with the evidence for this picture from light parton high P_T observables. Conceptually, the same QCD shower description should also be relevant for heavy quarks, but with several important modifications introduced by the quark masses. Thus especially in the limit of small jet energy over quark mass E_jet/m_q, the relevant physics may be rather different from light quark jets, and several attempts to explain the observed phenomenology of heavy quarks at high P_T are discussed here.

Thorsten Renk

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

MILESTONES IN SOIL CHEMISTRY Donald L. Sparks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MILESTONES IN SOIL CHEMISTRY Donald L. Sparks An array of pioneering research, dealing with various aspects of soil chemistry, has appeared in Soil Science for the past 90 years. In this review, two papers others that he published in Soil Science established the importance of variable or pH- dependent surface

Sparks, Donald L.

344

Accelerators for heavy ion fusion  

SciTech Connect

Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

Bangerter, R.O.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. June through August 1963  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. G. K. Radda, in Bio -Organic Chemistry Quarterly Report,1963. 2. G. K. Radda, in Bio-Organic Chemistry QuarterlyBassham and Martha Kirk, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly

Various

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT - MARCH THROUGH MAY 1961  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. Morimoto, and A. Orme, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly1949, 55. P. R. Hammond, in Bio-Organic Chemistry QuarterlyPhysiol. Edward Markham, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly

Various

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Chemistry courses as the turning point for premedical students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-9165-3 ORIGINAL PAPER Chemistry courses as the turningnegative experiences in chemistry courses are a major factorTo determine if chemistry courses have a similar effect at a

Barr, Donald A.; Matsui, John; Wanat, Stanley F.; Gonzalez, Maria Elena

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

showcase the power of chemistry in creating novel materials.J. R. Journal of Physical Chemistry 1996, 100, 7212-7219.781-783. Lobana, T. S. In The chemistry of organophosphorous

Liu, Haitao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

2012 Short Course Olive Oil Chemistry and Sensory Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olive Oil Chemistry and Sensory Relationships held at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo. 2012 Short Course Olive Oil Chemistry and Sensory Relationships Olive Oil Chemistry and Sensory Relationships Saturday, April 28 -Sunday, A

350

CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

laboratory wings, and one area that includes hot cells that provide heavy shielding and remote handling capabilities for work on highly radioactive materials. Three laboratory...

351

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information · Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations are stable and their physical properties ... can be observed, thus allowing details of their structures to be determined. Besides trivalent ions ... Olah demonstrated the existence of higher coordinate carbocations ... . These species do not violate the octet rule, but involve 2-electron 3-center bonding. '1

352

Aqueous complexes in f-element separation science  

SciTech Connect

Powerful and/or selective extractant molecules/sorbents are a necessary component of an efficient ion exchange or solvent extraction separation process. However, selectivity in extraction and efficiency in process design often rely on reactions occurring in or moderated by the aqueous medium. The focus of this report in on the role of the aqueous phase and reaction that occur in aquo in defining separation efficiency and metal ion selectivity. As the programmatic emphasis is on actinide solution chemistry, the separations chemistry of the f-elements will be used to illustrate the principal role of aqueous chemistry in separation science. Most of the arguments developed apply to metal ion separations chemistry and processes in general. The discussion will consider the application of aqueous complexants, incorporation of aqueous complexants into the extracted complex, and the effect of properties of the aqueous medium on separation efficiency and selectivity. Several historically important separations processes will be considered along with recent efforts in these laboratories to design and characterize new water soluble complexants for improved f-element separations.

Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Accelerators for heavy ion inertial fusion: Progress and plans  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Program is the principal part of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program in the Office of Fusion Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy. The emphasis of the Heavy Ion Program is the development of accelerators for fusion power production. Target physics research and some elements of fusion chamber development are supported in the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, a dual purpose (defense and energy) program in the Defense Programs part of the Department of Energy. The accelerator research program will establish feasibility through a sequence of scaled experiments that will demonstrate key physics and engineering issues at low cost compared to other fusion programs. This paper discusses progress in the accelerator program and outlines how the planned research will address the key economic issues of inertial fusion energy.

Bangerter, R.O.; Friedman, A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids Liquids James F. Wishart, Alison M. Funston, and Tomasz Szreder in "Molten Salts XIV" Mantz, R. A., et al., Eds.; The Electrochemical Society, Pennington, NJ, (2006) pp. 802-813. [Information about the volume (look just above this link)] Abstract: Ionic liquids have potentially important applications in nuclear fuel and waste processing, energy production, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments will require an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of ionic liquid radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material

355

UCRL-11359 UC-4 Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1359 1359 UC-4 Chemistry TID-45 (27th Ed ) UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Berkeley, California AEC Contract No. W-7405-eng-48 PROPOSED MOLECULAR BEAM DETERMINATION OF ENERGY PARTITION IN THE PHOTO DISSOCIATION OF POLYATOMIC MOLECULES Richard N. Zare and Dudley R. Herschba.ch January 29, 1.964 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

356

LA-2271 CHEMISTRY-GENERAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

2271 2271 CHEMISTRY-GENERAL TID-4500, 14th Ed. LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ALAMOS NEW MEXICO REPORT WRITTEN: August 1958 REPORT DISTRIBUTED: March 17, 1959 COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS AND FUGACITY COEFFICIENTS CALCULATED FROM THE BEATTIE-BRIDGEMAN EQUATION OF STATE FOR HYDROGEN, NITROGEN, OXYGEN, CARBON DIOXIDE, AMMONIA, METHANE, AND HELIUM by C. E. Holley, J r . W. J. Worlton R. K. Zeigler » * This report expresses the opinions of the author or authors and does not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Contract W-7405-ENG. 36 with the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

357

Chemistry implications of climate change  

SciTech Connect

Since preindustrial times, the concentrations of a number of key greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}) and the nitric oxides (N{sub 2}O) have increased. Additionally, the concentrations of anthropogenic aerosols have also increased during the same time period. Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are expected to increase temperature, while the aerosols tend to have a net cooling effect. Taking both of these effects into account, the current best scientific estimate is that the global average surface temperature is expected to increase by 2{degrees}C between the years 1990 to 2100. A climate change if this magnitude will both directly and indirectly impact atmospheric chemistry. For example, many important tropospheric reactions have a temperature dependence (either Arrhenius or otherwise). Thus, if temperature increase, reaction rates will also increase.

Atherton, C.S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

NA

2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate twentieth century transient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate twentieth century transient model investigation: Trends in short-lived species and climate responses Title Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate...

360

Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Chemistry...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2011 Chemistry Nobel Laureate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2011 Chemistry Nobel Laureate Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2011 Chemistry Nobel Laureate October 5, 2011 - 6:56pm Addthis WASHINGTON,...

362

EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA...

363

Computational Chemistry for Better Fuel Cells Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry for Better Fuel Cells Computational Chemistry for Better Fuel Cells Key Challenges: Rational development of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs). Fundamental scientific...

364

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Chemistry - It's More Than Puffs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Dinosaur Extinctions and Giant Asteroids) Dinosaur Extinctions and Giant Asteroids Chemistry - It's More Than Puffs and Bangs Dr. Joe Schwarcz - McGill Office for Chemistry and...

365

Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications Training at NERSC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 or 510-486-8611 Home For Users Training & Tutorials Training Events Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June...

366

NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences...

367

June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 15, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0...

368

Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2A GeV 3 Hadron Production from AGS to RHIC 3.1 SystematicsHadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions Hans Georg RitterAC02- 05CH11231. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

Ritter, Hans Georg

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Heavy Vehicle and Engine Resource Guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Vehicle and Engine Resource Guide is a catalog of medium- and heavy-duty engines and vehicles with alternative fuel and advanced powertrain options. This edition covers model year 2003 engines and vehicles.

