National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for heavy duty roots

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy Duty Roots Expander Heat Energy Recovery (HD-REHER)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Eaton Corporation at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about heavy duty roots expander...

  2. Heavy Duty & Medium Duty Drive Cycle Data Collection for Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy Duty & Medium Duty Drive Cycle Data Collection for Modeling Expansion Heavy Duty & Medium Duty Drive Cycle Data Collection for Modeling Expansion 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program...

  3. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion &...

  4. Sandia Energy - Heavy Duty

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy & Drilling TechnologyHeavy Duty Home Transportation

  5. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

  6. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  7. Sandia Energy - Heavy Duty Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy & Drilling TechnologyHeavy Duty Home

  8. NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation This report provides the results of an...

  9. Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Natural gas engine technology has evolved to meet the...

  10. SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro 4 Emission Standards in 2005 SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro 4 Emission Standards in...

  11. Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Presentation...

  12. NAFTA Heavy Duty Engine and Aftertreatment Technology: Status...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NAFTA Heavy Duty Engine and Aftertreatment Technology: Status and Outlook NAFTA Heavy Duty Engine and Aftertreatment Technology: Status and Outlook Presentation given at DEER 2006,...

  13. California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty Trucks California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty Trucks Describes system for fueling truck fleet with...

  14. WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and...

  15. Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using Model-Based Transient Calibration Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using...

  16. APBF-DEC Heavy Duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Status of APBF-DEC NOx AdsorberDPF Projects APBF- DEC Heavy-Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Catalyst Aging Study APBF-DEC Light-duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project...

  17. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy...

  18. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation vss043barnitt2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis Medium and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field...

  19. Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF In reference...

  20. HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING IN LABORATORY CONDITIONS HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING...

  1. Transient Simulation of a 2007 Prototype Heavy-Duty Engine |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simulation of a 2007 Prototype Heavy-Duty Engine Transient Simulation of a 2007 Prototype Heavy-Duty Engine 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference PresentationL...

  2. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Meeting vss043gonder2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis Battery Pack Requirements and Targets...

  3. Heavy-Duty Low Temperature Combustion Development Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Combustion Development Activities at Caterpillar Heavy-Duty Low Temperature Combustion Development Activities at Caterpillar Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel...

  4. Roadmapping Engine Technology for Post-2020 Heavy Duty Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles Roadmapping Engine Technology for Post-2020 Heavy Duty Vehicles Discusses Detroit Diesel collaborative multi-year technology program which includes systematic...

  5. Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency Targeting EPA 2010 Emissions Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency Targeting EPA 2010 Emissions...

  6. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Kenneth; Cosgrove, Jon; Duran, Adam; Konan, Arnaud; Lammert, Mike; Prohaska, Bob

    2015-06-09

    This presentation summarizes medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicle field evaluation test results, aggregated data, and detailed analysis.

  7. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Creation of the Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule forfor the heavy-duty chassis and engine dynamometer tests wererather than a heavy-duty engine dynamometer test. 31 The GTL

  8. Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty Vehicles Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty Vehicles Emissions tests of in-use heavy-duty vehicles...

  9. Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine Transportation Research PIER Transportation the research and development of an advanced natural gas engine concepts that can be used in the heavy duty Treatment System) simulations have been performed and reported. · The EATS hardware for engine tests has

  10. Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: AVL Powertrain Engineering...

  11. Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

  12. 2007-2009 USA Emission Solutions for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -2009 USA Emission Solutions for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines 2007-2009 USA Emission Solutions for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Southwest Research...

  13. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: • Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). • Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in light–duty vehicles.

  14. Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Cummins Inc. Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Program

  15. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis PI: Jeff Gonder (NREL) Team: Laurie Ramroth and Aaron Brooker May 15, 2012 Project ID : VSS043 This...

  16. Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In-Use Emission Performance Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland deer2003ikonen.pdf More...

  17. New Demands on Heavy Duty Engine Management Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the potential of emissions-based process control to meet future heavy-duty emissions legislation by identifying suitable actuated variables and developing hardware and related controllers.

  18. The Road to Improved Heavy Duty Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Heavy duty diesel engine fuel economy is improved by lowering the viscosity of engine lubricant, especially when engine speed is increased or load is decreased, as in long distance on-highway driving

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about heavy-duty low...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about heavy-duty low...

  1. Sandia Energy - Heavy Duty Low-Temperature & Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy & Drilling TechnologyHeavy Duty HomeHeavy Duty

  2. High-Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Combustion in a Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Engine via Fuel Reactivity Control High-Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Engine via Fuel...

  3. Measurement of Real-World Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real-World Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicles: The State-of-the-Art Measurement of Real-World Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicles: The State-of-the-Art 2003 DEER...

  4. ARB's Study of Emissions from Diesel and CNG Heavy-duty Transit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ARB's Study of Emissions from Diesel and CNG Heavy-duty Transit Buses ARB's Study of Emissions from Diesel and CNG Heavy-duty Transit Buses 2002 DEER Conference Presentation:...

  5. Can We Accurately Measure In-Use Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    We Accurately Measure In-Use Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines? Can We Accurately Measure In-Use Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines? Poster presentation at the 2007...

  6. Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control The more...

  7. A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency - Hybrid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency - Hybrid Power System of Diesel and WHR-ORC Engines A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency - Hybrid Power...

  8. Summary of In-Use Evaluation of Two Heavy Duty Hybrid Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NTE Windows and a Work-Based Method to Determine In-Use Emissions of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty Vehicles Can We...

  9. High-Load Partially Premixed Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Load Partially Premixed Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine High-Load Partially Premixed Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...

  10. Measuring "Real World" Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions with a Mobile...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Real World" Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions with a Mobile Lab Measuring "Real World" Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions with a Mobile Lab 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: University of...

  11. Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands Derived Fuels Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands Derived Fuels 2003 DEER Conference Presentation:...

  12. Reduction of Heavy-Duty Fuel Consumption and CO2 Generation ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty Fuel Consumption and CO2 Generation -- What the Industry Does and What the Government Can Do Reduction of Heavy-Duty Fuel Consumption and CO2 Generation -- What the...

  13. APBF- DEC Heavy-Duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Catalyst Aging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEC Heavy-Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Catalyst Aging Study APBF- DEC Heavy-Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Catalyst Aging Study 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  14. Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses field evaluations of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles performed by NREL. The project provides medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) test results, aggregated data, and detailed analysis, including 3rd party unbiased data (data that would not normally be shared by industry in an aggregated and detailed manner). Over 5.6 million miles of advanced technology MD and HD truck data have been collected, documented, and analyzed on over 240 different vehicles since 2002. Data, analysis, and reports are shared within DOE, national laboratory partners, and industry for R&D planning and strategy. The results help guide R&D for new technology development, help define intelligent usage of newly developed technology, and help fleets/users understand all aspects of advanced technology.

  15. Impact of Heavy Duty Vehicle Emissions Reductions on Global Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-08-01

    The impact of a specified set of emissions reductions from heavy duty vehicles on climate change is calculated using the MAGICC 5.3 climate model. The integrated impact of the following emissions changes are considered: CO2, CH4, N2O, VOC, NOx, and SO2. This brief summarizes the assumptions and methods used for this calculation.

  16. Remote Sensing of NO and NO2 Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    Research Remote Sensing of NO and NO2 Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Using Tunable Diode to measure the NOx emissions of heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDTs). The remote sensor could operate tightly controlled, the relative importance of heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDTs) as a NOx source has

  17. A Midwest Regional Inventory of Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    A Midwest Regional Inventory of Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Emissions by Christopher D. Dresser OF WISCONSIN - MADISON Abstract A Midwest Regional Inventory of Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Emissions Christopher-duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) for a ten-state Midwest region (Mississippi Valley Freight Coalition) using

  18. Heavy-Duty Engine Technology for High Thermal Efficiency at EPA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology for High Thermal Efficiency at EPA 2010 Emissions Regulations Heavy-Duty Engine Technology for High Thermal Efficiency at EPA 2010 Emissions Regulations Presentation...

  19. Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scora, George Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Model for Heavy Duty Diesel Vehicles. TransportationAir Contaminant Emissions from Diesel- fueled Engines. Factfor Measuring Emissions from Diesel Engines. 1. Regulated

  20. Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis Selective reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments with plasma-assisted...

  1. Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  2. TECHNICAL NOTE HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL VEHICLE (HDDV) IDLING ACTIVITY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;TECHNICAL NOTE HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL VEHICLE (HDDV) IDLING ACTIVITY AND EMISSIONS STUDY: PHASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Current Diesel Idling Emissions Factors

  3. Exhaust Heat Driven Rankine Cycle for a Heavy Duty Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents progress to date and plans to develop a viable Rankine engine to harness useful brake power from wasted heat energy in heavy duty truck engine exhaust

  4. Clean Cities' Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    Guide describes the alternative fuel and advanced medium- and heavy-duty vehicles available on the market, including buses, vans, refuse haulers, and more.

  5. Heavy-Duty Powertrain and Vehicle Development- A Look Toward 2020

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Globalization in emissions regulation will be driving freight efficiency improvements and will require heavy-duty engine and powertrain advancements, vehicle improvements, and optimized system integration

  6. Downspeeding a Heavy-Duty Pickup Truck with a Combined Supercharger...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pickup Truck with a Combined Supercharger and Turbocharger Boosting System to Improve Drive Cycle Fuel Economy Downspeeding a Heavy-Duty Pickup Truck with a Combined...

  7. Technologies for a Sustainable Heavy-Duty On-Road Fleet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Only selected energy pathways for the heavy-duty on-road fleet are consistent with the joint objectives of reducing petroleum dependence and mitigating climate change

  8. 3M heavy duty roto peen: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The roto peen scaler allows for the selective removal of concrete substrates. The peen is a tungsten carbide shot brazed to a hardened steel rivet that is supported by a heavy duty flexible flap. The peens are coupled with a commercially available piece of equipment that is used to scabble or remove the concrete. The scabbled debris is then collected into 55 gallon drums by means of a vacuum system. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  9. Energy 101: Heavy Duty Vehicle Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformationInformation AdministrationHeavy Duty

  10. Using LNG as a Fuel in Heavy-Duty Tractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liquid Carbonic, Inc. and Trucking Research Institute

    1999-08-09

    Recognizing the lack of operational data on alternative fuel heavy-truck trucks, NREL contracted with the Trucking Research Institute (TRI) in 1994 to obtain a cooperative agreement with Liquid Carbonic. The purpose of this agreement was to (1) purchase and operate liquid natural gas- (LNG-) powered heavy-duty tractor-trailers with prototype Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) Series 60 natural gas (S60G) engines in over-the-road commercial service applications; and (2) collect and provide operational data to DDC to facilitate the on-road prototype development of the engine and to NREL for the Alternative Fuels Data Center. The vehicles operated from August 1994 through April of 1997 and led to a commercially available, emissions-certified S60G in 1998. This report briefly documents the engine development, the operational characteristics of LNG, and the lessons learned during the project.

  11. The Effects of Altitude on Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck On-Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    The Effects of Altitude on Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck On-Road Emissions G A R Y A . B I S H O P , * J oxide from 5772 heavy-duty diesel trucks at five locations in the United States and Europe show slightly emissions has largely been focused on the regulation and control of exhaust emissions from light

  12. Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2011 Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2011 Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Friction the friction losses of a heavy duty diesel engine. In addition, a tear down procedure needed to be created in order to guide the engine disassembly and testing. The overall goal was to improve fuel economy

  13. Guaranteeing safety for heavy duty vehicle platooning: Safe set computations and experimental evaluations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    be increased and emissions can be reduced. Additionally, when governing vehicle platoons by an automatedGuaranteeing safety for heavy duty vehicle platooning: Safe set computations and experimental December 2013 Keywords: Heavy duty vehicle Platooning Game theory Safety analysis Vehicle-to-vehicle

  14. Urban driving cycle results of retrofitted diesel oxidation catalysts on heavy duty vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.F. [Engine Control Systems Ltd., Aurora, Ontario (Canada); Rideout, G.

    1996-09-01

    This paper presents the emissions testing results of various heavy duty engines and vehicles with and without retrofitted diesel oxidation catalyst technology. 1987 Cummins L10 and 1991 DDC 6V92TA DDECII engine results over the US Heavy Duty Transient Test are presented for comparison to chassis test results. The vehicles in this study include two urban buses, two school buses and three heavy duty trucks. The Central Business District, New York Bus and New York Composite urban driving cycles have been used to evaluate baseline emissions and the catalyst performance on a heavy duty chassis dynamometer. The results demonstrate that 25--45% particulate reduction is readily achievable on a wide variety of heavy duty vehicles. Significant carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon reductions were also observed.

  15. WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials

  16. Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Lyons

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.

  17. Predicted Impact of Idling Reduction Options for Heavy-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Trucks: A Comparison of Full-Fuel-Cycle Emissions, Energy Use, and Proximity to Urban Populations in Five States Predicted Impact of Idling Reduction Options for Heavy-Duty...

  18. Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis...

  19. On-Road Development of the C-Gas Plus Engine in Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-06-01

    Fact sheet details on-road development of C-Gas Plus natural gas engine in Viking Freight heavy-duty trucks, including emissions, fuel costs, and petroleum displacement.

  20. Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emissions tests of in-use heavy-duty vehicles showed that, natural gas- and propane-fueled vehicles have high emissions of NH3 and CO, compared to diesel vehicles, while meeting certification requirements

  1. Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In reference to legacy heavy-duty vehicles, emissions and fuel use are less closely related to immediate engine load than was the case without the use of aftertreatments.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Zero-Emission Heavy-Duty Drayage Truck Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by SCAQMD at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about zero-emission heavy-duty drayage truck...

  3. Heavy Duty Roots Expander for Waste Heat Energy Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  4. Evaluation of the European PMP Methodologies Using Chassis Dynamometer and On-road Testing of Heavy-duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical evaluation of new protocol for measurement of heavy-duty diesel engine particulate matter emissions proposed for potential use in California.

  5. Fuel Economy Improvement Potential of a Heavy Duty Truck using V2x Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaClair, Tim J; Verma, Rajeev; Norris, Sarah; Cochran, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an intelligent driver assistance system to reduce fuel consumption in heavy duty vehicles irrespective of the driving style of the driver. We specifically study the potential of V2I and V2V communications to reduce fuel consumption in heavy duty trucks. Most ITS communications today are oriented towards vehicle safety, with communications strategies and hardware that tend to focus on low latency. This has resulted in technologies emerging with a relatively limited range for the communications. For fuel economy, it is expected that most benefits will be derived with greater communications distances, at the scale of many hundred meters or several kilometers, due to the large inertia of heavy duty vehicles. It may therefore be necessary to employ different communications strategies for ITS applications aimed at fuel economy and other environmental benefits than what is used for safety applications in order to achieve the greatest benefits.

  6. Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from a Heavy-Duty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from waste heat from a heavy- duty diesel engine. For this system, a hierarchical and modular control) for recovering waste heat from a heavy-duty diesel engine. For this system, a hierarchical and modular control

  7. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    Today's fleets are increasingly interested in medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles that use alternative fuels or advanced technologies that can help reduce operating costs, meet emissions requirements, improve fleet sustainability, and support U.S. energy independence. Vehicle and engine manufacturers are responding to this interest with a wide range of options across a steadily growing number of vehicle applications. This guide provides an overview of alternative fuel power systems?including engines, microturbines, electric motors, and fuel cells?and hybrid propulsion systems. The guide also offers a list of individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicle models listed by application, along with associated manufacturer contact information, fuel type(s), power source(s), and related information.

  8. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-01

    Today's fleets are increasingly interested in medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles that use alternative fuels or advanced technologies that can help reduce operating costs, meet emissions requirements, improve fleet sustainability, and support U.S. energy independence. Vehicle and engine manufacturers are responding to this interest with a wide range of options across a steadily growing number of vehicle applications. This guide provides an overview of alternative fuel power systems--including engines, microturbines, electric motors, and fuel cells--and hybrid propulsion systems. The guide also offers a list of individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicle models listed by application, along with associated manufacturer contact information, fuel type(s), power source(s), and related information.

  9. Hydrogen/Natural Gas Blends for Heavy and Light-Duty Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    89502 Abstract NRG Tech is developing engine technology that is applicable for use in heavy-duty vehicle candidate engine platforms, ranging from 7.4 to 8.4 liters displacement, of its own for evaluation. Testing Current Results Tests on engine compression ratio ranged from 9.1 to 15.0 to 1. The desirable range

  10. Remote Sensing of In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    -road measurements in 2005 of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxideRemote Sensing of In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks D A N I E L A . B U R G A R D , G A R Y A . B I. Carbon monoxide and nitric oxide show increasing emissions with increased altitude. Oxides of nitrogen

  11. On-Road Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Diesel Truck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    measure the concentrations of CO, HC, NO, and CO2 in automobile and truck emissions while in route, HC, and NO to CO2 and to get percent opacity readings for heavy-duty diesel trucks with elevated the source. The data show, on average, a correlation between high CO emissions and reported opacity

  12. REAL-WORLD EFFICACY OF HEAVY DUTY DIESEL TRUCK NOX AND PM EMISSIONS CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    REAL-WORLD EFFICACY OF HEAVY DUTY DIESEL TRUCK NOX AND PM EMISSIONS CONTROLS Gurdas Sandhu H 0121 NOx(g/gal) Truck Number Highway Arterial Comparison of Trucks: Fuel-Based NO Emission Rates NOx emissions are substantially lower than Truck 5715. 1999 2005 2007 2009 2010 Fuel-Based Emission

  13. TRB 08-1311 Link-Based Emission Factors for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    for approximately 46% of NOx and 54% of PM10 of the nationwide on-road vehicle emission inventory (2). ThereforeTRB 08-1311 Link-Based Emission Factors for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Based on Real-World Data H and particulate matter to on-road vehicle emission inventory. The objectives of this study are to estimate roadway

  14. Fuel-efficient heavy-duty vehicle platooning by look-ahead control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    Fuel-efficient heavy-duty vehicle platooning by look-ahead control Valerio Turri, Bart Besselink intervehicular distances (known as platoons) has been shown to be an effective way of reducing fuel consumption be exploited to obtain fuel savings. The current paper aims at the inclusion of preview information

  15. High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  16. Heavy-duty diesel vehicle Nox? aftertreatment in 2010 : the infrastructure and compliance challenges of urea-SCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodek, Kristian M

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly stringent heavy-duty vehicle emission regulations are prompting the use of PM and NOx aftertreatment systems in the US, the EU and Japan. In the US, the EPA Highway Diesel Rule, which will be fully implemented ...

  17. Effects of blending a heavy alcohol (C20H40O with diesel in a heavy-duty compression-ignition engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    Effects of blending a heavy alcohol (C20H40O with diesel in a heavy-duty compression phytol (C20H40O) with diesel in 5%, 10%, and 20% by volume blends. 3-D, transient, turbulent nozzle flow and emissions experiments of the different phytol/diesel blends. Combustion event depicted by high

  18. Design and Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical and Chemical Measurements of PM Dispersing Plume of Heavy Duty Diesel Truck

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents plume characterization of three vehicles with different aftertreatment configuration, representative of legacy, current and future heavy-duty truck fleets

  19. Engine-External HC-Dosing for Regeneration of Diesel Particulate Filters for Heavy Duty and NRMM According to Annex XXVII StVZO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation discusses how a diesel particulate filter can be integrated in the exhaust piping of a heavy-duty engine.

  20. Combustion Commonality and Differences Between HSDI and Heavy Duty Truck Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Rong

    2000-08-20

    Experimental understanding of the diesel spray and combustion process at the fundamental level has helped advance the virtual lab simulation tools. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based simulation has been globally verified in many engines, providing substantial credibility to the use of this technology in advanced engine development. This paper highlights the common aspects and differences between the smallbore HSDI and the larger displacement heavy-duty truck engine spray and combustion processes. Implications for combustion system strategies will be delineated. Detroit Diesel integrated ''Wired'' approach will be explained with pointers towards future tool enhancements.

  1. Modeling Heavy/Medium-Duty Fuel Consumption Based on Drive Cycle Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lijuan; Duran, Adam; Gonder, Jeffrey; Kelly, Kenneth

    2015-10-13

    This paper presents multiple methods for predicting heavy/medium-duty vehicle fuel consumption based on driving cycle information. A polynomial model, a black box artificial neural net model, a polynomial neural network model, and a multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) model were developed and verified using data collected from chassis testing performed on a parcel delivery diesel truck operating over the Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT), City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle (CSHVC), New York Composite Cycle (NYCC), and hydraulic hybrid vehicle (HHV) drive cycles. Each model was trained using one of four drive cycles as a training cycle and the other three as testing cycles. By comparing the training and testing results, a representative training cycle was chosen and used to further tune each method. HHDDT as the training cycle gave the best predictive results, because HHDDT contains a variety of drive characteristics, such as high speed, acceleration, idling, and deceleration. Among the four model approaches, MARS gave the best predictive performance, with an average absolute percent error of -1.84% over the four chassis dynamometer drive cycles. To further evaluate the accuracy of the predictive models, the approaches were first applied to real-world data. MARS outperformed the other three approaches, providing an average absolute percent error of -2.2% of four real-world road segments. The MARS model performance was then compared to HHDDT, CSHVC, NYCC, and HHV drive cycles with the performance from Future Automotive System Technology Simulator (FASTSim). The results indicated that the MARS method achieved a comparative predictive performance with FASTSim.

