Sample records for heavy charged lepton

  1. Little Flavor: Heavy Leptons, Z' and Higgs Phenomenology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sichun Sun

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Little Flavor model is a close cousin of the Little Higgs theory which aims to generate flavor structure around TeV scale. While the original Little Flavor only included the quark sector, here we build the lepton part of the Little Flavor model and explore its phenomenology. The model produces the neutrino mixing matrix and Majorana masses of the Standard Model neutrinos through coupling to heavy lepton partners and Little Higgses. We combine the usual right-handed seesaw mechanism with global symmetry protection to suppress the Standard Model neutrino masses, and identify the TeV partners of leptons as right-handed Majorana neutrinos. The lepton masses and mixing matrix are calculated perturbatively in the theory. The TeV new gauge bosons have suppressed decay width in dilepton channels. Even assuming the Standard Model couplings, the branching ratios to normal dilepton channels are largely reduced in the model, to evade the bound from current $Z'$ search. It also opens up the new search channels for exotic gauge bosons, especially Z' -> E_{t missing} + multi L. The multiple lepton partners will create new chain decay signals in flavor related processes in colliders, which also give rise to flavor anomalies. The lepton flavor violation process can be highly suppressed in charged lepton sector and happens only through neutrinos.

  2. Prospects of Heavy Neutrino Searches at Future Lepton Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Shankha; Ibarra, Alejandro; Mandal, Tanumoy; Mitra, Manimala

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the future prospects of heavy neutrino searches at next generation lepton colliders. In particular, we focus on the planned electron-positron colliders, operating in two different beam modes, namely, $e^+e^-$ and $e^-e^-$. In the $e^+e^-$ beam mode, we consider various production and decay modes of the heavy neutrino ($N$), and find that the final state with $e+2j+\\slashed{E}$, arising from the $e^+e^-\\to N\

  3. Detecting exotic heavy leptons at the large hadron collider.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, B C; Harris, Chris M; Parker, Michael A; Richardson, P; Webber, Bryan R

    the cuts actually slightly increases with mass due to the longer time delays. 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 1000 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Cr os s se ct io n (fb ) Mass of heavy lepton (GeV) Before applying cuts After applying cuts Figure 5: Cross...

  4. Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  5. Nuclear PDF for neutrino and charged lepton data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Kovarik

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering on nuclei is an essential process to constrain the strange quark parton distribution functions in the proton. The critical component on the way to using the neutrino DIS data in a proton PDF analysis is understanding the nuclear effects in parton distribution functions. We parametrize these effects by nuclear parton distribution functions. Here we compare results from two analysis of NPDF both done at next-to-leading order in QCD. The first uses neutral current charged-lepton lA Deeply Inelastic Scattering and Drell-Yan data for several nuclear targets and the second uses neutrino-nucleon DIS data. We compare the nuclear corrections factors F_2^Fe/F_2^D for the charged-lepton data with other results from the literature. In particular, we compare and contrast fits based upon the charged-lepton DIS data with those using neutrino-nucleon DIS data.

  6. Measurement of the Inclusive Leptonic Asymmetry in Top-Quark Pairs that Decay to Two Charged Leptons at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; et al.,

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the inclusive forward-backward asymmetry of the charged-lepton pseudorapidities from top-quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions, and decaying to final states that contain two charged leptons (electrons or muons), using data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab.

  7. The scalar unparticle effect on the charged lepton electric dipole moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. O. Iltan

    2007-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the charged lepton electric dipole moment which is induced by the scalar unparticle mediation and we predict the appropriate range for the free parameters appearing in the effective lagrangian which drives the unparticle-standard model lepton interactions. We observe that the charged lepton electric dipole moment is strongly sensitive to the scaling dimension d_u of the unparticle and the new couplings in the effective interaction. Furthermore, we see that the current experimental limits of charged lepton electric dipole moments can ensure an appropriate range for these free parameters.

  8. Polarization Effects In The Charged Lepton Pair Production By A Neutrino (Antineutrino) In A Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huseynov, Vali A. [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Nakhchivan State University, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan); Laboratory of Physical Research, Nakhchivan Division of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan); Ahmad, Ali S. [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Nakhchivan State University, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan)

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The probability of the process of the charged lepton pair production by a neutrino (an antineutrino) with allowance for the longitudinal and transverse polarizations of the charged leptons in a magnetic field is presented. The dependence of the probability of the process on the spin variables of the charged leptons and on the azimuthal and polar angles of the initial and final neutrinos (antineutrinos) are investigated. It is shown that the probability of the process is sensitive to the spin variables of the charged leptons and to the direction of the neutrino (antineutrino) momentum. It is determined that the neutrino (antineutrino) energy and momentum loss through the production of a charged lepton pair happens asymmetrically.

  9. Measurement of the inclusive leptonic asymmetry in top-quark pairs that decay to two charged leptons at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucŕ; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martínez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the inclusive forward-backward asymmetry of the charged-lepton pseudorapidities from top-quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions, and decaying to final states that contain two charged leptons (electrons or muons), using data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. With an integrated luminosity of 9.1 $\\rm{fb}^{-1}$, the leptonic forward-backward asymmetry, $A_{\\text{FB}}^{\\ell}$, is measured to be $0.072 \\pm 0.060$ and the leptonic pair forward-backward asymmetry, $A_{\\text{FB}}^{\\ell\\ell}$, is measured to be $0.076 \\pm 0.082$, compared with the standard model predictions of $A_{\\text{FB}}^{\\ell} = 0.038 \\pm 0.003$ and $A_{\\text{FB}}^{\\ell\\ell} = 0.048 \\pm 0.004$, respectively. Additionally, we combine the $A_{\\text{FB}}^{\\ell}$ result with a previous determination from a final state with a single lepton and hadronic jets and obtain $A_{\\text{FB}}^{\\ell} = 0.090^{+0.028}_{-0.026}$.

  10. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efthimion, P.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

  11. The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab: a Search for Charged Lepton Flavor Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab: a Search for Charged Lepton Flavor of the Mu2e Collaboration. A new experiment, Mu2e, is being developed at Fermilab

  12. Search for Neutral Heavy Leptons in the NuTeV Experiment at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NuTeV Collaboration; R. B. Drucker

    1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results from a search for neutral heavy leptons in the NuTeV experiment at Fermilab. The upgraded NuTeV neutrino detector for the 1996-1997 run included an instrumented decay region for the NHL search which, combined with the NuTeV calorimeter, allows detection in several decay modes (mu-mu-nu, mu-e-nu, mu-pi, e-pi, and e-e-nu). We see no evidence for neutral heavy leptons in our current search in the mass range from 0.3 GeV to 2.0 GeV decaying into final states containing a muon.

  13. ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    plasmas are being considered as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus beyond resonance. Keywords: Plasma focus; RF plasma; Beam charge neutralization 1. INTRODUCTION A possible heavyECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization PHILIP C. EFTHIMION,1 ERIK GILSON,1

  14. Tau decays into three charged leptons and two neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for the radiative leptonic tau decays tau --> ee(+) e(-)nu(tau)nu(e) and tau --> mu e(+)e(-)nu(tau)nu(mu) using 3.60 fb(-1) of data collected by the CLEO-II experiment at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We present a first observation...

  15. On the lepton-nucleon neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing-Long Li; Yu-Liang Yan; Xiao-Mei Li; Dai-Mei Zhou; Xu Cai; Ben-Hao Sa

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the requirement in the simulation of lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS), we construct a fortran program LDCS 1.0 calculating the differential and total cross sections for the unpolarized charged lepton-unpolarized nucleon and neutrino-unpolarized nucleon neutral current (charged current) DIS at leading order. Any set of the experimentally fitted parton distribution functions could be employed directly. The mass of incident and scattered leptons is taken into account and the boundary conditions calculating the single differential and total cross section are studied. The calculated results well agree with the corresponding experimental data which indicating the LDCS 1.0 program is good. It is also turned out that the effect of tauon mass is not negligible in the GeV energy level.

  16. On leptonic decay of a heavy quarkonium with a Higgs-boson emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Kozlov

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A leptonic $(\\bar l l)$ decay of a heavy quark-antiquark bound state $T(\\bar QQ)$ with a Higgs-boson $H$ emission is investigated. The applying of the well-known low-energy theorem to meson-Higgs coupling allows one to estimate the probability of the decay $T(\\bar QQ)\\to \\bar ll H$. The only a simple version of the Standard Model extension containing two-Higgs doublet is considered.

  17. Search for Lepton Number Violating Charged Current Processes with Neutrino Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Kanemura; Yoshitaka Kuno; Toshihiko Ota

    2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new idea to test a class of loop-induced neutrino mass mechanisms by searching for lepton number violating charged current processes with incident of a neutrino beam. The expected rates of these processes are estimated based on some theoretical assumptions. They turn out to be sizable so that detection of such processes could be possible at near detectors in future highly intense neutrino-beam facilities.

  18. Electric dipole moments of charged leptons in the split fermion scenario in the two Higgs doublet model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. O. Iltan

    2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We predict the charged lepton electric dipole moments in the split fermion scenario in the framework of the two Higgs doublet model. We observe that the numerical value of the muon (tau) electric dipole moment is at the order of the magnitude of $10^{-22} (e-cm)$ ($10^{-20} (e-cm)$) and there is an enhancement in the case of two extra dimensions, especially for the tau lepton electric dipole moment.

  19. On the ambiguities in the tri-bimaximal mixing matrix and corresponding charged lepton corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duarah, Chandan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two negative signs naturally appear in the $U_{\\mu 1}$ and $U_{\\tau 2}$ elements of the Tri-bimaximal (TBM) matrix for positive values of the mixing angles $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$. Apart from this, in other TBM matrices negative signs are shifted to other elements in each case. They account for positive as well as negative values of $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$. We discuss the sign ambiguity in the TBM matrix and find that the TBM matrices, in fact, can be divided into two groups under certain circumstances. Interestingly, this classification of TBM matrices is accompanied by two different $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetric mass matrices which can separately be related to the groups. To accommodate non-zero value of $\\theta_{13}$ and deviate $\\theta_{23}$ towards first octant, we then perturb the TBM mixing ansatz with the help of charged lepton correction. The diagonalizing matrices for charged lepton mass matrices also possess sign ambiguity and respect the grouping of TBM matrices. They are parametrized in te...

  20. Charge Fluctuations as Thermometer for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Mathias

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a determination of freeze-out conditions in heavy-ion collisions based on ratios of cu- mulants of net electric charge fluctuations obtained from lattice QCD. These ratios can reliably be calculated for a wide range of chemical potential values by using a next-to-leading order Taylor series expansion around the limit of vanishing baryon, electric charge and strangeness chemical potentials. We first determine the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials that characterize the conditions in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We then show that a comparison of lattice QCD results for ratios of up to third order cumulants of electric charge fluctuations with experimental results allows us to extract the freeze-out baryon chemical potential and the freeze-out temperature. We apply our method to preliminary data of the STAR and PHENIX collaborations.

  1. Charge Fluctuations as Thermometer for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathias Wagner

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a determination of freeze-out conditions in heavy-ion collisions based on ratios of cu- mulants of net electric charge fluctuations obtained from lattice QCD. These ratios can reliably be calculated for a wide range of chemical potential values by using a next-to-leading order Taylor series expansion around the limit of vanishing baryon, electric charge and strangeness chemical potentials. We first determine the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials that characterize the conditions in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We then show that a comparison of lattice QCD results for ratios of up to third order cumulants of electric charge fluctuations with experimental results allows us to extract the freeze-out baryon chemical potential and the freeze-out temperature. We apply our method to preliminary data of the STAR and PHENIX collaborations.

  2. Electric Dipole moments of charged leptons and lepton flavor violating interactions in the general two Higgs Doublet model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. O. Iltan

    2001-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the electric dipole moment of electron using the experimental result of muon electric dipole moment and upper limit of the BR(\\mu --> e\\gamma) in the framework of the general two Higgs doublet model. Our prediction is 10^{-32} e-cm, which lies in the experimental current limits. Further, we obtain constraints for the Yukawa couplings \\bar{\\xi}^{D}_{N,\\tau e} and \\bar{\\xi}^{D}_{N,\\tau\\mu}. Finally we present an expression which connects the BR(\\tau\\to \\mu\\gamma) and the electric dipole moment of \\tau-lepton and study the relation between these physical quantities.

  3. Electromagnetic annihilation into charged leptons and scattering off nucleons of spin-3/2 Majorana particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José F. Nieves; Sarira Sahu

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the cross section for the electromagnetic annihilation into charged leptons, and the electromagnetic scattering off nucleons, of spin-3/2 self-conjugate (Majorana) particles using the general form of the electromagnetic vertex function that was obtained previously for such particles. In addition to the restrictions imposed by common principles such as electromagnetic gauge invariance and hermiticity, the vertex function incorporates the restriction due to the Majorana condition as well as the particular properties related to the spinors in the Rarita-Schwinger representation, and is the counterpart of the so-called anapole interaction of spin-1/2 Majorana particles. The formulas obtained for the cross sections share certain similarities with the corresponding results in the spin-1/2 case, but they also reveal some important differences which are pointed out and discussed. The results given here can be useful for applications involving the electromagnetic interactions of spin-3/2 or spin-1/2 Majorana particles in several contexts that have been of interest in the recent literature such as nucleosynthesis and dark matter.

  4. Exclusion of exotic top-like quarks with -4/3 electric charge using jet-charge tagging in single-lepton ttbar events at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; V. Boisvert; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; M. A. Ciocci; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. De Barbaro; L. Demortier; M. Deninno; M. d'Errico; F. Devoto; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; R. Eusebi; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. J. Kim; Y. K. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucŕ; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martínez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; K. S. McFarland; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; A. Pranko; F. Prokoshin; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; P. Sinervo; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; H. Song; V. Sorin; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; B. Stelzer; O. Stelzer-Chilton; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; A. Warburton; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a measurement of the top-quark electric charge in ttbar events in which one W boson originating from the top-quark pair decays into leptons and the other into hadrons. The event sample was collected by the CDF II detector in sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions and corresponds to 5.6 fb^(-1). We find the data to be consistent with the standard model and exclude the existence of an exotic quark with -4/3 electric charge and mass of the conventional top quark at the 99% confidence level.

  5. Energy Loss of a Heavy Particle near 3D Charged Rotating Hairy Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalil Naji

    2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider charged rotating black hole in 3 dimensions with an scalar charge and discuss about energy loss of heavy particle moving near the black hole horizon. We also study quasi-normal modes and find dispersion relations. We find that the effect of scalar charge and electric charge is increasing energy loss.

  6. Precision Measurement of the Ratio of the Charged Kaon Leptonic Decay Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The NA62 collaboration

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K+- --> e nu and K+- --> mu nu with the full data sample collected by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analysing ~150000 reconstructed K+- --> e nu candidates with 11% background contamination, is RK = (2.488+-0.010)*10^{-5}, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  7. Effects of global charge conservation on time evolution of cumulants of conserved charges in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miki Sakaida; Masayuki Asakawa; Masakiyo Kitazawa

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of the global charge conservation on the cumulants of conserved charges observed in relativistic heavy ion collisions in a finite rapidity window, $\\Delta\\eta$, with a special emphasis on the time evolution of fluctuations in the hadronic medium. It is argued that the experimental result of the net-electric charge fluctuation observed by ALICE does not receive effects from the global charge conservation, because of the finite diffusion distance of charged particles in the hadronic stage. We emphasize that the magnitude of the effect of the global charge conservation can be estimated experimentally by combining the information on the $\\Delta\\eta$ dependences of various cumulants of conserved charges, similarly to other dynamical properties of the hot medium.

  8. Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ID-NR.12345-1 Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Deer Conference 2003 Presented by Josef Maier AVL Powertrain Engineering ID-NR.12345-2 Overview of...

  9. Search for new phenomena in events with three charged leptons at sqrt[s]=7??TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A generic search for anomalous production of events with at least three charged leptons is presented. The search uses a pp-collision data sample at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=7??TeV corresponding to 4.6??fb-1 of integrated ...

  10. REVIEW OF HEAVY LEPTON PRODUCTION IN e+e- ANNIHILATION* Martin L. Per1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.Office ofMayPVREPORT TOREVIEW OF HEAVY

  11. Net-charge probability distributions in heavy ion collisions at chemical freeze-out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Braun-Munzinger; B. Friman; F. Karsch; K. Redlich; V. Skokov

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore net charge probability distributions in heavy ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas model. The distributions for strangeness, electric charge and baryon number are derived. We show that, within this model, net charge probability distributions and the resulting fluctuations can be computed directly from the measured yields of charged and multi-charged hadrons. The influence of multi-charged particles and quantum statistics on the shape of the distribution is examined. We discuss the properties of the net proton distribution along the chemical freeze-out line. The model results presented here can be compared with data at RHIC energies and at the LHC to possibly search for the relation between chemical freeze-out and QCD cross-over lines in heavy ion collisions.

  12. Charge splitting of directed flow and charge-dependent effects in pion spectra in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rybicki; A. Szczurek; M. Klusek-Gawenda; M. Kielbowicz

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The large and rapidly varying electric and magnetic fields induced by the spectator systems moving at ultrarelativistic velocities induce a charge splitting of directed flow, $v_1$, of positive and negative pions in the final state of the heavy ion collision. The same effect results in a very sizeable distortion of charged pion spectra as well as ratios of charged pions ($\\pi^+/\\pi^-$) emitted at high values of rapidity. Both phenomena are sensitive to the actual distance between the pion emission site and the spectator system. This distance $d_E$ appears to decrease with increasing rapidity of the pion, and comes below $\\sim$1~fm for pions emitted close to beam rapidity. In this paper we discuss how these findings can shed new light on the space-time evolution of pion production as a function of rapidity, and on the longitudinal evolution of the system created in heavy ion collisions.

  13. Study of Top-Quark Production and Decays involving a Tau Lepton at CDF and Limits on a Charged-Higgs Boson Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucŕ; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martínez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; C. Rizzi; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of top-antitop quark production and decay into a tau lepton, tau neutrino, and bottom quark using data from $9 {\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity at the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Dilepton events, where one lepton is an energetic electron or muon and the other a hadronically-decaying tau lepton, originating from proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV$ are used. A top-antitop quark production cross section of $8.1 \\pm 2.1 {\\rm pb}$ is measured, assuming standard-model top-quark decays. By separately identifying for the first time the single-tau and the ditau components, we measure the branching fraction of the top quark into tau lepton, tau neutrino, and bottom quark to be $(9.6 \\pm 2.8) %$. The branching fraction of top-quark decays into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark, which would imply violation of lepton universality, is limited to be less than $5.9%$ at $95%$ confidence level.

  14. Search for Lepton Flavour Violating Decays of Heavy Resonances and Quantum Black Holes to electron/muon Pairs in pp Collisions at a centre of mass energy of 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for heavy states decaying into the e$\\mu$ final state has been performed using an integrated luminosity of $19.7~\\text{fb}^{-1}$ of $8\\,\\text{TeV}$ proton-proton collision data recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. No evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model is observed in the invariant mass spectrum of selected e$\\mu$ pairs. 95$\\%$ CL upper limits are set on the cross section times branching ratio of different signals arising in theories of new physics with lepton flavour violation in interactions involving charged leptons. In the framework of TeV-scale quantum gravity from a renormalization of Newton's constant, exclusion limits are set on the production threshold of quantum black holes for threshold masses below $1.99\\,\\text{TeV}$, and in extra-dimensional models the bounds range from $2.36\\,\\text{TeV}$ for one extra dimension to $3.63\\,\\text{TeV}$ for six extra dimensions. Scenarios of resonant tau sneutrino LSP production in R-parity violating supersymmetry are excluded for LSP masses...