Not Available

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Proton Distribution in Heavy Nuclei  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

It is reasoned that, from considerations connected with beta-decay stability and Coulomb repulsion forces, a neutron excess is developed on the surface of heavy nuclei. Several consequences of this qualitative analysis in nucleon interactions are briefly noted. (K.S.)

Johnson, M. H; Teller, E.

1953-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

371

Light-Heavy Price Difference Varies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Light-Heavy Price Difference Varies ; Function of Crude Market Factors ; Function of Conversion Capacity ; Function of Product Market Factors

372

Summary of the Heavy Flavours Working Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a summary of the contributions presented in the Heavy Flavours Working Group of the DIS2006 Workshop.

U. Karshon; I. Schienbein; P. Thompson

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

Oklahoma Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Oklahoma Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

374

Heavy Vehicle and Engine Resource Guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive product catalog of medium and heavy-duty engines and vehicles with alternative fuel and advanced powertrain options.

Not Available

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Mississippi Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

376

The synthetic elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to 1940, the heaviest element known was uranium, discovered in 1789. Since that time the elements 93 through 109 have been synthesized and identified and the elements 43, 61, 85, and 87 which were missing form the periodic tables of the 1930's have been discovered. The techniques and problems involved in these discoveries and the placement of the transuranium elements in the periodic table will be discussed. The production and positive identification of elements heavier than Md (Z=101), which have very short half-lives and can only be produced an atom-at-a-time, are very difficult and there have been controversies concerning their discovery. Some of the new methods which have been developed and used in these studies will be described. The prospects for production of still heavier elements will be considered.

Hoffman, D.C.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Characteristics of water chemistry in heavy water recovery system of nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The moisture inside the coolant and moderator system areas of Candu-type nuclear power plant is recycled to prevent the deuterium of value from being lost and the tritium of harm from being spread to the natural environment. The deuterium is separated ... Keywords: anion, breakthrough time, cation, deuterium recovery, ion exchange, resin ratio

In Hyoung Rhee; Hyun Kyoung Ahn; Hyun Jun Jeong

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

EXPERIMENTS WITH RELATIVISTIC HEAVY IONS: A POTPOURRI OF CHEMISTRY, CANIS MAJORIS AND GRAINS OF SILVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the f i r s t by B. Judek, NRC, who studied the PFs o f 0 atLBL. The r e s u l t s of the NRC and LBL experiments werel i c l e s , with stack I (NRC) c o n t a i n i n g 50 p e

Heckman, H.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines Sindo N´u~nez-Queija based on joint ITC´u~nez-Queija CWI & TU/e #12;Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines Part I ­ Introduction and Methodology Tales to tell: · traffic measurements and statistical analysis · traffic modeling · heavy

Núñez-Queija, Rudesindo

380

Finding Interesting Correlations with Conditional Heavy Hitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finding Interesting Correlations with Conditional Heavy Hitters Katsiaryna Mirylenka, Themis Srivastava AT&T Labs, Florham Park, NJ, USA {graham, divesh}@research.att.com Abstract-- The notion of heavy of Conditional Heavy Hitters to identify such items, with applications in network monitoring, and Markov chain

Palpanas, Themis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 14 99.636% STABLE 15 0.364% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 10 No Data Available Proton Emission 100.00% 11 5.49×10-22 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 12 11.000 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% 13 9.965 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 14 STABLE - - 15 STABLE - - 16 7.13 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00% Beta-minus Decay with delayed Alpha Decay 1.2×10-3 % 17 4.173 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

382

FUEL ELEMENT INTERLOCKING ARRANGEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a system for mutually interlocking a multiplicity of elongated, parallel, coextensive, upright reactor fuel elements so as to render a laterally selfsupporting bundle, while admitting of concurrent, selective, vertical withdrawal of a sizeable number of elements without any of the remaining elements toppling, Each element is provided with a generally rectangular end cap. When a rank of caps is aligned in square contact, each free edge centrally defines an outwardly profecting dovetail, and extremitally cooperates with its adjacent cap by defining a juxtaposed half of a dovetail- receptive mortise. Successive ranks are staggered to afford mating of their dovetails and mortises. (AEC)

Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

ElementNodeIterator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... iter=element->node_iterator(); !iter.end(); ++iter) { Node *node = iter.node(); // do something ... node returns a pointer to the iterator's current Node . ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

384

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION Nuclear & Particle Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION Nuclear & Particle Physics Associate Laboratory Director Berndt Mueller Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Associate Laboratory Director James Misewich Financial Support Angela Wefer Department Chair Alexander L. Harris Gregory Hall, Deputy Chair Jean Petterson, Sr. Administrative Assistant Quality Assurance Rep. Charles Gortakowski *Assoc. Laser Safety Officer (Jack Preses) Berndt Mueller Training Coordinator/ Records Management (Linda Sallustio) Dept. Systems Support & Cyber Security POC Mahendra Kahanda Berndt Mueller Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Nuclear & Particle Physics Neutrino & Nuclear Chemistry Minfang Yeh Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics Gregory Hall Electron and Photo-

385

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Livermore Scientists Team with Russia to Discover Element 118  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Synthesis of the isotopes of elements 118 and 116" (Abstract) "Synthesis of the isotopes of elements 118 and 116" (Abstract) Physical Review C, October 9, 2006 Livermore Scientists Team With Russia To Discover Elements 113 and 115 LLNL News Release, February. 2, 2004 "Present at the Creation" Science & Technology Review, January/February 2002 Island of Stability NOVA Science Now, September 2006 Social Media Logos Follow LLNL on YouTube Subscribe to LLNL's RSS feed Follow LLNL on Facebook Follow LLNL on Twitter Follow LLNL on Flickr Contact: Anne M. Stark Phone: (925) 422-9799 E-mail: stark8l@llnl.gov FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 16, 2006 NR-06-10-03 Livermore scientists team with Russia to discover element 118 LIVERMORE, Calif. - Scientists from the Chemistry, Materials and Life Sciences Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in

388

HEAVY BARYONS: A COMBINED LARGE Nc AND HEAVY QUARK EXPANSION FOR ELECTROWEAK CURRENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combined large Nc and heavy quark limit for baryons containing a single heavy quark is discussed. The combined large Nc and heavy quark expansion of the heavy quark bilinear operators is obtained. In the combined expansion the corrections proportional to mN/mQ are summed to all orders. In particular, the combined expansion can be used to determine semileptonic form factors of heavy baryons in the combined limit. 1

Boris A. Gelman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Weak Decay Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide upper and lower bounds on the semileptonic weak decay form factors for $B \\to D^(*)$ and $\\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda_c$ decays by utilizing inclusive heavy quark effective theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to second order in $\\Lambda_{QCD}/m_Q$ and first order in $\\alpha_s$. The $O(\\alpha_s^2 \\beta_0)$ corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented.

Chiang, C W

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Weak Decay Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide upper and lower bounds on the semileptonic weak decay form factors for $B \\to D^(*)$ and $\\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda_c$ decays by utilizing inclusive heavy quark effective theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to second order in $\\Lambda_{QCD}/m_Q$ and first order in $\\alpha_s$. The $O(\\alpha_s^2 \\beta_0)$ corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

391

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Baryonic Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper and lower bounds are established on the Lambda_b -> Lambda_c semileptonic decay form factors by utilizing inclusive heavy-quark-effective-theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to leading order in Lambda_QCD/m_Q and alpha_s. The O(alpha_s^2 beta_0) corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented. Several form factor models used in the literature are compared with our bounds.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Baryonic Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper and lower bounds are established on the Lambda_b -> Lambda_c semileptonic decay form factors by utilizing inclusive heavy-quark-effective-theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to leading order in Lambda_QCD/m_Q and alpha_s. The O(alpha_s^2 beta_0) corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented. Several form factor models used in the literature are compared with our bounds.