  2. Natural Gas as a Future Fuel for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wai-Lin Litzke; James Wegrzyn

    2001-05-14

    In addition to their significant environmental impacts, medium-duty and heavy-duty (HD) vehicles are high volume fuel users. Development of such vehicles, which include transit buses, refuse trucks, and HD Class 6-8 trucks, that are fueled with natural gas is strategic to market introduction of natural gas vehicles (NGV). Over the past five years the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) has funded technological developments in NGV systems to support the growth of this sector in the highly competitive transportation market. The goals are to minimize emissions associated with NGV use, to improve on the economies of scale, and to continue supporting the testing and safety assessments of all new systems. This paper provides an overview of the status of major projects under a program supported by DOE/OHVT and managed by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The discussion focuses on the program's technical strategy in meeting specific goals proposed by the N GV industry and the government. Relevant projects include the development of low-cost fuel storage, fueling infrastructure, and HD vehicle applications.

  3. Analysis of C1, C2, and C10 through C33 particle-phase and semi-volatile organic compound emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    from heavy-duty diesel engines Z. Gerald Liu a,*, Devin R. Berg a , Victoria N. Vasys a , Melissa E 18 November 2009 Keywords: Organic compound emissions Particulate matter emissions Heavy-duty diesel engines Aftertreatment technology Diesel particulate filter Chemical speciation a b s t r a c t To meet

  4. Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis Overview Volvo Group Powertrain Engineering is interested performed to educate the team on engine friction testing. A 3D CAD model was initially produced to design

  5. Department of Energy and Electrical Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Energy and Electrical Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Engineering Specifications Concept Generation of Test Cell Test Cell Design Cad Drawings Labview Program. Future groups will be able to use this test rig to run a multitude of engine tests Volvo will be able

  6. Heavy-Duty Truck Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of Gary A. Bishop,* Brent G. Schuchmann,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Heavy-Duty Truck Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of California Gary A. Bishop,* Brent G, Colorado 80208, United States ABSTRACT: California and Federal emissions regulations for 2007 and newer of nitrogen spurring the introduction of new aftertreatment systems. Since 2008, four emission measurement

  7. FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; LaClair, Tim J; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E

    2013-01-01

    We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

  8. Evolution of Westinghouse heavy-duty power generation and industrial combustion turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scalzo, A.J.; Bannister, R.L.; DeCorso, M.; Howard, G.S.

    1996-04-01

    This paper reviews the evolution of heavy-duty power generation and industrial combustion turbines in the United States from a Westinghouse Electric Corporation perspective. Westinghouse combustion turbine genealogy began in March of 1943 when the first wholly American designed and manufactured jet engine went on test in Philadelphia, and continues today in Orlando, Florida, with the 230 MW, 501G combustion turbine. In this paper, advances in thermodynamics, materials, cooling, and unit size will be described. Many basic design features such as two-bearing rotor, cold-end drive, can-annular internal combustors, CURVIC{sup 2} clutched turbine disks, and tangential exhaust struts have endured successfully for over 40 years. Progress in turbine technology includes the clean coal technology and advanced turbine systems initiatives of the US Department of Energy.

  9. The GREET Model Expansion for Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Hao; Burnham, Andrew; Wang, Michael; Hang, Wen; Vyas, Anant

    2015-05-01

    Heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) account for a significant portion of the U.S. transportation sector’s fuel consumption, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and air pollutant emissions. In our most recent efforts, we expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREETTM) model to include life-cycle analysis of HDVs. In particular, the GREET expansion includes the fuel consumption, GHG emissions, and air pollutant emissions of a variety of conventional (i.e., diesel and/or gasoline) HDV types, including Class 8b combination long-haul freight trucks, Class 8b combination short-haul freight trucks, Class 8b dump trucks, Class 8a refuse trucks, Class 8a transit buses, Class 8a intercity buses, Class 6 school buses, Class 6 single-unit delivery trucks, Class 4 single-unit delivery trucks, and Class 2b heavy-duty pickup trucks and vans. These vehicle types were selected to represent the diversity in the U.S. HDV market, and specific weight classes and body types were chosen on the basis of their fuel consumption using the 2002 Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS) database. VIUS was also used to estimate the fuel consumption and payload carried for most of the HDV types. In addition, fuel economy projections from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, transit databases, and the literature were examined. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s latest Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator was employed to generate tailpipe air pollutant emissions of diesel and gasoline HDV types.

  10. Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Slone; Jeffrey Birkel

    2007-10-31

    The Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks program (DE-FC26-04NT42189), commonly referred to as the AES program, focused on areas that will primarily benefit fuel economy and improve heat rejection while driving over the road. The AES program objectives were to: (1) Analyze, design, build, and test a cooling system that provided a minimum of 10 percent greater heat rejection in the same frontal area with no increase in parasitic fan load. (2) Realize fuel savings with advanced power management and acceleration assist by utilizing an integrated starter/generator (ISG) and energy storage devices. (3) Quantify the effect of aerodynamic drag due to the frontal shape mandated by the area required for the cooling system. The program effort consisted of modeling and designing components for optimum fuel efficiency, completing fabrication of necessary components, integrating these components into the chassis test bed, completing controls programming, and performance testing the system both on a chassis dynamometer and on the road. Emission control measures for heavy-duty engines have resulted in increased engine heat loads, thus introducing added parasitic engine cooling loads. Truck electrification, in the form of thermal management, offers technological solutions to mitigate or even neutralize the effects of this trend. Thermal control offers opportunities to avoid increases in cooling system frontal area and forestall reduced fuel economy brought about by additional aerodynamic vehicle drag. This project explored such thermal concepts by installing a 2007 engine that is compliant with current regulations and bears additional heat rejection associated with meeting these regulations. This newer engine replaced the 2002 engine from a previous project that generated less heat rejection. Advanced power management, utilizing a continuously optimized and controlled power flow between electric components, can offer additional fuel economy benefits to the heavy-duty trucking industry. Control software for power management brings added value to the power distribution and energy storage architecture on board a truck with electric accessories and an ISG. The research team has built upon a previous truck electrification project, formally, 'Parasitic Energy Loss Reduction and Enabling Technologies for Class 7/8 Trucks', DE-FC04-2000AL6701, where the fundamental concept of electrically-driven accessories replacing belt/gear-driven accessories was demonstrated on a Kenworth T2000 truck chassis. The electrical accessories, shown in Figure 1, were controlled to provide 'flow on demand' variable-speed operation and reduced parasitic engine loads for increased fuel economy. These accessories also provided solutions for main engine idle reduction in long haul trucks. The components and systems of the current project have been integrated into the same Kenworth T2000 truck platform. Reducing parasitic engine loading by decoupling accessory loads from the engine and driving them electrically has been a central concept of this project. Belt or gear-driven engine accessories, such as water pump, air conditioning compressor, or air compressor, are necessarily tied to the engine speed dictated by the current vehicle operating conditions. These conventional accessory pumps are sized to provide adequate flow or pressure at low idle or peak torque speeds, resulting in excess flow or pressure at cruising or rated speeds. The excess flow is diverted through a pressure-minimizing device such as a relief valve thereby expending energy to drive unnecessary and inefficient pump operation. This inefficiency causes an increased parasitic load to the engine, which leads to a loss of usable output power and decreased fuel economy. Controlling variable-speed electric motors to provide only the required flow or pressure of a particular accessory system can yield significant increases in fuel economy for a commercial vehicle. Motor loads at relatively high power levels (1-5 kW, or higher) can be efficiently provided

  11. Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency (MEHE) Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, M.; Veliz, M.

    2011-09-30

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. was to improve diesel engine efficiency by incorporating advanced materials to enable higher combustion pressures and temperatures necessary for improved combustion. The project scope also included novel materials for use in advanced components and designs associated with waste-heat recovery and other concepts for improved thermal efficiency. Caterpillar initially provided ORNL with a 2004 Tier 2 C15 ACERT diesel engine (designed for on-highway use) and two 600 hp motoring dynamometers. The first year of the CRADA effort was focused on establishing a heavy-duty experimental engine research cell. First year activities included procuring, installing and commissioning the cell infrastructure. Infrastructure components consisted of intake air handling system, water tower, exhaust handling system, and cell air conditioning. Other necessary infrastructure items included the fuel delivery system and bottled gas handling to support the analytical instrumentation. The second year of the CRADA focused on commissioning the dynamometer system to enable engine experimentation. In addition to the requirements associated with the dynamometer controller, the electrical system needed a power factor correction system to maintain continuity with the electrical grid. During the second year the engine was instrumented and baseline operated to confirm performance and commission the dynamometer. The engine performance was mapped and modeled according to requirements provided by Caterpillar. This activity was further supported by a Work-for-Others project from Caterpillar to evaluate a proprietary modeling system. A second Work-for-Others activity was performed to evaluate a novel turbocharger design. This project was highly successful and may lead to new turbocharger designs for Caterpillar heavy-duty diesel engines. During the third (and final) year of the CRADA, a novel valve material was evaluated to assess high temperature performance and durability. A series of prototype valves, composed of a unique nickel-alloy was placed in the engine head. The engine was aggressively operated using a transient test cycle for 200 hours. The valve recession was periodically measured to determine valve performance. Upon completion of the test the valves were removed and returned to Caterpillar for additional assessment. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. Review of the status and research results were carried out on a regular basis (meetings and telecons) which included direction for future work activities. A significant portion of the industrial support was in the form of information exchange and technical consultation.

  12. An Investigation of Natural Gas as a Substitute for Diesel in Heavy Duty Trucks and Associated Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad, Muneer

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, applicability of natural gas fuel for transportation as compared to diesel is investigated. This study investigates a promising technology for the heavy duty truck sector of transportation as a target for conversion from diesel to natural gas. The supply of natural gas is limited so we also verify the available domestic supply quantities both before and after a fleet conversion. This paper concludes with an economic discussion regarding Javon's paradox and the fungibility of natural gas as compared to that of oil. In order to determine if natural gas can replace diesel for the country's heavy duty truck transportation needs, the energy equivalent and efficiency of natural gas alternatives should be compared to diesel. There are two alternatives for using natural gas as a replacement for diesel; compressed natural gas and liquefied natural gas.

  13. Quantitative Effects of Vehicle Parameters on Fuel Consumption for Heavy-Duty Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lijuan; Kelly, Kenneth; Walkowicz, Kevin; Duran, Adam

    2015-10-16

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fleet Test and Evaluations team recently conducted chassis dynamometer tests of a class 8 conventional regional delivery truck over the Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT), West Virginia University City (WVU City), and Composite International Truck Local and Commuter Cycle (CILCC) drive cycles. A quantitative study was conducted by analyzing the impacts of various factors on fuel consumption (FC) and fuel economy (FE) by modeling and simulating the truck using NREL's Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim). Factors used in this study included vehicle weight, and the coefficients of rolling resistance and aerodynamic drag. The simulation results from a single parametric study revealed that FC was approximately a linear function of the weight, coefficient of aerodynamic drag, and rolling resistance over various drive cycles. Among these parameters, the truck weight had the largest effect on FC. The study of the impact of two technologies on FE suggested that, depending on the circumstances, it may be more cost effective to reduce one parameter (such as coefficient of aerodynamic drag) to increase fuel economy, or it may be more beneficial to reduce another (such as the coefficient of rolling resistance). It also provided a convenient way to estimate FE by interpolating within the parameter values and extrapolating outside of them. The simulation results indicated that the FC could be reduced from 38.70 L/100 km, 50.72 L/100 km, and 38.42 L/100 km in the baseline truck to 26.78 L/100 km, 43.14 L/100 km and 29.84 L/100 km over the HHDDT, WVU City and CILCC drive cycles, respectively, when the U.S. Department of Energy's three targeted new technologies were applied simultaneously.

  14. Heavy duty insulator assemblies for 500-kV bulk power transmission line with large diameter octagonalbundled conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Hayase, I.; Hirai, J.; Inove, M.; Naito, K.; Yukino, T.

    1982-11-01

    This paper describes the design procedure and the results of field tests on mechanical performances of insulator assemblies newly developed to support octagonal-bundled conductors for 500-kV bulk power transmission. Taking account of conductor-motion-induced peak tensile load, fatigue, torsional torque and others, a successful design has been achieved in two prototype assemblies for such heavy mechanical duties as encountered during conductor galloping or swing. This has been proved throughout three years of the field tests.

  15. Multivariate analysis of exhaust emissions from heavy-duty diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjoegren, M.; Ulf, R.; Li, H.; Westerholm, R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    1996-01-01

    Particulate and gaseous exhaust emission phases from running 10 diesel fuels on two makes of heavy-duty diesel engines were analyzed with respect to 63 chemical descriptors. Measurements for one of the fuels were also made in the presence of an exhaust aftertreatment device. The variables included 28 polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), regulated pollutants (CO, HC, NO{sub x}, particles), and 19 other organic and inorganic exhaust emission components. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied for the statistical exploration of the obtained data. In addition, relationships between chemical (12 variables) and physical (12 variables) parameters of the fuels to the exhaust emissions were derived using partial least squares (PLS) regression. Both PCA and PLS models were derived for the engine makes separately. The PCA showed that the most descriptive exhaust emission factors from these diesel fuels included fluoranthene as a representative of PAC, the regulated pollutants, sulfates, methylated pyrenes, and monoaromatics. Exhaust emissions were significantly decreased in the presence of an exhaust aftertreatment device. Both engine makes exhibited similar patterns of exhaust emissions. Discrepancies were observed for the exhaust emissions of CO{sub 2} and oil-derived soluble organic fractions, owing to differences in engine design. The PLS analysis showed a good correlation of exhaust emission of the regulated pollutants and PAC with the contents of PAC in the fuels and the fuel aromaticity. 41 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

    2010-03-31

    The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

  17. Development of NOx Adsorber System for Dodge Ram 2007 Heavy duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Integrated Diesel NOx Adsorber AT Subsystem at Light-Duty Operation Oxidation State Optimization for Maximum Efficiency of NOx Adsorber Catalysts Enhanced High Temperature...

  18. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development for Auxiliary Power in Heavy Duty Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel T. Hennessy

    2010-06-15

    Changing economic and environmental needs of the trucking industry is driving the use of auxiliary power unit (APU) technology for over the road haul trucks. The trucking industry in the United States remains the key to the economy of the nation and one of the major changes affecting the trucking industry is the reduction of engine idling. Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC (Delphi) teamed with heavy-duty truck Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) PACCAR Incorporated (PACCAR), and Volvo Trucks North America (VTNA) to define system level requirements and develop an SOFC based APU. The project defines system level requirements, and subsequently designs and implements an optimized system architecture using an SOFC APU to demonstrate and validate that the APU will meet system level goals. The primary focus is on APUs in the range of 3-5 kW for truck idling reduction. Fuels utilized were derived from low-sulfur diesel fuel. Key areas of study and development included sulfur remediation with reformer operation; stack sensitivity testing; testing of catalyst carbon plugging and combustion start plugging; system pre-combustion; and overall system and electrical integration. This development, once fully implemented and commercialized, has the potential to significantly reduce the fuel idling Class 7/8 trucks consume. In addition, the significant amounts of NOx, CO2 and PM that are produced under these engine idling conditions will be virtually eliminated, inclusive of the noise pollution. The environmental impact will be significant with the added benefit of fuel savings and payback for the vehicle operators / owners.

  19. Truck Duty Cycle and Performance Data Collection and Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Duty Cycle and Performance Data Collection and Analysis Program Heavy Duty & Medium Duty Drive Cycle Data Collection for Modeling Expansion Roadmap and Technical White Papers for...

  20. Development and Demonstration of a Low Cost Hybrid Drive Train for Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strangas, Elias; Schock, Harold; Zhu, Guoming; Moran, Kevin; Ruckle, Trevor; Foster, Shanelle; Cintron-Rivera, Jorge; Tariq, Abdul; Nino-Baron, Carlos

    2011-04-30

    The DOE sponsored effort is part of a larger effort to quantify the efficiency of hybrid powertrain systems through testing and modeling. The focus of the DOE sponsored activity was the design, development and testing of hardware to evaluate the efficiency of the electrical motors relevant to medium duty vehicles. Medium duty hybrid powertrain motors and generators were designed, fabricated, setup and tested. The motors were a permanent magnet configuration, constructed at Electric Apparatus Corporation in Howell, Michigan. The purpose of this was to identify the potential gains in terms of fuel cost savings that could be realized by implementation of such a configuration. As the electric motors constructed were prototype designs, the scope of the project did not include calculation of the costs of mass production of the subject electrical motors or generator.

  1. Simulated fuel economy and emissions performance during city and interstate driving for a heavy-duty hybrid truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, C Stuart; Gao, Zhiming; Smith, David E; LaClair, Tim J; Pihl, Josh A; Edwards, Kevin Dean

    2013-01-01

    We compare simulated fuel economy and emissions for both conventional and hybrid class 8 heavy-duty diesel trucks operating over multiple urban and highway driving cycles. Both light and heavy freight loads were considered, and all simulations included full aftertreatment for NOx and particulate emissions controls. The aftertreatment components included a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), urea-selective catalytic NOx reduction (SCR), and a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Our simulated hybrid powertrain was configured with a pre-transmission parallel drive, with a single electric motor between the clutch and gearbox. A conventional HD truck with equivalent diesel engine and aftertreatment was also simulated for comparison. Our results indicate that hybridization can significantly increase HD fuel economy and improve emissions control in city driving. However, there is less potential hybridization benefit for HD highway driving. A major factor behind the reduced hybridization benefit for highway driving is that there are fewer opportunities to utilize regenerative breaking. Our aftertreatment simulations indicate that opportunities for passive DPF regeneration are much greater for both hybrid and conventional trucks during highway driving due to higher sustained exhaust temperatures. When passive DPF regeneration is extensively utilized, the fuel penalty for particulate control is virtually eliminated, except for the 0.4%-0.9% fuel penalty associated with the slightly higher exhaust backpressure.

  2. Heavy-duty diesel engine NO{sub x} reduction with nitrogen-enriched combustion air. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, S.; Energy Systems

    2010-07-28

    The concept of engine emissions control by modifying intake combustion gas composition from that of ambient air using gas separation membranes has been developed during several programs undertaken at Argonne. These have led to the current program which is targeted at heavy-duty diesel truck engines. The specific objective is reduction of NO{sub x} emissions by the target engine to meet anticipated 2007 standards while extracting a maximum of 5 percent power loss and allowing implementation within commercial constraints of size, weight, and cost. This report includes a brief review of related past programs, describes work completed to date during the current program, and presents interim conclusions. Following a work schedule adjustment in August 2002 to accommodate problems in module procurement and data analysis, activities are now on schedule and planned work is expected to be completed in September, 2004. Currently, we believe that the stated program requirements for the target engine can be met, based upon extrapolation of the work completed. Planned project work is designed to experimentally confirm these projections and result in a specification for a module package that will meet program objectives.

  3. Progress in Reducing Aerodynamic Drag for Higher Efficiency of Heavy Duty Trucks (Class 7-8)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose McCallen; Richard Couch; Juliana Hsu; Fred Browand; Mustapha Hammache; Anthony Leonard; Mark Brady; Kambiz Salari; Walter Rutledge; James Ross; Bruce Storms; J.T. Heineck; David Driver; James Bell; Gregory Zilliac

    1999-12-31

    This paper describes research and development for reducing the aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by demonstrating new approaches for the numerical simulation and analysis of aerodynamic flow. In addition, greater use of newly developed computational tools holds promise for reducing the number of prototype tests, for cutting manufacturing costs, and for reducing overall time to market. Experimental verification and validation of new computational fluid dynamics methods are also an important part of this approach. Experiments on a model of an integrated tractor-trailer are underway at NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Southern California. Companion computer simulations are being performed by Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and California Institute of Technology using state-of-the-art techniques, with the intention of implementing more complex methods in the future.

  4. Truck Duty Cycle and Performance Data Collection and Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. vss002knee2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy Duty & Medium Duty Drive Cycle Data Collection for Modeling Expansion Truck Duty Cycle and Performance Data...

  5. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions...

  7. Design and Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Design and Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Poster presentation at the...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced heavy...

  9. In-Use Performance Results of Medium Duty Electric Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2012-07-01

    This presentation describes a DOE program to monitor and report on vehicle performance and energy utilization of medium-duty and heavy-duty electric vehicles.

  10. Simulation of high-altitude effects on heavy-duty diesel emissions. Final report, 31 October 1988-30 September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Human, D.M.; Ullman, T.L.