  15. Leptons in Composite MFV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Redi

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the lepton sector of composite Higgs models with partial compositeness. The standard anarchic scenario is in conflict with the absence of observable charged lepton flavor violation. This tension can be completely solved in MFV scenarios that require either left-handed or right-handed SM leptons to be equally composite. Constraints on this scenario are weak and the composite lepton partners could be as light as few hundreds GeVs with interesting LHC signatures. The contribution to the muon (g-2) in theories where the Higgs is a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson is also discussed.

  16. Quark-lepton symmetric model at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson D. Clarke; Robert Foot; Raymond R. Volkas

    2012-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the quark-lepton symmetric model of Foot and Lew in the context of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this `bottom-up' extension to the Standard Model, quark-lepton symmetry is achieved by introducing a gauged `leptonic colour' symmetry which is spontaneously broken above the electroweak scale. If this breaking occurs at the TeV scale, then we expect new physics to be discovered at the LHC. We examine three areas of interest: the Z$'$ heavy neutral gauge boson, charge $\\pm1/2$ exotic leptons, and a colour triplet scalar diquark. We find that the LHC has already explored and/or will explore new parameter space for these particles over the course of its lifetime.

  17. Left-Right Symmetry and the Charged Higgs Bosons at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bambhaniya; J. Chakrabortty; J. Gluza; M. Kordiaczynska; R. Szafron

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The charged Higgs boson sector of the Minimal Manifest Left-Right Symmetric model (MLRSM) is investigated in the context of LHC discovery search for new physics beyond Standard Model. We discuss and summarise the main processes within MLRSM where heavy charged Higgs bosons can be produced at the LHC. We explore the scenarios where the amplified signals due to relatively light charged scalars dominate against heavy neutral $Z_2$ and charged gauge $W_2$ as well as heavy neutral Higgs bosons signals which are dumped due to large vacuum expectation value $v_R$ of the right-handed scalar triplet. In particular, production processes with one and two doubly charged Higgs bosons are considered. We further incorporate the decays of those scalars leading to multi lepton signals at the LHC. Branching ratios for heavy neutrino $N_R$, $W_2$ and $Z_2$ decay into charged Higgs bosons are calculated. These effects are substantial enough and cannot be neglected. The tri- and four-lepton final states for different benchmark points are analysed. Kinematic cuts are chosen in order to strength the leptonic signals and decrease the Standard Model (SM) background. The results are presented using di-lepton invariant mass and lepton-lepton separation distributions for the same sign (SSDL) and opposite sign (OSDL) di-leptons as well as the charge asymmetry are also discussed. We have found that for considered MLRSM processes tri-lepton and four-lepton signals are most important for their detection when compared to the SM background. Both of the signals can be detected at 14 TeV collisions at the LHC with integrated luminosity at the level of $300 fb^{-1}$ with doubly charged Higgs bosons up to approximately 600 GeV. Finally, possible extra contribution of the charged MLRSM scalar particles to the measured Higgs to di-photon ($H_0^0 \\to \\gamma \\gamma$) decay is computed and pointed out.

  18. Search for the production of ZW and ZZ boson pairs decaying into charged leptons and jets in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; et al,

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the production cross section for ZW and ZZ boson pairs in final states with a pair of charged leptons, from the decay of a Z boson, and at least two jets, from the decay of a W or Z boson, using the full sample of proton-antiproton collisions recorded with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to 8.9 fb^(-1) of integrated luminosity. We increase the sensitivity to vector boson decays into pairs of quarks using a neural network discriminant that exploits the differences between the spatial spread of energy depositions and charged-particle momenta contained within the jet of particles originating from quarks and gluons. Additionally, we employ new jet energy corrections to Monte Carlo simulations that account for differences in the observed energy scales for quark and gluon jets. The number of signal events is extracted through a simultaneous fit to the dijet mass spectrum in three classes of events: events likely to contain jets with a heavy-quark decay, events likely to contain jets originating from light quarks, and events that fail these identification criteria. We determine the production cross section to be 2.5 +2.0 -1.0 pb (< 6.1 pb at the 95% confidence level), consistent with the standard model prediction of 5.1 pb.

  19. Search for neutrinoless decays of the ? lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for neutrinoless ? decays into three charged particles. Evidence of such decays would demonstrate nonconservation of lepton flavor and, in some cases, lepton number. We see no signal for any such neutrinoless ? decays and set upper...

  20. A minimal and predictive $T_7$ lepton flavor 331 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández, A E Cárcamo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model based on the $SU(3)_{C}\\otimes SU(3)_{L}\\otimes U(1)_{X}$ gauge group having an extra $T_{7}\\otimes Z_{3}\\otimes Z_{14}$ flavor group, where the light active neutrino masses arise via double seesaw mechanism and the observed charged lepton mass hierarchy is a consequence of the $Z_{14}$ symmetry breaking at very high energy. In our minimal and predictive $T_7$ lepton flavor 331 model, the spectrum of neutrinos includes very light active neutrinos and heavy and very heavy sterile neutrinos. The obtained neutrino mixing parameters and neutrino mass squared splittings are compatible with the neutrino oscillation experimental data, for both normal and inverted hierarchies. The model predicts CP conservation in neutrino oscillations.

  1. Charged Particle and Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Raghunath; Behera, Nirbhay K; Nandi, Basanta K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the charged particle and photon multiplicity, and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like...

  2. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon (gamma(dir)) and pi(0) are measured in p + p and Au + Au collisions at center-of-mass energy root(S)(NN) = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. A shower...

  3. Measurement of the production and lepton charge asymmetry of $\\textit{W}$ bosons in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{\\mathbf{NN}}}}=$ 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of $\\textit{W}$ boson production in lead-lead collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=$2.76 TeV is presented. It is based on the analysis of data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2011 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.14 $\\mathrm{nb}^{-1}$ and 0.15 $\\mathrm{nb}^{-1}$ in the muon and electron decay channels, respectively. The differential production yields and lepton charge asymmetry are each measured as a function of the average number of participating nucleons $$ and absolute pseudorapidity of the charged lepton. The results are compared to predictions based on next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. These measurements are, in principle, sensitive to possible nuclear modifications to the parton distribution functions and also provide information on scaling of $\\textit{W}$ boson production in multi-nucleon systems.

  4. Charged Particle and Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghunath Sahoo; Aditya Nath Mishra; Nirbhay K. Behera; Basanta K. Nandi

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the charged particle and photon multiplicity, and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like charged particles, photons and the transverse energy measurement.

  5. Three dimensional simulations of space charge dominated heavy ion beams with applications to inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grote, D.P.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion fusion requires injection, transport and acceleration of high current beams. Detailed simulation of such beams requires fully self-consistent space charge fields and three dimensions. WARP3D, developed for this purpose, is a particle-in-cell plasma simulation code optimized to work within the framework of an accelerator`s lattice of accelerating, focusing, and bending elements. The code has been used to study several test problems and for simulations and design of experiments. Two applications are drift compression experiments on the MBE-4 facility at LBL and design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector for the proposed ILSE facility. With aggressive drift compression on MBE-4, anomalous emittance growth was observed. Simulations carried out to examine possible causes showed that essentially all the emittance growth is result of external forces on the beam and not of internal beam space-charge fields. Dominant external forces are the dodecapole component of focusing fields, the image forces on the surrounding pipe and conductors, and the octopole fields that result from the structure of the quadrupole focusing elements. Goal of the design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector is to produce a beam of as low emittance as possible. The simulations show that the dominant effects that increase the emittance are the nonlinear octopole fields and the energy effect (fields in the axial direction that are off-axis). Injectors were designed that minimized the beam envelope in order to reduce the effect of the nonlinear fields. Alterations to the quadrupole structure that reduce the nonlinear fields further were examined. Comparisons were done with a scaled experiment resulted in very good agreement.

  6. Charge asymmetry in the differential cross section of high-energy bremsstrahlung in the field of a heavy atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krachkov, P A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distinction between the charged particle and antiparticle differential cross sections of high-energy bremsstrahlung in the electric field of a heavy atom is investigated. The consideration is based on the quasiclassical approximation to the wave functions in the external field. The charge asymmetry (the ratio of the antisymmetric and symmetric parts of the differential cross section) arises due to the account for the first quasiclassical correction to the differential cross section. All evaluations are performed with the exact account of the atomic field. We consider in detail the charge asymmetry for electrons and muons. For electrons, the nuclear size effect is not important while for muons this effect should be taken into account. For the longitudinal polarization of the initial charged particle, the account for the first quasiclassical correction to the differential cross section leads to the asymmetry in the cross section with respect to the replacement $\\varphi\\rightarrow-\\varphi$, where $\\varphi$ i...

  7. Search for Lepton-Flavor and Lepton-Number Violation in the Decay tau to lhh'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay of the tau lepton into one charged lepton and two charged hadrons is performed using 221.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected at an e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring. In all 14 decay modes considered, the observed data are compatible with background expectations, and upper limits are set in the range {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}hh') < (0.7-4.8) x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  8. Evaluation of excitation energy and spin from light charged particles multiplicities in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckmeyer, J C; Grotowski, K; Pawowski, P; Aiello, S; Anzalone, A; Bini, M; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Cardella, G; Casini, G; Cavallaro, S; Charvet, J L; Dayras, R; De Filippo, E; Durand, D; Femin, S; Frankland, J D; Galíchet, E; Geraci, M; Giustolisi, F; Guazzoni, P; Iacono-Manno, M; Lanzalone, G; Lanzan, G; Le Neindre, N; Lo Nigro, S; Lo Piano, F; Olmi, A; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Pârlog, M; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Rivet, M F; Rizzo, F; Rosato, E; Roy, R; Sambataro, S; Sperduto, M L; Stefanini, A A; Sutera, C; Tamain, B; Vient, E; Volant, C; Wieleczko, J P; Zetta, L

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple procedure for evaluating the excitation energy and the spin transfer in heavy-ion dissipative collisions is proposed. It is based on a prediction of the GEMINI evaporation code : for a nucleus with a given excitation energy, the average number of emitted protons decreases with increasing spin, whereas the average number of alpha particles increases. Using that procedure for the reaction 107Ag+58Ni at 52 MeV/nucleon, the excitation energy and spin of quasi-projectiles have been evaluated. The results obtained in this way have been compared with the predictions of a model describing the primary dynamic stage of heavy-ion collisions.

  9. Study of high transverse momentum charged particle suppression in heavy ion collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Andre Sungho

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charged particle spectrum at large transverse momentum (PT), dominated by hadrons originating from parton fragmentation, is an important observable for studying the properties of the hot, dense medium produced in ...

  10. Search for High-Mass States with One Lepton Plus Missing Transverse Momentum in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} with the ATLAS Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; /Freiburg U. /Oklahoma U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Geneva U. /Oxford U. /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Oklahoma State U. /Michigan State U. /Tel Aviv U. /Orsay, LAL /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Udine /ICTP, Trieste /Brookhaven /Hampton U. /Yale U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Munich U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Rutherford

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS detector is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W{prime},W*), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of ppcollisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb{sup -1}. No excess beyond standard model expectations is observed. A W{prime} with sequential standard model couplings is excluded at 95% confidence level for masses below 1.49 TeV, and a W* (charged chiral boson) for masses below 1.35 TeV.

  11. Transverse energy and charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions: From RHIC to LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghunath Sahoo; Aditya Nath Mishra

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the charged particle and transverse energy production mechanism from AGS, SPS, RHIC to LHC energies in the framework of nucleon and quark participants. At RHIC and LHC energies, the number of nucleons-normalized charged particle and transverse energy density in pseudorapidity, which shows a monotonic rise with centrality, turns out to be an almost centrality independent scaling behaviour when normalized to the number of participant quarks. A universal function which is a combination of logarithmic and power-law, describes well the charged particle and transverse energy production both at nucleon and quark participant level for the whole range of collision energies. Energy dependent production mechanisms are discussed both for nucleonic and partonic level. Predictions are made for the pseudorapidity densities of transverse energy, charged particle multiplicity and their ratio (the barometric observable, $\\frac{dE_{\\rm{T}}/d\\eta}{dN_{\\rm{ch}}/d\\eta} ~\\equiv \\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$) at mid-rapidity for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}=5.5$ TeV. A comparison with models based on gluon saturation and statistical hadron gas is made for the energy dependence of $\\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$.

  12. Lepton flavor violation decays with the fourth generation neutrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu-Jun Huo; Tai-Fu Feng

    2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the lepton flavor violation decays, $\\tau \\to \\mu\\gamma$, $\\tau \\to e\\gamma$ and $\\mu \\to e\\gamma$, in the framwork of a squential fourth generation model with a heavy fourth neutrino, $\

  13. Delayed neutrons as a probe of nuclear charge distribution in fission of heavy nuclei by neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaev, S G; Piksaikin, V M; Roshchenko, V A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of the determination of cumulative yields of delayed neutron precursors is developed. This method is based on the iterative least-square procedure applied to delayed neutron decay curves measured after irradiation of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U sample by thermal neutrons. Obtained cumulative yields in turns were used for deriving the values of the most probable charge in low-energy fission of the above-mentioned nucleus.

  14. Unfolding of event-by-event net-charge distributions in heavy-ion collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Garg; D. K. Mishra; P. K. Netrakanti; A. K. Mohanty; B. Mohanty

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a method to obtain the true event-by-event net-charge multiplicity distributions from a corresponding measured distribution which is subjected to detector effects such as finite particle counting efficiency. The approach is based on the Bayes method for unfolding of distributions. We are able to faithfully unfold back the measured distributions to match with their corresponding true distributions obtained for a widely varying underlying particle production mechanism, beam energy and collision centrality. Particularly the mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis, their products and ratios of net-charge distributions from the event generators are shown to be successfully unfolded from the measured distributions constructed to mimic a real experimental distribution. We demonstrate the necessity to account for detector effects before associating the higher moments of net-charge distributions with physical quantities or phenomena. The advantage of this approach being that one need not construct new observable to cancel out detector effects which loose their ability to be connected to physical quantities calculable in standard theories.

  15. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the orbital momentum of the system created in non-central collisions. To study this effect, we investigate a three particle mixed harmonics azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho}-even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of this observable using the STAR detector in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 and 62 GeV. The results are presented as a function of collision centrality, particle separation in rapidity, and particle transverse momentum. A signal consistent with several of the theoretical expectations is detected in all four data sets. We compare our results to the predictions of existing event generators, and discuss in detail possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  16. The Lepton Sector of a Fourth Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo Burdman; Leandro Da Rold; Ricardo D. Matheus

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In extensions of the standard model with a heavy fourth generation one important question is what makes the fourth-generation lepton sector, particularly the neutrinos, so different from the lighter three generations. We study this question in the context of models of electroweak symmetry breaking in warped extra dimensions, where the flavor hierarchy is generated by the localization of the zero-mode fermions in the extra dimension. In this setup the Higgs sector is localized near the infrared brane, whereas the Majorana mass term is localized at the ultraviolet brane. As a result, light neutrinos are almost entirely Majorana particles, whereas the fourth generation neutrino is mostly a Dirac fermion. We show that it is possible to obtain heavy fourth-generation leptons in regions of parameter space where the light neutrino masses and mixings are compatible with observation. We study the impact of these bounds, as well as the ones from lepton flavor violation, on the phenomenology of these models.

  17. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic HeavyIon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au + Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub {perpendicular}}.

  18. Evidence for $s$-channel Single-Top-Quark Production in Events with one Charged Lepton and two Jets at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucŕ; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martínez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report evidence for $s$-channel single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}= 1.96 \\mathrm{TeV}$ using a data set that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $9.4 \\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events consistent with the $s$-channel process including two jets and one leptonically decaying $W$ boson. The observed significance is $3.8$ standard deviations with respect to the background-only prediction. Assuming a top-quark mass of $172.5 \\mathrm{GeV}/c^2$, we measure the $s$-channel cross section to be $1.41^{+0.44}_{-0.42} \\mathrm{pb}$.

  19. EBIT spectroscopy of highly charged heavy ions relevant to hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ding Xiaobin; Dong Chenzhong [North West Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Koike, Fumihiro [School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan); Nakano, Tomohide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ohashi, Hayato [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Watanabe, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectra of highly charged iron, gadolinium, and tungsten ions obtained with electron beam ion traps. Spectroscopic studies of these ions are important to diagnose and control hot plasmas in several areas. For iron ions, the electron density dependence of the line intensity ratio in extreme ultraviolet spectra is investigated for testing the model calculation used in solar corona diagnostics. Soft x-ray spectra of gadolinium are studied to obtain atomic data required in light source development for future lithography. Tungsten is considered to be the main impurity in the ITER plasma, and thus visible and soft x-ray spectra of tungsten have been observed to explore the emission lines useful for the spectroscopic diagnostics of the ITER plasma.

  20. Search for anomalous production of prompt same-sign lepton pairs and pair-produced doubly charged Higgs bosons with $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV $pp$ collisions using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-background inclusive search for new physics in events with same-sign dileptons is presented. The search uses proton-proton collisions corresponding to 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity taken in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Pairs of isolated leptons with the same electric charge and large transverse momenta of the type $e^{\\pm}e^{\\pm}, e^{\\pm}\\mu^{\\pm}$, and $\\mu^{\\pm}\\mu^{\\pm}$ are selected and their invariant mass distribution is examined. No excess of events above the expected level of Standard Model background is found. The results are used to set upper limits on the cross-sections for processes beyond the Standard Model. Limits are placed as a function of the dilepton invariant mass within a fiducial region corresponding to the signal event selection criteria. Exclusion limits are also derived for a specific model of doubly charged Higgs boson production.

  1. Performance of ?q-lepton reconstruction and identification in CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of tau-lepton reconstruction and identification algorithms is studied using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The tau leptons that decay into one or three charged hadrons, zero or more short-lived neutral hadrons, and a neutrino are identified using final-state particles reconstructed in the CMS tracker and electromagnetic calorimeter. The reconstruction efficiency of the algorithms is measured using tau leptons produced in Z-boson decays. The tau-lepton misidentification rates for jets and electrons are determined.

  2. Measurement of the Topological Branching Fractions of the ? Lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new and precise measurements of the decay branching fractions of the ? lepton to one and three charged particles. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 176 pb(?1), were collected by the high ...

  3. Fluctuations of charge separation perpendicular to the event plane and local parity violation in ?S[subscript NN] = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    Previous experimental results based on data (?15 × 10[superscript 6] events) collected by the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider suggest event-by-event charge-separation fluctuations perpendicular to ...

  4. Heavy quark physics from SLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers preliminary measurements from SLD on heavy quark production at the Z{sup 0}, using 150,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays accumulated during the 1993-1995 runs. A measurement of R{sub b} with a lifetime double tag is presented. The high electron beam polarization of the SLC is employed in the direct measurement of the parity-violating parameters A{sub b} and A{sub c} by use of the left-right forward-backward asymmetry. The lifetimes of B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mesons have been measured by two analyses. The first identifies semileptonic decays of B mesons with high (p,p{sub t}) leptons; the second analysis isolates a sample of B meson decays with a two-dimensional impact parameter tag and reconstructs the decay length and charge using a topological vertex reconstruction method.