Chiang, C W

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Understanding Mercury Chemistry in Coal-Fired Boilers: Biennial Report December 2001 December 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress on a research program cosponsored by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The overall objective of this program is to gain an understanding of the chemistry and kinetics of mercury speciation in post-furnace regions of coal-fired utility boilers, in order to enhance the oxidation of elemental mercury for subsequent capture by air pollution controls, such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), baghouses, and especially sulfur d...

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Heavy flavor production from photons and hadrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present state of the production and observation of hadrons containing heavy quarks or antiquarks as valence constituents, in reactions initiated by real and (space-like) virtual photon or by hadron beams is discussed. Heavy flavor production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which is well covered in a number of recent review papers is not discussed, and similarly, neutrino production is omitted due to the different (flavor-changing) mechanisms that are involved in those reactions. Heavy flavors from spacelike photons, heavy flavors from real photons, and heavy flavors from hadron-hadron collisions are discussed. (WHK)

Heusch, C.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor fuel element of the capillary tube type is described. The element consists of a thin walled tube, sealed at both ends, and having an interior coatlng of a fissionable material, such as uranium enriched in U-235. The tube wall is gas tight and is constructed of titanium, zirconium, or molybdenum.

Kesselring, K.A.; Seybolt, A.U.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Trace element emissions  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY OF HYDROUS MINERALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen has long been appreciated for its role in geological processes of the Earth's crust. However, its role in Earth's deep interior has been neglected in most geophysical thinking. Yet it is now believed that most of our planet's hydrogen may be locked up in high pressure phases of hydrous silicate minerals within the Earth's mantle. This rocky interior (approximately 7/8 of Earth's volume) is conjectured to contain 1-2 orders of magnitude more water than the more obvious oceans (the ''hydrosphere'') and atmosphere. This project is aimed at using the capability of neutron scattering from hydrogen to study the crystal chemistry and stability of hydrogen-bearing minerals at high pressures and temperatures. At the most basic level this is a study of the atomic position and hydrogen bond itself. We have conducted experimental runs on hydrous minerals under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The crystallographic structure of hydrous minerals at extreme conditions and its structural stability, and hydrogen bond at high P-T conditions are the fundamental questions to be addressed. The behavior of the hydrous minerals in the deep interior of the Earth has been discussed.

Y. ZHAO; ET AL

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Plasma chemistry in wire chambers  

SciTech Connect

The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

Wise, J.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Accelerators and Other Sources for Radiation Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerators and Other Sources for the Study of Radiation Chemistry James F. Wishart Adv. Chem. Ser. 254, Ch. 3, pp. 35-50 Abstract: This chapter is intended as a guide to aid in...

402

Simplifying Chemistry for Computational Efficiency in Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simplifying Chemistry for Computational Efficiency in Combustion Calculations Speaker(s): Shaheen Tonse Date: February 28, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of...

403

Mathematics for Chemistry with Symbolic Computation - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... as mentioned above. Download Mathematics for Chemistry with Symbolic Computation version 4.0, February 12th, 2013, for Maple 16 as a 6.7 MB zip file.

404

* Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 4 in the AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds. * Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division division

405

Strategic thinking in chemistry and materials  

SciTech Connect

Science and technology challenges facing the Chemistry and Materials program relate to the fundamental problem of addressing the critical needs to improve our understanding of how nuclear weapons function and age, while experiencing increased pressures to compensate for a decreasing technology base. Chemistry and materials expertise is an enabling capability embedded within every aspect of nuclear weapons design, testing, production, surveillance and dismantlement. Requirements to capture an enduring chemistry and materials technology base from throughout the integrated contractor complex have promoted a highly visible obligation on the weapons research and development program. The only successful response to this challenge must come from direct improvements in effectiveness and efficiency accomplished through improved understanding. Strategic thinking has generated the following three overarching focus areas for the chemistry and materials competency: As-built Materials Characterization and Performance; Materials Aging; and, Materials Synthesis and Processing.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Updated September 2012 Chemistry Degree Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approved courses at the 400-level in Chemistry, Geology and Physics Option 2) One approved course GEOL 471** Aqueous Geochemistry GEOL 472** Isotope Geochemistry GEOL 473** Courses not offered AY 12 ** contact the Geology department for course offerings #12;

Cina, Jeff

407

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive new soybean reference book, a volume from the AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds, disseminates key soybean oilseed information. Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry P

408

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

Sidney Diamond; D. Ray Johnson

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

Engineering Fundamentals - Chemistry, Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemistry module of Engineering Fundamentals is intended to provide a basic overview of this topic for individuals, from all engineering disciplines, beginning their career in the nuclear power industry.The Chemistry module covers basic terms and concepts as well as their applications in nuclear power plants. This course will help new engineers understand some of the basic processes and equipment that are critical to the operation of nuclear power plants, how their job might affect ...

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

410

Neutronic fuel element fabrication  

SciTech Connect

This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure by encompassing the sides of the fuel element between the header plates.

Korton, George (Cincinnati, OH)

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

411

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element possessing good stability and heat conducting properties is described. The fuel element comprises an outer tube formed of material selected from the group consisting of stainhess steel, V, Ti. Mo. or Zr, a fuel tube concentrically fitting within the outer tube and containing an oxide of an isotope selected from the group consisting of U/sup 235/, U/sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/, and a hollow, porous core concentrically fitting within the fuel tube and formed of an oxide of an element selected from the group consisting of Mg, Be, and Zr.

Shackleford, M.H.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

412

Element Word Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or, if you wish, you can download your very own copy of the Table of Elements. Download this Activity Lab Page Puzzle Puzzle Sample AnswersAnswer Key Answer Key Answer Key...

413

Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI  

SciTech Connect

The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its shortcomings, and its relevance to HCCI. Section 3 discusses the effects of fuel volatility on fuel and air mixing and the consequences it has on HCCI. The effects of alcohol fuels on HCCI performance, and specifically the effects that they have on the operable speed/load range, are reviewed in Section 4. Finally, conclusions are drawn in Section 5.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Heavy-Ion Physics with CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a brief overview of the CMS experiment capabilities to study the hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The CERN Large Hadron Collider will provide collisions of Pb nuclei at 5.5 TeV per nucleon. The CMS heavy ion group has developed a plethora of physics analyses addressing many important aspects of heavy-ion physics in preparation for a competitive and successful program.

Aneta Iordanova

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

415

Heavy ions and string theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review a selection of recent developments in the application of ideas of string theory to heavy ion physics. Our topics divide naturally into equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena. On the non-equilibrium side, we discuss generalizations of Bjorken flow, numerical simulations of black hole formation in asymptotically anti-de Sitter geometries, equilibration in the dual field theory, and hard probes. On the equilibrium side, we summarize improved holographic QCD, extraction of transport coefficients, inclusion of chemical potentials, and approaches to the phase diagram. We close with some possible directions for future research.

Oliver DeWolfe; Steven S. Gubser; Christopher Rosen; Derek Teaney

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

416

Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

Jian-Wei Qiu

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Recent Heavy Flavor Results at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the recent experimental results of heavy favor physics from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) at Long Island, New York, USA.We will discuss the directly reconstructed open charm mesons as well as electrons from heavy favor hadron decays. The charm and bottom quark production cross-sections have also been measured. We will also discuss JPsi and Upsilon states in p+p and heavy ion collisions. The studies described here were carried out and reported by the STAR and PHENIX collaborations at RHIC.