    1989-09-01

    Exhaust emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines operating at high altitude are of concern. EPA and Colorado Department of Health sponsored the project to characterize regulated and selected unregulated emissions from a naturally-aspirated Caterpillar 3208 and a turbocharged Cummins NTC-350 diesel engine at both low and simulated high altitude conditions (about 6000 ft). Emissions testing was performed over cold- and hot-start transient cycles as well as selected steady-state modes. Additionally, the turbocharged engine was operated with mechanically variable and fixed retarded fuel injection timing to represent normal and malfunction conditions, respectively. High altitude operation generally reduced NOx emissions approximately 10% for both engines. Average composite transient emissions of HC, CO, particulate matter, and aldehydes measured at high altitude for the naturally-aspirated engine were 2 to 4 times the levels noted for low altitude conditions. The same emission constituents from the turbocharged engine at high altitude with normal timing were 1.2 to 2 times the low altitude levels, but were 2 to 4 times the low altitude levels with malfunction timing.

  11. Effects of diesel fuel combustion-modifier additives on In-cylinder soot formation in a heavy-duty Dl diesel engine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musculus, Mark P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dietz, Jeff (The Lubrizol Corp.)

    2005-07-01

    Based on a phenomenological model of diesel combustion and pollutant-formation processes, a number of fuel additives that could potentially reduce in-cylinder soot formation by altering combustion chemistry have been identified. These fuel additives, or ''combustion modifiers'', included ethanol and ethylene glycol dimethyl ether, polyethylene glycol dinitrate (a cetane improver), succinimide (a dispersant), as well as nitromethane and another nitro-compound mixture. To better understand the chemical and physical mechanisms by which these combustion modifiers may affect soot formation in diesel engines, in-cylinder soot and diffusion flame lift-off were measured, using an optically-accessible, heavy-duty, direct-injection diesel engine. A line-of-sight laser extinction diagnostic was employed to measure the relative soot concentration within the diesel jets (''jetsoot'') as well as the rates of deposition of soot on the piston bowl-rim (''wall-soot''). An OH chemiluminescence imaging technique was utilized to measure the lift-off lengths of the diesel diffusion flames so that fresh oxygen entrainment rates could be compared among the fuels. Measurements were obtained at two operating conditions, using blends of a base commercial diesel fuel with various combinations of the fuel additives. The ethanol additive, at 10% by mass, reduced jet-soot by up to 15%, and reduced wall-soot by 30-40%. The other fuel additives also affected in-cylinder soot, but unlike the ethanol blends, changes in in-cylinder soot could be attributed solely to differences in the ignition delay. No statistically-significant differences in the diesel flame lift-off lengths were observed among any of the fuel additive formulations at the operating conditions examined in this study. Accordingly, the observed differences in in-cylinder soot among the fuel formulations cannot be attributed to differences in fresh oxygen entrainment upstream of the soot-formation zones after ignition.

  12. Very High Fuel Economy, Heavy Duty, Constant Speed, Truck Engine Optimized Via Unique Energy Recovery Turbines and Facilitated High Efficiency Continuously Variable Drivetrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahman Habibzadeh

    2010-01-31

    The project began under a corporative agreement between Mack Trucks, Inc and the Department of Energy starting from September 1, 2005. The major objective of the four year project is to demonstrate a 10% efficiency gain by operating a Volvo 13 Litre heavy-duty diesel engine at a constant or narrow speed and coupled to a continuously variable transmission. The simulation work on the Constant Speed Engine started on October 1st. The initial simulations are aimed to give a basic engine model for the VTEC vehicle simulations. Compressor and turbine maps are based upon existing maps and/or qualified, realistic estimations. The reference engine is a MD 13 US07 475 Hp. Phase I was completed in May 2006 which determined that an increase in fuel efficiency for the engine of 10.5% over the OICA cycle, and 8.2% over a road cycle was possible. The net increase in fuel efficiency would be 5% when coupled to a CVT and operated over simulated highway conditions. In Phase II an economic analysis was performed on the engine with turbocompound (TC) and a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). The system was analyzed to determine the payback time needed for the added cost of the TC and CVT system. The analysis was performed by considering two different production scenarios of 10,000 and 60,000 units annually. The cost estimate includes the turbocharger, the turbocompound unit, the interstage duct diffuser and installation details, the modifications necessary on the engine and the CVT. Even with the cheapest fuel and the lowest improvement, the pay back time is only slightly more than 12 months. A gear train is necessary between the engine crankshaft and turbocompound unit. This is considered to be relatively straight forward with no design problems.

  13. Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst: Final Report, 24 February 2004 -- 23 February 2006

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat IsHeavy-Duty Waste Hauler with

  14. Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and...

  15. K-*(892)(0) production in relativistic heavy ion collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Anderson, M.; Averichev, GS; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, RV; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, SP; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, JE; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, KJ; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, TJ; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Henry, TW; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horsley, M.; Huang, HZ; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, YI; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, AS; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, AD; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kunde, GJ; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Lansdell, CP; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, VM; LeVine, MJ; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, QJ; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; LoCurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, J.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mitchell, J.; Moore, CF; Morozov, V.; de Moura, MM; Munhoz, MG; Nelson, JM; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, SU; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevski, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schuttauf, A.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskii, SS; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, EJ; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Thompson, M.; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, MB; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Van Buren, G.; VanderMolen, AM; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vigdor, SE; Voloshin, SA; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, AE; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevski, YV; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2002-01-01

    COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 66, 061901~R! ~2002! K*?892?0 production in relativistic heavy ion collisions at AsNN?130 GeV C. Adler,11 Z. Ahammed,23 C. Allgower,12 J. Amonett,14 B. D. Anderson,14 M. Anderson,5 G. S. Averichev,9 J. Balewski,12 O.... Barannikova,9,23 L. S. Barnby,14 J. Baudot,13 S. Bekele,20 V. V. Belaga,9 R. Bellwied,31 J. Berger,11 H. Bichsel,30 A. Billmeier,31 L. C. Bland,2 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,24 A. Boucham,26 A. Brandin,18 A. Bravar,2 R. V. Cadman,1 H. Caines,33 M. Caldero...

  16. rho(0) photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.

    2008-01-01

    REVIEW C 77, 034910 (2008) ?0 photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at?sNN = 200 GeV B. I. Abelev,10 M. M. Aggarwal,32 Z. Ahammed,47 B. D. Anderson,21 D. Arkhipkin,14 G. S. Averichev,13 Y. Bai,30 J. Balewski,18 O.... Barannikova,10 L. S. Barnby,2 J. Baudot,19 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,30 R. R. Betts,10 S. Bhardwaj,37 A. Bhasin,20 A. K. Bhati,32 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,12 J. Bielcikova,12 L. C. Bland,3 S.-L. Blyth,24 M. Bombara,2 B. E...

  17. Effects of Retrofitting Emission Control Systems on In-Use Heavy Diesel Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millstein, Dev E.; Harley, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    use emissions from heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Environ. Sci.Sci. Technol. (7) Johnson, T. V. Diesel Emission Control inNO x control on heavy-duty diesel truck emissions. Environ.

  18. An Investigation on an Ethylene Gylcol/Water Nanofluid for Heavy Vehicle Cooling Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Use of nanofluids can help reduce radiator frontal area for heavy-duty vehicles and improves fuel efficiency.

  19. Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  20. Heavy Duty Diesels- The Road Ahead

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation gives a landscape picture of diesel engine technologies from the Daimler point of view.

  1. Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    by compressed natural gas (CNG) in spark-ignition engines,buses are powered by a CNG spark-ignition engine, providedno matter whether it is a CNG or a diesel engine [4, 5].

  2. Zero Emission Heavy Duty Drayage Truck Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  3. Emission Controls for Heavy-Duty Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  4. Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Moskwa, J. J. , 1995, Turbocharged diesel engine modelinganalysis and control of turbocharged diesels, Prof. IEEEof variable geometry turbocharged engines, Systems Modeling

  5. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  6. Hadronic resonance production in d+Au collisions at root S(NN) = 200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangaharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; deToledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2008-01-01

    tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p(T). We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m...

  7. Search for New Heavy Resonances Decaying To t+t^- Pairs at the LHC with Square Root S= 7 TEV (L = 5.0 FB^-1) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Indara

    2015-01-22

    for Heavy Resonances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 3. THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER AND THE CMS DETECTOR . . . 21 3.1 The Large Hadron Collider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.2 The Compact Muon Solenoid Detector...V center-of-mass energy to the CMS detector. CMS recorded 5.55 fb?1 of data. . . . . . . . . . . 23 3.3 Cross-sectional View of the CMS Detector. The subdetectors in or- der from the interaction point outward are the pixel detector, the sili- con tracker...

  8. APBF-DEC Light-duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Status of APBF-DEC NOx AdsorberDPF Projects APBF-DEC NOx AdsorberDPF Project: SUVPick-Up Platform APBF- DEC Heavy-Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Catalyst Aging Study...

  9. Observation of pi(+)pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV at the STAR detector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 81, 044901 (2010) Observation of pi+pi?pi+pi? photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at ? sN N = 200 GeV at the STAR detector B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 A. V. Alakhverdyants,17 B. D. Anderson,18 D.... Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,17 J. Balewski,22 L. S. Barnby,2 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L. C. Bland,3 B...

  10. Spin alignment measurements of the K*(0)(892) and phi(1020) vector mesons in heavy ion collisions at root S(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.

    2008-01-01

    COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 77, 061902(R) (2008) Spin alignment measurements of the K ?0(892) and ?(1020) vector mesons in heavy ion collisions at? sNN = 200 GeV B. I. Abelev,10 M. M. Aggarwal,32 Z. Ahammed,47 B. D. Anderson,21 D. Arkhipkin,14 G. S.... Biritz,7 L. C. Bland,3 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,38 M. Botje,30 J. Bouchet,21 E. Braidot,30 A. V. Brandin,28 S. Bueltmann,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,12 X. Z. Cai,41 H. Caines,52 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,6 J. Callner,10 O. Catu,52 D. Cebra,6...

  11. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  12. Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , location/direction/speed/time-of-day, fuel consumption, real-time weight, precipitation/ road condition in studying the effects on fuel consumption of their New Generation Single Wide-Based Tires (NGSWBTs) compared to standard dual tires. Two east-west runs were conducted from Kalamazoo, Michigan to Portland, Oregon

  13. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £SpaceFriction &

  14. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £SpaceFriction &Modeling |

  15. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £SpaceFriction &Modeling

  16. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £SpaceFriction

  17. Clinical Competence Assessments Fitness for Duty Evaluations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Clinical Competence Assessments Fitness for Duty Evaluations Practice & Billing Monitoring Assessment· Program Fitness for Duty Evaluations· Physician Enhancement Program· (PEP) - Monitoring Custom Competence Assessment· Fitness For Duty (FFD) Evaluation· #12;PACE Clinical Competence Assessment Program2 3

  18. Supersonic Air Jets Preserve Tree Roots in Underground Pipeline Installation1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supersonic Air Jets Preserve Tree Roots in Underground Pipeline Installation1 Rob Gross 2 trenching operations for pipeline installation. Although mechanical soil excavation using heavy equipment

  19. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

  20. Design of a tree root ball transporting device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Christopher (Christopher M.)

    2007-01-01

    Tree root balls from nurseries are often too heavy for one or two people to lift and plant, but powerful machinery can be expensive for small landscaping organizations or the weekend home gardener. This thesis intends to ...

  1. Systematic studies of the centrality and root S(NN) dependence of the dE(T)/d eta and dN(ch)/d eta in heavy ion collisions at midrapidity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, SS; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, NN; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Aronson, SH; Averbeck, R.; Awes, TC; Azmoun, R.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, KN; Barnes, PD; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhagavatula, S.; Boissevain, JG; Borel, H.; Borenstein, S.; Brooks, ML; Brown, DS; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, JM; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Chai, JS; Chand, P.; Chang, WC; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, CY; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, IJ; Choi, J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, BA; Constantin, P.; d'Enterria, DG; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, EJ; Dietzsch, O.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Efremenko, YV; El Chenawi, K.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Fields, DE; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, SL; Fox, BD; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, JE; Franz, A.; Frawley, AD; Fung, SY; Garpman, S.; Ghosh, TK; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; de Cassagnac, RG; Grau, N.; Greene, SV; Perdekamp, MG; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, HA; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, JS; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, AG; Hartouni, EP; Harvey, M.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, TK; Heuser, JM; Hibino, M.; Hill, JC; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, VV; Imai, K.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, BV; Jang, WY; Jeong, Y.; Jia, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, BM; Johnson, SC; Joo, KS; Jouan, D.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kang, JH; Kapoor, SS; Katou, K.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, DH; Kim, DJ; Kim, DW; Kim, E.; Kim, GB; Kim, HJ; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kiyoyama, K.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, PJ; Kuberg, CH; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, MJ; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, GS; Lacey, R.; Ladygin, V.; Lajoie, JG; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, DM; Lee, S.; Leitch, MJ; Li, XH; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, MX; Liu, Y.; Maguire, CF; Makdisi, YI; Malakhov, A.; Manko, VI; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Marx, MD; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, PL; Melnikov, E.; Mendenhall, M.; Messer, F.; Miake, Y.; Milan, J.; Miller, TE; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, RE; Mishra, GC; Mitchell, JT; Mohanty, AK; Morrison, DP; Moss, JM; Muhlbacher, F.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, JL; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, BK; Nara, M.; Newby, J.; Nilsson, P.; Nyanin, AS; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, CA; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, ID; Okada, K.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, APT; Pantuev, VS; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Parmar, A.; Pate, SF; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, JC; Peresedov, V.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, RP; Plasil, F.; Purschke, ML; Purwar, AK; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, KF; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Ryu, SS; Sadler, ME; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, M.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sato, HD; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shaw, MR; Shea, TK; Shibata, TA; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Silva, CL; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, KS; Singh, CP; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, RA; Sondheim, WE; Sorensen, SP; Sourikova, IV; Staley, F.; Stankus, PW; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, SP; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Takagui, EM; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, KH; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, MJ; Tarjan, P.; Tepe, JD; Thomas, TL; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, RS; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tuli, SK; Tydesjo, H.; Tyurin, N.; van Hecke, HW; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, AA; Volkov, MA; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, XR; Watanabe, Y.; White, SN; Wohn, FK; Woody, CL; Xie, W.; Yang, Y.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, GR; Yushmanov, IE; Zajc, WA; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, SJ; Zolin, L.; PHENIX Collaboration.

    2005-01-01

    Within a relativistic transport model for heavy-ion collisions, we show that the recently observed characteristic change from out-of-plane to in-plane elliptic flow of protons in midcentral Au+Au collisions as the incident ...

  2. Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Improve the efficiency of diesel engines for light duty applications...

  3. Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine: New Development Rersults Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the...

  4. Roadmapping Engine Technology for Post-2020 Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses Detroit Diesel collaborative multi-year technology program which includes systematic experimental and analytical assessment of enabling technologies for post-2020 NAFTA line haul trucks

  5. Sandia Energy - Heavy Duty Low-Temperature & Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reduce engine-out emissions. These approaches could allow advanced diesel combustion or low-temperature combustion strategies with potential for enabling both increased fuel...

  6. High Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Explore advancements in engine combustion systems using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) techniques to minimize engine-out emissions while optimizing fuel economy.

  7. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Parameter FedEx HEV C d 0.7 Frontal area (m 2 ) 7.02 Vehicle mass (kg) 4,472 Engine power (kW) 182 Motor power (kW) 100 Battery power (kW) 60 Battery capacity (kWh) 2.45...

  8. Heavy-duty H2-Diesel Dual Fuel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brake thermal efficiency can be improved with the addition of a large amount of hydrogen at medium to high loads

  9. Analysis of parasitic losses in heavy duty diesel engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, Christopher Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Fuel economy of large, on-road diesel engines has become even more critical in recent years for engine manufactures, vehicle OEMs, and truck operators, in view of pending CO2 emission regulations. Demands for increased ...

  10. Heavy-Duty Low Temperature Combustion Development Activities at Caterpillar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  11. Design of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Houston and City of Houston: Collaboration to Determine Best Solutions for Diesel Emission Reductions Combining Biodiesel and EGR for Low-Temperature NOx and PM Reductions...

  12. SCRT Technology for Retrofit of Heavy-Duty Diesel Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications The Development and On-Road Performance and Durability of the Four-Way Emission Control SCRTTM System Application Experience with a Combined SCR and DPF...

  13. California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Describes system for fueling truck fleet with biomethane generated from anaerobic digestion of organic waste it collects

  14. Heavy-Duty Powertrain and Vehicle Development - A Look Toward...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    system integration deer11groeneweg.pdf More Documents & Publications View from the Bridge: Commercial Vehicle Perspective High-Efficiency Engine Technologies Session...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Application Technology Manufacturer Fleet Years Collected Delivery Trucks All Electric Smith Newton Various 2012-2014 Class 8 Diesel Tractors Hybrid Electric Kenworth and...

  16. WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R&D Research and development RPM Revolutions per minute SI Spark ignition SMC Sheet molding compound SUV Sport utility vehicle VIUS Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey VTO Vehicle...

  17. Heavy Duty HCCI Development Activities - DOE High Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Combustion (HECC) Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st...

  18. Policy Discussion- Heavy-Duty Truck Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presesntation: National Commission on Energy Policy

  19. High Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engine | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative dual mode combustion strategy enabled by variable fuel injection offers emission reduction and efficiency improvement advantages. deer08zhang.pdf More Documents &...

  20. NAFTA Heavy Duty Engine and Aftertreatment Technology: Status and Outlook

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  1. Heavy Duty Powertrain System Optimization and Emissions Test Procedure Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  2. Fleet Evaluation and Factory Installation of Aerodynamic Heavy Duty Truck

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production atmeasurement forces.comparisonTrailers (Technical Report)

  3. Fleet Evaluation and Factory Installation of Aerodynamic Heavy Duty Truck

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production atmeasurement forces.comparisonTrailers (Technical

  4. Design Optimization of Piezoceramic Multilayer Actuators for Heavy Duty

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153Danielthrough theKDesert Peak EGS ProjectTSDesign

  5. Design Optimization of Piezoceramic Multilayer Actuators for Heavy Duty

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153Danielthrough theKDesert Peak EGS ProjectTSDesignDiesel

  6. Design Optimization of Piezoceramic Multilayer Actuators for Heavy Duty

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153Danielthrough theKDesert Peak EGS

  7. Development of High Performance Heavy Duty Engine Oils | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy 1 DOEEnergyEnergyEnergy

  8. Heavy Duty Vehicle Modeling & Simulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £Space HeatingEmerging|&

  9. Heavy Duty Vehicle Modeling and Simulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £Space HeatingEmerging|&and

  10. Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £SpaceFrictionEnergyVehicle

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle Data

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryinEnable Low Temperature Combustion(EVSE) Testingand

  12. The Ethanol Heavy-Duty Truck Fleet Demonstration Project

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat LetterPresidentEnergy

  13. Heavy Duty & Medium Duty Drive Cycle Data Collection for Modeling Expansion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £Space HeatingEmerging|

  14. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-02-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  15. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-03-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  16. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Stanton

    2010-12-31

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  17. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanton, Donald W

    2011-06-03

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy’s Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: 1. Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today’s state-ofthe- art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle 2. Develop & design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements. 3. Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class. 4. Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: ? A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target ? An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle – Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine ? Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated. ? The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing. ? The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment. ? The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment ? Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines) ? Key subsystems developed include – sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light- Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  18. Analysis of Mandatory and Discretionary Lane Change Behaviors for Heavy Trucks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    AVEC '14 Analysis of Mandatory and Discretionary Lane Change Behaviors for Heavy Trucks Ding Zhao1 about lane change for light vehicles, limited attention was paid to lane change behaviors for heavy-related deaths[9], [10]. Truck drivers are five times more likely to die than the average worker on their duty [9

  19. Experiments for Online Estimation of Heavy Vehicle's Mass and Time-Varying Road Grade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    for online estimation of Heavy Duty Vehicle mass and road grade. The test data is obtained from high- wayExperiments for Online Estimation of Heavy Vehicle's Mass and Time-Varying Road Grade Ardalan Vahidi 1 Anna Stefanopoulou Huei Peng Mechanical Engineering Dept., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

  20. Light Duty Vehicle CNG Tanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety StandardsLabor SeptemberofDepartmentDuty Vehicle CNG Tanks

  1. Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America 2005 Diesel Engine...

  2. Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol Download the webinar slides from the U.S. Department...

  3. Emissions from the European Light Duty Diesel Vehicle During...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the European Light Duty Diesel Vehicle During DPF Regeneration Events Emissions from the European Light Duty Diesel Vehicle During DPF Regeneration Events Repeated partial...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office AVTA: Light Duty Alternative Fuel...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office AVTA: Light Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Data Vehicle Technologies Office AVTA: Light Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Data The Vehicle Technologies...

  5. Light-Duty Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Drive Cycle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Drive Cycle Fuel Economy and Emissions Estimates Light-Duty Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Drive Cycle Fuel...

  6. Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions Milestones Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions...

  7. Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  8. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  9. Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milam, David

    2006-12-31

    This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

  10. Light Duty Utility Arm System hot test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howden, G.F.; Conrad, R.B.; Kiebel, G.R.