  5. DECAYS OF THE HEAVY LEPTON, TAU (1785)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blocker, Craig Alan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. S. Abrams et. a_K , PRL 4_3, 1555 (1979) W. Davies-WhiteL. v. C. Perl L. e t al_. , PRL 3 5 , al_. , et 63B, f,f^l. , Cavalli-Sforza J. Felinan PRL _3f r 558 H" (197

  6. Net-baryon-, net-proton-, and net-charge kurtosis in heavy-ion collisions within a relativistic transport approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marlene Nahrgang; Tim Schuster; Michael Mitrovski; Reinhard Stock; Marcus Bleicher

    2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the potential of net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis measurements to investigate the properties of hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Contrary to calculations in a grand canonical ensemble we explicitly take into account exact electric and baryon charge conservation on an event-by-event basis. This drastically limits the width of baryon fluctuations. A simple model to account for this is to assume a grand-canonical distribution with a sharp cut-off at the tails. We present baseline predictions of the energy dependence of the net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis for central ($b\\leq 2.75$ fm) Pb+Pb/Au+Au collisions from $E_{lab}=2A$ GeV to $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV from the UrQMD model. While the net-charge kurtosis is compatible with values around zero, the net-baryon number decreases to large negative values with decreasing beam energy. The net-proton kurtosis becomes only slightly negative for low $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$.

  7. Exclusive production of heavy charged Higgs boson pairs in the $p p \\to p p H^+ H^-$ reaction at the LHC and FCC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebiedowicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate differential cross sections for exclusive production of heavy charged scalar, weakly interacting, particles (charged Higgs bosons, charged technipions, etc.) via photon-photon fusion in the $p p \\to p p H^+ H^-$ reaction with exact $2 \\to 4$ kinematics. We present distributions in rapidities, transverse momenta and correlations in azimuthal angles between the protons and between the charged Higgs bosons. As an example, the integrated cross section for $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV (LHC) is about 0.1 fb and about 0.9 fb at the Future Circular Collider (FCC) for $\\sqrt{s}$ = 100 TeV when assuming $m_{H^{\\pm}}$ = 150 GeV. The results are compared with results obtained within standard equivalent-photon approximation (EPA) known from the literature. We discuss the role of the Dirac and Pauli electromagnetic form factors of the proton. Absorption corrections are calculated for the first time differentially for various distributions. In general, they lead to a damping of the cross section. The damping depends on ...

  8. Exotic in Leptonic Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Zhu

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected topics of exotics in leptonic machines are presented, including recent discovery of abnormal structures around the ppbar threshold and new information of the XYZ (charmonium-like) states.

  9. Studying Parton Energy Loss in Heavy-Ion Collisions via Direct-Photon and Charged-Particle Azimuthal Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The STAR Collaboration; B. I. Abelev

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon ($\\gamma_{dir} $) and $\\pi^0$ are measured in $p$+$p$ and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$. Assuming no associated charged particles in the $\\gamma_{dir}$ direction (near side) and small contribution from fragmentation photons ($\\gamma_{frag}$), the associated charged-particle yields opposite to $\\gamma_{dir}$ (away side) are extracted. At mid-rapidity ($|\\eta|<0.9$) in central Au+Au collisions, charged-particle yields associated with $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$ at high transverse momentum ($8< p_{T}^{trig}<16$ GeV/$c$) are suppressed by a factor of 3-5 compared with $p$ + $p$ collisions. The observed suppression of the associated charged particles, in the kinematic range $|\\eta|<1$ and $3< p_{T}^{assoc} < 16$ GeV/$c$, is similar for $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$, and independent of the $\\gamma_{dir}$ energy within uncertainties. These measurements indicate that the parton energy loss, in the covered kinematic range, is insensitive to the parton path length.

  10. Studying Parton Energy Loss in Heavy-Ion Collisions via Direct-Photon and Charged-Particle Azimuthal Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon ($\\gamma_{dir} $) and $\\pi^0$ are measured in $p$+$p$ and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$. Assuming no associated charged particles in the $\\gamma_{dir}$ direction (near side) and small contribution from fragmentation photons ($\\gamma_{frag}$), the associated charged-particle yields opposite to $\\gamma_{dir}$ (away side) are extracted. At mid-rapidity ($|\\eta|<0.9$) in central Au+Au collisions, charged-particle yields associated with $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$ at high transverse momentum ($8< p_{T}^{trig}<16$ GeV/$c$) are suppressed by a factor of 3-5 compared with $p$ + $p$ collisions. The observed suppression of the associated charged particles, in the kinematic range $|\\eta|<1$ and $3< p_{T}^{assoc} < 16$ GeV/$c$, is similar for $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$, and independent of t...

  11. Neutrino and it's lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Quznetsov

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper I cite p.p. 100-117 of book G. Quznetsov, Probabilistic Treatment of Gauge Theories, in series Contemporary Fundamental Physics,ed. V. Dvoeglazov, Nova Sci. Publ., NY (2007). There I research a bound between neutrino and it's lepton.

  12. Observation of charge asymmetry dependence of pion elliptic flow and the possible chiral magnetic wave in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Bairathi,; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, W; Li, Z M; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, Y G; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbćk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Z; Xu, Y F; Yang, Q; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, S; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Y; Zhang, S; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of $\\pi^-$ and $\\pi^+$ elliptic flow, $v_2$, at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5 and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, $A_{ch}$, based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that $\\pi^-$ ($\\pi^+$) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} = \\text{27 GeV}$ and higher. At $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} = \\text{200 GeV}$, the slope of the difference of $v_2$ between $\\pi^-$ and $\\pi^+$ as a function of $A_{ch}$ exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations that incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. Similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.

  13. Observation of charge asymmetry dependence of pion elliptic flow and the possible chiral magnetic wave in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; Bairathi; A. Banerjee; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; I. Chakaberia; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; J. H. Chen; X. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; W. Christie; G. Contin; H. J. Crawford; S. Das; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; R. Esha; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; P. Federic; J. Fedorisin; Z. Feng; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; L. Fulek; C. A. Gagliardi; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; L. He; S. Heppelmann; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; X. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; K. Jiang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; L. Kochenda; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; L. K. Kosarzewski; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Li; Z. M. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; X. Li; C. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; Y. G. Ma; R. Ma; G. L. Ma; L. Ma; N. Magdy; R. Majka; A. Manion; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; K. Meehan; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; D. Mishra; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; V. Okorokov; D. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; R. Pak; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; M. Posik; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; M. K. Sharma; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. Sikora; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Smirnov; L. Song; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; M. Stepanov; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; B. Summa; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; N. Svirida; M. A. Szelezniak; Z. Tang; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; A. N. Tawfik; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; S. K. Tripathy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Upsal; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; R. Varma; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbćk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; F. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. G. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; Q. H. Xu; N. Xu; H. Xu; Z. Xu; Y. F. Xu; Q. Yang; Y. Yang; C. Yang; Y. Yang; S. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Z. Zhang; Y. Zhang; S. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of $\\pi^-$ and $\\pi^+$ elliptic flow, $v_2$, at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5 and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, $A_{ch}$, based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that $\\pi^-$ ($\\pi^+$) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} = \\text{27 GeV}$ and higher. At $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} = \\text{200 GeV}$, the slope of the difference of $v_2$ between $\\pi^-$ and $\\pi^+$ as a function of $A_{ch}$ exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations that incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. Similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.

  14. Electric Charge Quantization in Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. B. Abdinov; F. T. Khalil-zade; S. S. Rzaeva

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of Standard Model for the arbitrary values of Higgs and fermions fields hypercharges, taking into account parity invariance of electromagnetic interaction, expressions for the fermions charges, testifying the electric charge quantization are obtained. From the chiral anomalies cancellation condition within one family of leptons and quarks, numerical values of fermions charges, coinciding with standard values of charges have been obtained.

  15. Radiative Leptonic B Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Edward Tann; /Caltech; ,

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a search for B{sup +} meson decays into {gamma}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}, where {ell} = e,{mu}. We use a sample of 232 million B{bar B} meson pairs recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We measure a partial branching fraction {Delta}{beta} in a restricted region of phase space that reduces the effect of theoretical uncertainties, requiring the lepton energy to be in the range 1.875 and 2.850 GeV, the photon energy to be in the range 0.45 and 2.35 GeV, and the cosine of the angle between the lepton and photon momenta to be less than -0.36, with all quantities computed in the {Upsilon}(4S) center-of-mass frame. We find {Delta}{Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {gamma}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) = (-0.3{sub 1.5}{sup +1.3}(statistical){sub -0.6}{sup +0.6}(systematic) {+-} 0.1(theoretical)) x 10{sup -6}, under the assumption of lepton universality. Interpreted as a 90% confidence-level Bayesian upper limit, the result corresponds to 1.7 x 10{sup -6} for a prior at in amplitude, and 2.3 x 10{sup -6} for a prior at in branching fraction.

  16. Determination of Dose From Light Charged Ions Relevant to Hadron Therapy Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport System (PHITS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butkus, Michael Patrick

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    on Radiation Protection (ICRP) relates Q and LET together by eqn (9). G733 Gd4c Gd5d G373G372G1e4G375G374G72eG727G736 Gd46 G374G1e4G374G375G372G372 G3beG72eG727G736G3a4 G3G3G3G1 G3G745G742G3G3G3G3G3G3 G72eG727G736G3 Gd51 G373G372G373G372 Gd4f G72eG727G736 Gd4... to note that eqn (9) is a simplified approximation made by the ICRP and although very useful to approximate Q, there are factors other than LET, such as delta ray creation, that influence Q for different ions. The effects that charged particles have...

  17. Search for a Vectorlike Quark with Charge 2/3 in t+Z Events from pp Collisions at ?s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hänsel, S.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Trauner, C.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Benucci, L.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Marage, P. E.; Raval, A.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Adler, V.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; Ceard, L.; Cortina Gil, E.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Ovyn, S.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Darmenov, N.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Mateev, M.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Cabrera, A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Lelas, K.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Marionneau, M.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Elgammal, S.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Greder, S.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Mikami, Y.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Lomidze, D.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for pair-produced heavy vectorlike charge-2/3 quarks, T, in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with the flavor-changing-neutral-current decay of a T quark to a top quark and a Z boson are selected by requiring two leptons from the Z-boson decay, as well as an additional isolated charged lepton. In a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.14 fb?ą, the number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model background prediction. Assuming a branching fraction of 100% for the decay T?tZ, a T quark with a mass less than 475 GeV/c˛ is excluded at the 95% confidence level.

  18. Search for a Vectorlike Quark with Charge 2/3 in t+Z Events from pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=7??TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for pair-produced heavy vector-like charge-2/3 quarks, T, in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with the flavor-changing-neutral-current decay of a T quark to a top quark and a Z boson are selected by requiring two leptons from the Z-boson decay, as well as an additional isolated charged lepton. In a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.14 inverse femtobarns, the number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model background prediction. Assuming a branching fraction of 100% for the decay T to tZ, a T quark with a mass less than 475 GeV/c^2 is excluded at the 95% confidence level.

  19. Relating quarks and leptons with the T7 flavour group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonilla, Cesar; Peinado, Eduardo; Valle, Jose W F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we present a model for quarks and leptons based on T7 as flavour symmetry, predicting a canonical mass relation between charged leptons and down-type quarks proposed earlier. Neutrino masses are generated through a Type-I seesaw mechanism, with predicted correlations between the atmospheric mixing angle and neutrino masses. Compatibility with oscillation results lead to lower bounds for the lightest neutrino mass as well as for the neutrinoless double beta decay rates, even for normal neutrino mass hierarchy.

  20. A Search for Neutrinoless Tau Decays to Three Leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, Jeffrey A.; /Oregon U. /SLAC

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Using approximately 350 million {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pair events recorded with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center between 1999 and 2006, a search has been made for neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating tau decays to three lighter leptons. All six decay modes consistent with conservation of electric charge and energy have been considered. With signal selection efficiencies of 5-12%, we obtain 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fraction {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}{ell}{ell}) in the range (4-8) x 10{sup -8}.

  1. Particle Production Reactions in Laser-Boosted Lepton Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah J. Müller; Christoph H. Keitel; Carsten Müller

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for ever higher energies in lepton colliders gives rise to the investigation of new accelerator schemes for elementary particle physics experiments. One perceivable way to increase the collision energy would be to combine conventional lepton acceleration with strong laser fields, making use of the momentum boost a charged particle experiences inside a plane electromagnetic wave. As an example for a process taking place in such a laser-boosted collision, Higgs boson creation is studied in detail. We further discuss other possible particle production processes that could be implemented in such a collider scheme and specify the required technical demands.

  2. Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Exotic Leptons and Black Holes at Future Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher M. Harris

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model of particle physics has been remarkably successful in describing present experimental results. However, it is assumed to be only a low-energy effective theory which will break down at higher energy scales, theoretically motivated to be around 1 TeV. There are a variety of proposed models of new physics beyond the Standard Model, most notably supersymmetric and extra dimension models. New charged and neutral heavy leptons are a feature of a number of theories of new physics, including the `intermediate scale' class of supersymmetric models. Using a time-of-flight technique to detect the charged leptons at the Large Hadron Collider, the discovery range (in the particular scenario studied in the first part of this thesis) is found to extend up to masses of 950 GeV. Extra dimension models, particularly those with large extra dimensions, allow the possible experimental production of black holes. The remainder of the thesis describes some theoretical results and computational tools necessary to model the production and decay of these miniature black holes at future particle colliders. The grey-body factors which describe the Hawking radiation emitted by higher-dimensional black holes are calculated numerically for the first time and then incorporated in a Monte Carlo black hole event generator; this can be used to model black hole production and decay at next-generation colliders. It is hoped that this generator will allow more detailed examination of black hole signatures and help to devise a method for extracting the number of extra dimensions present in nature.

  3. Lepton textures and neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Rohit

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic analyses of the textures arising in lepton mass matrices have been carried out using unitary transformations and condition of naturalness for the Dirac and Majorana neutrino possibilities. It is observed that the recent three neutrino oscillation data together with the effective mass in neutrinoless double beta decay provide vital clues in predicting the general structures of these lepton mass matrices.

  4. A search for charge 1/3 third generation leptoquarks in muon channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzunyan, Sergey A.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leptoquarks are exotic particles that have color, electric charge, and lepton number and appear in extended gauge theories and composite models. Current theory suggests that leptoquarks would come in three different generations corresponding to the three quark and lepton generations. We are searching for charge 1/3 third generation leptoquarks produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the D0 detector. Such leptoquarks would decay into either a tau-neutrino plus a b-quark or, if heavy enough, to a tau-lepton plus a t-quark. We present preliminary results on an analysis where both leptoquarks decay into neutrinos giving a final state with missing energy and two b-quarks using 367 pb{sup -1} of Run II D0 data taken between August 2002 and September 2004. We place upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} LQ{ovr LQ})B{sup 2} as a function of the leptoquark mass M{sub LQ}. Assuming B = 1, we exclude at the 95% confidence level third generation leptoquarks with M{sub LQ} < 197 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  5. Summary of Lepton Photon 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this lecture, I summarize developments presented at the Lepton Photon 2011 conference and give my perspective on the current situation in high-energy physics. I am grateful to the organizers of Lepton Photon 2011 for providing us a very pleasant and simulating week in Mumbai. This year's Lepton Photon conference has covered the full range of subjects that fall within the scope of high-energy physics, including connections to cosmology, nuclear physics, and atomic physics. The experiments that were discussed detect particles ranging in energy from radio frequencies to EeV.

  6. Single Anomalous Production of the Fourth SM Family Leptons at Future e+e-, ep and pp Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciftci, A. K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Ciftci, R.; Karadeniz, H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Sultansoy, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Avenue 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Yildiz, H. Duran [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Dumlupinar University, Merkez Campus, Kutahya (Turkey)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Possible single productions of fourth SM family charged and neutral leptons via anomalous interactions at the future e+e-, ep, and pp colliders are studied. Signatures of such anomalous processes are argued at above colliders comparatively.

  7. Almost Maximal Lepton Mixing with Large T Violation in Neutrino Oscillations and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-zhong Xing

    2001-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out two simple but instructive possibilities to construct the charged lepton and neutrino mass matrices, from which the nearly bi-maximal neutrino mixing with large T violation can naturally emerge. The two lepton mixing scenarios are compatible very well with current experimental data on solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations, and one of them may lead to an observable T-violating asymmetry between \

  8. Flavor Physics Data from the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) was established at the May 2002 Flavor Physics and CP Violation Conference in Philadelphia, and continues the LEP Heavy Flavor Steering Group's tradition of providing regular updates to the world averages of heavy flavor quantities. Data are provided by six subgroups that each focus on a different set of heavy flavor measurements: B lifetimes and oscillation parameters, Semi-leptonic B decays, Rare B decays, Unitarity triangle parameters, B decays to charm final states, and Charm Physics.

  9. The standard model and the constituents of leptons and quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Schmidt-Parzefall

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete set of postulates of the standard model of the electroweak interaction and mass generation is formulated and confirmed deriving the Lagrangian for the standard model. A massive fermion is formed by a right-handed and a left-handed elementary massless fermion, exchanging a scalar doublet. The elementary massless fermions forming leptons belong to an approximate SU(3) octet. The charges are quantised due to this symmetry.

  10. Heavy flavor production in the STAR experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Trzeciak; for the STAR Collaboration

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, recent STAR heavy flavor measurements in proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions are highlighted. We report studies of open charm mesons, reconstructed directly from hadronic decay products, and studies of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor hadrons. We also present J/$\\psi$ measurements via the di-electron decay channel at various collision systems and energies. In Au+Au collisions the energy dependence of J/$\\psi$ production measured at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV is shown. Finally, prospects of heavy flavor measurements with the STAR detector upgrades are discussed.

  11. The anomalous lepton magnetic moment, LFV decays and the fourth generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Huo; T. F. Feng

    2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the lepton flavor violation (LFV) decays, $\\tau\\to l\\gamma$ ($l=\\mu, e$) and $\\mu\\to e\\gamma$, and the newly observed muon $g-2$ anomaly in the framwork of a squential fourth generation model with a heavy fourth neutrino, $\

  12. A model of leptons, quarks and bosons as composites of spinons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckart Marsch

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is presented of the leptons, quarks and bosons as non-elementary particles being composed of spinons. They are defined as massless fermions obeying the Weyl equations, but in addition are charged and assumed to have two internal degrees of freedom (weak colour charges). The corresponding total Lagrangian density of the quantized fields has a fermionic part and a gauge-field part, which leads to the interaction of the charged spinons. They are bound together by the gauge fields of the non-Abelian SU(2) symmetry group, and three of them can combine to a triple state forming the well known first generation of left- and right-handed leptons and quarks, including their proper electric charges (fractional for the quarks). The neutral and charged vector bosons of the weak interactions or the Higgs bosons can be constructed as binaries of two spinons.

  13. Turbine fuels from tar-sands bitumen and heavy oil. Volume 2. Phase 3. Process design specifications for a turbine-fuel refinery charging San Ardo heavy crude oil. Final report, 1 June 1985-31 March 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, A.F.; Swesey, J.R.; Magill, L.G.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering design was developed for a 50,000-BPSD grass-roots refinery to produce aviation turbine fuel grades JP-4 and JP-8 from San Ardo heavy crude oil. The design was based on the pilot-plant studies described in Phase III - Volume I of this report. The detailed plant design described in this report was used to determine estimated production costs.