Wenqin Xu

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

418

Isospin Splittings of Doubly Heavy Baryons  

SciTech Connect

The SELEX Collaboration has reported a very large isospin splitting of doubly charmed baryons. We show that this effect would imply that the doubly charmed baryons are very compact. One intriguing possibility is that such baryons have a linear geometry Q-q-Q where the light quark q oscillates between the two heavy quarks Q, analogous to a linear molecule such as carbon dioxide. However, using conventional arguments, the size of a heavy-light hadron is expected to be around 0.5 fm, much larger than the size needed to explain the observed large isospin splitting. Assuming the distance between two heavy quarks is much smaller than that between the light quark and a heavy one, the doubly heavy baryons are related to the heavy mesons via heavy quark-diquark symmetry. Based on this symmetry, we predict the isospin splittings for doubly heavy baryons including {Xi}{sub cc}, {Xi}{sub bb} and {Xi}{sub bc}. The prediction for the {Xi}{sub cc} is much smaller than the SELEX value. On the other hand, the {Xi}{sub bb} baryons are predicted to have an isospin splitting as large as (6.3 {+-} 1.7) MeV. An experimental study of doubly bottomed baryons is therefore very important to better understand the structure of baryons with heavy quarks.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Guo, Feng-Kun; /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.; Hanhart, Christoph; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich; Meissner, Ulf-G.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

419

Heavy Duty Truck Engine Advancement Adoption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

petroleum consumption. According to the DOE Energy Information Administration's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009, U.S. heavy truck fuel consumption will increase 23 percent between...

420

Heavy ion physics at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy Ion Physics at the LHC ? R. VogtLaboratory, Berkeley, CA USA Physics Department, Universityfor addressing unique physics issues in a completely new

Vogt, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

P. Bernot

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

422

Categorical Exclusion 4497: Lithium Wet Chemistry Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/2012 07:36 8/2012 07:36 8655749041 ENVIRONMENTAL COMPL U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Detennination Form Proposed Action Tills: Lithium W@t Chemistry Project (4597) Program or Fi~ld Oftke: Y-12 Site Office L&cationfs) (CiWLCount:r/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County; Tennessee Proposed Action Description: PAGE 03/04 r: :;: :: !: s .a : brnl, i ~ y. : $ ~-rtl~il : t·:~::;J The proposed action is to develop a small lithium wet chemistry operation for the following purposes: (1) to capture wet chemistry operations, (2) to provide processing path for Lithium materials such as machine dust, (3) to provide lithium based materials, and (4) to produce the littlium hydroxide needed to support production. CategQrj~l Exclusion(s) Applied

423

Heavy Squarks at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHC, with its seven-fold increase in energy over the Tevatron, is capable of probing regions of SUSY parameter space exhibiting qualitatively new collider phenomenology. Here we investigate one such region in which first generation squarks are very heavy compared to the other superpartners. We find that the production of these squarks, which is dominantly associative, only becomes rate-limited at mSquark > 4(5) TeV for L~10(100) fb-1. However, discovery of this scenario is complicated because heavy squarks decay primarily into a jet and boosted gluino, yielding a dijet-like topology with missing energy (MET) pointing along the direction of the second hardest jet. The result is that many signal events are removed by standard jet/MET anti-alignment cuts designed to guard against jet mismeasurement errors. We suggest replacing these anti-alignment cuts with a measurement of jet substructure that can significantly extend the reach of this channel while still removing much of the background. We study a selection of benchmark points in detail, demonstrating that mSquark= 4(5) TeV first generation squarks can be discovered at the LHC with L~10(100)fb-1.

JiJi Fan; David Krohn; Pablo Mosteiro; Arun M. Thalapillil; Lian-Tao Wang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy b- and c-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in B{sub s} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

Borissov, G.; /Lancaster U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles and their resulting warm cloud-nucleation properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCN activation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10, 5241-precipitation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9, 3223-particles. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009, 9, A. P.

Moore, Meagan Julia Kerry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Research and ecology semiannual progress report, January--June 1972. Chemistry research and development  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported in the following areas: chemistry research and development, chemistry instrumentation, process chemistry, chemical technology, and environmental research. (DHM)

Thompson, M.A.

1973-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

428

Nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

Zocher, Roy W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>A rib arrangement and an end construction for nuclearfuel elements laid end to end in a coolant tube are described. The rib arrangement is such that each fuel element, when separated from other fuel elements, fits loosely in the coolant tube and so can easily be inserted or withdrawn from the tube. The end construction of the fuel elements is such that the fuel elements when assembled end to end are keyed against relative rotation, and the ribs of each fuel element cooperate with the ribs of the adjacent fuel elements to give the assembled fuel elements a tight fit with the coolant tube. (AEC)

Weems, S.J.

1963-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

FUEL ELEMENT CONSTRUCTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preventing diffusible and volatile fission products from diffusing through a fuel element container and contaminating reactor coolant is described. More specifically, relatively volatile and diffusible fission products either are adsorbed by or react with magnesium fluoride or difluoride to form stable, less volatile, less diffusible forms. The magnesium fluoride or difluoride is disposed anywhere inwardly from the outer surface of the fuel element container in order to be contacted by the fission products before they reach and contaminate the reactor coolant. (AEC)

Simnad, M.T.

1961-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Heavy metals hazardous components of Eaf dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is a waste generated in the EAF during the steel production process. Among different wastes, EAF dust represents one of the most hazardous, since it contains heavy metals such as Zn, Fe, Cr, Cd and Pb. The goal of the ... Keywords: electric arc furnace (EAF), furnace additives, hazard components, heavy metals, scrap composition, x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

Cristiana-Zizi Rizescu; Zorica Bacinschi; Elena Valentina Stoian; Aurora Poinescu; Dan Nicolae Ungureanu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Heavy metals in suspended powders from steelmaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivations for controlling heavy metal concentrations in gas streams are diverse. Some of them are dangerous to health or to the environment (e.g. Hg, Cd, As, Pb, Cr), some may cause corrosion (e.g. Zn, Pb), some are harmful in other ways (e.g. Arsenic ... Keywords: anthropogenic sources, emissions, heavy metals, human health, pollution of ecosystem, toxic

Cristiana-Zizi Rizescu; Elena-Valentina Stoian; Aurora-Anca Poinescu; Sofia Teodorescu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

UNITAR boosts cogeneration for heavy crude production  

SciTech Connect

The UNITAR/UNDP Information Center for Heavy Crude and Tar Sands publicized the favorable effect of cogeneration on the economics of generating steam for in situ recovery of heavy oil. Although cogeneration of electricity with the production of steam for heavy crude production is a rapidly growing activity in California, it is still unknown in other countries where heavy crude is produced. The study concentrated on two specific cases: a heavy crude cogeneration plant in Kern County in California and a heavy crude production plant at Wolf Lake in Alberta, Canada. A comparison of the two cases showed that due to the specific conditions in California, cogeneration can reduce, in this specific case, the cost of production of heavy crude by $4.80 per barrel whereas in the case of Wolf Lake, cogeneration would not be economic (electricity prices in relation to natural gas prices are much lower in Canada). One of the purposes of the UNITAR study was to direct attention in other countries producing heavy crude to the advantages of cogeneration.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Heavy Vehicle Technologies Program Retrospective and Outlook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OHVT Mission is to conduct, in collaboration with our heavy vehicle industry partners and their suppliers, a customer-focused national program to research and develop technologies that will enable trucks and other heavy vehicles to be more energy efficient and able to use alternative fuels while simultaneously reducing emissions.

James J. Eberhardt

1999-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, Dimitrios C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

TABLE OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS.  

SciTech Connect

For those chemical elements which have no stable nuclides with a terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on radioactive half-lives and relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest and importance have been evaluated and the recommended values and uncertainties are listed.