    1996-02-01

    This Engineering Task Plan describes the scope of work and cost for implementing a hot test of the Light Duty Utility Arm System in Tank T-106 in September 1996.

  11. Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    1998-01-01

    Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air ...

  12. Pion femtoscopy in p?+?p collisions at ?s=200 [square root of s = 200] GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    The STAR Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured two-pion correlation functions from p+p collisions at ?s=200 [square root of s = 200] GeV. Spatial scales are extracted via a femtoscopic ...

  13. Scaling tests with dynamical overlap and rooted staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerr, Stephan; Hoelbling, Christian

    2005-03-01

    We present a scaling analysis in the 1-flavor Schwinger model with the full overlap and the rooted staggered determinant. In the latter case the chiral and continuum limit of the scalar condensate do not commute, while for overlap fermions they do. For the topological susceptibility a universal continuum limit is suggested, as is for the partition function and the Leutwyler-Smilga sum rule. In the heavy-quark force no difference is visible even at finite coupling. Finally, a direct comparison between the complete overlap and the rooted staggered determinant yields evidence that their ratio is constant up to O(a{sup 2}) effects.

  14. Application for certification, 1991 model-year light-duty vehicles - Sterling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems or exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the application contains the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

  15. Duty-ratio of cooperative molecular motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadiv Dharan; Oded Farago

    2012-01-22

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body, and have many different and important roles. These micro-machines move along filament tracks, and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty-ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II - a non-processive molecular machine with a low duty ratio - cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of non-processive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track.

  16. Sizes, graphitic structures and fractal geometry of light-duty diesel engine particulates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K. O.; Zhu, J.; Ciatti, S.; Choi, M. Y.; Energy Systems; Drexel Univ.

    2003-01-01

    The particulate matter of a light-duty diesel engine was characterized in its morphology, sizes, internal microstructures, and fractal geometry. A thermophoretic sampling system was employed to collect particulates directly from the exhaust manifold of a 1.7-liter turbocharged common-rail direct-injection diesel engine. The particulate samples collected at various engine-operating conditions were then analyzed by using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an image processing/data acquisition system. Results showed that mean primary particle diameters (dp), and radii of gyration (Rg), ranged from 19.4 nm to 32.5 nm and 77.4 nm to 134.1 nm, respectively, through the entire engine-operating conditions of 675 rpm (idling) to 4000 rpm and 0% to 100% loads. It was also revealed that the other important parameters sensitive to the particulate formation, such as exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) rate, equivalence ratio, and temperature, affected particle sizes significantly. Bigger primary particles were measured at higher EGR rates, higher equivalence ratios (fuel-rich), and lower exhaust temperatures. Fractal dimensions (D{sup f}) were measured at a range of 1.5 - 1.7, which are smaller than those measured for heavy-duty direct-injection diesel engine particulates in our previous study. This finding implies that the light-duty diesel engine used in this study produces more stretched chain-like shape particles, while the heavy-duty diesel engine emits more spherical particles. The microstructures of diesel particulates were observed at high TEM magnifications and further analyzed by a Raman spectroscope. Raman spectra revealed an atomic structure of the particulates produced at high engine loads, which is similar to that of typical graphite.

  17. Heavy baryons in the large Nc limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albertus, C; Fernando, I P; Goity, J L

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that in the large Nc limit heavy baryon masses can be estimated quantitatively in a 1/Nc expansion using the Hartree approximation. The results are compared with available lattice calculations for different values of the ratio between the square root of the string tension and the heavy quark mass tension independent of Nc. Using a potential adjusted to agree with the one obtained in lattice QCD, a variational analysis of the ground state spin averaged baryon mass is performed using Gaussian Hartree wave functions. Relativistic corrections through the quark kinetic energy are included. The results provide good estimates for the first sub-leading in 1/Nc corrections.

  18. Heavy baryons in the large Nc limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Albertus; E. Ruiz Arriola; I. P. Fernando; J. L. Goity

    2015-07-16

    It is shown that in the large Nc limit heavy baryon masses can be estimated quantitatively in a 1/Nc expansion using the Hartree approximation. The results are compared with available lattice calculations for different values of the ratio between the square root of the string tension and the heavy quark mass tension independent of Nc. Using a potential adjusted to agree with the one obtained in lattice QCD, a variational analysis of the ground state spin averaged baryon mass is performed using Gaussian Hartree wave functions. Relativistic corrections through the quark kinetic energy are included. The results provide good estimates for the first sub-leading in 1/Nc corrections.

  19. Heavy loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, D.

    1982-01-01

    The extreme pressures on the roof and walls of an earth-sheltered residential home are discussed and the need for careful planning is stressed. Pertinent terms are defined. Footings and wall structure (reinforced concrete walls and concrete block walls) are described. Roofing systems are discussed in detail and illustrated: (1) poured-in-place concrete roof slabs; (2) pre-cast concrete planks; and (3) heavy timber roofs. Insulation of earth-sheltered homes is reviewed in terms of using: (1) urethanes; (2) extruded polystyrene; and (3) expanded polystyrene. Advantages, disadvantages, R-factors, costs, and installation are discussed. (MJJ)

  20. Page 1 of 1 EMPLOYEE FITNESS FOR DUTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Page 1 of 1 EMPLOYEE FITNESS FOR DUTY INITIAL OBSERVATION REPORT Date of Incident: ___________ Time, confusion Threatening to harm self or others Document other observations related to Fitness for Duty

  1. Light-Duty Advanced Diesel Combustion Research | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Advanced Diesel Combustion Research Light-Duty Advanced Diesel Combustion Research Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008...

  2. Marketing Light-Duty Diesels to U.S. Consumers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of Volkswagen's approach in introducing light-duty diesels to the U.S. passenger vehicle market.

  3. Active Duty Military Tuition Waiver UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Active Duty Military Tuition Waiver UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO SEMESTER: __________ YEAR of the (DUTY STATION) State of New Mexico. This active duty assignment is for the period from _______________________________________________________ ORGANIZATION Return waiver to: The University of New Mexico Division of Enrollment Management Office

  4. Lifecycle-analysis for heavy vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.

    1998-04-16

    Various alternative fuels and improved engine and vehicle systems have been proposed in order to reduce emissions and energy use associated with heavy vehicles (predominantly trucks). For example, oil companies have proposed improved methods for converting natural gas to zero-aromatics, zero-sulfur diesel fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch process. Major heavy-duty diesel engine companies are working on ways to simultaneously reduce particulate-matter and NOX emissions. The trend in heavy vehicles is toward use of lightweight materials, tires with lower rolling resistance, and treatments to reduce aerodynamic drag. In this paper, we compare the Mecycle energy use and emissions from trucks using selected alternatives, such as Fisher-Tropsch diesel fuel and advanced fuel-efficient engines. We consider heavy-duty, Class 8 tractor-semitrailer combinations for this analysis. The total life cycle includes production and recycling of the vehicle itself, extraction, processing, and transportation of the fuel itself, and vehicle operation and maintenance. Energy use is considered in toto, as well as those portions that are imported, domestic, and renewable. Emissions of interest include greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants. Angonne's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is used to generate per-vehicle fuel cycle impacts. Energy use and emissions for materials manufacturing and vehicle disposal are estimated by means of materials information from Argonne studies. We conclude that there are trade-offs among impacts. For example, the lowest fossil energy use does not necessarily result in lowest total energy use, and lower tailpipe emissions may not necessarily result in lower lifecycle emissions of all criteria pollutants.

  5. Light duty utility arm startup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-09-01

    This plan details the methods and procedures necessary to ensure a safe transition in the operation of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. The steps identified here outline the work scope and identify responsibilities to complete startup, and turnover of the LDUA to Characterization Project Operations (CPO).

  6. Jury Duty: Murder Trial Jerry R. Hobbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobbs, Jerry R.

    Jury Duty: Murder Trial Jerry R. Hobbs The first thing the prosecuting attorney at the murder that 187 is the section of the California Penal Code that defines murder. I asked Christine later if she because she knew too much about DNA. The defense excused a woman whose sister had been murdered

  7. Root cause outline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures PrintRooftop DiagnosticianRoomWPSS Root

  8. Heavy metal biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  9. Rotating Liner Engine: Improving Efficiency of Heavy Duty Diesels by Significant Friction Reduction, and Extending the Life of Heavy Duty Engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dardalis, Dimitrios

    2013-12-31

    This report describes the work on converting a 4 cylinder Cummins ISB engine into a single cylinder Rotating Liner Engine functioning prototype that can be used to measure the friction benefits of rotating the cylinder liner in a high pressure compression ignition engine. A similar baseline engine was also prepared, and preliminary testing was done. Even though the fabrication of the single cylinder prototype was behind schedule due to machine shop delays, the fundamental soundness of the design elements are proven, and the engine has successfully functioned. However, the testing approach of the two engines, as envisioned by the original proposal, proved impossible due to torsional vibration resonance caused by the single active piston. A new approach for proper testing has been proposed,

  10. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 54 Environmental Sciences arctic; tundra; fine roots; root biomass; root production; root turnover; plant-soil, model Word Cloud More Like This Dataset...

  11. Distribution of Fine Roots of Ponderosa Pine and Douglas-Fir in a Central Idaho Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    at a study site in a central Idaho forest. Concentration and content of fine roots extracted from soil cores of exotic dis- eases, heavy grazing, and timber harvest has altered forest structure, stand composition(SwezyandAgee1991,Dumm2003).Finerootsarecritical structures for water and nutrient absorption from the soil

  12. Strange particle production in p+p collisions at root s=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.

    2007-01-01

    We present strange particle spectra and yields measured at midrapidity in root s = 200 GeV proton-proton (p + p) collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the previously observed universal transverse mass (m...

  13. Light-duty Diesels: Clean Enough? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance EPA Mobile Source Rule Update Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some...

  14. Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some Perspectives ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Control Technology Review Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some Perspectives...

  15. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington D.C. vssarravt068miyasato2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration and Evaluation Vehicle...

  16. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation arravt068vssmiyasato2011o .pdf More Documents & Publications Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration and Evaluation SCAQMD:Plug-In...

  17. Mixture Formation in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents quantitative measurements of evolution of in-cylinder equivalence ratio distributions in a light-duty engine where wall interactions and strong swirl are significant

  18. Business Case for Light-Duty Diesels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesels Business Case for Light-Duty Diesels 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deergodwin.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  19. Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08frazier.pdf More Documents & Publications Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion Exhaust Energy Recovery: 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review...

  20. Reducing Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The Combined Potential of Hybrid Technology and Behavioral Adaptation Title Reducing Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas...

  1. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-09-30

    The order establishes policy, requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime and compensatory time, leave administration, and hours of duty.

  2. WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion...

  3. Scenario analysis of hybrid class 3-7 heavy vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, F.; Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Eberhardt, J. J.

    1999-12-23

    The effects of hybridization on heavy-duty vehicles are not well understood. Heavy vehicles represent a broader range of applications than light-duty vehicles, resulting in a wide variety of chassis and engine combinations, as well as diverse driving conditions. Thus, the strategies, incremental costs, and energy/emission benefits associated with hybridizing heavy vehicles could differ significantly from those for passenger cars. Using a modal energy and emissions model, they quantify the potential energy savings of hybridizing commercial Class 3-7 heavy vehicles, analyze hybrid configuration scenarios, and estimate the associated investment cost and payback time. From the analysis, they conclude that (1) hybridization can significantly reduce energy consumption of Class 3-7 heavy vehicles under urban driving conditions; (2) the grid-independent, conventional vehicle (CV)-like hybrid is more cost-effective than the grid-dependent, electric vehicle (EV)-like hybrid, and the parallel configuration is more cost-effective than the series configuration; (3) for CV-like hybridization, the on-board engine can be significantly downsized, with a gasoline or diesel engine used for SUVs perhaps being a good candidate for an on-board engine; (4) over the long term, the incremental cost of a CV-like, parallel-configured Class 3-4 hybrid heavy vehicle is about %5,800 in the year 2005 and $3,000 in 2020, while for a Class 6-7 truck, it is about $7,100 in 2005 and $3,300 in 2020; and (5) investment payback time, which depends on the specific type and application of the vehicle, averages about 6 years under urban driving conditions in 2005 and 2--3 years in 2020.

  4. Automatic Incremental Routing Using Multiple Roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Rumi; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    J. J. Garcia-Luna-Aceves, “Automatic Routing Using MultipleAutomatic Incremental Routing Using Multiple Roots RumiWe present Multi-root Automatic Incremental Rout- ing (

  5. Using Time Perception to Measure Fitness for Duty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Time Perception to Measure Fitness for Duty David M. Eagleman Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas Assessing fitness for duty (FFD) typically requires expensive equipment and large time result in avoidable accidents (Rigaud & Flynn, 1995). Currently, the main method for assessing fitness

  6. This form is interactive --complete electronically and print Notification of Fitness for Duty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillow, Jonathan

    This form is interactive -- complete electronically and print Notification of Fitness for Duty as written notification directing you to undergo a Fitness for Duty Evaluation. The reason

  7. Fueling U.S. Light Duty Diesel Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fueling U.S. Light Duty Diesel Vehicles Fueling U.S. Light Duty Diesel Vehicles 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

  8. Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric Devices and Comfort Modeling Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric...

  9. Roots, States, and Stative Passives David Embick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embick, David

    with Stative Passive formation; and (ii) whether building Target State meanings into (certain) RootsRoots, States, and Stative Passives David Embick University of Pennsylvania ***** Roots Workshop be part of a Root's meaning, by BT:R PLAN: Reexamine/reanalyze the generalizations that building Target

  10. Piston Bowl Optimization for RCCI Combustion in a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Reed M; Curran, Scott; Wagner, Robert M; Reitz, Rolf; Kokjohn, Sage

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is an engine combustion strategy that that produces low NO{sub x} and PM emissions with high thermal efficiency. Previous RCCI research has been investigated in single-cylinder heavy-duty engines. The current study investigates RCCI operation in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine at 3 operating points. These operating points were chosen to cover a range of conditions seen in the US EPA light-duty FTP test. The operating points were chosen by the Ad Hoc working group to simulate operation in the FTP test. The fueling strategy for the engine experiments consisted of in-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel-injection (PFI) of gasoline and early-cycle, direct-injection (DI) of diesel fuel. At these 3 points, the stock engine configuration is compared to operation with both the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and custom machined pistons designed for RCCI operation. The pistons were designed with assistance from the KIVA 3V computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. By using a genetic algorithm optimization, in conjunction with KIVA, the piston bowl profile was optimized for dedicated RCCI operation to reduce unburned fuel emissions and piston bowl surface area. By reducing these parameters, the thermal efficiency of the engine was improved while maintaining low NOx and PM emissions. Results show that with the new piston bowl profile and an optimized injection schedule, RCCI brake thermal efficiency was increased from 37%, with the stock EURO IV configuration, to 40% at the 2,600 rev/min, 6.9 bar BMEP condition, and NOx and PM emissions targets were met without the need for exhaust after-treatment.

  11. Medium Duty Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackie, Robin J. D.

    2015-05-31

    The Smith Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project (SDP) was integral to the Smith business plan to establish a manufacturing base in the United States (US) and produce a portfolio of All Electric Vehicles (AEV’s) for the medium duty commercial truck market. Smith focused on the commercial depot based logistics market, as it represented the market that was most ready for the early adoption of AEV technology. The SDP enabled Smith to accelerate its introduction of vehicles and increase the size of its US supply chain to support early market adoption of AEV’s that were cost competitive, fully met the needs of a diverse set of end users and were compliant with Federal safety and emissions requirements. The SDP accelerated the development and production of various electric drive vehicle systems to substantially reduce petroleum consumption, reduce vehicular emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), and increase US jobs.

  12. WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials

  13. Plasma Catalysis for NOx Reduction from Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-12-15

    On behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies, we are pleased to introduce the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The mission of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program is to develop more energy efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies that enable Americans to use less petroleum for their vehicles. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program supports this mission by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines for light-, medium-, and heavy-duty highway vehicles that meet future Federal and state emissions regulations. The primary objective of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program is to improve the brake thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines from 30 to 45 percent for light-duty applications by 2010; and 40 to 55 percent for heavy-duty applications by 2012; while meeting cost, durability, and emissions constraints. R&D activities include work on combustion technologies that increase efficiency and minimize in-cylinder formation of emissions, as well as aftertreatment technologies that further reduce exhaust emissions. Work is also being conducted on ways to reduce parasitic and heat transfer losses through the development and application of thermoelectrics and turbochargers that include electricity generating capability, and conversion of mechanically driven engine components to be driven via electric motors. This introduction serves to outline the nature, current progress, and future directions of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The research activities of this Sub-Program are planned in conjunction with the FreedomCAR Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership and are carried out in collaboration with industry, national laboratories, and universities. Because of the importance of clean fuels in achieving low emissions, R&D activities are closely coordinated with the relevant activities of the Fuel Technologies Sub-Program, also within the Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies. Research is also being undertaken on hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines to provide an interim hydrogen-based powertrain technology that promotes the longer-range FreedomCAR Partnership goal of transitioning to a hydrogen-fueled transportation system. Hydrogen engine technologies being developed have the potential to provide diesel-like engine efficiencies with near-zero emissions.

  14. Emissions from Medium-Duty Conventional and Diesel-Electric Hybrid Vehicles; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragatz, A.; Duran, A.; Thornton, M.; Walkowicz, K.

    2014-04-02

    This presentation discusses the results of emissions testing for medium-duty conventional and diesel-electric hybrid vehicles. Testing was based on a field evaluation approach that utilized the Fleet DNA drive cycle database and NREL’s Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory chassis dynamometer. Vehicles tested included parcel delivery (Class 6 step vans), beverage delivery (Class 8 tractors), and parcel delivery (Class 7 box trucks) vehicles, all with intended service class medium/heavy heavy-duty diesel (MHDD).
    Results for fuel economy and tailpipe NOx emissions included: diesel hybrid electric vehicles showed an average fuel economy advantage on identified test cycles: Class 6 Step Vans: 26%; Class 7 Box Trucks: 24.7%; Class 8 Tractors: 17.3%. Vehicle miles traveled is an important factor in determining total petroleum and CO2 displacement. Higher NOx emissions were observed over some test cycles: highly drive cycle dependent; engine-out differences may result from different engine operating point; and selective catalyst reduction temperature may play a role, but does not explain the whole story.

  15. Duty Cycle Analysis & Tools: Maximizing Vehicle Performance (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2009-10-28

    Shows that the benefits of using hybrid vehicle trucks in fleets depends on the duty cycle, or how the vehicles will be driven (e.g., stop and go) over a particular route (e.g., urban or rural).

  16. Decontamination trade study for the Light Duty Utility Arm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieck, R.H.

    1994-09-29

    Various methods were evaluated for decontaminating the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). Physical capabilities of each method were compared with the constraints and requirements for the LDUA Decontamination System. Costs were compared and a referred alternative was chosen.

  17. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-14

    This Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime and compensatory time, leave administration, and hours of duty. Cancels DOE O 322.1A. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  18. A Geographic Information Retrieval Approach to Locate Pharmacies on Duty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Paolo

    Geographic Information Retrieval (GIR), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Toponym Disambiguation 1 disciplines, in particular geographic information retrieval and geographical information systems, which playedGIRPharma: A Geographic Information Retrieval Approach to Locate Pharmacies on Duty Francisco M

  19. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-19

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime pay and compensatory time, leave administration, time and attendance reporting, and hours of duty. Cancels DOE O 322.1B and DOE O 535.1

  20. Development of the 2011MY Ford Super Duty Catalyst System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efforts leading to medium-duty truck aftertreatment system development, issues addressed, including catalyst layout to maximize NOx conversion and balance of precious metals for oxidation function during cold-start and filter regeneration

  1. Assessment of Out-of-State Heavy-Duty Truck Activity Trends In California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    Highway Patrol ( CHP), 2006. Personal Communication. “OtayCA: Caltrans: CARB: CDFA: CEC: CHP: CVIS: g/bhp: g/mi: GVWR:California Highway Patrol (CHP) enforcement facilities and

  2. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    600 hp General Electric DC electric engine dynamometer. Thehp General Electric DC electric engine dynamometer. For allhp General Electric DC electric engine dynamometer and is

  3. ORNL/TM-2008/122 Class-8 Heavy Truck Duty Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti 865-576-5728 E-mail reports@osti.gov Web site http://www.osti.gov/contact.html This report

  4. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    of vegetable oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils, withof vegetable oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils.Fuel Wobbe Number Waste Vegetable Oil xxiv Chapter One:

  5. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    of Biodiesel Chemistry, Carbon Footprint and Regional Fuelof Biodiesel Chemistry, Carbon Footprint and Regional Fuelof Biodiesel Chemistry, Carbon Footprint and Regional Fuel

  6. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    20% share of biodiesel and bioethanol should be blended with20% share of biodiesel and bioethanol shall be blended with

  7. Development of Urea Dosing System for 10 Liter Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Powered Vehicle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  8. Design and Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  9. Design Optimization of Piezoceramic Multilayer Actuators for Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Fuel Injectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  10. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    A. Potential Methods for NOx Reduction from Biodiesel. SAECombustion on NOx Emissions and their Reduction Approaches.Combustion on NOx Emissions and their Reduction Approaches.