  14. Statistical Understanding of Quark and Lepton Masses in Gaussian Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence J. Hall; Michael P. Salem; Taizan Watari

    2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental theory of nature may allow a large landscape of vacua. Even if the theory contains a unified gauge symmetry, the 22 flavor parameters of the Standard Model, including neutrino masses, may be largely determined by the statistics of this landscape, and not by any symmetry. Then the measured values of the flavor parameters do not lead to any fundamental symmetries, but are statistical accidents; their precise values do not provide any insights into the fundamental theory, rather the overall pattern of flavor reflects the underlying landscape. We investigate whether random selection from the statistics of a simple landscape can explain the broad patterns of quark, charged lepton, and neutrino masses and mixings. We propose Gaussian landscapes as simplified models of landscapes where Yukawa couplings result from overlap integrals of zero-mode wavefunctions in higher-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories. In terms of just five free parameters, such landscapes can account for all gross features of flavor, including: the hierarchy of quark and charged lepton masses; small quark mixing angles, with 13 mixing less than 12 and 23 mixing; very light Majorana neutrino masses, with the solar to atmospheric neutrino mass ratio consistent with data; distributions for leptonic 12 and 23 mixings that are peaked at large values, while the distribution for 13 mixing is peaked at low values; and order unity CP violating phases in both the quark and lepton sectors. While the statistical distributions for flavor parameters are broad, the distributions are robust to changes in the geometry of the extra dimensions. Constraining the distributions by loose cuts about observed values leads to narrower distributions for neutrino measurements of 13 mixing, CP violation, and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  15. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton plus jets final state at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a search for WW and WZ production in final states that contain a charged lepton (electron or muon) and at least two jets, produced in ?s=1.96??TeV pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, using data corresponding ...

  16. Natural fourth generation of leptons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Antipin; Matti Heikinheimo; Kimmo Tuominen

    2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider implications of a fourth generation of leptons, allowing for the most general mass patterns for the fourth generation neutrino. We determine the constraints due to the precision electroweak measurements and outline the signatures to search for at the LHC experiments. As a concrete framework to apply these results we consider the minimal walking technicolor (MWTC) model where the matter content, regarding the electroweak quantum numbers, corresponds to a fourth generation.

  17. Heavy neutrinos and the $pp\\to lljj$ CMS data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gluza, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the excess in the $pp \\to ee jj$ CMS data can be naturally interpreted within the Minimal Left Right Symmetric model (MLRSM), keeping $g_L = g_R$, if CP phases and non-degenerate masses of heavy neutrinos are taken into account. As an additional benefit, a natural interpretation of the reported ratio (14:1) of the opposite-sign (OS) $pp\\to l^\\pm l^\\mp jj$ to the same-sign (SS) $pp\\to l^\\pm l^\\pm jj$ lepton signals is possible. Finally, a suppression of muon pairs with respect to electron pairs in the $pp \\to lljj$ data is obtained, in accordance with experimental data. If the excess in the CMS data survives in the future, it would be a first clear hint towards presence of heavy neutrinos in right-handed charged currents with specific CP phases, mixing angles and masses, which will have far reaching consequences for particle physics directions.

  18. Searches for Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Silke; /SLAC

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the branching fractions of purely leptonic decays of B-mesons translate into constraints in the plane of the charged Higgs mass versus tan {beta} which are relatively insensitive to the particular theoretical model. Using the full BABAR dataset of 450 million B-decays we search for these decays. No significant signal is found in the decays into electrons or muons and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of the order of a 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. We measure the branching fraction of B {yields} {tau}{mu} to be (1.7 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4}.

  19. Perturbations to $?-?$ Symmetry, Leptogenesis and Lepton Flavour Violation with Type II Seesaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manikanta Borah; Debasish Borah; Mrinal Kumar Das; Sudhanwa Patra

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the possibility of generating non-zero reactor mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by perturbing the $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetric neutrino mass matrix. The leading order $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetric neutrino mass matrix originates from type I seesaw mechanism whereas the perturbations to $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetry originate from type II seesaw term. We consider four different realizations of $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetry: Bimaximal Mixing(BM), Tri-bimaximal Mixing (TBM), Hexagonal Mixing (HM) and Golden Ratio Mixing (GRM) all giving rise to $\\theta_{13} = 0, \\theta_{23} = \\frac{\\pi}{4}$ but different non-zero values of solar mixing angle $\\theta_{12}$. We assume a minimal $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetry breaking type II seesaw mass matrix as a perturbation and calculate the neutrino oscillation parameters as a function of type II seesaw strength. We then consider the origin of non-trivial leptonic CP phase in the charged lepton sector and calculate the lepton asymmetry arising from the lightest right handed neutrino decay by incorporating the presence of both type I and type II seesaw. We constrain the type II seesaw strength as well as leptonic CP phase (and hence the charged lepton sector) by comparing our results with experimental neutrino oscillation parameters as well as Planck bound on baryon to photon ratio. Finally, we extend our analysis on lepton flavour violating decays like $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ and $\\mu \\to eee$ due to exchange of TeV scale Higgs triplet scalar within the low scale type II seesaw framework. The branching ratios for these lepton flavour processes are examined with the small type II perturbation term $\\omega$ and the estimated values are very close to the experimental bound coming from current search experiments.

  20. Measurement of the top quark mass in lepton+jets events with secondary vertex tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Robert Duane; /Northeastern U.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton + jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events with single isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), exactly four calorimeter jets, and significant missing transverse energy are selected. Probabilities used to discriminate between signal and background are assumed to be proportional to differential cross-sections, calculated using event kinematics and folding in object resolutions and parton distribution functions. The event likelihoods constructed using these probabilities are varied with the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and the jet energy scale, JES, to give the smallest possible combined statistical + JES uncertainty.

  1. Spin Asymmetries Arising In Neutrino-Lepton Processes In A Magnetic Field And Their Macroscopic Appearance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huseynov, Vali A. [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Nakhchivan State University, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan); Laboratory of Physical Research, Nakhchivan Division of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan); Gasimova, Rasmiyya E.; Akbarova, Nurida Y.; Hajiyeva, Billura T. [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Nakhchivan State University, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan)

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present expressions that determine the differential cross sections and energy and momentum losses for the neutrino-lepton processes {nu}le- {yields} {nu}le-, {nu}-tildele- {yields} {nu}-tildele-, {nu}l{nu}-tildel {yields} e-e+, {nu}l{nu}-tildee {yields} l-e+, {nu}le- {yields} {nu}el- in a magnetic field with allowance for the longitudinal and transverse polarizations of the charged leptons and antileptons and the results on the spin asymmetries arising in these processes.

  2. Symmetrical parametrizations of the lepton mixing matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advantages of the original symmetrical form of the parametrization of the lepton mixing matrix are discussed. It provides a conceptually more transparent description of neutrino oscillations and lepton number violating processes like neutrinoless double beta decay, clarifying the significance of Dirac and Majorana phases. It is also ideal for parametrizing scenarios with light sterile neutrinos.

  3. On Symmetric Lepton Mixing Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochmuth, K A; Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Rodejohann, Werner

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to the quark mixing matrix, the lepton mixing matrix could be symmetric. We study the phenomenological consequences of this possibility. In particular, we find that symmetry would imply that |U_{e3}| is larger than 0.16, i.e., above its current 2 sigma limit. The other mixing angles are also constrained and CP violating effects in neutrino oscillations are suppressed, even though |U_{e3}| is sizable. Maximal atmospheric mixing is only allowed if the other observables are outside their current 3 sigma ranges, and sin^2 theta_{23} lies typically below 0.5. The Majorana phases are not affected, but the implied values of the solar neutrino mixing angle have some effect on the predictions for neutrinoless double beta decay. We further discuss some formal properties of a symmetric mixing matrix.

  4. Recent results from the UrQMD hybrid model for heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleicher, Marcus; Steinheimer, Jan; van Hees, Hendrik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings present recent results from transport-hydrodynamics-hybrid models for heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies. The main focus is on the absorption of (anti-)protons in the hadronic afterburner stage of the reaction, di-lepton production at SPS and heavy quark dynamics.

  5. Quarks with Integer Electric Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. LaChapelle

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the context of the Standard Model, quarks are placed in a $(\\mathbf{3},\\mathbf{2})\\oplus (\\mathbf{3},\\bar{\\mathbf{2}})$ matter field representation of $U_{EW}(2)$. Although the quarks carry unit intrinsic electric charge in this construction, anomaly cancellation constrains the Lagrangian in such a way that the quarks' associated currents couple to the photon with the usual 2/3 and 1/3 fractional electric charge associated with conventional quarks. The resulting model is identical to the Standard Model in the $SU_C(3)$ sector: However, in the $U_{EW}(2)$ sector it is similar but not necessarily equivalent. Off hand, the model appears to be phenomenologically equivalent to the conventional quark model in the electroweak sector for experimental conditions that preclude observation of individual constituent currents. On the other hand, it is conceivable that detailed analyses for electroweak reactions may reveal discrepancies with the Standard Model in high energy and/or large momentum transfer reactions. The possibility of quarks with integer electric charge strongly suggests the notion that leptons and quarks are merely different manifestations of the same underlying field. A speculative model is proposed in which a phase transition is assumed to occur between $SU_C(3)\\otimes U_{EM}(1)$ and $U_{EM}(1)$ regimes. This immediately; explains the equality of lepton/quark generations and lepton/hadron electric charge, relates neutrino oscillations to quark flavor mixing, reduces the free parameters of the Standard Model, and renders the issue of quark confinement moot.

  6. Semi-inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moreno, Omar [California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Donnelly, T. W. [California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Van Orden, Jay Wallace [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Ford, William P. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case of the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. Finally, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.

  7. Search for Pair Production of Heavy Top-Like Quarks Decaying to a High-p[subscript T]W Boson and a b Quark in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search is presented for production of a heavy up-type quark (t[superscript ?]) together with its antiparticle, assuming a significant branching ratio for subsequent decay into a W boson and a b quark. The search is ...

  8. Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

  9. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair in multi-lepton final states with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair is performed in multi-lepton final states using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. Five final states, targeting the decays $H\\to WW^*$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $ZZ^*$, are examined for the presence of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson: two same-charged light leptons ($e$ or $\\mu$) without an additional hadronically decaying tau; three light leptons; two same-charged light leptons with an additional hadronically decaying tau; four light leptons; and one light lepton and two hadronically decaying taus. No significant excess of events is observed above the background expectation. The best fit for the $t\\bar t H$ production cross section, assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, is $2.1 ^{+1.4}_{-1.2}$ times the SM expectation, and the observed (expected) upper limit at the 95% confidence level is 4.7 (2.4) times the SM rate. The $p$-value for comp...

  10. Proceedings of the Lepton Photon 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a linear collider complementing the LHC remains at the top of the list of future projects, other smaller projects have gathered momentum like ultra high intensity Super B-factories, charm factories, and others Proceedings of the 24th International Symposium on Lepton and Photon Interactions at High Energies 2009

  11. Tutorial guide to the tau lepton and close-mass lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perl, M.L.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a tutorial guide to present knowledge of the tau lepton, to the tau decay mode puzzle, and to present searches for close-mass lepton pairs. The test is minimal; the emphasis is on figures, tables and literature references. It is based on a lecture given at the 1988 International School of Subnuclear Physics: The Super World III. 54 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Citation: K. Nakamura et al. (Particle Data Group), JPG 37, 075021 (2010) (URL: http://pdg.lbl.gov) Heavy Bosons Other Than

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://pdg.lbl.gov) Heavy Bosons Other Than Higgs Bosons, Searches for We list here various limits on charged and neutral heavy vector bosons (other than W 's and Z's), heavy scalar bosons (other than Higgs bosons), vector

  13. Citation: J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), PR D86, 010001 (2012) (URL: http://pdg.lbl.gov) Heavy Bosons Other Than

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://pdg.lbl.gov) Heavy Bosons Other Than Higgs Bosons, Searches for We list here various limits on charged and neutral heavy vector bosons (other than W 's and Z's), heavy scalar bosons (other than Higgs bosons), vector

  14. Test of lepton universality and search for lepton flavor violation in Upsilon(1S,2S,3S) decays at CLEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istvan Danko; for the CLEO Collaboration

    2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analysis technique and preliminary results of two ongoing analyses at CLEO which put lepton universality and lepton flavor conservation to the test in Upsilon decays.

  15. Simplified unitarity triangles for the lepton sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorken, James D. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Harrison, P. F. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Scott, W. G. [CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX, UK (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Encouraged by the latest SNO results, we consider the lepton mixing matrix in the approximation that the {nu}{sub 2} mass eigenstate is trimaximally (democratically) mixed. This suggests a new parameterization of the remaining mixing degrees of freedom, which eschews mixing angles, dealing instead, directly with the complex parameter U{sub e3} of the mixing matrix. Unitarity triangles then take a particularly simple form, which we hope will facilitate comparison with experiment.

  16. Lepton Flavor Violation in Flavored Gauge Mediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Calibbi; Paride Paradisi; Robert Ziegler

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the anatomy and phenomenology of Lepton Flavor Violation (LFV) in the context of Flavored Gauge Mediation (FGM). Within FGM, the messenger sector couples directly to the MSSM matter fields with couplings controlled by the same dynamics that explains the hierarchies in the SM Yukawas. Although the pattern of flavor violation depends on the particular underlying flavor model, FGM provides a built-in flavor suppression similar to wave function renormalization or SUSY Partial Compositeness. Moreover, in contrast to these models, there is an additional suppression of left-right (LR) flavor transitions by third-generation Yukawas that in particular provides an extra protection against flavor-blind phases. We exploit the consequences of this setup for lepton flavor phenomenology, assuming that the new couplings are controlled by simple U(1) flavor models that have been proposed to accommodate large neutrino mixing angles. Remarkably, it turns out that in the context of FGM these models can pass the impressive constraints from LFV processes and leptonic EDMs even for light superpartners, therefore offering the possibility of resolving the longstanding muon g-2 anomaly.

  17. Inclusive lepton production in hadronic events from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, M.E.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the production rates of prompt electrons and muons in hadronic events from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at 29 GeV. The inclusive rate per hadronic event for leptons with total momenta greater than 2 GeV/c is determined to be (0.033 +- 0.003 +- 0.012) for electrons and (0.037 +- 0.005 +- 0.008) for muons. We measure the longitudinal and transverse momentum spectra of these leptons. The harder transverse momentum spectrum of leptons from bottom and charm quark relative to charm decays allows us to separate the bottom and charm quark contributions to the prompt lepton signal. The longitudinal momentum distributions allow us to study the fragmentation properties of these heavy quarks. For charm quarks we find average semileptonic branching ratios of (6.4 +- 1.3 +- 2.8)% into electrons and (8.1 +- 1.6 +- 1.8)% into muons. For bottom quarks we find average branching ratios of (12.9 +- 2.5 +- 2.0)% into electrons and (12.2 +- 5.0 +- 3.0)% into muons. The fragmentation function for bottom quarks is determined to be peaked at large z with /sub b/ approx. = 0.75. 46 references.

  18. Charged Condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Gabadadze; Rachel A. Rosen

    2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Bose-Einstein condensation of massive electrically charged scalars in a uniform background of charged fermions. We focus on the case when the scalar condensate screens the background charge, while the net charge of the system resides on its boundary surface. A distinctive signature of this substance is that the photon acquires a Lorentz-violating mass in the bulk of the condensate. Due to this mass, the transverse and longitudinal gauge modes propagate with different group velocities. We give qualitative arguments that at high enough densities and low temperatures a charged system of electrons and helium-4 nuclei, if held together by laboratory devices or by force of gravity, can form such a substance. We briefly discuss possible manifestations of the charged condensate in compact astrophysical objects.

  19. Effect of steriles states on lepton magnetic moments and neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abada, A; Teixeira, A M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the impact of sterile fermion states on the anomalous magnetic moment of charged leptons, as well as their contribution to neutrinoless double beta decays. We illustrate our results in a minimal, effective extension of the Standard Model by one sterile fermion state, and in a well-motivated framework of neutrino mass generation, embedding the Inverse Seesaw into the Standard Model. The simple "3+1" effective case succeeds in alleviating the tension related to the muon anomalous magnetic moment, albeit only at the 3$\\sigma$ level, and for light sterile states (corresponding to a }cosmologically disfavoured regime). Interestingly, our analysis shows that a future $0 \

  20. AN in inclusive lepton-proton collisions: TMD and twist-3 approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokudin, Alexey [JLAB

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the inclusive production of hadrons in lepton-nucleon scattering. For a transversely polarized nucleon this reaction shows a left-right azimuthal asymmetry, which we compute this asymmetry in both TMD and in twist-3 collinear factorization formalisms. All non-perturbative parton correlators of the calculation are fixed through information from other hard processes. Our results for the left-right asymmetry agree in sign with recent data for charged pion production from the HERMES Collaboration and from Jefferson Lab. We discuss similarities and differences of two formalisms.

  1. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the Standard Model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the Standard Model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  2. Heavy Higgs signal-background interference in gg --> VV in the Standard Model plus real singlet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kauer, Nikolas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Standard Model extended with a real scalar singlet field, the modification of the heavy Higgs signal due to interference with the continuum background and the off-shell light Higgs contribution is studied for gg --> ZZ, WW --> 4 lepton processes at the Large Hadron Collider. A public program that allows to simulate the full interference is presented.

  3. Hydrodynamics of charge fluctuations and balance functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ling; T. Springer; M. Stephanov

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply stochastic hydrodynamics to the study of charge density fluctuations in QCD matter undergoing Bjorken expansion. We find that the charge density correlations are given by a time integral over the history of the system, with the dominant contribution coming from the QCD crossover region where the change of susceptibility per entropy, chi T/s, is most significant. We study the rapidity and azimuthal angle dependence of the resulting charge balance function using a simple analytic model of heavy-ion collision evolution. Our results are in agreement with experimental measurements, indicating that hydrodynamic fluctuations contribute significantly to the measured charge correlations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. The sensitivity of the balance function to the value of the charge diffusion coefficient D allows us to estimate the typical value of this coefficient in the crossover region to be rather small, of the order of 1/(2pi T), characteristic of a strongly coupled plasma.

  4. Lepton Flavor Violation in Predictive SUSY-GUT Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, Carl H.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab; Chen, Mu-Chun; /UC, Irvine

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been many theoretical models constructed which aim to explain the neutrino masses and mixing patterns. While many of the models will be eliminated once more accurate determinations of the mixing parameters, especially sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}, are obtained, charged lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments are able to differentiate even further among the models. In this paper, they investigate various rare LFV processes, such as {ell}{sub i} {yields} {ell}{sub j} + {gamma} and {mu} - e conversion, in five predictive SUSY SO(10) models and their allowed soft SUSY breaking parameter space in the constrained minimal SUSY standard model (CMSSM). Utilizing the WMAP dark matter constraints, they obtain lower bounds on the branching ratios of these rare processes and find that at least three of the five models they consider give rise to predictions for {mu} {yields} e + {gamma} that will be tested by the MEG collaboration at PSI. in addition, the next generation {mu} - e conversion experiment has sensitivity to the predictions of all five models, making it an even more robust way to test these models. While generic studies have emphasized the dependence of the branching ratios of these rare processes on the reactor neutrino angle, {theta}{sub 13}, and the mass of the heaviest right-handed neutrino, M{sub 3}, they find very massive M{sub 3} is more significant than large {theta}{sub 13} in leading to branching ratios near to the present upper limits.

  5. Higgs boson decay into four leptons at NLOPS electroweak accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boselli, Stefano; Montagna, Guido; Nicrosini, Oreste; Piccinini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of precision studies of the Higgs sector at the Run II of the LHC, the improvement of the accuracy of the theoretical prediction is becoming a pressing issue. In this framework, we detail a calculation of the full Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) electroweak corrections to Higgs boson decay into four charged leptons, by considering the gold-plated channel H -> Z(*) Z(*) -> 2l 2l', l,l' = e, mu. We match the NLO corrections with a QED Parton Shower (PS), in order to simulate exclusive multiple photon emission and provide novel results at NLOPS electroweak accuracy. We compare our NLO predictions to those of the program Prophecy4f and present NLOPS phenomenological results relevant for Higgs physics studies, with particular attention to precision measurements of the Higgs boson mass, spin-parity assignment and tests of the Standard Model. Our calculation is implemented in a new code, Hto4l, which can be easily interfaced to any generator describing Higgs boson production. As an example, we provide illustrati...