HOLDEN,N.E.

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, D.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

Heating element support clip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for supporting a heating element in a channel formed in a heater base is disclosed. A preferred embodiment includes a substantially U-shaped tantalum member. The U-shape is characterized by two substantially parallel portions of tantalum that each have an end connected to opposite ends of a base portion of tantalum. The parallel portions are each substantially perpendicular to the base portion and spaced apart a distance not larger than a width of the channel and not smaller than a width of a graphite heating element. The parallel portions each have a hole therein, and the centers of the holes define an axis that is substantially parallel to the base portion. An aluminum oxide ceramic retaining pin extends through the holes in the parallel portions and into a hole in a wall of the channel to retain the U-shaped member in the channel and to support the graphite heating element. The graphite heating element is confined by the parallel portions of tantalum, the base portion of tantalum, and the retaining pin. A tantalum tube surrounds the retaining pin between the parallel portions of tantalum.

Sawyer, William C. (Salida, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element comprising a plurality of nuclear fuel bearing strips is presented. The strips are folded along their longitudinal axes to an angle of about 60 deg and are secured at each end by ferrule to form an elongated assembly suitable for occupying a cylindrical coolant channel.

Gurinsky, D.H.; Powell, R.W.; Fox, M.

1959-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

440

Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Print Wednesday, 27 September 2006 00:00 Heavy-fermion systems are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Heavy photon search experiment at JLAB  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab will search for new heavy vector boson(s), aka "heavy photons", in the mass range of 20 MeV/c{sup 2} to 1000 MeV/c{sup 2} using the scattering of high energy, high intensity electron beams off a high Z target. The proposed measurements will cover the region of parameter space favored by the muon g-2 anomaly, and will explore a significant region of parameter space, not only at large couplings ({alpha}'/{alpha} > 10{sup -7}), but also in the regions of small couplings, down to {alpha}'/{alpha}~10{sup -10}. The excellent vertexing capability of the Si-tracker uniquely enables HPS to cover the small coupling region. Also, HPS will search for heavy photons in an alternative to the e{sup +} e{sup -} decay mode, in the heavy photon's decay to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}.

Stepanyan, Stepan [JLAB

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Research and Development Opportunities for Heavy Trucks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1] 1] Introduction Heavy-duty long-haul trucks are critical to the movement of the Nation's freight. These vehicles, which currently consume about 10 percent of the Nation's oil, are characterized by high fuel consumption, fast market turnover, and rapid uptake of new technologies. Improving the fuel economy of Class 8 trucks will dramatically impact both fuel and cost savings. This paper describes the importance of heavy trucks to the Nation's economy, and its potential for fuel efficiency gains. Why Focus on Heavy Trucks? Large and Immediate Impact Investments in improving the fuel economy of heavy Class 8 trucks will result in large reduction in petroleum consumption within a short timeframe. While heavy-duty vehicles make up only 4% of the

443

Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined atmospheric chemistry-meteorology experiment, the Dynamics and Chemistry of the Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS), was carried out during the summer of 1985 over the eastern Pacific Ocean using the NCAR Electra aircraft. The objectives ...

D. H. Lenschow; I. R. Paluch; A. R. Bandy; R. Pearson Jr.; S. R. Kawa; C. J. Weaver; B. J. Huebert; J. G. Kay; D. C. Thornton; A. R. Driedger III

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques, January IAP 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students ...

Tabacco, Sarah

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chemistry Chemistry Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. (Hanan E. Abdou) - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam (Noam Agmon) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Agrafiotis, Dimitris K. (Dimitris K. Agrafiotis) - Molecular Design and Informatics Group, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development Alabugin, Igor (Igor Alabugin) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Alavi, Ali (Ali Alavi) - Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Allen, Heather C.(Heather C.Allen).- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University Amar, François G. (François G. Amar) - Department of Chemistry,

446

Helicity probabilities for heavy quark fragmentation into heavy-light excited mesons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a brief review on how heavy quark symmetry constraints the helicity fragmentation probabilities for a heavy quark hadronizes into heavy-light hadrons, we present a heavy quark fragmentation model to extract the value for the Falk-Peskin probability $w_{3/2}$ describing the fragmentation of a heavy quark into a heavy-light meson whose light degrees of freedom have angular momentum ${3 \\over 2}$. We point out that this probability depends on the longitudinal momentum fraction $z$ of the meson and on its transverse momentum $p_\\bot$ relative to the jet axis. In this model, the light degrees of freedom prefer to have their angular momentum aligned transverse to, rather than along, the jet axis. Implications for the production of excited heavy mesons, like $D^{**}$ and $B^{**}$, are briefly discussed.

Tzu Chiang Yuan

1995-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

447

Ultrasonic Chemistry: A Survey and Energy Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemicals, Petroleum and Natural Gas Target of EPRI's Energy Delivery & Utilization Division supports Strategic Science & Technology, a program aimed at anticipating future needs and determining future directions. A study of sonochemistry (chemistry resulting from applying ultrasound to chemical reaction systems) assessed this field's progress relative to utility and process industry needs.

1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

The Complex Chemistry of William H. Green  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population (billions) Global Energy Demand (1971-2030) 1750-2050 #12;Electricity: Coal, Nuclear? · 20th Century View: ­ Complex reacting mixtures are too hard to model... ­ ...so do many pilot plant us to handle complexity. ­ Quantum chemistry allows us to predict kinetic parameters. ­ To cost

Barton, Paul I.

449

Factor groups, semidirect product and quantum chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we prove some general theorems about representations of finite groups arising from the semidirect product of groups and we show how these results can be used for standard applications of group theory in quantum chemistry. This approach is illustrated by the dihedral group.

Marco A. S. Trindade

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

450

Microsoft Word - Lipid_Chemistry_Schaich.doc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LIPID CHEMISTRY 400:505 Spring, XXXX Dr. Karen M. Schaich schaich@aesop.rutgers.edu 732 932-9611 x233 Food Science 315 Class: Mon./Wed 3:30 5:30 Office hours: By appointment Schedule of Topics Classes listed are

451

Nanochannel and its application in analytical chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nanochannels method for the separation and detection of analytes plays an important role in the analytical chemistry and is exhibiting the great potential advantages and promising future. In this review we bring together and discuss a number of nanochannels ... Keywords: applications, nanochannels, preparation, separation

Zenglian Yue; Guoqing Zhao; Bin Peng; Shasheng Huang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

A Three-Dimensional Cloud Chemistry Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cloud chemistry model is formulated in term of continuity equations for chemical species in the aqueous and aqueous phases within the cloud. The model includes scavenging of SO2, HNO3, HN3, H2O3, and sulphate aerosol particles. Calculations ...

Andre Tremblay; Henry Leighton

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

SUPRI heavy oil research program  

SciTech Connect

The 14th Annual Report of the SUPRI Heavy Oil Research Program includes discussion of the following topics: (1) A Study of End Effects in Displacement Experiments; (2) Cat Scan Status Report; (3) Modifying In-situ Combustion with Metallic Additives; (4) Kinetics of Combustion; (5) Study of Residual Oil Saturation for Steam Injection and Fuel Concentration for In-Situ Combustion; (6) Analysis of Transient Foam Flow in 1-D Porous Media with Computed Tomography; (7) Steam-Foam Studies in the Presence of Residual Oil; (8) Microvisualization of Foam Flow in a Porous Medium; (9) Three- Dimensional Laboratory Steam Injection Model; (10) Saturation Evaluation Following Water Flooding; (11) Numerical Simulation of Well-to-Well Tracer Flow Test with Nonunity Mobility Ratio.