  11. Demonstration of a Low-NOx Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-02-01

    Results of a Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle engine research project: A Caterpillar C-12 natural gas engine with Clean Air Power Dual-Fuel technology and exhaust gas recirculation demonstrated low NOx and PM emissions.

  12. Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    · CO2, CO, HC, NOx, and particulates · Fuels: Diesel, gasoline, CNG, propane, LNG, LPG, ethanol state and transient · Multiple fuels capability including diesel, gasoline, CNG, propane, LNG, LPG

  13. Development of LNG-Powered Heavy-Duty Trucks in Commercial Hauling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detroit Diesel Corporation; Trucking Research Institute

    1998-12-03

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's development, deployment, and evaluation of alternative fuels, NREL and the Trucking Research Institute contracted with Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) to develop and operate a liquid natural gas fueled tractor powered by a DDC Series 50 prototype natural gas engine. This is the final report on the project.

  14. Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency Targeting EPA 2010 Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  15. Heavy-Duty Engine Technology for High Thermal Efficiency at EPA 2010 Emissions Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  16. Design of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Both simulated and actual diesel emissions were able to be measured and analyzed using a bench-top adiabatic reactor.

  17. Can We Accurately Measure In-Use Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  18. Application Experience with a Combined SCR and DPF Technology for Heavy Duty Diesel Retrofit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  19. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions. SAE Technical Paper 2008,Energy Laboratory Diesel Emissions Control - Sulfur Effectsbetween NOx, Particulate Emission, and Fuel Consumption of a

  20. SCR Potential and Issues for Heavy-Duty Applications in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Daimler Chrysler Detroit Diesel Corporation

  1. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Natural Gas Liquids Natural Gas Vehicle Ammonia Non-methanein emissions for natural gas vehicles (NGVs), emissions for226. Timmons, S. Natural Gas Fuel Effects on Vehicle Exhaust

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Medium and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about medium...

  3. Demonstration of Alternative Fuel, Light and Heavy Duty Vehicles in State and Municipal Vehicle Fleets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, John H.; Polubiatko, Peter; Tucchio, Michael A.

    2002-02-06

    This project involved the purchase of two Compressed Natural Gas School Buses and two electric Ford Rangers to demonstrate their viability in a municipal setting. Operational and maintenance data were collected for analysis. In addition, an educational component was undertaken with middle school children. The children observed and calculated how electric vehicles could minimize pollutants through comparison to conventionally powered vehicles.

  4. Assessment of Out-of-State Heavy-Duty Truck Activity Trends In California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    2006. "Average Retail Diesel Fuel Prices." Accessed Decemberdiesel prices for Nevada were not available. Sampling methods for these fuel prices

  5. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from CNG Transit Buses EquippedOxidation Catalyst Effect on CNG Transit Bus Emissions. SAEOxidation Catalyst Effect on CNG Transit Bus Emissions. SAE

  6. Pneumatic brake control for precision stopping of heavy-duty vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bu, Fanping; Tan, Han-Shue

    2007-01-01

    stopping” of a 40 foot CNG bus for the Bus Precision Dockingfor two different 40 foot CNG buses (c1 and c2). Althoughpressure of two different CNG buses (c1 and c2) speeds since

  7. LNT + SCR Aftertreatment for Medium-Heavy Duty Applications: A Systems Approach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  8. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    effects, driven by fuel chemistry and fluid dynamics, andeffects, driven by fuel chemistry and fluid dynamics, and

  9. Pneumatic brake control for precision stopping of heavy-duty vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bu, Fanping; Tan, Han-Shue

    2007-01-01

    IEEE/ASME Trans. on Mechatronics, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 79–91,Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM), Italy, 2001. [21

  10. Investigation of the Application of the European PMP Method to Clean Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  11. Heavy-Duty Powertrain DevelopmentCurrent Status and Future Opportuniti...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2010. deer10aneja.pdf More Documents & Publications BLUETEC - Heading for 50 State Diesel Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: SuperTruck Program: Engine Project...

  12. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    with a 10% aromatic, ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel used inequivalent 10% aromatic ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel used inx emissions compared to ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD).

  13. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Commission Neste Oil biomass-to-liquid Natural Gas NaturalGas Liquids Natural Gas Vehicle Ammonia Non-methanerecover valuable natural gas liquids (NGLs), such as ethane,

  14. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  15. Simulation and Analysis of HP/LP EGR for Heavy-Duty Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Combustion System of a HD Single Cylinder Engine Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Control Strategy for a Dual Loop EGR System to...

  16. Aftertreatment Technologies for Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, M.D.

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this program was to explore a combination of advanced injection control and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to reduce the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from a Tier 2 off-highway diesel engine to Tier 3 emission targets while maintaining fuel efficiency. The engine used in this investigation was a 2004 4.5L John Deere PowerTechTM; this engine was not equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Under the original CRADA, the principal objective was to assess whether Tier 3 PM emission targets could be met solely by increasing the rail pressure. Although high rail pressure will lower the total PM emissions, it has a contrary effect to raise NOx emissions. To address this effect, a urea-SCR system was used to determine whether the enhanced NOx levels, associated with high rail pressure, could be reduced to Tier 3 levels. A key attraction for this approach is that it eliminates the need for a Diesel particulate filter (DPF) to remove PM emissions. The original CRADA effort was also performed using No.2 Diesel fuel having a maximum sulfur level of 500 ppm. After a few years, the CRADA scope was expanded to include exploration of advanced injection strategies to improve catalyst regeneration and to explore the influence of urea-SCR on PM formation. During this period the emission targets also shifted to meeting more stringent Tier 4 emissions for NOx and PM, and the fuel type was changed to ultra-low sulfur Diesel (ULSD) having a maximum sulfur concentration of 15 ppm. New discoveries were made regarding PM formation at high rail pressures and the influences of oxidation catalysts and urea-SCR catalysts. These results are expected to provide a pathway for lower PM and NOx emissions for both off- and on-highway applications. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. Review of the research results were carried out on a regular basis (annual reports and meetings) followed by suggestions for improvement in ongoing work and direction for future work. A significant portion of the industrial support was in the form of experimentation, data analysis, data exchange, and technical consultation.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Strength, Light-Weight Engines for Heavy Duty Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high strength,...

  18. Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    reduced diesel fuel consumption, lubricant changes, anddiesel consumption Diesel fuel cost Lubricant cost Engine

  19. Emission Estimation of Heavy Duty Diesel Vehicles by Developing Texas Specific Drive Cycles with Moves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Chaoyi

    2013-07-31

    Driving cycles are acting as the basis of the evaluation of the vehicle performance from air quality point of view, such as fuel consumption or pollutant emission, especially in emission modeling and emission estimation. ...

  20. Study of Oil Degradation in Extended Idle Operation Heavy Duty Vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kader, Michael Kirk

    2013-01-18

    Advances in engine oil technology and increased combustion efficiency has resulted in the longer oil intervals in vehicles. Current oil change interval practice only takes into account the mileage a vehicle has driven and ...

  1. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    larger reserves compared to crude oil. However, the qualitylarger reserves than crude oil, and also the potential forreserves compared to crude oil, and also the potential for

  2. Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Medium and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about medium...

  4. Development of SCR on Diesel Particulate Filter System for Heavy Duty Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation of a system consisting of SCRDPF in comparison to a commercial 2010 CDPF system on an engine under high and low engine-out NOx conditions

  5. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    J. ; Hamze, F. ; Mak, C. LNG Research Study. Gutierrez, J.Saldivar, A. R. ; Mora, J. R. LNG Research Study-Phase 1.is representative of Peruvian LNG that has been modified to

  6. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Such advancedhorizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Such advanced

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Powertrain Controls Optimization for Heavy Duty Line Haul Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about powertrain...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Powertrain Controls Optimization for Heavy Duty Line Haul Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about powertrain...

  9. Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion: Heavy-Duty Optical-Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. ft004mueller2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuels and Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency Clean-Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Advanced...

  10. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    tcf in 2035. 3 The quality of natural gas depends on bothQuality Standards National Development Reform Commission Neste Oil biomass-to-liquid Natural Gasair quality. In this study, six blends of natural gas with

  11. Efficient Use of Natural Gas Based Fuels in Heavy-Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Natural gas and other liquid feedstocks for transportation fuels are compared for use in a dual-fuel engine. Benefits include economic stability, national security, environment, and cost.

  12. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  13. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Testing Certification Testing B5-WVO CARB ULSD vs.B5-WVO B5-Animal CARB ULSD vs. B5-Animal B5-Soy B5-WVO B5-Certification Testing B5-WVO CARB ULSD vs. B5-WVO B5-Animal

  14. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    J. W. The Effect of Natural Gas Composition on the RegulatedOperating on Various Natural Gas Compositions. Journal ofimpacts of varying natural gas composition on the exhaust

  15. Heavy-Duty Powertrain DevelopmentCurrent Status and Future Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  16. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    sizable 44% increase. 51 Shale gas production, which alreadyof this expansion, with shale gas production going from 6.8sizable 44% increase. 2 Shale gas production, which already

  17. Heavy Duty HCCI Development Activities- DOE High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  18. Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The more heavily catalyzed and the hotter the exhaust temperature, the more strongly the aftertreatment will oxidize the exhaust.

  19. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Effects of Methyl Ester Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions.Increase When Burning Biodiesel; A New (Old) Theory. FuelE. ; Natarajan, M. Effects of Biodiesel Fuels Upon Criteria

  20. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Dieseland Specifications. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviewstheir Reduction Approaches. Renewable and Sustainable Energy

  1. Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scora, George Alexander

    2011-01-01

    300 vehicles and three drive cycles. The model framework wasover a 1000 second drive cycle with two apparent drivingrepresenting individual drive cycles, characterized by their

  2. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    using an Optical Direct Injection Diesel Engine. 2006, 7,using an Optical Direct Injection Diesel Engine. 2006, 7,Emissions Using an Optical Direct Injection Diesel Engine.

  3. Second Stage Intercooling Using LNG for Turbocharged Heavy Duty Road Vehicles Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-09-21

    It is well documented in engine performance literature that reduced engine inlet air temperature increases power output and reduces NO, emissions for both diesel and spark ignited (SI) engines. In addition, reduced inlet temperature increases the knock resistance of SI engines. In that most HD natural gas engines are SI derivatives of diesel engines it is appropriate to evaluate the benefits of reduced engine air temperature through LNG fuel. This project investigated the ''real world'' possibilities of a patented process for utilizing the ''cold'' in LNG to chill engine inlet air. The results support the conclusion that doing so is a practical means to increase engine power and reduce engine-out NO{sub x}.

  4. Cold starting capabilities of petroleum and syntehetic lubricants in heavy-duty diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margeson, M.A.; Belmesch, B.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the work described in this paper was to compare the cold weather starting ability of diesel engines lubricated with SAE 15W-40 petroleum and SAE 5W-30 synthetic motor oil. Laboratory bench tests were used to compare rhelogical features such as borderline pumping temperature and cold cranking simulator profiles. A cold box provided a well controlled environment in which cranking and starting studies were carried out on the two oils in a turbocharged diesel engine. The SAE 5W-30 synthetic exhibited higher cranking speeds, lower starter amperage draw and immediate oil pressure readings when compared to the SAE l5W-40 petroleum. The SAE 5W-30 synthetic oil was safely started at {minus} l0 {sup 0}F oil temperature without auxiliary heaters. The comparative cylinder turbocharged diesel engines representing conditions commonly found in the commercial and off-highway sectors, These studies indicate that combining high capacity cold cranking amperage batteries, high pressure ether aid injection, and SAE 5W-30 synthetic oil resulted in a system that safely starts diesel engines down to actual oil temperatures of at least {minus} 10 {sup 0}F.

  5. Analysis, Design, And Evaluation Of AVCS For Heavy-duty Vehicles: Phase 1 Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanakiev, Diana; Kanellakopoulos, Ioannis

    1995-01-01

    Mean value modeling of large turbocharged two-stroke dieselvalue modeling of a small turbocharged diesel engine," SAEM. Kao and J. J. Moskwa, Turbocharged diesel engine modeling

  6. Analysis, Design, And Evaluation Of Avcs For Heavy-duty Vehicles With Actuator Delays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanakiev, Diana; Eyre, Jennifer; Kanellakopoulos, Ioannis

    1998-01-01

    Mean value modeling of large turbocharged two-stroke dieselvalue modeling of a small turbocharged diesel engine. SAEand J. J. Moskwa. 1993. Turbocharged diesel engine modeling

  7. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    52, 23-37. Lewtas, J. Air Pollution Combustion Emissions:Reference Lewtas, J. Air Pollution Combustion Emissions:

  8. Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajbabaei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Development Plan for Renewable Energy. In India, a NationalDevelopment Plan for Renewable Energy. In India, a National

  9. Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis Dynamometer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

  10. Development of NOx Adsorber System for Dodge Ram 2007 Heavy duty Pickup Truck

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  11. Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scora, George Alexander

    2011-01-01

    GPS data along with vehicle and emission data. The collectedLoad on Motor Vehicle Emissions. Environmental Science andthe CRC 11th On-Road Vehicle Emission Workshop. San Diego,

  12. Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation discusses a virtual lab which can model sophisticated future vehicle systems using three layers of model fidelity supporting each other.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Zero-Emission Heavy-Duty Drayage Truck Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by South Coast Air Quality Management District at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  14. Long-Term Aging of NOx Sensors in Heavy-Duty Engine Exhaust

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels-Diesel Emission Control (APBF-DEC) Project

  15. APBF- DEC Heavy-Duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Catalyst Aging Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  16. Making a Difference: Heavy-Duty Combustion Engine Research Saved Billions |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics »ApplicationEnergy andLisa Murkowski About Us LisaMajor Demonstrations

  17. Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle and Engine Testing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial ReportProposal to change FacRepMeasuring OFFICEMedium Base

  18. Medium and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial ReportProposal to change FacRepMeasuring OFFICEMedium BaseMedium and

  19. Medium and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial ReportProposal to change FacRepMeasuring OFFICEMedium BaseMedium

  20. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial ReportProposal to change FacRepMeasuring OFFICEMedium

  1. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial ReportProposal to change FacRepMeasuring OFFICEMediumDepartment of

  2. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial ReportProposal to change FacRepMeasuring OFFICEMediumDepartment

  3. Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Drayage Truck Replacement Program | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £SpaceFrictionEnergy 2 DOE

  4. Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Drayage Truck Replacement Program | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £SpaceFrictionEnergy 2

  5. Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Drayage Truck Replacement Program | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £SpaceFrictionEnergy

  6. High Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢HelpHighJian Li,1 DOEFuel Economy

  7. Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion: Heavy-Duty Optical-Engine Research |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDanKathy LoftusFuel

  8. Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion: Heavy-Duty Optical-Engine Research |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDanKathy LoftusFuelDepartment of Energy 09 DOE

  9. Top U.S. Automakers Collaborate to Improve Heavy-Duty Freight Efficiency |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory Authority J-I-12TiffanyEnergy

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas aEthanolAFDC Printable

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls on asPublications »Test Your

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sacramento Adds Regional Heavy-Duty LNG

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehicles andProductionRental CarsFueling

  13. Heavy-Duty Trucks Poised to Accelerate Growth of American Alternative Transportation Fuels Market

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is

  14. Norcal Waste Systems, Inc. Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service, LNG Heavy-Duty Trucks Fact Sheet.

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Letter toTRUCKS ARE EQUIPPED

  15. Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M; Briggs, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

  16. Medium Truck Duty Cycle Data from Real-World Driving Environments: Project Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Since the early part of the 20th century, the US trucking industry has provided a safe and economical means of moving commodities across the country. At the present time, nearly 80% of the US domestic freight movement involves the use of trucks. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is spearheading a number of research efforts to improve heavy vehicle fuel efficiencies. This includes research in engine technologies (including hybrid and fuel cell technologies), lightweight materials, advanced fuels, and parasitic loss reductions. In addition, DOE is developing advanced tools and models to support heavy vehicle truck research, and is leading the 21st Century Truck Partnership whose stretch goals involve a reduction by 50% of the fuel consumption of heavy vehicles on a ton-mile basis. This Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) Project is a critical element in DOE s vision for improved heavy vehicle energy efficiency and is unique in that there is no other national database of characteristic duty cycles for medium trucks. It involves the collection of real-world data for various situational characteristics (rural/urban, freeway/arterial, congested/free-flowing, good/bad weather, etc.) and looks at the unique nature of medium trucks drive cycles (stop-and-go delivery, power takeoff, idle time, short-radius trips), to provide a rich source of data that can contribute to the development of new tools for fuel efficiency and modeling, provide DOE a sound basis upon which to make technology investment decisions, and provide a national archive of real-world-based medium-truck operational data to support heavy vehicle energy efficiency research. The MTDC project involves a two-part field operational test (FOT). For the Part-1 FOT, three vehicles, each from two vocations (urban transit and dry-box delivery) were instrumented for one year of data collection. The Part-2 FOT will involve the towing/recovery and utility vocations. The vehicles participating in the MTDC project are doing so through gratis partnerships in return for early access to the results of this study. Partnerships such as these are critical to FOTs in which real-world data is being collected. In Part 1 of the project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL) established partnerships with the H.T. Hackney Company, one of the largest wholesale distributors in the country, distributing products to 21 states; and with the Knoxville Area Transit (KAT), the City of Knoxville s transit system, operating services across the city of Knoxville and parts of Knox co. These partnerships and agreements provided ORNL access to three Class-7 2005/2007 International day-cab tractors, model 8600, which regularly haul 28 ft pup trailers (H.T. Hackney Co) and three Class-7 2005 Optima LF-34 buses (KAT), for collection of duty cycle data. In addition, ORNL has collaborated with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to determine if there were possible synergies between this duty cycle data collection effort and FMCSA s need to learn more about the operation and duty cycles of the second-largest fuel consuming commercial vehicle category in the US. FMCSA s primary interest was in collecting safety data relative to the driver, carrier, and vehicle. In order to collect the duty cycle and safety-related data, ORNL developed a data acquisition and wireless communication system that was placed on each test vehicle. Each signal recorded in this FOT was collected by means of one of the instruments incorporated into each data acquisition system (DAS). Native signals were obtained directly from the vehicle s J1939 and J1708 data buses. A VBOX II Lite collected Global Positioning System related information including speed, acceleration, and spatial location information at a rate of 5 Hz, and communicated this data via the CAN (J1939) protocol. The Air-Weigh LoadMaxx, a self-weighing system which determines the vehicle s gross weight by means of pressure transducers and posts the weight to the vehicle s J1939 data bus, was used to collect vehicle payload information. A cellular modem, the Raven X

  17. Nuclear modification factor of nonphotonic electrons in heavy-ion collisions, and the heavy-flavor baryon-to-meson ratio 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear modification factor R(AA) of nonphotonic electrons in Au + Au collisions at root(S)NN = 200 GeV is studied by considering the decays of heavy-flavor hadrons produced in a quark coalescence model. Although an enhanced Lambda(c)/D(0) ratio...

  18. Design of a continuous duty cryopump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedgley, D.W.

    1985-05-01

    A continuous duty cryopump system was designed and developed that comprises a self-contained cryopump for installation into a vacuum chamber, and a microprocessor controller for automatic operation. This deuterium pump has two units in a single housing, arranged so that one is pumping while the other is being regenerated. Liquid helium-cooled, finned sections in each unit pump deuterium by condensation, and a third pump integral within the cryopump housing collects the regenerated gas. A microprocessor unit controls distribution of liquid and gaseous helium, used for conditioning the pumping units, and operates remote actuators for the regeneration. Software provides fully automatic, timed sequencing of the repetitive cryopump events which include: cooldown of the pumping units, opening of the louvers isolating the unit from the vacuum chamber, closing of the louvers, and warming up of the unit for regeneration. Default values in the software can be reprogrammed by the operator through the keyboard in response to prompts displayed on the computer. An override allows the operator to control the cryopump manually by activating switches on a control panel. Interlocks to prevent cryogen lockup are included in the software.