  6. From the Fourth Color to Spin-charge Separation - Neutrinos and Spinons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi Xiong

    2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the spin-charge separation mechanism to the quark-lepton unification models which consider the lepton number as the fourth color. In certain finite-density systems, quarks and leptons are decomposed into spinons and chargons, which carry the spin and charge degrees of freedom respectively. Neutrinos can be related to the spinons with respect to the electric-charge and spin separation in the early universe or other circumstances. Some effective, probably universal couplings between the spinon sector and the chargon sector are derived and a phenomenological description for the chargon condensate is proposed. It is then demonstrated that the spinon current can induce vorticity in the chargon condensate, and spinon zero modes are trapped in the vortices, forming spinon-vortex bound states. In cosmology this configuration may lead to the emission of extremely high energy neutrinos when vortices split and reconnect.

  7. From the Fourth Color to Spin-charge Separation - Neutrinos and Spinons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Chi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the spin-charge separation mechanism to the quark-lepton unification models which consider the lepton number as the fourth color. In certain finite-density systems, quarks and leptons are decomposed into spinons and chargons, which carry the spin and charge degrees of freedom respectively. Neutrinos can be related to the spinons with respect to the electric-charge and spin separation in the early universe or other circumstances. Some effective, probably universal couplings between the spinon sector and the chargon sector are derived and a phenomenological description for the chargon condensate is proposed. It is then demonstrated that the spinon current can induce vorticity in the chargon condensate, and spinon zero modes are trapped in the vortices, forming spinon-vortex bound states. In cosmology this configuration may lead to the emission of extremely high energy neutrinos when vortices split and reconnect.

  8. CHARGED PARTICLE MULTIPLICITIES AT BRAHMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DEBBE, R., FOR THE BRAHMS COLLABORATION

    2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the measurement of charged particle multiplicity densities dN/d{eta} in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions as function of {eta} and the centrality of the collisions. This distributions were extracted from data collected by the BRAHMS collaboration during the first RHK run with gold ions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130A {center_dot} GeV. The analysis method is described and, results are compared to some model predictions.

  9. First search for CP violation in tau lepton decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed the first search for CP violation in tau lepton decay. CP violation in lepton decay does not occur in the minimal standard model but can occur in extensions such as the multi-Higgs doublet model. It appears as a characteristic...

  10. Phenomenology of a leptonic goldstino and invisible Higgs boson decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignatios Antoniadis; Marc Tuckmantel; Fabio Zwirner

    2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-linearly realized supersymmetry, combined with the Standard Model field content and SU(3)XSU(2)XU(1) gauge invariance, permits local dimension-six operators involving a goldstino, a lepton doublet and a Higgs doublet. These interactions preserve total lepton number if the left-handed goldstino transforms as an antilepton. We discuss the resulting phenomenology, in the simple limit where the new couplings involve only one lepton family, thus conserving also lepton flavour. Both the Z boson and the Higgs boson can decay into a neutrino and a goldstino: the present limits from the invisible Z width and from other observables leave room for the striking possibility of a Higgs boson decaying dominantly, or at least with a sizable branching ratio, via such an invisible mode. We finally comment on the perspectives at hadron and lepton colliders, and on possible extensions of our analysis.

  11. New Paradigm for Baryon and Lepton Number Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Pavel Fileviez

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possible discovery of proton decay, neutron-antineutron oscillation, neutrinoless beta decay in low energy experiments, and exotic signals related to the violation of the baryon and lepton numbers at collider experiments will change our understanding of the conservation of fundamental symmetries in nature. In this review we discuss the rare processes due to the existence of baryon and lepton number violating interactions. The simplest grand unified theories and the neutrino mass generation mechanisms are discussed. The theories where the baryon and lepton numbers are defined as local gauge symmetries spontaneously broken at the low scale are discussed in detail. The simplest supersymmetric gauge theory which predicts the existence of lepton number violating processes at the low scale is investigated. The main goal of this review is to discuss the main implications of baryon and lepton number violation in physics beyond the Standard Model.

  12. VOLUME 76, NUMBER 1 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 1 JANUARY 1996 First Study of Heavy-Ion Mirror Charge Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    are nuclear reaction studies with mirror nuclear pairs, since only one member of a mirror pair can be stable accessible excitation energy range. Charge-exchange p, n reactions at energies above 100 MeV have long been, since they involve the detection of rather low-energy neutrons. Furthermore, experiments in the b1

  13. VOLUME 79, NUMBER 11 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 15 SEPTEMBER 1997 Charge State Dependent Energy Loss of Slow Heavy Ions in Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Hamza,1 K. Bethge,2 H. Schmidt-Böcking,2 and D. H. Schneider1 1 Physics & Space Technology Directorate from q 31 for oxygen to q 691 for gold ions. For the first time, charge state dependent energy loss. The presence of one K-shell vacancy, e.g., in oxygen ions is predicted to reduce stopping as compared to oxygen

  14. Searches for heavy Higgs bosons in two-Higgs-doublet models and for t to ch decay using multilepton and diphoton final states in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches are presented for heavy scalar (H) and pseudoscalar (A) Higgs bosons posited in the two doublet model (2HDM) extensions of the standard model (SM). These searches are based on a data sample of pp collisions collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The decays H to hh and A to Zh, where h denotes an SM-like Higgs boson, lead to events with three or more isolated charged leptons or with a photon pair accompanied by one or more isolated leptons. The search results are presented in terms of the H and A production cross sections times branching fractions and are further interpreted in terms of 2HDM parameters. We place 95% CL cross section upper limits of approximately 7 pb on sigma times B for H to hh and 2 pb for A to Zh. Also presented are the results of a search for the rare decay of the top quark that results in a charm quark and an SM Higgs boson, t to ch, the existence of which would indicate a nonzero flavor-changing Yukawa coupling of the top quark to the Higgs boson. We place a 95% CL upper limit of 0.56% on B(t to ch).

  15. Search for supersymmetry at sqrt(s)=8 TeV in final states with jets and two same-sign leptons or three leptons with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for strongly produced supersymmetric particles is conducted using signatures involving multiple energetic jets and either two isolated leptons ($e$ or $\\mu$) with the same electric charge, or at least three isolated leptons. The search also utilises jets originating from b-quarks, missing transverse momentum and other observables to extend its sensitivity. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. No deviation from the Standard Model expectation is observed. New or significantly improved exclusion limits are set on a wide variety of supersymmetric models in which the lightest squark can be of the first, second or third generations, and in which R-parity can be conserved or violated.

  16. Light Vector Meson Photoproduction off of H at Jefferson Lab and rho-omega Interference in the Leptonic Decay Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaden Djalali

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies of light vector meson production in heavy nuclear targets has generated interest in {rho}-{omega} interference in the leptonic e{sup +}e{sup -} decay channel. An experimental study of the elementary process provides valuable input for theoretical models and calculations. In experiment E04-005 (g12), high statistics photoproduction data has been taken in Jefferson Lab's Hall B with the Cebaf Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The invariant mass spectrum is fitted with two interfering relativistic Breit-Wigner functions to determine the interference phase. Preliminary analysis indicate a measurable {rho}-{omega} interference.

  17. Heavy flavours in heavy-ion collisions: quenching, flow and correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Beraudo; A. De Pace; M. Monteno; M. Nardi; F. Prino

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the quenching, elliptic flow and azimuthal correlations of heavy flavour particles in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions obtained through the POWLANG transport setup, developed in the past to study the propagation of heavy quarks in the Quark-Gluon Plasma and here extended to include a modeling of their hadronization in the presence of a medium. Hadronization is described as occurring via the fragmentation of strings with endpoints given by the heavy (anti-)quark Q(Qbar) and a thermal parton qbar(q) from the medium. The flow of the light quarks is shown to affect significantly the R_AA and v_2 of the final D mesons, leading to a better agreement with the experimental data. The approach allows also predictions for the angular correlation between heavy-flavour hadrons (or their decay electrons) and the charged particles produced in the fragmentation of the heavy-quark strings.

  18. Measurement of the Mass of the W Boson in $e^+ e^-$ collisions using the Fully Leptonic Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbiendi, G; Ĺkesson, P F; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bloodworth, Ian J; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Cammin, J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Caron, B; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Cohen, I; Csilling, Akos; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Dallison, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hauschildt, J; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Hensel, C; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Horváth, D; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klein, K; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kokott, T P; Komamiya, S; Kormos, L L; Kowalewski, R V; Krämer, T; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krop, D; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Leins, A; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Rick, Hartmut; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, R J; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trefzger, T M; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vachon, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method of determining the mass of the W boson in the W+W- -> lnu lnu channel is presented and applied to 667pb^-1 of data recorded at the center-of- mass energies in the range 183-207 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The Measured energies of charged leptons and the results of a new procedure based on an approximate kinematic reconstruction of the events are combined to give: Mw=80.41+-0.41+-0.13 GeV, when the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty on the lepton energy, which is calibrated using data, and the parameterization of the variables used in the fitting, which is obtained using Monte Carlo events. Both of these are limited by statistics.

  19. Low and high energy phenomenology of quark-lepton complementarity scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany); Rodejohann, Werner [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We conduct a detailed analysis of the phenomenology of two predictive seesaw scenarios leading to quark-lepton complementarity. In both cases we discuss the neutrino mixing observables and their correlations, neutrinoless double beta decay and lepton flavor violating decays such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma}. We also comment on leptogenesis. The first scenario is disfavored on the level of one to two standard deviations, in particular, due to its prediction for |U{sub e3}|. There can be resonant leptogenesis with quasidegenerate heavy and light neutrinos, which would imply sizable cancellations in neutrinoless double beta decay. The decays {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} are typically observable unless the SUSY masses approach the TeV scale. In the second scenario leptogenesis is impossible. It is, however, in perfect agreement with all oscillation data. The prediction for {mu}{yields}e{gamma} is in general too large, unless the SUSY masses are in the range of several TeV. In this case {tau}{yields}e{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} are unobservable.

  20. Neutrino Masses, Lepton Flavor Mixing and Leptogenesis in the Minimal Seesaw Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan-lei Guo; Zhi-zhong Xing; Shun Zhou

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a review of neutrino phenomenology in the minimal seesaw model (MSM), an economical and intriguing extension of the Standard Model with only two heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos. Given current neutrino oscillation data, the MSM can predict the neutrino mass spectrum and constrain the effective masses of the tritium beta decay and the neutrinoless double-beta decay. We outline five distinct schemes to parameterize the neutrino Yukawa-coupling matrix of the MSM. The lepton flavor mixing and baryogenesis via leptogenesis are investigated in some detail by taking account of possible texture zeros of the Dirac neutrino mass matrix. We derive an upper bound on the CP-violating asymmetry in the decay of the lighter right-handed Majorana neutrino. The effects of the renormalization-group evolution on the neutrino mixing parameters are analyzed, and the correlation between the CP-violating phenomena at low and high energies is highlighted. We show that the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe can naturally be interpreted through the resonant leptogenesis mechanism at the TeV scale. The lepton-flavor-violating rare decays, such as $\\mu \\to e + \\gamma$, are also discussed in the supersymmetric extension of the MSM.

  1. Challenges to quantum chromodynamics: Anomalous spin, heavy quark, and nuclear phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general structure of QCD meshes remarkably well with the facts of the hadronic world, especially quark-based spectroscopy, current algebra, the approximate point-like structure of large momentum transfer inclusive reactions, and the logarithmic violation of scale invariance in deep inelastic lepton-hadron reactions. QCD has been successful in predicting the features of electron-positron and photon-photon annihilation into hadrons, including the magnitude and scaling of the cross sections, the shape of the photon structure function, the production of hadronic jets with patterns conforming to elementary quark and gluon subprocesses. The experimental measurements appear to be consistent with basic postulates of QCD, that the charge and weak currents within hadrons are carried by fractionally-charged quarks, and that the strength of the interactions between the quarks, and gluons becomes weak at short distances, consistent with asymptotic freedom. Nevertheless in some cases, the predictions of QCD appear to be in dramatic conflict with experiment. The anomalies suggest that the proton itself as a much more complex object than suggested by simple non-relativistic quark models. Recent analyses of the proton distribution amplitude using QCD sum rules points to highly-nontrival proton structure. Solutions to QCD in one-space and one-time dimension suggest that the momentum distributions of non-valence quarks in the hadrons have a non-trival oscillatory structure. The data seems also to be suggesting that the intrinsic'' bound state structure of the proton has a non- negligible strange and charm quark content, in addition to the extrinsic'' sources of heavy quarks created in the collision itself. 144 refs., 46 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Isolated leptons in events with missing transverse momentum and the search for single top production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calorimeter · Optimised for precision measure- ment of the scattered lepton ZEUS · Depleted Uranium

  3. Phenomenology of lepton-nucleus DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Kulagin; R. Petti

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of recent phenomenological studies of unpolarized nuclear deep-inelastic scattering are discussed and applied to calculate neutrino charged-current structure functions and cross sections for a number of nuclei.

  4. Heavy metal biosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  5. Self-sustained asymmetry of lepton-number emission: A new phenomenon during the supernova shock-accretion phase in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irene Tamborra; Florian Hanke; Hans-Thomas Janka; Bernhard Mueller; Georg G. Raffelt; Andreas Marek

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the stalled-shock phase of our 3D hydrodynamical core-collapse simulations with energy-dependent, 3-flavor neutrino transport, the lepton-number flux (nue minus antinue) emerges predominantly in one hemisphere. This novel, spherical-symmetry breaking neutrino-hydrodynamical instability is termed LESA for "Lepton-number Emission Self-sustained Asymmetry." While the individual nue and antinue fluxes show a pronounced dipole pattern, the heavy-flavor neutrino fluxes and the overall luminosity are almost spherically symmetric. Initially, LESA seems to develop stochastically from convective fluctuations, it exists for hundreds of milliseconds or more, and it persists during violent shock sloshing associated with the standing accretion shock instability. The nue minus antinue flux asymmetry originates mainly below the neutrinosphere in a region of pronounced proto-neutron star (PNS) convection, which is stronger in the hemisphere of enhanced lepton-number flux. On this side of the PNS, the mass-accretion rate of lepton-rich matter is larger, amplifying the lepton-emission asymmetry, because the spherical stellar infall deflects on a dipolar deformation of the stalled shock. The increased shock radius in the hemisphere of less mass accretion and minimal lepton-number flux (antinue flux maximum) is sustained by stronger convection on this side, which is boosted by stronger neutrino heating because the average antinue energy is higher than the average nue energy. Asymmetric heating thus supports the global deformation despite extremely nonstationary convective overturn behind the shock. While these different elements of LESA form a consistent picture, a full understanding remains elusive at present. There may be important implications for neutrino-flavor oscillations, the neutron-to-proton ratio in the neutrino-heated supernova ejecta, and neutron-star kicks, which remain to be explored.

  6. Leptonic $D_s$ decays at $B$-factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Zupanc

    2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent measurements of leptonic $D_s$-meson decays performed by Belle and BaBar collaborations. Described measurements enable experimental extraction of the $D_s$-meson decay constant which can be compared with lattice QCD calculations.

  7. Measurement of $ZZ$ production in leptonic final states at $\\surd{s}$ of 1.96 TeV at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a precise measurement of the total ZZ production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using data collected with the CDF II detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 6 fb{sup -1}. The result is obtained by combining separate measurements in the four-charged ({ell}{ell}{ell}{prime}{ell}{prime}), and two-charged-lepton and two-neutral-lepton ({ell}{ell}{nu}{nu}) decay modes of the Z. The combined measured cross section for p{bar p} {yields} ZZ is 1.64{sub -0.38}{sup +0.44} pb. This is the most precise measurement of the ZZ production cross section in 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions to date.

  8. Search for direct slepton and gaugino production in final states with two leptons and missing transverse momentum with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the electroweak pair production of charged sleptons and weak gauginos decaying into final states with two leptons is performed using 4.7 fb[superscript ?1] of proton–proton collision data at ?s = 7 TeV recorded ...

  9. Survey of lepton number violation via effective operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea, Andre de; Jenkins, James [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We survey 129 lepton number violating effective operators, consistent with the minimal standard model gauge group and particle content, of mass dimension up to and including 11. Upon requiring that each one radiatively generates the observed neutrino masses, we extract an associated characteristic cutoff energy scale which we use to calculate other observable manifestations of these operators for a number of current and future experimental probes, concentrating on lepton number violating phenomena. These include searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay and rare meson, lepton, and gauge boson decays. We also consider searches at hadron/lepton collider facilities in anticipation of the CERN LHC and the future ILC. We find that some operators are already disfavored by current data, while more are ripe to be probed by next-generation experiments. We also find that our current understanding of lepton mixing disfavors a subset of higher dimensional operators. While neutrinoless double-beta decay is the most promising signature of lepton number violation for the majority of operators, a handful is best probed by other means. We argue that a combination of constraints from various independent experimental sources will help to pinpoint the ''correct'' model of neutrino mass, or at least aid in narrowing down the set of possibilities.

  10. New physics motivated by the low energy approach to electric charge quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Lew; R. R. Volkas

    1994-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-energy approach to electric charge quantization predicts physics beyond the minimal standard model. A model-independent approach via effective Lagrangians is used examine the possible new physics, which may manifest itself indirectly through family-lepton--number violating rare decays.

  11. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  12. Net-charge fluctuations and balance functions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Weber; for the ALICE collaboration

    2012-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of event-by-event fluctuations and charge-dependent particle correlations are used to study properties of nuclear matter at high temperatures as produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We present results for event-by-event net-charge fluctuations and charge balance functions in \\Delta\\eta\\ and \\Delta\\phi\\ in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN)= 2.76 TeV.

  13. Electroweak corrections to lepton pair production in association with two hard jets at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansgar Denner; Lars Hofer; Andreas Scharf; Sandro Uccirati

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the next-to-leading order corrections of $O(\\alpha_s^2\\alpha^3)$ to the hadronic production of two oppositely charged leptons and two hard jets, $p p \\to j j l^- l^+$, using Recola and Collier. We include electroweak and QCD corrections at the given order and all off-shell effects. We provide detailed predictions for the LHC operating at 13 TeV and obtain per-cent-level corrections for the total cross section. For differential distributions we find significant non-uniform distortions in high-energy tails at the level of several ten per cent due to electroweak Sudakov logarithms and deformations at the level of a few per cent for angular variables.

  14. PDF uncertainties on the W boson mass measurement from the lepton transverse momentum distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozzi, Giuseppe; Vicini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the charged current Drell-Yan process and we evaluate the proton parton densities uncertainties on the lepton transverse momentum distribution and their impact on the determination of the W-boson mass. We consider the global PDF sets CT10, MSTW2008CPdeut, NNPDF2.3, NNPDF3.0, MMHT2014, and apply the PDF4LHC recipe to combine the individual results, obtaining an uncertainty on MW that ranges between +-18 and +-24 MeV, depending on the final state, collider energy and kind. We discuss the dependence of the uncertainty on the acceptance cuts and the role of the individual parton densities in the final result. We remark that some PDF sets predict an uncertainty on MW of O(10 MeV); this encouraging result is spoiled, in the combined analysis of the different sets, by an important spread of the central values predicted by each group.