Aziz, K.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Castanier, L.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND MEASUREMENT SCIENCE (What Has DOE Done For Analytical Chemistry?) CONF-8904181--1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, . - - ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND MEASUREMENT SCIENCE (What Has DOE Done For Analytical Chemistry?) CONF-8904181--1 DE89 009559 W. D. Shults Analytical Chemistry Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory* Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6129 ABSTRACT Over the past forty years, analytical scientists within the DOE complex have had a tremendous impact on the field of analytical chemistry. This paper suggests six "high impact" research/development areas that either originated within or wcce brought to maturity within the DOE laboratories. "High impact" means they lead to new subdisciplines or to new ways of doing business. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

456

Effect of Chemistry Modifications and Heat Treatments on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EFFECT OF CHEMISTRY MODIFICATIONS AND HEAT TREATMENTS. ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DS MAR-M200 SUPERALLOY.

457

Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Print Heavy-fermion systems are characterized by electrons with extremely large effective masses. The corresponding...

458

Deformation Prediction of a Heavy Hydro Turbine Blade During ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Deformation Prediction of a Heavy Hydro Turbine Blade During ... Abstract Scope, Heavy hydro turbine castings are made of martensitic...

459

Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy Ion Beam Driven Fusion Reactor Study, KfK-3480,a possible heavy ion fusion reactor design [1]. The final

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Experimental Research on Recovery of Heavy Metals from EAF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To recycle these heavy metals, it is quite important to know the reactivity and metallurgical behavior of these heavy metals contained in EAF stainless steel dust.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Assessment of heavy metal contamination of roadside soils in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2008 ... heavy metals was found using factor analysis. Keywords Heavy metals Roadside soils . Transportation period Contamination index .

462

Los Alamos National Laboratory's Chemistry Division Presents Periodic Table of the Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.8 106.3 13.1 (14.5°) 9.3 1.3952 0.256 62 Triethylene glycol dimethyl ether -45 216 7.5 1.4224 0.253 63 2 PROMETHIUM NEPTUNIUM PLUTONIUM AMERICIUM CURIUM BERKELIUM CALIFORNIUM EINSTEINIUM FERMIUM MENDELEVIUM

Hochberg, Michael

463

Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

Delegard, C.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

STUDIES IN THE NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY OF PLUTONIUM, AMERICIUM, AND CURIUM AND MASSES OF THE HEAVIEST ELEMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy Series, Plutonium Project Record, Vol. 14B,Nuclear Energy Series, Plutonium Project Record, Vol. 9, p.Nuclear Energy Series, Plutonium Project Record, Vol. l4B,

Glass, Richard Alois

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Computationally efficient implementation of combustion chemistry in parallel PDF calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In parallel calculations of combustion processes with realistic chemistry, the serial in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) algorithm [S.B. Pope, Computationally efficient implementation of combustion chemistry using in situ adaptive tabulation, Combustion ... Keywords: 07.05.Mh, 46.15.-x, 47.11.-j, Combustion chemistry, Distribution strategy, ISAT, Load balance, Parallel calculation

Liuyan Lu; Steven R. Lantz; Zhuyin Ren; Stephen B. Pope

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines - Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

467

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised "Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines" to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

468

Historical Aspects of Soil Chemistry Donald L. Sparks1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 Historical Aspects of Soil Chemistry Donald L. Sparks1 The Origins of Agricultural Chemistry: The Forerunner of Soil Chemistry In ancient times Aristotle proposed that plants derive nourishment from is food; the constitution of soils; and the manner in which lands are enriched by manure, or rendered

Sparks, Donald L.

469

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 11 The Chemistry and Nutrition of Nonnutritive Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 11 The Chemistry and Nutrition of Nonnutritive Fats Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

470

Production of Intermediate-Mass and Heavy Nuclei  

SciTech Connect

Nucleosynthesis is the science related to all astrophysical processes which are responsible for the abundances of the elements and their isotopes in the universe. The astrophysical sites are the big bang and stellar objects. The working of nucleosynthesis processes is presented in a survey of events which act as abundance sources. For intermediate-mass and heavy elements, these are stellar evolution, type Ia and core collapse supernovae as well as hypernovae. We discuss successes and failures of existing processes and possible solutions via new (hitherto unknown) processes. Finally an analysis of their role is given in the puzzle to explain the evolution of the elemental and isotopic compositions found in galaxies, and especially the mixture found in the solar system. Different timescales due to the progenitor mass dependence of the endpoints of stellar evolution (type II supernova explosions - SNe II vs. planetary nebulae) or single vs. binary stellar systems (the latter being responsible for novae, type Ia supernovae -- SNe Ia, or X-ray bursts) are the keys to understand galactic evolution. At very early times, the role of explosion energies of events, polluting pristine matter with a composition originating only from the big bang, might also play a role. We also speculate on the role of very massive stars not undergoing SN II explosions but rather causing 'hypernovae' after the formation of a central black hole via core collapse.

Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl W. [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Fr?hlich, Dr. Carla [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Hirschi, Raphael [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Liebendoerfer, Matthias [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Dillmann, Iris [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Mocelj, Darko [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Rauscher, Thomas [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Langanke, Karlheinz [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Farouq, Khalil [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig [ORNL; Pfeiffer, Bernard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Panov, Igor V. [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Nadyozhin, Dimitri K [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Blinnikov, Sergei I [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Bravo, Eduardo [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain; H?flich, Peter [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Zinner, Nikolaj T [ORNL

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Improvement of Plants for Selenium and Heavy Metal Phytoremediation Through Genetic Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phytoremediation -- the use of plants to remove, stabilize, or detoxify pollutants -- has proved very promising for the cleanup of trace elements from contaminated soil and water. Under the EPRI-Genetics Research Program, investigators successfully used genetic engineering to create seven genetically altered lines of plants with superior capacities for the phytoremediation of selenium (Se) and heavy metals, such as Molybdenum (Mo), Tungsten (W), and Cadmium (Cd). These transgenic plants are more tolerant...

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

472

Element Crossword Puzzles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crossword Puzzles Crossword Puzzles Welcome to It's Elemental - Element Crossword Puzzles! Use the clues provided to solve each crossword puzzle. To place letters on the puzzle, first select the clue you are answering from the pull-down menu and then enter your answer in the text box. Press the 'return' key on your keyboard when you are done. Correct letters will be green while incorrect letters will be red. Good luck and have fun! If you are reading this, your browser is NOT running JavaScript. JavaScript MUST be enabled for this section of our site to work. Once you have turned JavaScript on, reload this page and this warning will go away. Puzzle 1 - It's a Gas! Puzzle 2 - Easy Symbols Puzzle 3 - Strange Symbols Puzzle 4 - Known to the Ancients Puzzle 5 - The Alkali Metals

473

Determination of the CKM Element V(Ub)  

SciTech Connect

The precise determination of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| is crucial in testing the Standard Model mechanism for CP violation. From a sample of 88 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector, charmless semileptonic B decays are selected using simultaneous requirements on the electron energy, E{sub e}, and the invariant mass squared of the electron-neutrino pair, q{sup 2}. The partial branching fraction, unfolded for detector effects, is determined in a region of the q{sup 2}-E{sub e} plane where the dominating semileptonic decays to charm mesons are highly suppressed. Theoretical calculations based on the Heavy Quark Expanion allows for a determination of |V{sub ub}| = (3.95 {+-} 0.27{sub -0.42}{sup +0.58} {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -3}, where the errors represent experimental, heavy quark parameters and theoretical uncertainties, respectively.

Fortin, Dominique; /Victoria U.