  19. The Heavy Photon Search test detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Battaglieri, M.; Boyarinov, S.; Bueltmann, S.; Burkert, V.; Celentano, A.; Charles, G.; Cooper, W.; Cuevas, C.; Dashyan, N.; DeVita, R.; et al

    2015-03-01

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS), an experiment to search for a hidden sector photon in fixed target electroproduction, is preparing for installation at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in the Fall of 2014. As the first stage of this project, the HPS Test Run apparatus was constructed and operated in 2012 to demonstrate the experiment's technical feasibility and to confirm that the trigger rates and occupancies are as expected. This paper describes the HPS Test Run apparatus and readout electronics and its performance. In this setting, a heavy photon can be identified as a narrow peak in themore »e?e?invariant mass spectrum above the trident background or as a narrow invariant mass peak with a decay vertex displaced from the production target, so charged particle tracking and vertexing are needed for its detection. In the HPS Test Run, charged particles are measured with a compact forward silicon microstrip tracker inside a dipole magnet. Electromagnetic showers are detected in a PbW04 crystal calorimeter situated behind the magnet, and are used to trigger the experiment and identify electrons and positrons. Both detectors are placed close to the beam line and split top-bottom. This arrangement provides sensitivity to low-mass heavy photons, allows clear passage of the unscattered beam, and avoids the spray of degraded electrons coming from the target. The discrimination between prompt and displaced e?e? pairs requires the first layer of silicon sensors be placed only 10 cm downstream of the target. The expected signal is small, and the trident background huge, so the experiment requires very large statistics. Accordingly, the HPS Test Run utilizes high-rate readout and data acquisition electronics and a fast trigger to exploit the essentially 100% duty cycle of the CEBAF accelerator at JLab.« less

  20. The Heavy Photon Search Test Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Battaglieri; Sergey Boyarinov; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Andrea Celentano; Gabriel Charles; William Cooper; Chris Cuevas; Natalia Dashyan; Raffaella DeVita; Camille Desnault; Alexandre Deur; Hovanes Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Rouven Essig; Vitaliy Fadeyev; Clive Field; Arne Freyberger; Yuri Gershtein; Nerses Gevorgyan; Francois-Xavier Girod; Norman Graf; Mathew Graham; Keith Griffioen; Alexander Grillo; Michel Guidal; Gunther Haller; Per Hansson Adrian; Ryan Herbst; Maurik Holtrop; John Jaros; Scott Kaneta; Mahbub Khandaker; Alexey Kubarovsky; Valery Kubarovsky; Takashi Maruyama; Jeremy McCormick; Ken Moffeit; Omar Moreno; Homer Neal; Timothy Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Al Odian; Marco Oriunno; Rafayel Paremuzyan; Richard Partridge; Sarah Phillips; Emmanuel Rauly; Benjamin Raydo; Joseph Reichert; Emmanuel Rindel; Philippe Rosier; Carlos Salgado; Philip Schuster; Youri Sharabian; Daria Sokhan; Stepan Stepanyan; Natalia Toro; Sho Uemura; Maurizio Ungaro; Hakop Voskanyan; Dieter Walz; Larry Weinstein; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski

    2015-06-04

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS), an experiment to search for a hidden sector photon in fixed target electroproduction, is preparing for installation at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in the Fall of 2014. As the first stage of this project, the HPS Test Run apparatus was constructed and operated in 2012 to demonstrate the experiment's technical feasibility and to confirm that the trigger rates and occupancies are as expected. This paper describes the HPS Test Run apparatus and readout electronics and its performance. In this setting, a heavy photon can be identified as a narrow peak in the e$^+$e$^-$ invariant mass spectrum, above the trident background or as a narrow invariant mass peak with a decay vertex displaced from the production target, so charged particle tracking and vertexing are needed for its detection. In the HPS Test Run, charged particles are measured with a compact forward silicon microstrip tracker inside a dipole magnet. Electromagnetic showers are detected in a PbW0$_{4}$ crystal calorimeter situated behind the magnet, and are used to trigger the experiment and identify electrons and positrons. Both detectors are placed close to the beam line and split top-bottom. This arrangement provides sensitivity to low-mass heavy photons, allows clear passage of the unscattered beam, and avoids the spray of degraded electrons coming from the target. The discrimination between prompt and displaced e$^+$e$^-$ pairs requires the first layer of silicon sensors be placed only 10~cm downstream of the target. The expected signal is small, and the trident background huge, so the experiment requires very large statistics. Accordingly, the HPS Test Run utilizes high-rate readout and data acquisition electronics and a fast trigger to exploit the essentially 100% duty cycle of the CEBAF accelerator at JLab.

  1. The Heavy Photon Search test detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Battaglieri, M; Boyarinov, S; Bueltmann, S; Burkert, V; Celentano, A; Charles, G; Cooper, W; Cuevas, C; Dashyan, N; DeVita, R; Desnault, C; Deur, A; Egiyan, H; Elouadrhiri, L; Essig, R; Fadeyev, V; Field, C; Freyberger, A; Gershtein, Y; Gevorgyan, N; Girod, F -X; Graf, N; Graham, M; Griffioen, K; Grillo, A; Guidal, M; Haller, G; Hansson Adrian, P; Herbst, R; Holtrop, M; Jaros, J; Kaneta, S; Khandaker, M; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, V; Maruyama, T; McCormick, J; Moffeit, K; Moreno, O; Neal, H; Nelson, T; Niccolai, S; Odian, A; Oriunno, M; Paremuzyan, R; Partridge, R; Phillips, S K; Rauly, E; Raydo, B; Reichert, J; Rindel, E; Rosier, P; Salgado, C; Schuster, P; Sharabian, Y; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S; Toro, N; Uemura, S; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Walz, D; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B

    2015-03-01

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS), an experiment to search for a hidden sector photon in fixed target electroproduction, is preparing for installation at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in the Fall of 2014. As the first stage of this project, the HPS Test Run apparatus was constructed and operated in 2012 to demonstrate the experiment's technical feasibility and to confirm that the trigger rates and occupancies are as expected. This paper describes the HPS Test Run apparatus and readout electronics and its performance. In this setting, a heavy photon can be identified as a narrow peak in the e+e- invariant mass spectrum, above the trident background or as a narrow invariant mass peak with a decay vertex displaced from the production target, so charged particle tracking and vertexing are needed for its detection. In the HPS Test Run, charged particles are measured with a compact forward silicon microstrip tracker inside a dipole magnet. Electromagnetic showers are detected in a PbW04 crystal calorimeter situated behind the magnet, and are used to trigger the experiment and identify electrons and positrons. Both detectors are placed close to the beam line and split top-bottom. This arrangement provides sensitivity to low-mass heavy photons, allows clear passage of the unscattered beam, and avoids the spray of degraded electrons coming from the target. The discrimination between prompt and displaced e+e? pairs requires the first layer of silicon sensors be placed only 10~cm downstream of the target. The expected signal is small, and the trident background huge, so the experiment requires very large statistics. Accordingly, the HPS Test Run utilizes high-rate readout and data acquisition electronics and a fast trigger to exploit the essentially 100% duty cycle of the CEBAF accelerator at JLab.

  2. Root and Root Collar Disease of Eucalyptus grandis Caused by Pythium splendens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Root and Root Collar Disease of Eucalyptus grandis Caused by Pythium splendens 125 C. LINDE, M. J. H. J. 1994. Root and root collar disease of Eucalyptus gramlis caused by Pythium spJendens. Plant trees. P. splendens inoculated on two different clones of E. grandis and on Eucalyptus fastigata

  3. Fuel and emission impacts of heavy hybrid vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, F.; Eberhardt, J. J.; Stodolsky, F.

    1999-03-02

    Hybrid powertrains for certain heavy vehicles may improve fuel economy and reduce emissions. Of particular interest are commercial vehicles, typically in Classes 3-6, that travel in urban areas. Hybrid strategies and associated energy/emissions benefits for these classes of vehicles could be significantly different from those for passenger cars. A preliminary analysis has been conducted to investigate the energy and emissions performance of Class 3 and 6 medium-duty trucks and Class 6 school buses under eight different test cycles. Three elements are associated with this analysis: (1) establish baseline fuel consumption and emission scenario's from selected, representative baseline vehicles and driving schedules; (2) identify sources of energy inefficiency from baseline technology vehicles; and (3) assess maximum and practical potentials for energy savings and emissions reductions associated with heavy vehicle hybridization under real-world driving conditions. Our analysis excludes efficiency gains associated with such other measures as vehicle weight reduction and air resistance reduction, because such measures would also benefit conventional technology vehicles. Our research indicates that fuel economy and emission benefits of hybridization can be very sensitive to different test cycles. We conclude that, on the basis of present-day technology, the potential fuel economy gains average about 60-75% for Class 3 medium-duty trucks and 35% for Class 6 school buses. The fuel economy gains can be higher in the future, as hybrid technology continues to improve. The practical emissions reduction potentials associated with vehicle hybridization are significant as well.

  4. Heavy-flavor transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Beraudo

    2015-10-29

    The formation of a hot deconfined medium (Quark-Gluon Plasma) in high-energy nuclear collisions affects heavy-flavor observables. In the low/moderate-pT range transport calculations allow one to simulate the propagation of heavy quarks in the plasma and to evaluate the effect of the medium on the final hadronic spectra: results obtained with transport coefficients arising from different theoretical approaches can be compared to experimental data. Finally, a discussion of possible effects on heavy-flavor observables due to the possible formation of a hot-medium in small systems (like in p-A collisions) is presented.

  5. Light duty utility arm walkdown report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalley, J.L.

    1998-09-25

    This document is a report of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) drawing walkdown. The purpose of this walkdown was to validate the essential configuration of the LDUA in preparation of deploying the equipment in a Hanford waste tank. The LDUA system has, over the course of its development, caused the generation of a considerable number of design drawings. The number of drawings is estimated to be well over 1,000. A large number consist of vendor type drawings, furnished by both Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and SPAR Aerospace Limited (SPAR). A smaller number, approximately 200, are H-6 type drawing sheets in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) document control system. A preliminary inspection of the drawings showed that the physical configuration of the LDUA did not match the documented configuration. As a result of these findings, a scoping walkdown of 20 critical drawing sheets was performed to determine if a problem existed in configuration management of the LDUA system. The results of this activity showed that 18 of the 20 drawing sheets were found to contain errors or omissions of varying concern. Given this, Characterization Engineering determined that a walkdown of the drawings necessary and sufficient to enable safe operation and maintenance of the LDUA should be performed. A review team was assembled to perform a review of all of the drawings and determine the set which would need to be verified through an engineering walkdown. The team determined that approximately 150 H-6 type drawing sheets would need to be verified, 12 SPAR/PNNL drawing sheets would need to be verified and converted to H-6 drawings, and three to six new drawings would be created (see Appendix A). This report documents the results of that walkdown.

  6. Medium Truck Duty Cycle Data from Real-World Driving Environments: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascurain, Mary Beth; Franzese, Oscar; Capps, Gary J; Siekmann, Adam; Thomas, Neil; LaClair, Tim J; Barker, Alan M; Knee, Helmut E

    2012-11-01

    Since the early part of the 20th century, the US trucking industry has provided a safe and economical means of moving commodities across the country. At present, nearly 80% of US domestic freight movement involves the use of trucks. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is spearheading a number of research efforts to improve heavy vehicle fuel efficiencies. This includes research in engine technologies (including hybrid and fuel cell technologies), lightweight materials, advanced fuels, and parasitic loss reductions. In addition, DOE is developing advanced tools and models to support heavy vehicle research and is leading the 21st Century Truck Partnership and the SuperTruck development effort. Both of these efforts have the common goal of decreasing the fuel consumption of heavy vehicles. In the case of SuperTruck, a goal of improving the overall freight efficiency of a combination tractor-trailer has been established. This Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) project is a critical element in DOE s vision for improved heavy vehicle energy efficiency; it is unique in that there is no other existing national database of characteristic duty cycles for medium trucks based on collecting data from Class 6 and 7 vehicles. It involves the collection of real-world data on medium trucks for various situational characteristics (e.g., rural/urban, freeway/arterial, congested/free-flowing, good/bad weather) and looks at the unique nature of medium trucks drive cycles (stop-and-go delivery, power takeoff, idle time, short-radius trips). This research provides a rich source of data that can contribute to the development of new tools for FE and modeling, provide DOE a sound basis upon which to make technology investment decisions, and provide a national archive of real-world-based medium-truck operational data to support energy efficiency research. The MTDC project involved a two-part field operational test (FOT). For the Part-1 FOT, three vehicles each from two vocations (urban transit and dry-box delivery) were instrumented for the collection of one year of operational data. The Part-2 FOT involved the towing and recovery and utility vocations for a second year of data collection. The vehicles that participated in the MTDC project did so through gratis partnerships in return for early access to the results of this study. Partnerships such as these are critical to FOTs in which real-world data is being collected. In Part 1 of the project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established partnerships with the H.T. Hackney Company (HTH), one of the largest wholesale distributors in the country, distributing products to 21 states; and with Knoxville Area Transit (KAT), the city of Knoxville s transit system, which operates across Knoxville and parts of Knox County. These partnerships and agreements provided ORNL access to three Class-7 day-cab tractors that regularly haul 28 ft pup trailers (HTH) and three Class-7 buses for the collection of duty cycle data. In addition, ORNL collaborated with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to determine if there were possible synergies between this duty cycle data collection effort and FMCSA s need to learn more about the operation and duty cycles of medium trucks. FMCSA s primary interest was in collecting safety data relative to the driver, carrier, and vehicle. In Part 2 of the project, ORNL partnered with the Knoxville Utilities Board, which made available three Class-8 trucks. Fountain City Wrecker Service was also a Part 2 partner, providing three Class-6 rollback trucks. In order to collect the duty cycle and safety-related data, ORNL developed a data acquisition system (DAS) that was placed on each test vehicle. Each signal recorded in this FOT was collected by means of one of the instruments incorporated into each DAS. Other signals were obtained directly from the vehicle s J1939 and J1708 data buses. A VBOX II Lite collected information available from a global positioning system (GPS), including speed, acceleration, and spatial location information at a rate of 5 Hz for the Part 1

  7. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  8. Heavy Hybrid mesons Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Iddir; L. Semlala

    2006-11-25

    We estimate the ground state masses of the heavy hybrid mesons using a phenomenological QCD-type potential. 0^{- -},1^{- -},0^{- +},1^{- +} and 0^{+ -} J^{PC} states are considered.

  9. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  10. HEAVY QUARKS JETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, M.

    2010-01-01

    i'iAsm Heavy Quark Jets iBirijets. Short-distance vs long-than a few wide angle sub-jets at to draw first skelton jet

  11. ROOT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton Delivery andInnovations INFORMATIONRichlandRMSSEC

  12. Contribution of Pi-N-]Lambda-K to Subthreshold Kaon Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, L.; Ko, Che Ming; Wu, J. Q.

    1990-01-01

    We report the first observation of K-*(892)(0)-->piK in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The transverse momentum spectrum of (K-*0+(K) over bar (*0))/2 from central Au+Au collisions at roots(NN)=130 GeV is presented. The ...

  13. Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks Urea SCR Durability Assessment for Tier 2 Light-Duty Truck Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II...

  14. 2013 Washington State Budget-Recession and Basic Education as a Constitutional Paramount Duty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Francis; Chavez, Maria; Lovrich, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Paramount Duty: Funding Education for McCleary and Beyond. ”a-parmount-duty-funding-education-for- mccleary-and-beyond/the-state-isnt-fully-funding-education/>. Scheer, Alexander.

  15. Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand Gasoline and distillate demand impact of the Energy Independance and Security Act of 2007...

  16. A Study of Emissions from a Light Duty Diesel Engine with the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Study of Emissions from a Light Duty Diesel Engine with the European Particulate Measurement Programme A Study of Emissions from a Light Duty Diesel Engine with the European...

  17. This form is interactive --complete electronically and print! Certification of Fitness For Duty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillow, Jonathan

    This form is interactive -- complete electronically and print! Certification of Fitness For Duty referred to you for an evaluation and confirmation of fitness for duty based on the following observations

  18. Evaluation of a Local Air Conditioning Duty Cycling Device as a Load Management Tool 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, K.; Thedford, M.

    1986-01-01

    During the summer of 1984, a test was performed to evaluate a local air conditioning duty cycling device as a tool to reduce TUEC's system summer peak demand. In addition to the local duty cycling device, a direct load ...

  19. Variability in baseline job duty measures as a component of worker control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philo, Joel Richard

    2002-01-01

    Naylor, Pritchard, and Ilgen's (1980) theory of motivation stresses the importance of worker control on productivity. Greater control over specific job duties is hypothesized to increase motivation to do those job duties. ...

  20. System-Response Issues Imposed by Biodiesel in a Medium-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System-Response Issues Imposed by Biodiesel in a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine System-Response Issues Imposed by Biodiesel in a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine The objective of the current...

  1. Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light Duty Tier 2...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Presentation given at 2007 Diesel...

  2. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

  3. Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Six different fuels were investigated to study the...

  4. DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles This table lists the technical targets...

  5. Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Substantial increases in engine efficiency of a...

  6. Marketable Credits for Light-Duty Vehicle Emission Control in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; Kling, Catherine; Sperling, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    for Light-Duty Vehicle Emission CQntrol, Ph.D dissertation,for Light-Duty Vehicle Emission Control in Califorr6a QuantuSince the beginning of vehicle emission regulation in the

  7. Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea Cu/Zeolite...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts CuZeolite SCR catalysts...

  8. Low and high Temperature Dual Thermoelectric Generation Waste Heat Recovery System for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developing a low and high temperature dual thermoelectric generation waste heat recovery system for light-duty vehicles.

  9. BEHAVIORAL DISTINCTIONS: THE USE OF LIGHT-DUTY TRUCKS AND PASSENGER CARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    BEHAVIORAL DISTINCTIONS: THE USE OF LIGHT-DUTY TRUCKS AND PASSENGER CARS by Kara Maria Kockelman as light-duty trucks (LDTs), resulting in a variety of regulatory protections. Production and purchase as light-duty trucks (LDTs), and they currently capture 51% of new U.S. passenger vehicle sales1 ­ much

  10. Centralized Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks with Ultra Low Duty Cycle to Achieve Maximum Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    Centralized Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks with Ultra Low Duty Cycle to Achieve performance because most of them are designed without considering a ultra low duty cycled environment to improve a network lifetime and a routing maintenance cost. We explain the issues of a ultra low duty

  11. Energy Efficient Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks with Ultra Low Duty Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    Energy Efficient Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks with Ultra Low Duty Cycle Wooguil of high energy consumption mainly caused by the clock drift in ultra low duty cycled environments because most of them are designed without considering ultra low duty cycled environments. To achieve

  12. Opportunistic Flooding in Low-Duty-Cycle Wireless Sensor Networks with Unreliable Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    . Combined with unreliable links, flooding in low-duty-cycle networks is a new challenging issueOpportunistic Flooding in Low-Duty-Cycle Wireless Sensor Networks with Unreliable Links Shuo Guo, little work has yet been done on low-duty-cycle wireless sensor networks in which nodes stay asleep most

  13. Duty-Cycle-Aware Broadcast in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jiangchuan (JC)

    active and dormant states, so as to conserve energy and extend the network lifetime. Unfortunately fails to capture the uniqueness of energy-constrained wireless sensor networks. The sensor nodesDuty-Cycle-Aware Broadcast in Wireless Sensor Networks Feng Wang Jiangchuan Liu School of Computing

  14. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-19

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime pay and compensatory time, leave administration, time and attendance reporting, and hours of duty. Admin Chg 1, dated 5-10-12, supersedes DOE O 322.1C.

  15. Chemical root pruning and its effects on water relations and root morphology of photinia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vartak, Diptish Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    ). Kirchhof (1992) used a hand-held computer scanner for measurement of root length. Growth of roots can be non-destructively monitored using the root periscope/mini-rhizot- ron technique (Karl and Doescher, 1991). A common method of estimating the length...

  16. Root-growth-inhibiting sheet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burton, Frederick G. (Stansbury Park, UT); Cataldo, Dominic A. (Kennewick, WA); Cline, John F. (Prosser, WA); Skiens, W. Eugene (Wilsonville, OR); Van Voris, Peter (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01

    In accordance with this invention, a porous sheet material is provided at intervals with bodies of a polymer which contain a 2,6-dinitroaniline. The sheet material is made porous to permit free passage of water. It may be either a perforated sheet or a woven or non-woven textile material. A particularly desirable embodiment is a non-woven fabric of non-biodegradable material. This type of material is known as a "geotextile" and is used for weed control, prevention of erosion on slopes, and other landscaping purposes. In order to obtain a root repelling property, a dinitroaniline is blended with a polymer which is attached to the geotextile or other porous material.

  17. Root-growth-inhibiting sheet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.; Van Voris, P.

    1993-01-26

    In accordance with this invention, a porous sheet material is provided at intervals with bodies of a polymer which contain a 2,6-dinitroaniline. The sheet material is made porous to permit free passage of water. It may be either a perforated sheet or a woven or non-woven textile material. A particularly desirable embodiment is a non-woven fabric of non-biodegradable material. This type of material is known as a geotextile'' and is used for weed control, prevention of erosion on slopes, and other landscaping purposes. In order to obtain a root repelling property, a dinitroaniline is blended with a polymer which is attached to the geotextile or other porous material.