  15. Lepton number violating processes mediated by Majorana neutrinos at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovalenko, Sergey; Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico, Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile) and Center of Subatomic Physics, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the lepton number violating like-sign dilepton processes h{sub 1}h{sub 2}{yields}l{sup {+-}}l{sup '{+-}}jjX and h{sub 1}h{sub 2}{yields}l{sup {+-}}l{sup '{+-}}W{sup {+-}}X, mediated by heavy GeV scale Majorana neutrinos. We focus on the resonantly enhanced contributions with a nearly on-mass-shell Majorana neutrino in the s channel. We study the constraints on like-sign dilepton production at the Tevatron and the LHC on the basis of the existing experimental limits on the masses of heavy neutrinos and their mixings U{sub {alpha}}{sub N} with {alpha}={nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}. Special attention is paid to the constraints from neutrinoless double beta decay. We note that searches for like-sign e{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}} events at Tevatron and LHC may provide evidence of CP violation in the neutrino sector. We also discuss the conditions under which it is possible to extract individual constraints on the mixing matrix elements in a model independent way.

  16. Charge Transfer Between Neutral Atoms and Highly Ionized Species: Implications for ISO Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. J. Ferland; K. T. Korista; D. A. Verner; A. Dalgarno

    1997-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate rate coefficients for charge transfer between neutral hydrogen and helium and moderate to highly ionized heavy elements. Although charge transfer does not have much influence on hot collisionally ionized plasmas, its effects on photoionized plasmas can be profound. We present several photoionization models which illustrate the significant effect of charge transfer on the far infrared lines detected by ISO.

  17. THE STATUS OF HEAVY-LEPTON SEARCHES*+ Martin L. Per1 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign Object DamageSystemsU.S. TALKS1

  18. Ch 16 Electric Charge &Ch 16. Electric Charge & Electric Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Ch 16 Electric Charge &Ch 16. Electric Charge & Electric Field Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 #12;I Basic ConceptsI. Basic Concepts Static electricity: charges at rest Electric charge Like charges repel Unlike charges attract Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 #12;Electric ChargeElectric Charge Electron charge: -eElectron charge

  19. Neutrino oscillation experiments and limits on lepton-number and lepton-flavor violating processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Rodejohann

    2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a three neutrino framework we investigate bounds for the effective Majorana neutrino mass matrix. The mass measured in neutrinoless double beta decay is its (11) element. Lepton-number and -flavor violating processes sensitive to each element are considered and limits on branching ratios or cross sections are given. Those processes include $\\mu^- e^+$ conversion, $K^+ \\to \\pi^- \\mu^+ \\mu^+$ or recently proposed high-energy scattering processes at HERA. Including all possible mass schemes, the three solar solutions and other allowed possibilities, there is a total of 80 mass matrices. The obtained indirect limits are up to 14 orders of magnitude more stringent than direct ones. It is investigated how neutrinoless double beta decay may judge between different mass and mixing schemes as well as solar solutions. Prospects for detecting processes depending on elements of the mass matrix are also discussed.

  20. Measurement of the t-tbar production cross section in p-pbar collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV using lepton+jets events in the CDF detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palencia, Enrique; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Cantabria U., Santander

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The top quark is the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the standard model (SM). In particular, the measurement of the top quark pair production cross section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} is of interest as a test of QCD predictions. Recent QCD calculations done with perturbation theory to next-to-leading order predict {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} with an uncertainty of less than 15%, which motivate measurements of comparable precision. In this thesis, the author reports a measurement of the cross section for pair production of top quarks in the lepton+jets channel in 318 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were recorded between March 2002 and September 2004, during Run II of the Tevatron, by the CDF II detector, a general purpose detector which combines charged particle trackers, sampling calorimeters, and muon detectors. processes in which a W boson is produced in association with several jets with large transverse momentum can be misidentified at t{bar t}, since they have the same signature. In order to separate the t{bar t} events from this background, they develop a method to tag b-jets based on tracking information from the silicon detector. The main event selection requires at least one tight (more restrictive) b tag in the event. As a cross check, they also measure the cross section using events with a loose (less restrictive) b tag and events which have at least two tight or at least two loose b tags. Background contributions from heavy flavor production processes, such as Wb{bar b}, Wc{bar c} or Wc, misidentified W bosons, electroweak processes, single top production, and mistagged jets are estimated using a combination of Monte Carlo calculations and independent measurements in control data samples. An excess over background in the number of events that contain a lepton, missing energy and three or more jets with at least one b-tag is assumed to be a signal of t{bar t} production and is used to measure the production cross section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}}.

  1. The role of top in heavy flavor physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, J.L. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implications of the massive top quark on heavy flavor transitions are explored. We review the generation of quark masses and mixings and the determination techniques, and present the status of the elements of the weak mixing matrix. Purely leptonic decays of heavy mesons are briefly summarized. We present a general introduction to flavor changing neutral currents and an extensive summary of radiative and other rare decay modes. The physics of neutral meson mixing is reviewed and applied to each meson system. We describe the phenomenology of CP violation and how it may be measured in meson decays. Standard Model predictions are given in each case and the effects of physics beyond the Standard Model are also discussed. Throughout, we contrast these transitions in the K and B meson systems to those in the D meson and top-quark sectors.

  2. Discriminating among the theoretical origins of new heavy Majorana neutrinos at the CERN LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. M. L. de Almeida Jr.; Y. A. Coutinho; J. A. Martins Simoes; A. J. Ramalho; S. Wulck; M. A. B. do Vale

    2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A study on the possibility of distinguishing new heavy Majorana neutrino models at LHC energies is presented. The experimental confirmation of standard neutrinos with non-zero mass and the theoretical possibility of lepton number violation find a natural explanation when new heavy Majorana neutrinos exist. These new neutrinos appear in models with new right-handed singlets, in new doublets of some grand unified theories and left-right symmetrical models. It is expected that signals of new particles can be found at the CERN high-energy hadron collider (LHC). We present signatures and distributions that can indicate the theoretical origin of these new particles. The single and pair production of heavy Majorana neutrinos are calculated and the model dependence is discussed. Same-sign dileptons in the final state provide a clear signal for the Majorana nature of heavy neutrinos, since there is lepton number violation. Mass bounds on heavy Majorana neutrinos allowing model discrimination are estimated for three different LHC luminosities.

  3. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Lepton Flavor Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Cirigliano; A. Kurylov; M. J. Ramsey-Musolf; P. Vogel

    2004-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out that extensions of the Standard Model with low scale (~TeV) lepton number violation (LNV) generally lead to a pattern of lepton flavor violation (LFV) experimentally distinguishable from the one implied by models with GUT scale LNV. As a consequence, muon LFV processes provide a powerful diagnostic tool to determine whether or not the effective neutrino mass can be deduced from the rate of neutrinoless double beta decay. We discuss the role of \\mu -> e \\gamma and \\mu -> e conversion in nuclei, which will be studied with high sensitivity in forthcoming experiments.

  4. Dynamics of heavy flavor quarks in high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Beraudo

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A general overview on the role of heavy quarks as probes of the medium formed in high energy nuclear collisions is presented. Experimental data compared to model calculations at low and moderate pT are exploited to extract information on the transport coefficients of the medium, on possible modifications of heavy flavor hadronization in a hot environment and to provide quantitative answers to the issue of kinetic (and chemical, at conceivable future experimental facilities) thermalization of charm. Finally, the role of heavy flavor at high pT as a tool to study the mass and color-charge dependence the jet quenching is also analyzed.

  5. Study of the top quark electric charge at the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartos, Pavol; /Comenius U.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the measurement of the top quark electric charge using the jet charge tagging method on events containing a single lepton collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab between February 2002 and February 2010 at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. There are three main components to this measurement: determining the charge of the W (using the charge of the lepton), pairing the W with the b-jet to ensure that they are from the same top decay branch and finally determining the charge of the b-jet using the Jet Charge algorithm. We found, on a sample of 5.6 fb{sup -1} of data, that the p-value under the standard model hypothesis is equal to 13.4%, while the p-value under the exotic model hypothesis is equal to 0.014%. Using the a priori criteria generally accepted by the CDF collaboration, we can say that the result is consistent with the standard model, while we exclude an exotic quark hypothesis with 95% confidence. Using the Bayesian approach, we obtain for the Bayes factor (2ln(BF)) a value of 19.6, that favors very strongly the SM hypothesis over the XM one. The presented method has the highest sensitivity to the top quark electric charge among the presented so far top quark charge analysis.

  6. Primary Versus Secondary Leptons in the EGRET SNR's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Fatuzzo; Fulvio Melia

    2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The EGRET supernova remnants (SNR's) are all expanding into nearby dense molecular clouds, powering a shock at the interface where protons and electrons accelerate to relativistic energies. A viable mechanism for the emission of gamma$-rays in these sources is the decay of neutral pions created in collisions between the relativistic hadrons and protons in the ambient medium. But neutral pion decay alone cannot reproduce the whole high-energy spectrum, particularly below 100 MeV. A pion-decay scenario thus requires a lepton population to "fill in" the lower part of the spectrum via bremsstrahlung emission. This population, however, is constrained by the SNR radio spectrum. Taking our cue from the behavior of Sgr A East, an energetic EGRET SNR at the Galactic center, we here examine the role played in these sources by secondary leptons--electrons and positrons produced in proton-proton scattering events and the ensuing particle cascades. We show that while secondary leptons cannot account for the gamma-rays below 100 MeV, they can account for the hard radio spectra observed from the EGRET SNR's. Thus, it appears that both primary and secondary leptons may be important contributors to the overall broadband emission from these sources, but if so, must radiate most of their energy in different parts of the SNR-cloud environment. We show that shock acceleration in dense cores being overtaken by the expanding SNR shell can naturally lead to such a scenario.

  7. A Lepton Universality Test at CERN NA62 Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgueni Goudzovski

    2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA62 experiment at CERN collected a large sample of K+ --> enu decays during a dedicated run in 2007, aiming at a precise test of lepton universality by measurement of the helicity suppressed ratio RK = BR(K+ --> enu)/BR(K+ --> munu). A preliminary result of the analysis of a partial data sample of 51089 K+ --> enu candidates is presented.

  8. Supersymmetric Dark Matter and Lepton Flavor Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soleimani, Ali

    2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    .11) by introducing anti-commuting ‘spinorial’ chargesQa (a = 1...N): [Pµ,Qa] = 0, (1.12) [Mµ?,Qa] = ?(?µ?)abQb, (1.13) {Qa, ŻQb} = 2(?µ)abPµ (1.14) {Qa,Qb} = ?2(?µC)abPµ, (1.15) {ŻQa, ŻQb} = 2(C?1?µ)abPµ, (1.16) whereA,B ?AB+BA. The resulting algebra is not a Lie...)M+ 1 2( Ż??)N + 1 2( Ż??5?µ?)Vµ + i(Ż??5?) bracketleftbigg Ż? parenleftbigg ?+ i?2?/? parenrightbiggbracketrightbigg ? 14(Ż??5?)2 bracketleftbigg D? 12squareS bracketrightbigg . (1.19) We have arranged the expansion terms into a vector fieldVµ, two...

  9. Bioconversion of Heavy oil.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbakk, Sandra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??70 % of world?s oil reservoirs consist of heavy oil, and as the supply of conventional oil decreases, researchers are searching for new technologies to… (more)

  10. Finding the charge of the top quark in the dilepton channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beretvas, A.; Antos, J.; Chen, Y.C.; Gunay, Z.; Sorin, V.; Tollefson, K.; Bednar, P.; Tokar, S.; Boisvert, V.; Hopkins, W.; McFarland, K.; /Fermilab /Kosice, IEF /Taiwan,

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a question about the identity of the top quark. Is it the top quark of the Standard Model (SM) with electric charge 2/3 or is it an exotic quark with charge -4/3? An exotic quark has been proposed by D. Chang et al. [1]. This analysis will use the standard CDF run II dilepton sample. The key ingredients of this analysis are the correct pairing of the lepton and b-jet, the determination of the charge of the b-jet. The analysis proceeds by using a binomial distribution and is formulated so that rejecting one hypothesis means support for the other hypothesis.

  11. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Borissov

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the $p \\bar p$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy $b$- and $c$-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays $B^0, B^0_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in $B_s \\to J\\psi \\phi$ decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in $D^0 \\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the $B_s \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  12. Lepton flavor violating processes \\tau ->\\mu\\gamma$, $\\tau-> 3\\mu$ and $Z-> \\mu\\tau$ in the Supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hue, L T; Long, H N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we study the charged lepton flavor violating (cLFV) decays $\\tau-> \\mu\\gamma$, $\\tau-> 3\\mu$ and $Z->\\mu\\tau$ in the framework of the Supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model. Analytic formulas for branching ratios (BR) of these decays are presented. We assume that there exist lepton flavor violation (LFV) sources in both right- and left-handed slepton sectors. This leads to the strong enhancement of cLFV decay rates. We also show that the effects of the LFV source to the cLFV decay rates in the left-handed slepton sector are greater than those in the right- handed slepton sector. By numerical investigation, we show that the model under consideration contains the relative light mass spectrum of sleptons which satisfies the current experimental bounds on LFV processes in the limit of small $\\tan \\gamma$. The interplay between monopole and dipole operators also was studied.

  13. Exploring the Doubly Charged Higgs of the Left-Right Symmetric Model using Vector Boson Fusion-like Events at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhaskar Dutta; Ricardo Eusebi; Yu Gao; Tathagata Ghosh; Teruki Kamon

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the pair production of the doubly charged Higgs boson of the left-right symmetric models using multilepton final state in the vector boson fusion (VBF)-like processes. The study is performed in the framework consistent with the model's correction to the standard model $\\rho_{EW}$ parameter. VBF topological cuts, number of leptons in the final state and $p_T$ cuts on the leptons are found to be effective in suppressing the background. Significant mass reach can be achieved for exclusion/discovery of the doubly charge Higgs boson for the upcoming LHC run with a luminosity of $\\mathcal{O}(10^3)$ fb$^{-1}$.

  14. Event by event fluctuations in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Volker

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the physics underlying event-by-event fluctuations in relativistic heavy ion collisions. We will argue that the fluctuations of the ratio of positively over negatively charged particles may serve as a unique signature for the Quark Gluon Plasma.

  15. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Heavy Sterile Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manimala Mitra; Goran Senjanovic; Francesco Vissani

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental rate of neutrinoless double beta decay can be saturated by the exchange of virtual sterile neutrinos, that mix with the ordinary neutrinos and are heavier than 200 MeV. Interestingly, this hypothesis is subject only to marginal experimental constraints, because of the new nuclear matrix elements. This possibility is analyzed in the context of the Type I seesaw model, performing also exploratory investigations of the implications for heavy neutrino mass spectra, rare decays of mesons as well as neutrino-decay search, LHC, and lepton flavor violation. The heavy sterile neutrinos can saturate the rate only when their masses are below some 10 TeV, but in this case, the suppression of the light-neutrino masses has to be more than the ratio of the electroweak scale and the heavy-neutrino scale; i.e., more suppressed than the naive seesaw expectation. We classify the cases when this condition holds true in the minimal version of the seesaw model, showing its compatibility (1) with neutrinoless double beta rate being dominated by heavy neutrinos and (2) with any light neutrino mass spectra. The absence of excessive fine-tunings and the radiative stability of light neutrino mass matrices, together with a saturating sterile neutrino contribution, imply an upper bound on the heavy neutrino masses of about 10 GeV. We extend our analysis to the Extended seesaw scenario, where the light and the heavy sterile neutrino contributions are completely decoupled, allowing the sterile neutrinos to saturate the present experimental bound on neutrinoless double beta decay. In the models analyzed, the rate of this process is not strictly connected with the values of the light neutrino masses, and a fast transition rate is compatible with neutrinos lighter than 100 meV.

  16. Lepton Generation Problem, Some Properties and Implications of the Curved Spacetime Dirac Equation -- (II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Nyambuya

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This reading is a continuation of the earlier reading Nyambuya (2008); where three new Curved Spacetime Dirac Equations have been derived mainly to try and account in a natural way for the observed anomalous gyromagnetic ratio of fermions and the suggestions is that particles including the Electron, which is thought to be a point particle, do have a finite spatial size and this is one of the reasons for the observed anomalous gyromagnetic ratio. Combining the idea in Nyambuya (2008) which lead to the derivation of the three new Curved Spacetime Dirac Equations, and the proposed Unified Field Theory (Nyambuya 2007), a total of 12 equations each with 16 sub-components are generated thus leading to a total of 192 equations for the Curved Spacetime Dirac Equation. Some symmetries of these equations are investigated, i.e., the Lorentz symmetry, charge conjugation symmetry (C), time reversal symmetry (T), Space reversal (P) and a combination of the C, P and T - symmetries. It is shown that these equations are Lorentz invariant, obey C-symmetry and that some violate T and P-symmetry while others do not and that they all obey PT-symmetry. These symmetries show (or modestly said -- seem to suggest) that anti-particles have positive mass and energy but a negative rest-mass and the opposite sign in electronic charge. Through the inspection of these symmetries, a suggestion is (here) made to the effect that the rest-mass of a particle must be related to the electronic charge of that particle thus leading us to a possible resolution of whether or not Neutrinos do have a none-zero rest-mass. Additionally, we demonstrate that these equations have the potency to explain naturally the observed lepton generation phenomena.

  17. U(2)? flavor symmetry and lepton universality violation in W?????

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Filipuzzi, Alberto; Portolés, Jorge; González-Alonso, Martín

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The seeming violation of universality in the ? lepton coupling to the W boson suggested by LEP-II data is studied using an effective field theory (EFT) approach. Within this framework we explore how this feature fits into the current constraints from electroweak precision observables using different assumptions about the flavor structure of New Physics, namely [U(2)×U(1)]? and U(2)?. We show the importance of leptonic and semileptonic tau decay measurements, giving 3–4 TeV bounds on the New Physics effective scale at 90% C.L. We conclude under very general assumptions that it is not possible to accommodate this deviation from universality in the EFT framework, and thus such a signal could only be explained by the introduction of light degrees of freedom or New Physics strongly coupled at the electroweak scale.

  18. Electroweak Penguin and Leptonic Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucci, F.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin and leptonic decays are reviewed. In particular, the measurements of B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the preliminary results on B {yields} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented. Also summarized are the preliminary limits on B{sup +} {yields} l{sup +}{nu} (l = e,{mu}) and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

  19. Lepton Flavour Violation in Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, F.F.; /Rutherford

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from {tau} physics studies at BABAR are presented with an emphasis on Lepton Flavour Violation measurements. The results from the current generation of B-meson Factories are already beginning to constrain the parameter space of models that go beyond the Standard Model. By the end of their data-taking, the current generation of B-meson factories will have produced nearly 2 billion {tau} pair decays. The physics potential of this legacy has only just begun to be exploited.

  20. Lepton flavor violation two-body decays of quarkoniums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Huo; T. F. Feng; Y. C. Xing

    2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we firstly study various model-independent bounds on lepton flavor violation (LFV) in processes of $J/\\Psi$, $\\Psi'$ and $\\Upsilon$ two-body decays, then calculate their branch ratios % By using the constraints from other ways, we obtain %the indirect bounds of ${\\rm Br} (J/\\Psi,\\Psi',\\Upsilon \\to ll')$ in models of the leptoquark, $R$ violating MSSM and topcolor assisted technicolor(TC2) models.