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

474

Multilayered nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element is described which is suitable for high temperature applications comprised of a kernel of fissile material overlaid with concentric layers of impervious graphite, vitreous carbon, pyrolytic carbon and metal carbide. The kernel of fissile material is surrounded by a layer of impervious graphite. The layer of impervious graphite is then surrounded by a layer of vitreous carbon. Finally, an outer shell which includes alternating layers of pyrolytic carbon and metal carbide surrounds the layer of vitreous carbon.

Schweitzer, Donald G.; Sastre, Cesar

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Multimedia Trace Elements Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current and future trace element regulations on flue gas emissions, water discharges, and solid waste disposal will result in increasingly stringent limits and substantially increased costs for energy companies. As a result, there is a critical need to address environmental pollutant releases in a holistic, multimedia manner so that a pollutant removed by a control technology in one medium (for example, flue gas) is properly managed in regard to discharges in the other media (water and solid waste). This...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Chemical Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Names and symbols for the elements (in alphabetical order)...Sodium (j) Na Strontium Sr Sulfur S Tantalum Ta Technetium Tc Tellurium Te Terbium Tb Thallium Tl Thorium Th Thulium Tm Tin (k) Sn Titanium Ti Tungsten (l) W Ununnilium Uun Unununium Uuu Uranium U Vanadium V Xenon Xe Ytterbium Yb Yttrium Y Zinc Zn Zirconium Zr (a) Symbol based on the Latin

477

Nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element wherein a tubular cladding of zirconium or a zirconium alloy has a fission gas plenum chamber which is held against collapse by the loops of a spacer in the form of a tube which has been deformed inwardly at three equally spaced, circumferential positions to provide three loops. A heat resistant disc of, say, graphite separates nuclear fuel pellets within the cladding from the plenum chamber. The spacer is of zirconium or a zirconium alloy.

Meadowcroft, Ronald Ross (Deep River, CA); Bain, Alastair Stewart (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Dynamics of neutralizing electrons during the focusing of intense heavy ions beams inside a heavy fusion reactor chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

beams inside a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber * Agustin F.of a Heavy Ion Fusion reactor heavily depends on the maximum

Lifschitz, Agustin F.; Maynard, Gilles; Vay, Jean-Luc; Lenglet, Andrian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Dynamics of neutralizing electrons during the focusing of intense heavy ions beams inside a heavy fusion reactor chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

beams inside a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber * Agustin F.efficiency of a Heavy Ion Fusion reactor heavily depends on

Lifschitz, Agustin F.; Maynard, Gilles; Vay, Jean-Luc; Lenglet, Andrian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets  

SciTech Connect

The determination of stopping powers for slow heavy ions in targets containing light elements is important to accurately describe ionsolid interactions, evaluate ion irradiation effects and predict ion ranges for device fabrication and nuclear applications. Recently, discrepancies of up to 40% between the experimental results and SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) predictions of ion ranges for heavy ions with medium and low energies (elemental targets have been reported. The longer experimental ion ranges indicate that the stopping powers used in the SRIM code are overestimated. Here, a molecular dynamics simulation scheme is developed to calculate the ion ranges of heavy ions in light elemental targets. Electronic stopping powers generated from both a reciprocity approach and the SRIM code are used to investigate the influence of electronic stopping on ion range profiles. The ion range profiles for Au and Pb ions in SiC and Er ions in Si, with energies between 20 and 5250 keV, are simulated. The simulation results show that the depth profiles of implanted ions are deeper and in better agreement with the experiments when using the electronic stopping power values derived from the reciprocity approach. These results indicate that the origin of the discrepancy in ion ranges between experimental results and SRIM predictions in the low energy region may be an overestimation of the electronic stopping powers used in SRIM.

Lan, C.; Xue, J. M.; Zhang, Y.; Morris, J. R.; Zhu, Zh.; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Y. G.; Yan, S.; Weber, William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy element chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets  

SciTech Connect

The determination of stopping powers for slow heavy ions in targets containing light elements is important to accurately describe ion-solid interactions, evaluate ion irradiation effects and predict ion ranges for device fabrication and nuclear applications. Recently, discrepancies of up to 40% between the experimental results and SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) predictions of ion ranges for heavy ions with medium and low energies (< {approx} 25 keV/nucleon) in light elemental targets have been reported. The longer experimental ion ranges indicate that the stopping powers used in the SRIM code are overestimated. Here, a molecular dynamics simulation scheme is developed to calculate the ion ranges of heavy ions in light elemental targets. Electronic stopping powers generated from both a reciprocity approach and the SRIM code are used to investigate the influence of electronic stopping on ion range profiles. The ion range profiles for Au and Pb ions in SiC and Er ions in Si, with energies between 20 and 5250 keV, are simulated. The simulation results show that the depth profiles of implanted ions are deeper and in better agreement with the experiments when using the electronic stopping power values derived from the reciprocity approach. These results indicate that the origin of the discrepancy in ion ranges between experimental results and SRIM predictions in the low energy region may be an overestimation of the electronic stopping powers used in SRIM.

Lan, Chune [Peking University; Xue, Jianming [Peking University; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Morris, James R [ORNL; Zhu, Zihua [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Gao, Yuan [Peking University; Wang, Yugang [Peking University; Yan, Sha [Peking University; Weber, William J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets  

SciTech Connect

The determination of stopping powers for slow heavy ions in targets containing light elements is important to accurately describe ion-solid interactions, evaluate ion irradiation effects and predict ion ranges for device fabrication and nuclear applications. Recently, discrepancies of up to 40% between the experimental results and SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) predictions of ion ranges for heavy ions with medium and low energies (<25 keV/nucleon) in light elemental targets have been reported. The longer experimental ion ranges indicate that the stopping powers used in the SRIM code are overestimated. Here, a molecular dynamics simulation scheme is developed to calculate the ion ranges of heavy ions in light elemental targets. Electronic stopping powers generated from both a reciprocity approach and the SRIM code are used to investigate the influence of electronic stopping on ion range profiles. The ion range profiles for Au and Pb ions in SiC and Er ions in Si, with energies between 20 and 5250 keV, are simulated. The simulation results show that the depth profiles of implanted ions are deeper and in better agreement with the experiments when using the electronic stopping power values derived from the reciprocity approach. These results indicate that the origin of the discrepancy in ion ranges between experimental results and SRIM predictions in the low energy region may be an overestimation of the electronic stopping powers used in SRIM.

Lan, Chune; Xue, Jianming; Zhang, Yanwen; Morris, James R.; Zhu, Zihua; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Yugang; Yan, Sha; Weber, William J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Effect of plasma treatments on interface chemistry and adhesion strength between porous SiO2 low-k film and SiC/SiN layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the interface chemistry and adhesion strengths between porous SiO"2 low-dielectric-constant film and SiN capping layer as well as SiC etch stop layer have been investigated under different plasma treatments. Elements of Si, O, and N constructed ... Keywords: Bonding configuration, Dielectrics, Interface adhesion

Shou-Yi Chang; Yi-Chung Huang

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Fuel and emission impacts of heavy hybrid vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hybrid powertrains for certain heavy vehicles may improve fuel economy and reduce emissions. Of particular interest are commercial vehicles, typically in Classes 3-6, that travel in urban areas. Hybrid strategies and associated energy/emissions benefits for these classes of vehicles could be significantly different from those for passenger cars. A preliminary analysis has been conducted to investigate the energy and emissions performance of Class 3 and 6 medium-duty trucks and Class 6 school buses under eight different test cycles. Three elements are associated with this analysis: (1) establish baseline fuel consumption and emission scenario's from selected, representative baseline vehicles and driving schedules; (2) identify sources of energy inefficiency from baseline technology vehicles; and (3) assess maximum and practical potentials for energy savings and emissions reductions associated with heavy vehicle hybridization under real-world driving conditions. Our analysis excludes efficiency gains associated with such other measures as vehicle weight reduction and air resistance reduction, because such measures would also benefit conventional technology vehicles. Our research indicates that fuel economy and emission benefits of hybridization can be very sensitive to different test cycles. We conclude that, on the basis of present-day technology, the potential fuel economy gains average about 60-75% for Class 3 medium-duty trucks and 35% for Class 6 school buses. The fuel economy gains can be higher in the future, as hybrid technology continues to improve. The practical emissions reduction potentials associated with vehicle hybridization are significant as well.