  18. Design and operation of the LBL heavy ion RFQ linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouch, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    LBL has designed and tested a heavy ion RFQ linac for ions in the mass range of 1 to 40. Designed as part of a preinjector package for synchrotron applications, it is a low duty factor device, operating at 200 MHz with maximum surface fields as high as 28 MV/meter. It is a loop-driven, four vane structure employing several innovative design concepts. These include an exit matcher section, to ensure efficient capture by a following Alvarez linac; advanced mechanical design features, to ensure accurate positioning of the vane pole-tips; and vane coupling rings, to ensure field stabilization and balance. This RFQ has been used on a test bench to accelerate a variety of ions as heavy as silicon, with charge to mass ratios as low as 1/7. Results of the initial operation show that the structure meets all of the design performance criteria, and that it holds promise for a long lifetime of simple and reliable service. This RFQ linac will soon be incorporated into the Bevatron operations program as part of th 200 MHz injector upgrade. A further application of this same RFQ design is in the dedicated Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator presently under study at LBL. Details of the design, construction and testing of the RFQ linac are given.

  19. Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

    2000-04-11

    Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

  20. PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Plants Chelating agents Pb hyperaccumulation Effects of pH on metal extraction Disposal options contaminants from soils Contaminants must be in harvestable portions of the plant (Wongkongkatep et al. 2003) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al

  1. Heavy Quark Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul B. Mackenzie

    1992-12-14

    Lattice calculations of heavy quark systems provide very good measures of the lattice spacing, a key element in recent determinations of the strong coupling constant using lattice methods. They also provide excellent testing grounds for lattice methods in general. I review recent phenomenological and technical developments in this field.

  2. Long-term control of root growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burton, Frederick G. (West Richland, WA); Cataldo, Dominic A. (Kennewick, WA); Cline, John F. (Prosser, WA); Skiens, W. Eugene (Richland, WA)

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  3. Viscous heavy brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    House, R.F.; Hoover, L.D.

    1984-07-10

    Hydroxyethyl cellulose and a sequestrant are added to a heavy brine containing one or more salts selected from calcium chloride, calcium bromide, and zinc bromide to increase the viscosity of the brine. Preferably the brine contains zinc bromide, has a density in the range from about 14.2-19.2 pounds per gallon, and the sequestrant is a polyphosphonic acid or water soluble salt thereof.

  4. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  5. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, N.; Moore, C.; Grant, T.; Fleming, T.; Hunt, P.; Martin, R.; Murphy, S.; Hauth, J.; Wilson, R.; Bittner, A.; Bramwell, A.; Macaulay, J.; Olson, J.; Terrill, E.; Toquam, J. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents an overview of the NRC licensees' implementation of the FFD program during the first full year of the program's operation and provides new information on a variety of FFD technical issues. The purpose of this document is to contribute to appropriate changes to the rule, to the inspection process, and to other NRC activities. It describes the characteristics of licensee programs, discusses the results of NRC inspections, updates technical information covered in previous reports, and identifies lessons learned during the first year. Overall, the experience of the first full year of licensees' FFD program operations indicates that licensees have functioning fitness for duty programs devoted to the NRC rule's performance objectives of achieving drug-free workplaces in which nuclear power plant personnel are not impaired as they perform their duties. 96 refs., 14 tabs.

  6. Heavy Quarkonium Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Brambilla; M. Krämer; R. Mussa; A. Vairo; G. Bali; G. T. Bodwin; E. Braaten; E. Eichten; S. Eidelman; S. Godfrey; A. Hoang; M. Jamin; D. Kharzeev; M. P. Lombardo; C. Lourenco; A. B. Meyer; V. Papadimitriou; C. Patrignani; M. Rosati; M. A. Sanchis-Lozano; H. Satz; J. Soto; D. Z. Besson; D. Bettoni; A. Böhrer; S. Boogert; C. -H. Chang; P. Cooper; P. Crochet; S. Datta; C. Davies; A. Deandrea; R. Faustov; T. Ferguson; R. Galik; F. A. Harris; O. Iouchtchenko; O. Kaczmarek; F. Karsch; M. Kienzle; V. V. Kiselev; S. R. Klein; P. Kroll; A. Kronfeld; Y. -P. Kuang; V. Laporta; Jungil Lee; A. Leibovich; J. P. Ma; P. Mackenzie; L. Maiani; M. L. Mangano; A. Meyer; X. H. Mo; C. Morningstar; A. Nairz; J. Napolitano; S. Olsen; A. Penin; P. Petreczky; F. Piccinini; A. Pineda; A. D. Polosa; L. Ramello; R. Rapp; J. -M. Richard; V. Riquer; S. Ricciardi; E. Robutti; O. Schneider; E. Scomparin; J. Simone; T. Skwarnicki; G. Stancari; I. W. Stewart; Yu. Sumino; T. Teubner; J. Tseng; R. Vogt; P. Wang; B. Yabsley; C. Z. Yuan; F. Zantow; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zieminski

    2005-07-26

    This report is the result of the collaboration and research effort of the Quarkonium Working Group over the last three years. It provides a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in heavy-quarkonium theory and experiment, covering quarkonium spectroscopy, decay, and production, the determination of QCD parameters from quarkonium observables, quarkonia in media, and the effects on quarkonia of physics beyond the Standard Model. An introduction to common theoretical and experimental tools is included. Future opportunities for research in quarkonium physics are also discussed.

  7. Light is Heavy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Mark, M B

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's relativity theory appears to be very accurate, but at times equally puzzling. On the one hand, electromagnetic radiation must have zero rest mass in order to propagate at the speed of light, but on the other hand, since it definitely carries momentum and energy, it has non-zero inertial mass. Hence, by the principle of equivalence, it must have non-zero gravitational mass, and so, light must be heavy. In this paper, no new results will be derived, but a possibly surprising perspective on the above paradox is given.

  8. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Reflection systems and partial root systems Ottmar Loos a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Erhard

    Reflection systems and partial root systems Ottmar Loos a and Erhard Neher b, Department.loos@uibk.ac.at bemail: neher@uottawa.ca Abstract. We develop a general theory of reflection systems and, more specifically, partial root sys- tems which provide a unifying framework for finite root systems, Kac-Moody root

  11. Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

    2006-05-01

    Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

  12. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Gasoline-Like Fuel Effects on Advanced...

  13. Non-Light Duty Energy and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Accounting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-Light Duty Energy and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Accounting Tool (NEAT) for Long Term Energy and GHG Impacts Evaluation: Domestic Freight Component Documentation and User's...

  14. High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Combustion and Emissions Performance of Dual-Fuel Gasoline and Diesel HECC on a Multi-Cylinder Light Duty Diesel Engine Addressing...

  15. The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Volkwagen AG, Wolfsburg, Germany 2004deerschindler.pdf More Documents & Publications Accelerating Light-Duty Diesel...

  16. Impacts of Oxygenated Gasoline Use on California Light-Duty Vehicle Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Singer, Brett C.; Harley, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    on-road motor vehicle emissions (BURDEN7F). Mobile Sourcespeciation profile for vehicle emissions agrees with cold=Light-Duty Vehicle Emissions Thomas W. Kirchstetter Brett C°

  17. Light-Duty Vehicle Exhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-Pricing Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; Kling, Catherine; Sperling, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    System for Light-Duty Vehicle: Emission Control," Ph.D.reductions motor in vehicle emissions have that Today’scorresponding to consumers vehicle emission one path over

  18. Treatability of Stormwater Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Treatability of Stormwater Heavy Metals or Breaking the Irreducible Concentration Barrier R. Pitt Technologies for Urban Stormwater Conducted by the University of Alabamay y from 1999 to 2003 · Examined the characteristics and treatability of stormwater heavy metals at selected source areas and at outfalls. · Conducted

  19. Searching for Jets in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salur, Sevil

    2008-01-01

    measurements with full jet reconstruction in heavy ionDirect measurement of jets in s N N = 200 GeV Heavy Ion5–12, 2008 Searching for Jets in Heavy Ion Collisions Sevil

  20. Overview of Light-Duty Vehicle Studies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT OFER-B-00-020 DOEProgram |&|Light-Duty

  1. Heavy oil hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.E.; Nongbri, G.; Clausen, G.A. [Texaco R& D, Port Arthur, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Many of the crude oils available worldwide are classified as heavy oils (API gravity less than 20). In addition, many of the heavier crude oils are also high in sulfur content. Both the low gravity and high sulfur content make these crude oils difficult to process in many refineries and additional processing equipment is required. Often, deasphalting of the vacuum residuum is one of the processing routes chosen. However, the deasphalted oil (DAO) is often of poor quality and presents problems in processing in existing refinery units. Fixed bed hydrotreater and hydrocracker catalysts are quickly fouled and fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) reach regenerator temperature limits with only small amounts of DAO in the feed. Use of the T-STAR ebullated bed process to hydrocrack and upgrade the DAO is an excellent route for making the DAO more palatable to refinery units.

  2. PT invariant complex E(8) root spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Fring; Monique Smith

    2010-10-11

    We provide a construction procedure for complex root spaces invariant under antilinear transformations, which may be applied to any Coxeter group. The procedure is based on the factorisation of a chosen element of the Coxeter group into two factors. Each of the factors constitutes an involution and may therefore be deformed in an antilinear fashion. Having the importance of the E(8)-Coxeter group in mind, such as underlying a particular perturbation of the Ising model and the fact that for it no solution could be found previously, we exemplify the procedure for this particular case. As a concrete application of this construction we propose new generalisations of Calogero-Moser Sutherland models and affine Toda field theories based on the invariant complex root spaces and deformed complex simple roots, respectively.

  3. The Square Root Depth Wave Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin C. Cotter; Darryl D. Holm; James R. Percival

    2009-12-11

    We introduce a set of coupled equations for multilayer water waves that removes the ill-posedness of the multilayer Green-Naghdi (MGN) equations in the presence of shear. The new well-posed equations are Hamiltonian and in the absence of imposed background shear they retain the same travelling wave solutions as MGN. We call the new model the Square Root Depth equations, from the modified form of their kinetic energy of vertical motion. Our numerical results show how the Square Root Depth equations model the effects of multilayer wave propagation and interaction, with and without shear.

  4. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05

    Bakhtin?s carnivalesque theory by analyzing comedic rhetoric performed by two comedic metal bands. Through the theories of Johan Huizinga and Mikhail Bakhtin, Chapter I: I Play Metal argues that heavy metal culture is a modern carnivalesque play...

  5. Overview of the Safety Issues Associated with the Compressed Natural Gas Fuel System and Electric Drive System in a Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S.C.

    2002-11-14

    This report evaluates the hazards that are unique to a compressed-natural-gas (CNG)-fueled heavy hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) design compared with a conventional heavy vehicle. The unique design features of the heavy HEV are the CNG fuel system for the internal-combustion engine (ICE) and the electric drive system. This report addresses safety issues with the CNG fuel system and the electric drive system. Vehicles on U. S. highways have been propelled by ICEs for several decades. Heavy-duty vehicles have typically been fueled by diesel fuel, and light-duty vehicles have been fueled by gasoline. The hazards and risks posed by ICE vehicles are well understood and have been generally accepted by the public. The economy, durability, and safety of ICE vehicles have established a standard for other types of vehicles. Heavy-duty (i.e., heavy) HEVs have recently been introduced to U. S. roadways, and the hazards posed by these heavy HEVs can be compared with the hazards posed by ICE vehicles. The benefits of heavy HEV technology are based on their potential for reduced fuel consumption and lower exhaust emissions, while the disadvantages are the higher acquisition cost and the expected higher maintenance costs (i.e., battery packs). The heavy HEV is more suited for an urban drive cycle with stop-and-go driving conditions than for steady expressway speeds. With increasing highway congestion and the resulting increased idle time, the fuel consumption advantage for heavy HEVs (compared with conventional heavy vehicles) is enhanced by the HEVs' ability to shut down. Any increase in fuel cost obviously improves the economics of a heavy HEV. The propulsion system for a heavy HEV is more complex than the propulsion system for a conventional heavy vehicle. The heavy HEV evaluated in this study has in effect two propulsion systems: an ICE fueled by CNG and an electric drive system with additional complexity and failure modes. This additional equipment will result in a less reliable vehicle with a lower availability than a conventional heavy vehicle. Experience with heavy HEVs to date supports this observation. The key safety concern for the electric drive system is the higher voltages and currents that are required in the electric drive system. Faults that could expose personnel to these electric hazards must be considered, addressed, and minimized. The key issue for the CNG-fueled ICE is containment of the high-pressure natural gas. Events that can result in a release of natural gas with the possibility of subsequent ignition are of concern. These safety issues are discussed. The heavy HEV has the potential to have a safety record that is comparable to that of the conventional vehicle, but adequate attention to detail will be required.

  6. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  7. MAC Design for Supporting Ultra Low Duty Cycle in Wireless Sensor Networks1 *Wooguil PakO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    MAC Design for Supporting Ultra Low Duty Cycle in Wireless Sensor Networks1 *Wooguil PakO , *Hyuk.1%). Our proposed U-MAC (Ultra low duty cycle MAC) protocol targets achieving low energy consumption under. In this paper, we propose a new MAC algorithm called U-MAC (Ultra low duty cycle MAC) that works effectively

  8. Centralized route recovery based on multi-hop wakeup time estimation for wireless sensor networks with ultra low duty cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    with ultra low duty cycles Wooguil Pak, Saewoong Bahk Department of EECS & INMC, Seoul National University Keywords: Wireless sensor network Routing protocol Ultra low duty cycle Network lifetime Multi-hop wakeup time estimation to maximize the network lifetime of WSNs under ultra low duty cycles. It does not use

  9. Fitness for Duty Procedures These procedures are intended to be a guide for implementing University Policy HRM-037, "Evaluating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    1 Fitness for Duty Procedures These procedures are intended to be a guide for implementing University Policy HRM-037, "Evaluating Employee Fitness for Duty". That policy applies to all employees's fitness for duty must report their observations to the employee's supervisor. 2. The supervisor

  10. LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishiyama, K. I.

    2010-12-01

    A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

  11. Heavy Flavour in a Nutshell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Lambert

    2011-05-06

    Moriond QCD brings together particle physicists of varied interests. This review and introduction to heavy flavour physics is aimed at those not in the heavy-flavour field to describe the motivation and methodology of precision flavour physics, and introduce the most tantalising searches for new physics. The LHC experiments are expected to make great inroads into constraining the new physics parameter space and discover the new physics which I will argue \\emph{must} be present to describe our observed universe.

  12. Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using Model-Based Transient Calibration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  13. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  14. Measurement of Real-World Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicles: The State-of-the-Art

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2003 DEER Conference Presentation: West Virginia University - Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

  15. Potential Benefits of Utilizing Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units in Lieu of Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Idling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    truck fuel and lubricant consumption through elimination offuel consumption, lubricant consumption, and engine wear,fuel consumption, lubricant consumption, and maintenance

  16. Energy use and emissions of idling-reduction options for heavy-duty diesel truacks a comparison.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L. L.; Hartman, C. J. B.; Solomon, M. J.; Energy Systems; James Madison Univ.; Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management

    2009-01-01

    Pollution and energy analyses of different idling-reduction (IR) technologies have been limited to localized vehicle emissions and have neglected upstream energy use and regional emissions. In light of increasing regulation and government incentives for IR, this research analyzed the full fuel cycle effects of contemporary approaches. It compared emissions, energy use, and proximity to urban populations for nine alternatives, including idling, electrified parking spaces, auxiliary power units, and several combinations of these. It also compared effects for the United States and seven states: California, Florida, Illinois, New York, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. U.S. average emissions impacts from all onboard IR options were found to be lower than those from a 2007-compliant idling truck. Total particulate emissions from electrified parking spaces were found to be greater than those from a 2007 truck, but such emissions generally occurred in areas with low population density. The lowest energy use, carbon dioxide emissions, and nitrogen oxide emissions are seen with a direct-fired heater combined with electrified parking spaces for cooling, and the lowest particulate-matter emissions were found with a direct-fired heater combined with an onboard device for cooling. As expected, state-to-state variations in the climate and grid fuel mix influence the impacts of the full fuel cycle from IR technologies, and the most effective choice for one location may be less effective elsewhere.

  17. Potential Benefits of Utilizing Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units in Lieu of Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Idling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    do not account for full fuel cycle emissions (e.g. emissionsfuel cell APUs, a full fuel cycle analysis should be done

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design Optimization of Piezoceramic Multilayer Actuators for Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Fuel Injectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about design...

  19. 6 TRANSPORTATION OF SPECIMENS All samples to be transported should be packaged in heavy-duty containers and should comply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Helene

    with sufficient absorbent material (i.e. clean cotton wool/wadding, shredded or crumpled newspaper) to absorb, tissue and tissue fluids, being shipped for purposes of diagnosis, but excluding live infected animals

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Development of Advanced High Strength Cast Alloys for Heavy Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Caterpillar at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of advanced high...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Advanced High Strength Cast Alloys for Heavy Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Caterpillar at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of advanced high...

  2. Modelling the global prospects and impacts of heavy duty liquefied natural gas vehicles in computable general equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Arthur Hong Chun

    2014-01-01

    Natural gas vehicles have the prospects of making substantial contributions to transportation needs. The adoption of natural gas vehicles could lead to impacts on energy and environmental systems. An analysis of the main ...

  3. Demonstration of Air-Power-Assist (APA) Engine Technology for Clean Combustion and Direct Energy Recovery in Heavy Duty Application

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  4. A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency- Hybrid Power System of Diesel and WHR-ORC Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  5. Effects of a Zeolite-Selective Catalytic Reduction System on Comprehensive Emissions from a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    lean-combustion diesel engines, including exhaust gas recirculation, lean NOx catalysis, selective by several engine manufacturers for use in mobile emis- sion sources to meet stringent NOx regulations.2

  6. The new Mercedes-Benz OM 904 LA light heavy-duty diesel engine for class 6 trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schittler, M.; Bergmann, H.; Flathmann, K.

    1996-09-01

    As part of a comprehensive strategic product initiative the most important commercial vehicle manufacturer--Mercedes-Benz AG--is step by step renewing its entire product range. This primarily refers to the heart of the vehicles--the engine. After the OM 457 LA, which was developed together with DDC for the special American market demands and which is produced and sold in the US by DDC under the label Series 55, has had its premiere in Freightliner`s Century Class, the OM 904 LA will now follow in the light commercial vehicle class. This engine has a completely new concept of a direct-injection, highly sophisticated turbocharged four-cylinder in-line engine with air-to-air intercooler, whose main characteristics can be outlined by the terms multi-valve technology, high-pressure injection via unit pumps and electronic engine control. This small engine has several interesting features, which--up to now--were only known from class 8 engines. In addition to fulfilling increased customer demands with regard to long service life, easy maintenance, reliability and economy, great attention was paid during the design of the engine to not only fulfill the global regulations, but also account for sufficient potential to comply with further aggravations to be expected. The most important design features and the attained engine ratings are indicated and explained in detail.

  7. Demonstration of Air-Power-Assist Engine Technology for Clean Combustion and Direct Energy Recovery in Heavy Duty Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyungsuk Kang; Chun Tai

    2010-05-01

    The first phase of the project consists of four months of applied research, starting from September 1, 2005 and was completed by December 31, 2005. During this time, the project team heavily relied on highly detailed numerical modeling techniques to evaluate the feasibility of the APA technology. Specifically, (i) A GT-Power{sup TM}engine simulation model was constructed to predict engine efficiency at various operating conditions. Efficiency was defined based on the second-law thermodynamic availability. (ii) The engine efficiency map generated by the engine simulation was then fed into a simplified vehicle model, which was constructed in the Matlab/Simulink environment, to predict fuel consumption of a refuse truck on a simple collection cycle. (iii) Design and analysis work supporting the concept of retrofitting an existing Sturman Industries Hydraulic Valve Actuation (HVA) system with the modifications that are required to run the HVA system with Air Power Assist functionality. A Matlab/Simulink model was used to calculate the dynamic response of the HVA system. Computer aided design (CAD) was done in Solidworks for mechanical design and hydraulic layout. At the end of Phase I, 11% fuel economy improvement was predicted. During Phase II, the engine simulation group completed the engine mapping work. The air handling group made substantial progress in identifying suppliers and conducting 3D modelling design. Sturman Industries completed design modification of the HVA system, which was reviewed and accepted by Volvo Powertrain. In Phase II, the possibility of 15% fuel economy improvement was shown with new EGR cooler design by reducing EGR cooler outlet temperature with APA engine technology from Air Handling Group. In addition, Vehicle Simulation with APA technology estimated 4 -21% fuel economy improvement over a wide range of driving cycles. During Phase III, the engine experimental setup was initiated at VPTNA, Hagerstown, MD. Air Handling system and HVA system were delivered to VPTNA and then assembly of APA engine was completed by June 2007. Functional testing of APA engine was performed and AC and AM modes testing were completed by October 2007. After completing testing, data analysis and post processing were performed. Especially, the models were instrumental in identifying some of the key issues with the experimental HVA system. Based upon the available engine test results during AC and AM modes, the projected fuel economy improvement over the NY composite cycle is 14.7%. This is close to but slightly lower than the originally estimated 18% from ADVISOR simulation. The APA project group demonstrated the concept of APA technology by using simulation and experimental testing. However, there are still exists of technical challenges to meet the original expectation of APA technology. The enabling technology of this concept, i.e. a fully flexible valve actuation system that can handle high back pressure from the exhaust manifold is identified as one of the major technical challenges for realizing the APA concept.