  1. Fragmentation in central collisions of heavy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claesson, G.; Doss, K.G.R.; Ferguson, R.; Gavron, A.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Harris, J.W.; Jacak, B.V.; Kampert, K.H.; Kolb, B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the goals of heavy ion reaction studies is to understand the fragmentation of hot nuclei. The LBL/GSI Plastic Ball detector system has been used to achieve a very high solid angle for detection of light and medium-heavy fragments emitted in 200 Mev/A Au + Au and Au + Fe reactions. The simultaneous measurement of almost all of the nucleons and nuclei resulting from each collision allows an estimation of the total charged particle multiplicity and hence the impact parameter. By choosing subsets of the data corresponding to a peripheral or central collision, the assumptions inherent in various models of nuclear fragmentation can be tested. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  3. Heavy Hybrid mesons Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Iddir; L. Semlala

    2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the ground state masses of the heavy hybrid mesons using a phenomenological QCD-type potential. 0^{- -},1^{- -},0^{- +},1^{- +} and 0^{+ -} J^{PC} states are considered.

  4. Search for events with leptonic jets and missing transverse energy in $\\mathbf{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s}=1.96}$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first search for pair production of isolated jets of charged leptons in association with a large imbalance in transverse energy in p{bar p} collisions using 5.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No excess is observed above Standard Model background, and the result is used to set upper limits on the production cross section of pairs of supersymmetric chargino and neutralino particles as a function of 'dark-photon' mass, where the dark photon is produced in the decay of the lightest supersymmetric particle.

  5. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calzetta, E. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  6. Hadron production in heavy relativistic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolf Kuiper; Georg Wolschin

    2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate particle production in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies as function of incident energy, and centrality in a three-sources Relativistic Diffusion Model. Pseudorapidity distributions of produced charged hadrons in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6 GeV, 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV and 200 GeV show an almost equilibrated midrapidity source that tends to increase in size towards higher incident energy, and more central collisions. It may indicate quark-gluon plasma formation prior to hadronization.

  7. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

  8. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to in the fully leptonic final state in pp collisions at

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to W+W- in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is reported. The data are collected at the LHC with the CMS detector, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 inverse femtobarns. The W+W- candidates are selected in events with two charged leptons and large missing transverse energy. No significant excess of events above the standard model background expectations is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production relative to the standard model Higgs expectation are derived. The standard model Higgs boson is excluded in the mass range 129-270 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  9. ChargePoint America Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 2013 Number of Charging Units Charging Electricity Charging Unit - Private Not Installed to Events Consumed By Region Residential Commercia Public Specified Date...

  10. ChargePoint America Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 2013 Number of Charging Units Charging Electricity Charging Unit - Private Not Installed to Events Consumed By Region Residential Commercia Public Specified Date Performed...

  11. ChargePoint America Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    December 2012 Number of Charging Units Charging Electricity Charging Unit - Private Not Installed to Events Consumed By Region Residential Commercia Public Specified Date...

  12. ChargePoint America Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report Project Status to Date through: March 2012 Number of Charging Units Charging Electricity Charging Unit - Private Installed to Events Consumed By State Residential...

  13. ChargePoint America Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 2012 Number of Charging Units Charging Electricity Charging Unit - Private Installed to Events Consumed By State Residential Commercial Public Not Specified Date...

  14. ChargePoint America Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 2012 Number of Charging Units Charging Electricity Charging Unit - Private Installed to Events Consumed By State Residential Commercial Public Not Specified Date Performed...

  15. Rapidity Dependence of Charged Hadron Production in Central Au+Au Collisions at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­chemical potential in energy and rapidity. In ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, final state hadrons are used (-0.1 y 3.5). In this paper, we report on some of our latest results on identified charged particle. Detector efficiency, multiple scattering and in­flight decay corrections #12;Charged Hadron Production

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - analyses lepton scattering Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    leptons and missing... +p, e-p data Analyses presented utilize the final combined dataset 1 fb-1 Recontres de ... Source: Raval, Amita - ZEUS DESY & Department of Physics,...

  17. Collider searches and cosmology in the MSSM with heavy scalars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carena, Marcela; /Fermilab; Freitas, A.; /Zurich U.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a variety of supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the scalar partners of the quarks and leptons are predicted to be very heavy and beyond the reach of next-generation colliders. For instance, the realization of electroweak baryogenesis in supersymmetry requires new sources of CP-violation, which can only be naturally accommodated with electric dipole moment constraints if the first and second generation scalar fermions are beyond the TeV scale. Also in focus-point supersymmetry and split supersymmetry the scalar fermions are very heavy. In this work, the phenomenology of scenarios with electroweak baryogenesis and in the focus point region at the LHC and ILC is studied, which becomes challenging due to the presence of heavy scalar fermions. Implications for the analysis of baryogenesis and dark matter are deduced. It is found that precision measurements of superpartner properties allow an accurate determination of the dark matter relic density in both scenarios, while important but only incomplete information about the baryogenesis mechanism can be obtained.

  18. Electric Vehicle Smart Charging Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Ching-Yen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Multiplexed Electric Vehicle Charging”, US20130154561A1,Chynoweth, ”Intelligent Electric Vehicle Charging System”,of RFID Mesh Network for Electric Vehicle Smart Charging

  19. The Mixed Phase of Charged AdS Black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyabut Burikham; Chatchai Promsiri

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mixed phase of charged AdS black hole and radiation when the total energy is fixed below the threshold to produce a stable charged black hole branch. The coexistence conditions for the charged AdS black hole and radiation are derived for the generic case when radiation particles carry charge. The phase diagram of the mixed phase is demonstrated for both fixed potential and charge ensemble. In the dual gauge picture, they correspond to the mixed phase of quark-gluon plasma~(QGP) and hadron gas in the fixed chemical potential and density ensemble respectively. In the nuclei and heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies, the mixed phase of exotic QGP and hadron gas could be produced. The mixed phase will condensate and evaporate into the hadron gas as the fireball expands.

  20. Muon g-2 Anomaly and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hye-Sung [W& M

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a potentially alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.

  1. Leptonic CP violation: zero, maximal or between the two extremes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Farzan; A. Yu. Smirnov

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Discovery of the CP-violation in the lepton sector is one of the challenges of the particle physics. We search for possible principles, symmetries and phenomenological relations that can lead to particular values of the CP-violating Dirac phase, $\\delta$. In this connection we discuss two extreme cases: the zero phase, $\\delta = 0$, and the maximal CP-violation, $\\delta = \\pm \\pi/2$, and relate them to the peculiar pattern of the neutrino mixing. The maximal CP-violation can be related to the $\

  2. Electric Charge and Electric Field Electrostatics: Charge at rest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jaehoon

    Chapter 16 Electric Charge and Electric Field #12;Electrostatics: Charge at rest Electric Charges of conservation of Electric Charge: The net amount of electric charge produced in any process is zero. Model, neutral). #12;· All protons and electrons have same magnitude of electric charge but their masses

  3. Search for tau -> gamma mu: A test of lepton number conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the lepton number violating decay of the tau lepton to the gammamu final state has been performed with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell e+e- storage ring CESR. In a data sample that corresponds to an ...

  4. Electron generation of leptons and hadrons with reciprocal -quantized lifetimes and masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Electron generation of leptons and hadrons with reciprocal -quantized lifetimes and masses generation occurs via an initial "-leap" from an electron pair to a "platform state" M, and then subsequent in the generation of hadron masses. In fact, the role of the electron in generating lepton masses has never been

  5. Double Beta Decay, Lepton Flavour Violation and Collider Signatures of Left-Right Symmetric Models with Spontaneous D Parity Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; Tomas E. Gonzalo; Sudhanwa Patra; Narendra Sahu; Utpal Sarkar

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a class of left-right symmetric models (LRSMs) with spontaneous D parity breaking, where SU(2)_R breaks at the TeV scale while discrete left-right symmetry breaks around 10^9 GeV. By embedding this framework in a non-supersymmetric SO(10) Grand Unified Theory (GUT) with Pati-Salam symmetry as the highest intermediate breaking step, we obtain g_R / g_L ~ 0.6 between the right- and left-handed gauge couplings at the TeV scale. This leads to a suppression of beyond the Standard Model phenomena induced by the right-handed gauge coupling. Here we focus specifically on the consequences for neutrinoless double beta decay, low energy lepton flavour violation and LHC signatures due to the suppressed right handed currents. Interestingly, the reduced g_R allows us to interpret an excess of events observed recently in the range of 1.9 TeV to 2.4 TeV by the CMS group at the LHC as the signature of a right handed gauge boson in LRSMs with spontaneous D parity breaking. Moreover, the reduced right-handed gauge coupling also strongly suppresses the non-standard contribution of heavy states to the neutrinoless double beta decay rate as well as the amplitude of low energy lepton flavour violating processes. In a dominant type-II Seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass generation, we find that both sets of observables provide stringent and complimentary bounds which make it challenging to observe the scenario at the LHC.

  6. The Heavy Photon Search Test Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Battaglieri; Sergey Boyarinov; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Andrea Celentano; Gabriel Charles; William Cooper; Chris Cuevas; Natalia Dashyan; Raffaella DeVita; Camille Desnault; Alexandre Deur; Hovanes Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Rouven Essig; Vitaliy Fadeyev; Clive Field; Arne Freyberger; Yuri Gershtein; Nerses Gevorgyan; Francois-Xavier Girod; Norman Graf; Mathew Graham; Keith Griffioen; Alexander Grillo; Michel Guidal; Gunther Haller; Per Hansson Adrian; Ryan Herbst; Maurik Holtrop; John Jaros; Scott Kaneta; Mahbub Khandaker; Alexey Kubarovsky; Valery Kubarovsky; Takashi Maruyama; Jeremy McCormick; Ken Moffeit; Omar Moreno; Homer Neal; Timothy Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Al Odian; Marco Oriunno; Rafayel Paremuzyan; Richard Partridge; Sarah Phillips; Emmanuel Rauly; Benjamin Raydo; Joseph Reichert; Emmanuel Rindel; Philippe Rosier; Carlos Salgado; Philip Schuster; Youri Sharabian; Daria Sokhan; Stepan Stepanyan; Natalia Toro; Sho Uemura; Maurizio Ungaro; Hakop Voskanyan; Dieter Walz; Larry Weinstein; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski

    2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS), an experiment to search for a hidden sector photon in fixed target electroproduction, is preparing for installation at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in the Fall of 2014. As the first stage of this project, the HPS Test Run apparatus was constructed and operated in 2012 to demonstrate the experiment's technical feasibility and to confirm that the trigger rates and occupancies are as expected. This paper describes the HPS Test Run apparatus and readout electronics and its performance. In this setting, a heavy photon can be identified as a narrow peak in the e$^+$e$^-$ invariant mass spectrum, above the trident background or as a narrow invariant mass peak with a decay vertex displaced from the production target, so charged particle tracking and vertexing are needed for its detection. In the HPS Test Run, charged particles are measured with a compact forward silicon microstrip tracker inside a dipole magnet. Electromagnetic showers are detected in a PbW0$_{4}$ crystal calorimeter situated behind the magnet, and are used to trigger the experiment and identify electrons and positrons. Both detectors are placed close to the beam line and split top-bottom. This arrangement provides sensitivity to low-mass heavy photons, allows clear passage of the unscattered beam, and avoids the spray of degraded electrons coming from the target. The discrimination between prompt and displaced e$^+$e$^-$ pairs requires the first layer of silicon sensors be placed only 10~cm downstream of the target. The expected signal is small, and the trident background huge, so the experiment requires very large statistics. Accordingly, the HPS Test Run utilizes high-rate readout and data acquisition electronics and a fast trigger to exploit the essentially 100% duty cycle of the CEBAF accelerator at JLab.

  7. The Heavy Photon Search test detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Battaglieri, M.; Boyarinov, S.; Bueltmann, S.; Burkert, V.; Celentano, A.; Charles, G.; Cooper, W.; Cuevas, C.; Dashyan, N.; DeVita, R.; Desnault, C.; Deur, A.; Egiyan, H.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Essig, R.; Fadeyev, V.; Field, C.; Freyberger, A.; Gershtein, Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Girod, F.-X.; Graf, N.; Graham, M.; Griffioen, K.; Grillo, A.; Guidal, M.; Haller, G.; Hansson Adrian, P.; Herbst, R.; Holtrop, M.; Jaros, J.; Kaneta, S.; Khandaker, M.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, J.; Moffeit, K.; Moreno, O.; Neal, H.; Nelson, T.; Niccolai, S.; Odian, A.; Oriunno, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Partridge, R.; Phillips, S.K.; Rauly, E.; Raydo, B.; Reichert, J.; Rindel, E.; Rosier, P.; Salgado, C.; Schuster, P.; Sharabian, Y.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Toro, N.; Uemura, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Walz, D.; Weinstein, L.B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS), an experiment to search for a hidden sector photon in fixed target electroproduction, is preparing for installation at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in the Fall of 2014. As the first stage of this project, the HPS Test Run apparatus was constructed and operated in 2012 to demonstrate the experiment's technical feasibility and to confirm that the trigger rates and occupancies are as expected. This paper describes the HPS Test Run apparatus and readout electronics and its performance. In this setting, a heavy photon can be identified as a narrow peak in the e+e- invariant mass spectrum, above the trident background or as a narrow invariant mass peak with a decay vertex displaced from the production target, so charged particle tracking and vertexing are needed for its detection. In the HPS Test Run, charged particles are measured with a compact forward silicon microstrip tracker inside a dipole magnet. Electromagnetic showers are detected in a PbW04 crystal calorimeter situated behind the magnet, and are used to trigger the experiment and identify electrons and positrons. Both detectors are placed close to the beam line and split top-bottom. This arrangement provides sensitivity to low-mass heavy photons, allows clear passage of the unscattered beam, and avoids the spray of degraded electrons coming from the target. The discrimination between prompt and displaced e+e? pairs requires the first layer of silicon sensors be placed only 10~cm downstream of the target. The expected signal is small, and the trident background huge, so the experiment requires very large statistics. Accordingly, the HPS Test Run utilizes high-rate readout and data acquisition electronics and a fast trigger to exploit the essentially 100% duty cycle of the CEBAF accelerator at JLab.

  8. Quark and lepton masses and mixing in the landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John F. Donoghue; Koushik Dutta; Andreas Ross

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Even if quark and lepton masses are not uniquely predicted by the fundamental theory, as may be the case in the string theory landscape, nevertheless their pattern may reveal features of the underlying theory. We use statistical techniques to show that the observed masses appear to be representative of a scale invariant distribution, rho(m) ~ 1/m. If we extend this distribution to include all the Yukawa couplings, we show that the resulting CKM matrix elements typically show a hierarchical pattern similar to observations. The Jarlskog invariant measuring the amount of CP violation is also well reproduced in magnitude. We also apply this framework to neutrinos using the seesaw mechanism. The neutrino results are ambiguous, with the observed pattern being statistically allowed even though the framework does not provide a natural explanation for the observed two large mixing angles. Our framework highly favors a normal hierarchy of neutrino masses. We also are able to make statistical predictions in the neutrino sector when we specialize to situations consistent with the known mass differences and two large mixing angles. Within our framework, we show that with 95% confidence the presently unmeasured MNS mixing angle sin theta_{13} is larger than 0.04 and typically of order 0.1. The leptonic Jarlskog invariant is found to be typically of order 10^{-2} and the magnitude of the effective Majorana mass m_{ee} is typically of order 0.001 eV.

  9. Multi Leptons in ep Collisions at HERA Analyses of multi-muon & and multi-electron production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi Leptons in ep Collisions at HERA Analyses of multi-muon & and multi-electron production Boris Lei�ner, RWTH Aachen on behalf of the and collaborations B. Lei�ner, Multi Leptons in ep Collisions - 1 for additional leptons e e e p · Conclusions B. Lei�ner, Multi Leptons in ep Collisions - 2 #12;Outline · How

  10. Exploiting heavy oil reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen.hamptonassociates.com pRINTED BY nB GroUP Paper sourced from sustainable forests CONTENTS 3/5 does the north Sea still industry partnership drives research into sensor systems 11 Beneath the waves in 3d 12/13 does

  11. PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    ) Type of phytoremediation Cost effective form of environmental remediation (Glass 1999) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al -using hyperaccumulator plant biomass to produce a bio-ore for commercial use -Li et al. look at using Ni

  12. System Benefits Charge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York's system benefits charge (SBC), established in 1996 by the New York Public Service Commission (PSC), supports energy efficiency, education and outreach, research and development, and low...

  13. Estimation of electric conductivity of the quark gluon plasma via asymmetric heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuji Hirono; Masaru Hongo; Tetsufumi Hirano

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that in asymmetric heavy-ion collisions, especially off-central Cu+Au collisions, a sizable strength of electric field directed from Au nucleus to Cu nucleus is generated in the overlapping region, because of the difference in the number of electric charges between the two nuclei. This electric field would induce an electric current in the matter created after the collision, which result in a dipole deformation of the charge distribution. The directed flow parameters $v_1^{\\pm}$ of charged particles turn out to be sensitive to the charge dipole and provide us with information about electric conductivity of the quark gluon plasma.

  14. Aspects of heavy-ion collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolschin, G. [Institut für Theoretische Physik der Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of relativistic heavy-ion collisions are considered in this article: (1) Stopping and baryon transport in a QCD-based approach, (2) charged-hadron production in a nonequilibrium-statistical relativistic diffusion model (RDM), and (3) quarkonia suppression and in particular, ? suppression in PbPb at the current LHC energy of ?(s{sub NN})?=?2.76TeV.

  15. PHENIX recent heavy flavor results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanghoon Lim for the PHENIX collaboration

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects provide an important baseline for the interpretation of data in heavy ion collisions. Such effects include nuclear shadowing, Cronin effect, and initial patron energy loss, and it is interesting to study the dependence on impact parameter and kinematic region. Heavy quark production is a good measurement to probe the CNM effects particularly on gluons, since heavy quarks are mainly produced via gluon fusions at RHIC energy. The PHENIX experiment has experiment has ability to study the CNM effects by measuring heavy quark production in $d$$+$Au collisions at variety of kinematic ranges. Comparisons of heavy quark production at different rapidities allow us to study modification of gluon density function in the Au nucleus depending on momentum fraction. Furthermore, comparisons to the results from heavy ion collisions (Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu) measured by PHENIX provide insight into the role of CNM effects in such collisions. Recent PHENIX results on heavy quark production are discussed.

  16. Image Charge Differential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Image Charge Differential Amplifier FT 0 Crude Oil Time (s) 543210 Frequency (kHz) m/z m q B f Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) uses the frequency of cyclotron motion of the ions in a static magnetic field to determine the mass-to-charge ratio, which is then used

  17. Charging Black Saturn?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenda Chng; Robert Mann; Eugen Radu; Cristian Stelea

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct new charged static solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations in five dimensions via a solution generation technique utilizing the symmetries of the reduced Lagrangian. By applying our method on the multi-Reissner-Nordstrom solution in four dimensions, we generate the multi-Reissner-Nordstrom solution in five dimensions. We focus on the five-dimensional solution describing a pair of charged black objects with general masses and electric charges. This solution includes the double Reissner-Nordstrom solution as well as the charged version of the five-dimensional static black Saturn. However, all the black Saturn configurations that we could find present either a conical singularity or a naked singularity. We also obtain a non-extremal configuration of charged black strings that reduces in the extremal limit to a Majumdar-Papapetrou like solution in five dimensions.