An, F.; Eberhardt, J. J.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

485

2009 Chemistry Nobel to APS Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The First Experiment at the LCLS The First Experiment at the LCLS Linda Young Named to Head X-ray Science Division $7.9 M in ARRA Funding Brings New Instrumentation to the APS Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Earns an R&D 100 Award Winans of XSD Elected to ACS Fellowship APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed 2009 Chemistry Nobel to APS Users OCTOBER 7, 2009 Bookmark and Share Clockwise from top left: Ada Yonath, Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, and Thomas Steitz. All three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry published papers on their award-winning work based on data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Between them, biochemists Thomas Steitz of Yale University, Ada Yonath of

486

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are drawing attention in many areas of catalysis as scientists attempt to reduce precious metal content while maintaining optimum catalytic selectivity and reactivity. Cobalt, an important transition metal used for catalytic hydrogenation reactions of CO and CO2 to produce gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons, has a long history of use in the industrial process of producing synthetic fuels. Researchers explored the role of Pt in Co reducing and oxidizing, and found that the catalytic properties of monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles of Co are closely related to the oxidation state of Co, which informs the prediction of cobalt oxidation states as reaction conditions are altered. This research also suggests the presence of a tetrahedral cobalt oxide that differs from the Co3O4 spinel structure.

487

Chemistry and Physics of Complex Systems Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CPCS Overview CPCS Overview Section 2-1-1 Chemistry and Physics of Complex Systems Facility The Chemistry and Physics of Complex Systems (CPCS) Facility supports the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy (DOE) mission of fostering fundamental research in the natural sciences to provide the basis for new and improved energy technologies and for understanding and mitigating the environmental impacts of energy use and contaminant releases. This research provides a foundation for understanding interactions of atoms, molecules, and ions with materials and with photons and electrons. Particular emphasis is on interfacial processes. A distinguishing feature of research at national laboratories is their approach to problem- solving. Significant scientific issues are addressed using focused and multidisciplinary

488

Surface chemistry driven actuation in nanoporous gold  

SciTech Connect

Although actuation in biological systems is exclusively powered by chemical energy, this concept has not been realized in man-made actuator technologies, as these rely on generating heat or electricity first. Here, we demonstrate that surface-chemistry driven actuation can be realized in high surface area materials such as nanoporous gold. For example, we achieve reversible strain amplitudes in the order of a few tenths of a percent by alternating exposure of nanoporous Au to ozone and carbon monoxide. The effect can be explained by adsorbate-induced changes of the surface stress, and can be used to convert chemical energy directly into a mechanical response thus opening the door to surface-chemistry driven actuator and sensor technologies.

Biener, J; Wittstock, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Biener, M M; Zielasek, V; Kramer, D; Viswanath, R N; Weissmuller, J; Baumer, M; Hamza, A V

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

489

Closed Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline: Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Closed Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline addresses the use of chemicals and monitoring methods to mitigate corrosion, fouling, and microbiological growth in the closed cooling-water (CCW) systems of nuclear and fossil-fueled power plants. The chemical additives used for these purposes depend on plant-design characteristics, water quality, operating parameters, and the specifications of the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) suppliers. The list of chemicals is not as extensive as that ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

490

Bistability in Interstellar Gas-Phase Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of "bistability" in gas-phase chemical models of dark interstellar clouds. We identify the chemical mechanisms that allow high- and low-ionization solutions to the chemical rate-equations to coexist. We derive simple analytic scaling relations for the gas densities and ionization rates for which the chemistry becomes bistable. We explain why bistability is sensitive to the H3+ dissociative recombination rate coefficient, and why it is damped by gas-grain neutralization.

Gai I. Boger; Amiel Sternberg

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

491

FGD Chemistry and Analytical Methods Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this handbook is to provide a comprehensive guide to sampling, analytical, and physical test methods essential to the operation, maintenance, and understanding of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system chemistry. EPRI sponsored the preparation of the first version of this multi-volume report in the mid-1980s in response to the needs of electric utility personnel responsible for establishing and operating FGD analytical laboratories. Prompted by the results of research into various nonstanda...

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

492

A 3 MEGAJOULE HEAVY ION FUSION DRIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research, Office of Inertia! Fusion, Research Division ofA 3 MEGAJOULE HEAVY ION FUSION DRIVER* A. Faltens, E. Hoyer,Research, Office of Inertial Fusion, Research Division of

Faltens, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND HEAVY-ION FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Structure and Heavy-Ton Fusion* A series of lecturesthe cross section for fusion in the experiments consideredEffects g in III. Subharrier Fusion Cross Sections for Light

Stokstad, R.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Magnetism and superconductivity of heavy fermion matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interplay of magnetism and unconventional superconductivity (d singlet wave or p triplet wave) in strongly correlated electronic system (SCES) is discussed with recent examples found in heavy fermion compounds. A short presentation is given on the formation of the heavy quasiparticle with the two sources of a local and intersite enhancement for the effective mass. Two cases of the coexistence or repulsion of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity are given with CeIn3 and CeCoIn5. A spectacular example is the emergence of superconductivity in relatively strong itinerant ferromagnets UGe2 and URhGe. The impact of heavy fermion matter among other SCES as organic conductor or high TC oxide is briefly pointed out. Key words: heavy fermion, superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, ferromagnetism

J. Flouquet A; G. Knebel A; D. Braithwaite A; D. Aoki B; J. P. Brison C; F. Hardy A; A. Huxley A; S. Raymond A; B. Salce A; I. Sheikin D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review hadron production in heavy ion collisions with emphasis on pion and kaon production at energies below 2 AGeV and on partonic collectivity at RHIC energies.

Helmut Oeschler; Hans Georg Ritter; Nu Xu

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

496

Statistics of Heavy Rainfall Occurrences in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal variations of heavy rainfall days over Taiwan are analyzed using 6-yr (19972002) hourly rainfall data from about 360 rainfall stations, including high-spatial-resolution Automatic Rainfall and Meteorological Telemetry System ...

Ching-Sen Chen; Yi-Leng Chen; Che-Ling Liu; Pay-Liam Lin; Wan-Chin Chen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

An Early History of Heavy Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1945 Canada has had a nuclear power industry based on reactor design which uses natural uranium and heavy water. The tortuous and improbable sequence of events which led to this situation is examined. 1 1

Chris Waltham

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Heavy hadrons in quark-gluon plasma  

SciTech Connect

We use the nonperturbative quark-antiquark potential derived within the Field Correlator Method and the screened Coulomb potential to calculate binding energies and melting temperatures of heavy mesons and baryons in the deconfined phase of quark-gluon plasma.

Narodetskii, I. M., E-mail: naro@itep.ru; Simonov, Yu. A.; Veselov, A. I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

The search for a heavy Higgs boson  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical limits on the mass of the Higgs boson from vacuum stability and perturbative unitarity are examined. Search techniques for heavy Higgs bosons, M/sub H/ > 200 GeV, are also reviewed. 8 refs., 5 figs.

Dawson, S.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Light-Heavy Crude & Product Price Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Similar light-heavy price difference trends are seen in both the crude oil and the product markets. However, there are some short-term product market changes that ...