  8. Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, G.B.; DelVecchio, K.A.; Hays, W.J.; Hiltner, J.D.; Nagaraj, R.; Emmer, C.

    2000-03-02

    This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of this contract. The authors completed four tasks under this phase of the subcontract. (1) They developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a 3500 direct injected natural gas (DING) engine gas injection/combustion system and used it to identify DING ignition/combustion system improvements. The results were a 20% improvement in efficiency compared to Phase 1 testing. (2) The authors designed and procured the components for a 3126 DING engine (300 hp) and finished assembling it. During preliminary testing, the engine ran successfully at low loads for approximately 2 hours before injector tip and check failures terminated the test. The problems are solvable; however, this phase of the program was terminated. (3) They developed a Decision & Risk Analysis model to compare DING engine technology with various other engine technologies in a number of commercial applications. The model shows the most likely commercial applications for DING technology and can also be used to identify the sensitivity of variables that impact commercial viability. (4) MVE, Inc., completed a preliminary design concept study that examines the major design issues involved in making a reliable and durable 3,000 psi LNG pump. A primary concern is the life of pump seals and piston rings. Plans for the next phase of this program (Phase 3) have been put on indefinite hold. Caterpillar has decided not to fund further DING work at this time due to limited current market potential for the DING engine. However, based on results from this program, the authors believe that DI natural gas technology is viable for allowing a natural gas-fueled engine to achieve diesel power density and thermal efficiency for both the near and long terms.

  9. Medium Duty ARRA Data Reporting and Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2014-06-01

    This project compiles medium-duty (MD) aggregated deployment data and provides the compiled detailed analyses to industry. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) deployment and demonstration projects are helping to commercialize technologies for all-electric vehicles, electrified accessories, and electric charging infrastructure. Over 3.2 million miles of in-service all-electric MD truck data from 560 different vehicles have been collected since 2011, and usage data from over 1,000 truck electrification sites have been collected since 2013. Through the DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office, NREL is working to analyze real-time data from these deployment and demonstration projects to quantify the benefits: results and summary statistics are made available through the NREL website as quarterly and annual reports; 23 aggregated reports have been published on the performance and operation of these vehicles; and detailed data are being extracted to help further understand battery use and performance.

  10. A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Thomas E; Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Curran, Scott; Nafziger, Eric J

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

  11. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative agreements and their completion were problematic for the US and world economies. This resulted in the President and Congress implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, abbreviated ARRA (Pub.L. 111-5), commonly referred to as the Stimulus or The Recovery Act. The stimulus money available for transportation projects encouraged the SCAQMD to seek additional funds. In August of 2009, they eventually were awarded an additional $45.5 M, and the scope of their project was expanded to 378 vehicles. However, as a consequence of the stimulus money and the inundation of DOE with applications for new project under the ARRA, the expected time table for producing and testing vehicles was significantly delayed. As a result, these vehicles were not available for validating the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium. Therefore, in April of 2011, the Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) for the project was revised, and limited to producing the draft protocol for PHEV certification as its deliverable.

  12. REGULAR ARTICLE A comparison of methods for converting rhizotron root

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provide valuable information about plant root production, but measurements are usually made in units of root length per unit surface area of observation window surface. These measure- ment units developed to convert rhizotron measurement units into root mass production per unit ground area

  13. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-05-23

    A thick airfoil is described for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%--26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4--1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects. 3 Figs.

  14. for estimates of root production and the ca-pacity of soils to store carbon. If most root

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    1345 for estimates of root production and the ca- pacity of soils to store carbon. If most root of soil respiration and leaf litterfall (8). This carbon supports all root functions, not just growth not really un- derstand the pathways this carbon takes; some may be retained in soils for many years through

  15. Heavy Quark Photoproduction in Ultra-peripheral Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein; Joakim Nystrand; Ramona Vogt

    2002-08-09

    Heavy quarks are copiously produced in ultra-peripheral heavy ion collisions. In the strong electromagnetic fields, c c-bar and b b-bar are produced by photonuclear and two-photon interactions; hadroproduction can occur in grazing interactions. We present the total cross sections, quark transverse momentum and rapidity distributions, as well as the Q Q-bar invariant mass spectra from the three production channels. We consider AA and pA collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider. We discuss techniques for separating the three processes and describe how the AA to pA production ratios might be measured accurately enough to study nuclear shadowing.

  16. Complex roots in the inhour equation of coupled reactors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Elizabeth Ching

    1970-01-01

    Parameters. II Complex Roots s = x + iy of Complex Inhour Equation and Physical Parameters of Input Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 III Analytical Bounds of Complex Roots. vii LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Real roots of inhour equation for two... Roots of Inhour Equation To discuss the complex roots, we resolve equation (14-a) into its real ond imaginary parts by letting s = x + iy, then (x+iy) A(x+iy) = ( ? ? ? 6) +e e p+2g 2 R 2 -2r (x+iy) + [ ? + c e p 2 t l p+2 1Rx irqy (~-B)+c e e 2 R...

  17. Thermal management for heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wambsganss, M.W.

    2000-04-03

    Thermal management is a crosscutting technology that has an important effect on fuel economy and emissions, as well as on reliability and safety, of heavy-duty trucks. Trends toward higher-horsepower engines, along with new technologies for reducing emissions, are substantially increasing heat-rejection requirements. For example, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), which is probably the most popular near-term strategy for reducing NO{sub x} emissions, is expected to add 20 to 50% to coolant heat-rejection requirements. There is also a need to package more cooling in a smaller space without increasing costs. These new demands have created a need for new and innovative technologies and concepts that will require research and development, which, due to its long-term and high-risk nature, would benefit from government funding. This document outlines a research program that was recommended by representatives of truck manufacturers, engine manufacturers, equipment suppliers, universities, and national laboratories. Their input was obtained through personal interviews and a plenary workshop that was sponsored by the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies and held at Argonne National Laboratory on October 19--20, 1999. Major research areas that received a strong endorsement by industry and that are appropriate for government funding were identified and included in the following six tasks: (1) Program management/coordination and benefits/cost analyses; (2) Advanced-concept development; (3) Advanced heat exchangers and heat-transfer fluids; (4) Simulation-code development; (5) Sensors and control components development; and (6) Concept/demonstration truck sponsorship.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Light-Duty Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about light-duty...

  19. Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S....

  20. Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Diesel Vehicles BiodieselFuelManagementBestPracticesReport.pdf A Life-Cycle Assessment Comparing Select Gas-to-Liquid Fuels with Conventional Fuels in the...

  1. Impact of Fuel Properties on Light-Duty Engine Performance and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects of seven fuels with significantly different fuel properties on a state-of-the-art light-duty diesel engine. Cetane numbers range between 26 and 76 for the investigated...

  2. The role of the duty factor in ultrasound-mediated cardiac stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    @illinois.edu, wdo@illinois.edu Abstract: The role of the duty factor (DF) in ultrasound-mediated car- diac- controlled platform in dorsal recumbency for ultrasonic cardiac exposure. Respiratory rate, heart rate

  3. Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light-Duty Tier 2...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Operation of U.S. Light-Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Results of the NOx adsorber system with catalyst aged to useful life conditions (simulated 120k miles),...

  4. Implementation of the Joint Duty Program at CIA: Analysis and Recommendations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burk, Judah; Ericson, Paige; Fillman, Kara; Graber, Jon; Jones, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Cheryl; Rodgers, Randy; Wilson, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    This report assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the Joint Duty (JD) program as it is currently implemented at the CIA. Over the course of approximately six weeks, the Bush School 2012 Capstone interviewed - in-person ...

  5. On Combining Duty-cycling with Network Coding in Flood-based Sensor Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandanala, Roja Ramani

    2012-02-14

    Network coding and duty-cycling are two popular techniques for saving energy in wireless sensor networks. To the best of our knowledge, the idea to combine these two techniques, for even more aggressive energy savings, ...

  6. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. ace17wagner.pdf More Documents & Publications High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines High Efficiency Clean Combustion in...

  7. Increasing the Fuel Economy and Safety of New Light-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenzel, Tom; Ross, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Automotive Technology and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Through2004. “The effect of fuel economy on automobile safety: aM. , 2002. “Near-term fuel economy potential for light-duty

  8. Business Case for Light-Duty Diesel in the U.S. | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleaning Up Non-Road Diesel Vehicles: A Public Health Imperative Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Market Opportunity Assessment...

  9. Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st...

  10. SCReaming for Low NOx - SCR for the Light Duty Market | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - SCR for the Light Duty Market Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st...

  11. Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Six different fuels were investigated to study the influence of fuel properties on engine out emissions and performance of low temperature premixed compression ignition combustion light-duty HSDI engines

  12. Renewable Energy, Nuclear Power and Galileo: Do Scientists Have a Duty to Expose Popular Misconceptions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 OPINION Renewable Energy, Nuclear Power and Galileo: Do Scientists Have a Duty to Expose Popular misconception discussed below concerns the fallacy that renewable energy is rapidly supplanting conventional energy. Total non-hydro renewables today offset o

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Ultra Efficient Light Duty Powertrain with Gasoline Low Temperature Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delphi Powertrain at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ultra efficient light duty...

  14. Light Duty Utility Arm System applications for tank waste remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carteret, B.A.

    1994-10-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System is being developed by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Technology Development (OTD, EM-50) to obtain information about the conditions and contents of the DOE`s underground storage tanks. Many of these tanks are deteriorating and contain hazardous, radioactive waste generated over the past 50 years as a result of defense materials production at a member of DOE sites. Stabilization and remediation of these waste tanks is a high priority for the DOE`s environmental restoration program. The LDUA System will provide the capability to obtain vital data needed to develop safe and cost-effective tank remediation plans, to respond to ongoing questions about tank integrity and leakage, and to quickly investigate tank events that raise safety concerns. In-tank demonstrations of the LDUA System are planned for three DOE sites in 1996 and 1997: Hanford, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper provides a general description of the system design and discusses a number of planned applications of this technology to support the DOE`s environmental restoration program, as well as potential applications in other areas. Supporting papers by other authors provide additional in-depth technical information on specific areas of the system design.

  15. Hymenaea courbaril Marine construction, heavy construction,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FSC Jatoba Hymenaea courbaril Marine construction, heavy construction, light construction, interior construction, furniture FSC Pine Pinus spp. Marine construction, heavy construction, light construction, interior construction, panel products, furniture FSC Larch Larix spp. (European Larch, Larix decidua

  16. Title Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy J. Glauber

    2006-04-10

    I shall try to say a few words about two particular ways in which my own work has a certain relation to your work with heavy ions. My title is therefore "Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics".

  17. Take-All Root Rot of Turfgrass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krausz, Joseph P.

    2005-04-21

    year for St. Augustinegrass, or 5 pounds per 1,000 square feet per year for bermudagrass. If thatch build-up is a problem, use a vertical mower to break up the thatch, aerate the soil with a core aerifyer, and mow at the proper height (2 to 3... inches for St. Augus- tinegrass and 1 to 1.5 inches for bermudagrass). compacted. Fungicides If take-all root rot or bermudagrass decline are a problem in your lawn, you will probably need to apply a fungicide. Fall and spring are the best times to do...

  18. Root River Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgency (IRENA)OptionsEquivalent URIGumCenterRidgeWindRoot River

  19. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  20. Summary of Heavy Ion Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean Gavin

    1994-09-20

    Can we study hot QCD using nuclear collisions? Can we learn about metallic hydrogen from the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter? The answer to both questions may surprise you! I summarize progress in relativistic heavy ion theory reported at DPF `94 in the parallel sessions.

  1. Heavy quark physics from LEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dornan, P.J. [Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01

    A review of some of the latest results on heavy flavor physics from the LEP Collaborations is presented. The emphasis is on B physics, particularly new results and those where discrepancies is given of the many techniques which have been developed to permit these analyses.

  2. DIESEL/HEAVY The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    DIESEL/HEAVY EQUIPMENT The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance and repair of heavy equipment and trucks. Students will learn to work on electrical and air systems, diesel · Small Engines · Automotive Maintenance · Welding · Training for entry level heavy diesel equipment

  3. 3, 37453768, 2003 Heavy hydrogen in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 3, 3745­3768, 2003 Heavy hydrogen in the stratosphere T. R¨ockmann et al. Title Page Abstract/3745/ © European Geosciences Union 2003 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Heavy hydrogen Heavy hydrogen in the stratosphere T. R¨ockmann et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  4. Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  5. Innovative Structural and Joining Concepts for Lightweight Design of Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacky C. Prucz; Samir N. Shoukry; Gergis W. William

    2005-08-31

    Recent advances in the area of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) have brought these materials to a maturity stage where the technology is ready for transition to large-volume production and commercialization. The new materials seem to allow the fabrication of higher quality parts at less than 50 percent of the weight as compared to steel, especially when they are selectively reinforced with carbon, silicon carbide, or aluminum oxide fibers. Most of the developments in the MMC materials have been spurred, mainly by applications that require high structural performance at elevated temperatures, the heavy vehicle industry could also benefit from this emerging technology. Increasing requirements of weight savings and extended durability are the main drivers for potential insertion of MMC technology into the heavy vehicle market. Critical elements of a typical tractor-trailer combination, such as highly loaded sections of the structure, engine components, brakes, suspensions, joints and bearings could be improved through judicious use of MMC materials. Such an outcome would promote the DOE's programmatic objectives of increasing the fuel efficiency of heavy vehicles and reducing their life cycle costs and pollution levels. However, significant technical and economical barriers are likely to hinder or even prevent broad applications of MMC materials in heavy vehicles. The tradeoffs between such expected benefits (lower weights and longer durability) and penalties (higher costs, brittle behavior, and difficult to machine) must be thoroughly investigated both from the performance and cost viewpoints, before the transfer of MMC technology to heavy vehicle systems can be properly assessed and implemented. MMC materials are considered to form one element of the comprehensive, multi-faceted strategy pursued by the High Strength/Weight Reduction (HS/WR) Materials program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for structural weight savings and quality enhancements in heavy vehicles. The research work planed for the first year of this project (June 1, 2003 through May 30, 2004) focused on a theoretical investigation of weight benefits and structural performance tradeoffs associated with the design, fabrication, and joining of MMC components for heavy-duty vehicles. This early research work conducted at West Virginia University yielded the development of integrated material-structural models that predicted marginal benefits and significant barriers to MMC applications in heavy trailers. The results also indicated that potential applications of MMC materials in heavy vehicles are limited to components identified as critical for either loadings or weight savings. Therefore, the scope of the project was expanded in the following year (June 1, 2004 through May 30, 2005) focused on expanding the lightweight material-structural design concepts for heavy vehicles from the component to the system level. Thus, the following objectives were set: (1) Devise and evaluate lightweight structural configurations for heavy vehicles. (2) Study the feasibility of using Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for critical structural components and joints in heavy vehicles. (3) Develop analysis tools, methods, and validated test data for comparative assessments of innovative design and joining concepts. (4) Develop analytical models and software for durability predictions of typical heavy vehicle components made of particulate MMC or fiber-reinforced composites. This report summarizes the results of the research work conducted during the past two years in this projects.

  6. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iversen, Colleen M; Sloan, Victoria L; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; McGuire, A. David; Norby, Richard J; Walker, Anthony P; Warren, Jeffrey; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2015-01-01

    Arctic tundra is characterized by short-statured plant communities underlain by carbon (C)-rich soils and permafrost. Ecosystem C and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant growth in the Arctic. We synthesized available literature on tundra roots and discussed their representation in terrestrial biosphere models. Belowground biomass in tundra ecosystems can be an order of magnitude larger than aboveground biomass. Data on root production and turnover in tundra is sparse, limiting our understanding of the controls over root dynamics in these systems. Roots are shallowly distributed in the thin layer of soil that thaws each year, and are often found in the organic horizon at the soil surface. Species-specific differences in root distribution, mycorrhizal colonization, and resource partitioning may affect plant species competition under changing climatic conditions. Model representation of belowground processes has increased in complexity over recent years, but data are desperately needed to fill the gaps in model treatment of tundra roots. Future research should focus on estimates of root production and lifespan, and interactions between roots and the surrounding soil across the diversity of tundra ecosystems in the Arctic.

  7. Heavy flavor production from photons and hadrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heusch, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present state of the production and observation of hadrons containing heavy quarks or antiquarks as valence constituents, in reactions initiated by real and (space-like) virtual photon or by hadron beams is discussed. Heavy flavor production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which is well covered in a number of recent review papers is not discussed, and similarly, neutrino production is omitted due to the different (flavor-changing) mechanisms that are involved in those reactions. Heavy flavors from spacelike photons, heavy flavors from real photons, and heavy flavors from hadron-hadron collisions are discussed. (WHK)

  8. Open heavy flavor production at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. P. Suaide

    2007-02-16

    The study of heavy flavor production in relativistic heavy ion collisions is an extreme experimental challenge but provides important information on the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) created in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Heavy-quarks are believed to be produced in the initial stages of the collision, and are essential on the understanding of parton energy loss in the dense medium created in such environment. Moreover, heavy-quarks can help to investigate fundamental properties of QCD in elementary p+p collisions. In this work we review recent results on heavy flavor production and their interaction with the hot and dense medium at RHIC.

  9. Thermal hydrocracking of heavy hydrocarbon oils with heavy oil recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denis, J.D.; Khulbe, C.P.; Pruden, B.B.

    1981-02-24

    An improved process is described for the hydrocracking of heavy hydrocarbon oils, such as oils extracted from tar sands. The heavy hydrocarbon oil feedstock in the presence of an excess of hydrogen is passed through a confined hydrocracking zone under upflow liquid conditions, and the effluent emerging from the top of the hydrocracking zone is passed into a hot separator where it is separated into a gaseous stream containing hydrogen and vaporous hydrocarbons and a liquid stream containing heavy hydrocarbons. The hot separator is maintained near the temperature of the hydrocracking zone and the effluent from the hydrocracking zone enters the separator in a lower region below the liquid level in the separator. The gaseous stream containing hydrogen and vaporous hydrocarbons is withdrawn from the top of the separator while a portion of the liquid phase in the separator is recycled to the hydrocracking zone without further treatment and in quantities sufficient to increase the superficial liquid flow velocity in the hydrocracking zone such that deposition of coke in the hydrocracking zone is substantially eliminated.

  10. Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric Devices and Comfort Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summarizes results from a study to identify and demonstrate technical and commercial approaches necessary to accelerate the deployment of zonal TE HVAC systems in light-duty vehicles

  11. An Emission Saved is an Emission Earned: An Empirical Study of Emission Banking for Light-Duty Vehicle Manufacturers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Jonathan D.; Kling, Catherine

    1993-01-01

    System for Light-Duty Vehicle Emission Control," Ph.D.the same number of vehicles and emissions in each category.estimates for vehicle emissions, unpublished manuscript,

  12. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semi-annual progress report for October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  13. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, S.; Johnson, D.R.

    1999-04-26

    The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

  14. Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in North ­ This study is part of a larger project aimed at quantifying the biomass and biomass increment been developed to estimate the biomass and biomass increment of coarse, small and fine roots of trees

  15. A Maple Package for Root Systems and Finite Coxeter Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stembridge, John

    A Maple Package for Root Systems and Finite Coxeter Groups Version 2.4 #3; February 28, 2004 John R in the study of root systems, #12;nite Coxeter groups, and Weyl characters. The coxeter package contains 38;nds in the appendices of Bourbaki [1]. The weyl package is a supple- ment to coxeter containing 12

  16. Research Article Connecting Soil Organic Carbon and Root Biomass with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    of Earth's terrestrial organic carbon but are sensitive to land-use. Rangelands are important to carbon. Introduction Soils constitute the greatest stock of terrestrial organic carbon [1] and soil properties can major pathways of organic matter input--root tissue and exudates--directly involve plants [22]. Roots

  17. Automatic Computation of the Complete Root Classification for a Parametric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey, David

    Automatic Computation of the Complete Root Classification for a Parametric Polynomial Songxin Liang, Canada Abstract An improved algorithm, together with its implementation, is presented for the automatic) for references. Our present goal is to compute automat- ically the Complete Root Classification (CRC

  18. Root Modeling: Estimating Storage, Live, and Dead Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Root Modeling: Estimating Storage, Live, and Dead Pool Turnover Times; Storage Inputs to New Root to choose best-fit parameters · "Storage" simulations with in-growth cores · Live and dead pool simulations Atmosphere East Atmosphere; 1 SD East tree rings f(Average respiration and soil gas) Modeled GSD = 1.3 Range

  19. In Situ Root System Architecture Extraction from Magnetic Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    using SmartRoot (Lobet et al., 2011). It is tested on the basis of a MRI image of a 25 days old lupin was inspired by methods for blood vessel detection in MRI images. It describes the root system). Both systems work well and allow for continuous water flow. Slight differences in the connectivity

  20. Reflection systems and partial root systems Ottmar Loos and Erhard Neher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Erhard

    Reflection systems and partial root systems Ottmar Loos and Erhard Neher Abstract. We develop a general theory of reflection systems and, more specifically, partial root sys- tems which provide a unifying framework for finite root systems, Kac-Moody root systems, extended affine root systems