  18. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  19. Generalized lepton number and dark left-right gauge model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban [Center for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Lee, Hye-Sung; Ma, Ernest [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a left-right gauge model of particle interactions, the left-handed fermion doublet ({nu},e){sub L} is connected to its right-handed counterpart (n,e){sub R} through a scalar bidoublet so that e{sub L} pairs with e{sub R}, and {nu}{sub L} with n{sub R} to form mass terms. Suppose the latter link is severed without affecting the former, then n{sub R} is not the mass partner of {nu}{sub L}, and as we show in this paper, becomes a candidate for dark matter which is relevant for the recent PAMELA and ATIC observations. We accomplish this in a specific nonsupersymmetric model, where a generalized lepton number can be defined, so that n{sub R} and W{sub R}{sup {+-}} are odd under R{identical_to}(-1){sup 3B+L+2j}. Fermionic leptoquarks are also predicted.

  20. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau+- ---> e+- gamma and tau+- ---> mu+- gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS; /more authors.; ,

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire dataset of (963 {+-} 7) x 10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and they set upper limits on the branching fractions of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 4.4 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  1. Falsifying High-Scale Baryogenesis with Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Lepton Flavor Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; Julia Harz; Martin Hirsch; Wei-Chih Huang; Heinrich Päs

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions that manifest themselves as lepton number violating processes at low energies in combination with sphaleron transitions typically erase any pre-existing baryon asymmetry of the universe. In this letter, we discuss the constraints obtained from an observation of neutrinoless double beta decay in this context. If a new physics mechanism of neutrinoless double beta decay is observed, typical scenarios of high-scale baryogenesis will be excluded unless the baryon asymmetry is stabilized via some new mechanism. We also sketch how this conclusion can be extended beyond the first lepton generation by incorporating lepton flavor violating processes.

  2. Falsifying High-Scale Baryogenesis with Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Lepton Flavor Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deppisch, Frank F; Hirsch, Martin; Huang, Wei-Chih; Päs, Heinrich

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions that manifest themselves as lepton number violating processes at low energies in combination with sphaleron transitions typically erase any pre-existing baryon asymmetry of the universe. In this letter, we discuss the constraints obtained from an observation of neutrinoless double beta decay in this context. If a new physics mechanism of neutrinoless double beta decay is observed, typical scenarios of high-scale baryogenesis will be excluded unless the baryon asymmetry is stabilized via some new mechanism. We also sketch how this conclusion can be extended beyond the first lepton generation by incorporating lepton flavor violating processes.

  3. taking charge : optimizing urban charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramani, Praveen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyses the opportunities and constraints of deploying charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles in urban environments. Existing electric vehicle charging infrastructure for privately owned vehicles ...

  4. Search for Higgs boson production in trilepton and like-charge electron-muon final states with the D0 detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for Higgs bosons in multilepton final states in pp-bar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, using the full Run II data set with integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1. The multilepton states considered are two electron plus muon, electron with two muons, muon with two hadronic tau leptons, and like-charge electron-muon pairs. These channels directly probe the HVV (V=W,Z) coupling of the Higgs boson in production and decay. The muon with two hadronic tau lepton channel is also sensitive to H to tau lepton pair decays. Upper limits at the 95% C.L on the rate of standard model Higgs boson production are derived in the mass range 100 Higgs boson model.

  5. Production and propagation of heavy hadrons in air-shower simulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Garcia Canal; J. I. Illana; M. Masip; S. J. Sciutto

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Very energetic charm and bottom hadrons may be produced in the upper atmosphere when a primary cosmic ray or the leading hadron in an extensive air shower collide with a nucleon. At $E\\approx 10^8$ GeV their decay length becomes of the order of 10 km, implying that they tend to interact in the air instead of decaying. Since the inelasticity in these collisions is much smaller than the one in proton and pion collisions, there could be rare events where a heavy-hadron component transports a significant amount of energy deep into the atmosphere. We have developed a module for the detailed simulation of these processes and have included it in a new version of the air shower simulator AIRES. We study the frequency, the energy distribution and the depth of charm and bottom production, as well as the depth and the energy distribution of these quarks when they decay. As an illustration, we consider the production and decay of tau leptons (from $D_s$ decays) and the lepton flux at PeV energies from a 30 EeV proton primary. The proper inclusion of charm and bottom hadrons in AIRES opens the possibility to search for air-shower observables that are sensitive to heavy quark effects.

  6. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7??fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, Gemma; Clutter, Jeffrey Scott; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW??????? decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7??fb(?1) of pp...

  7. International aeronautical user charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odoni, Amedeo R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: 1.1 BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION Very few issues relating to the international air transportation industry are today as divisive as those pertaining to user charges imposed at international airports and enroute ...

  8. Societal Benefits Charge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey's 1999 electric-utility restructuring legislation created a "societal benefits charge" (SBC) to support investments in energy efficiency and "Class I" renewable energy. The SBC funds New...

  9. Abstract adiabatic charge pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Joye; V. Brosco; F. Hekking

    2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of an abstract formula describing quantum adiabatic charge pumping in a general context. We consider closed systems characterized by a slowly varying time-dependent Hamiltonian depending on an external parameter $\\alpha$. The current operator, defined as the derivative of the Hamiltonian with respect to $\\alpha$, once integrated over some time interval, gives rise to a charge pumped through the system over that time span. We determine the first two leading terms in the adiabatic parameter of this pumped charge under the usual gap hypothesis. In particular, in case the Hamiltonian is time periodic and has discrete non-degenerate spectrum, the charge pumped over a period is given to leading order by the derivative with respect to $\\alpha$ of the corresponding dynamical and geometric phases.

  10. Charged Schrodinger black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Allan

    We construct charged and rotating asymptotically Schrödinger black hole solutions of type IIB supergravity. We begin by obtaining a closed-form expression for the null Melvin twist of a broad class of type IIB backgrounds, ...

  11. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

  12. Production cross section and topological decay branching fractions of the ? lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new measurements of the production cross section for the reaction e(+)e(?)??(+)?(?) at s?=29 GeV, as well as the topological decay branching fractions of the ? lepton. The data were taken with the High Resolution ...

  13. Lepton Flavor Violation in tau and B decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoni, Elisa; /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article summarizes the search for lepton flavor violating {tau} and B decays, using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory.

  14. The Inclusive Semileptonic Decay Lepton Spectrum from $B \\to X e \\overline?$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisa Randall

    1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, we review the QCD calculation of the lepton spectrum from inclusive semileptonic $B$ decay. We compare this prediction to that of the ACCMM model. This latter work was done in collaboration with Csaba Csaki.

  15. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The ...

  16. Impact of Lepton Number Violation at the LHC on Models of Leptogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; Julia Harz

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of lepton number violation (LNV) at the LHC would have profound consequences for the viability of high-scale leptogenesis models. As an example, we discuss the case of observing a signal with two same-sign leptons, two jets and no missing energy. This would imply a large washout factor for the lepton number density in the early Universe, which leads to a significant constraint on any high-scale model for the generation of the observed baryon asymmetry. In a standard leptogenesis scenario, the corresponding washout factor would strongly decrease a pre-existing lepton asymmetry and thus would render leptogenesis models that generate a (B-L) asymmetry far above the LHC scale ineffective. Therefore, LHC searches focused on LNV processes without missing energy are powerful probes for high-scale leptogenesis models and correspondingly shed light on the nature of baryogenesis and neutrino masses.

  17. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HERMES collaboration; A. Airapetian

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studiedfor hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found.

  19. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy...

  20. OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHIES IN ECOLOGY "HEAVY METAL TOLERANCE"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    cellular mechanisms affected by heavy metals is Bánfalvi 2011. Pollution by heavy metals is an important environmental problem, and sources that focus on heavy metal pollution often contain information about heavyOXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHIES IN ECOLOGY "HEAVY METAL TOLERANCE" By Nishanta Rajakaruna and Robert S. Boyd

  1. Test of Lepton Flavour Universality in K+ --> l+nu Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Lazzeroni et al.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision test of lepton flavour universality has been performed by measuring the ratio RK of kaon leptonic decay rates K+ --> e+nu and K+ --> mu+nu in a sample of 59813 reconstructed K+ --> e+nu candidates with (8.71 +- 0.24)% background contamination. The result RK = (2.487 +- 0.013) * 10^{-5} is in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  2. Prospects for Searching for Excited Leptons during RunII of the Fermilab Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Boos; A. Vologdin; D. Toback; J. Gaspard

    2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter presents a study of prospects of searching for excited leptons during RunII of the Fermilab Tevatron. We concentrate on single and pair production of excited electrons in the photonic decay channel in one CDF/DO detector equivalent for 2 fb^{-1}. By the end of RunIIa, the limits should be easily extended beyond those set by LEP and HERA for excited leptons with mass above about 190 GeV.

  3. Calculation of conventional and prompt lepton fluxes at very high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedynitch, Anatoli; Gaisser, Thomas K; Riehn, Felix; Stanev, Todor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.

  4. Finding the Charge of the top quark in the Dilepton Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beretvas, A; Chen, Y C; Gunay, Z; Sorin, V; Tollefson, K; Bednar, P; Tokar, S; Boisvert, V; Hopkins, W; McFarland, K

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a question about the identity of the top quark. Is it the top quark of the Standard Model (SM) with electric charge 2/3 or is it an exotic quark with charge -4/3? An exotic quark has been proposed by D. Chang et al.\\cite{hep-ph/9810531, hep-ph/9805273}. This analysis will use the standard CDF run II dilepton sample. The key ingredients of this analysis are the correct pairing of the lepton and b-jet, the determination of the charge of the b-jet. The analysis proceeds by using a binomial distribution and is formulated so that rejecting one hypothesis means support for the other hypothesis.

  5. Thermodynamics and fluctuations of conserved charges in Hadron Resonance Gas model in finite volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit; Samanta, Subhasis; Sur, Subrata

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamics of hot and dense matter created in heavy-ion collision experiments are usually studied as a system of infinite volume. Here we report on possible effects for considering a finite system size for such matter in the framework of the Hadron Resonance Gas model. The bulk thermodynamic variables as well as the fluctuations of conserved charges are considered. We find that the finite size effects are insignificant once the observables are scaled with the respective volumes. The only substantial effect is found in the fluctuations of electric charge which may therefore be used to extract information about the volume of fireball created in heavy-ion collision experiments.

  6. Managing Inventories of Heavy Actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wham, Robert M [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has stored a limited inventory of heavy actinides contained in irradiated targets, some partially processed, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 'heavy actinides' of interest include plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes; specifically 242Pu and 244Pu, 243Am, and 244/246/248Cm. No alternate supplies of these heavy actinides and no other capabilities for producing them are currently available. Some of these heavy actinide materials are important for use as feedstock for producing heavy isotopes and elements needed for research and commercial application. The rare isotope 244Pu is valuable for research, environmental safeguards, and nuclear forensics. Because the production of these heavy actinides was made possible only by the enormous investment of time and money associated with defense production efforts, the remaining inventories of these rare nuclear materials are an important part of the legacy of the Nuclear Weapons Program. Significant unique heavy actinide inventories reside in irradiated Mark-18A and Mark-42 targets at SRS and ORNL, with no plans to separate and store the isotopes for future use. Although the costs of preserving these heavy actinide materials would be considerable, for all practical purposes they are irreplaceable. The effort required to reproduce these heavy actinides today would likely cost billions of dollars and encompass a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles for at least 50 years; thus, reproduction is virtually impossible. DOE has a limited window of opportunity to recover and preserve these heavy actinides before they are disposed of as waste. A path forward is presented to recover and manage these irreplaceable National Asset materials for future use in research, nuclear forensics, and other potential applications.

  7. LFV decays and anomalous magnetic (electric) moments in a lepton mass matrices ansatz induced by SUSY GUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Huo

    2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    By using the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments of the $\\tau$ lepton in an effective lagrangian approach to the new physics, we investigate the lepton flavor violation (LFV) decays, $l\\to l'\\gamma$, and $\\mu,\\tau$ anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments in a lepton mass matrices ansatz which induced by SUSY GUT. We put very stringent constraints LFV decays and $\\tau$ anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments.

  8. Quick charge battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs) will become a significant reality in the near future of the automotive industry. Both types of vehicles will need a means to store energy on board. For the present, the method of choice would be lead-acid batteries, with the HEV having auxiliary power supplied by a small internal combustion engine. One of the main drawbacks to lead-acid batteries is internal heat generation as a natural consequence of the charging process as well as resistance losses. This limits the re-charging rate to the battery pack for an EV which has a range of about 80 miles. A quick turnaround on recharge is needed but not yet possible. One of the limiting factors is the heat buildup. For the HEV the auxiliary power unit provides a continuous charge to the battery pack. Therefore heat generation in the lead-acid battery is a constant problem that must be addressed. Presented here is a battery that is capable of quick charging, the Quick Charge Battery with Thermal Management. This is an electrochemical battery, typically a lead-acid battery, without the inherent thermal management problems that have been present in the past. The battery can be used in an all-electric vehicle, a hybrid-electric vehicle or an internal combustion engine vehicle, as well as in other applications that utilize secondary batteries. This is not restricted to only lead-acid batteries. The concept and technology are flexible enough to use in any secondary battery application where thermal management of the battery must be addressed, especially during charging. Any battery with temperature constraints can benefit from this advancement in the state of the art of battery manufacturing. This can also include nickel-cadmium, metal-air, nickel hydroxide, zinc-chloride or any other type of battery whose performance is affected by the temperature control of the interior as well as the exterior of the battery.

  9. Search for microscopic black holes and string balls in final states with leptons and jets with the ATLAS detector at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for an excess of events with multiple high transverse momentum objects including charged leptons and jets is presented, using 20.3 fb^-1 of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. No excess of events beyond Standard Model expectations is observed. Using extra-dimensional models for black hole and string ball production and decay, exclusion contours are determined as a function of the mass threshold for production and the fundamental gravity scale for two, four and six extra dimensions. For six extra dimensions, mass thresholds of 4.8-6.2 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level, depending on the fundamental gravity scale and model assumptions. Upper limits on the fiducial cross-sections for non-Standard Model production of these final states are set.

  10. Search for supersymmetry in events with a lepton, a photon, and large missing transverse energy in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is performed for an excess of events, over the standard model expectations, with a photon, a lepton, and large missing transverse energy in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. Such events are expected in many new physics models, in particular a supersymmetric theory that is broken via a gauge-mediated mechanism, when the lightest charged and neutral gauginos are mass degenerate. The data sample used in this search corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse picobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. No evidence of such an excess above the standard model backgrounds, dominated by W-gamma production, is found. The results are presented as 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section for a benchmark gauge-mediated scenario, and are then converted into exclusion limits on the squark, gluino, and wino masses.

  11. The Mixed Phase of Charged AdS Black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyabut Burikham; Chatchai Promsiri

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mixed phase of charged AdS black hole and radiation when the total energy is fixed below the threshold to produce a stable charged black hole branch. The phase diagram of the mixed phase is demonstrated for both fixed potential and charge ensemble. In the dual gauge picture, they correspond to the mixed phase of quark-gluon plasma~(QGP) and hadron gas in the fixed chemical potential and density ensemble respectively. In the nuclei and heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies, the mixed phase of exotic QGP and hadron gas could be produced. The mixed phase will condensate and evaporate into the hadron gas as the fireball expands.

  12. The Beam-Charge Azimuthal Asymmetry and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Balin, D; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Borysenko, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Chen, T; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Grebenyuk, O; Gregor, I M; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kobayashi, T; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lü, H; Lü, J; Lu, S; Ma, B Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Michler, T; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Negodaev, M; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Osborne, A; Pickert, N; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Sinram, K; Sommer, W; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Van Haarlem, Y; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Vogel, C; Volmer, J; Wang, S; Wendland, J; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first observation of an azimuthal cross--section asymmetry with respect to the charge of the incoming lepton beam is reported from a study of hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The data have been accumulated by the HERMES experiment at DESY, in which the HERA 27.6 GeV electron or positron beam scattered off an unpolarized hydrogen gas target. The observed asymmetry is attributed to the interference between the Bethe--Heitler process and the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process. The interference term is sensitive to DVCS amplitudes, which provide the most direct access to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  13. AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced...

  14. LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishiyama, K. I.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

  15. The sediment of mixtures of charged colloids: segregation and inhomogeneous electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jos Zwanikken; rene van Roij

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of dilute binary, ternary, and polydisperse mixtures of colloidal particles with different buoyant masses and/or charges. We focus on the low-salt regime, where the entropy of the screening ions drives spontaneous charge separation and the formation of an inhomogeneous macroscopic electric field. The resulting electric force lifts the colloids against gravity, yielding highly nonbarometric and even nonmonotonic colloidal density profiles. The most profound effect is the phenomenon of segregation into layers of colloids with equal mass-per-charge, including the possibility that heavy colloidal species float onto lighter ones.

  16. Anomalous magnetic and electric moments of $?$ and lepton flavor mixing matrix in effective lagrangian approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Q. Zhang; X. C. Song; W. J. Huo; T. F. Feng

    2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effective lagrangian approach [EM97] to new physics, the authors in ref. [HL99] pushed tau anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments (AMDM and EDM) down to $10^{-11}$ and $10^{-25} e cm$ by using a Fritzsch-Xing lepton mass matrix ansatz. In this note, we find that, in this approach, there exists the connection between $\\tau$ AMDM and EDM and the lepton flavor mixing matrix. By using the current neutrino oscillation experimental results, we investigate the parameter space of lepton mixing angles to $\\tau$ AMDM and EDM. We can obtain the same or smaller bounds of $\\delta a_\\tau$ and $d_\\tau$ acquired in ref. [HL99] and constrain $\\theta_l$ (the mixing angle obtained by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments) from $\\tau$ AMDM and EDM.

  17. On the possibility of observable signatures of leptonic onium atoms from astrophysical sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, S C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of Ps in our Galaxy is well measured, and has led to important and unanswered questions on the origin of the positrons. In principle it should be possible to form analogous systems from mu and tau leptons, viz. true muonium and true tauonium. However the probability of formation for these systems is greatly reduced due to the intrinsically short lifetimes of the mu and tau leptons. Likewise, the decay of the atoms is hastened by the high probability of the constituent particles decaying. Nevertheless, if significant numbers of mu and tau pairs are produced in high energy astrophysical environments there may be significant production of true muonium and true tauonium, despite the small probabilities. This paper addresses this possibility. We have calculated the pair production spectra of mu and tau leptons from photon-photon annihilation and electron-positron annihilation in astrophysical environments. We have computed the cross-sections for radiative recombination and direct annihilation of the ...

  18. Super Heavy Nuclei over Critical Fields and their Conections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, Walter [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Zagrebaev, Valery [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reaction, JINR, Dubna, 141980, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2007-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Low energy collisions of very heavy nuclei (238U+238U, 232Th+250Cf and 238U+248Cm) have been studied within the realistic dynamical model based on multi-dimensional Langevin equations. Large charge and mass transfer was found due to the 'inverse quasi-fission' process leading to formation of survived superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei. In many events lifetime of the composite system consisting of two touching nuclei turns out to be rather long; sufficient for spontaneous positron formation from super-strong electric field, a fundamental QED process.

  19. THE ELECTRIC PROGRAM INVESTMENT CHARGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ELECTRIC PROGRAM INVESTMENT CHARGE: PROPOSED 201214 TRIENNIAL INVESTMENT PLAN The California Energy Commission has prepared this triennial investment plan (2012 ­ 2014) for the new Electric, 2012, Phase 2 Decision 1205037. This decision established the Electric Program Investment Charge

  20. Forward energy flow, central charged-particle multiplicities, and pseudorapidity gaps in W and Z boson events from pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of forward energy flow and central charged-particle multiplicity in events with W and Z bosons decaying into leptons is presented. The analysis uses a sample of 7 TeV pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The observed forward energy depositions, their correlations, and the central charged-particle multiplicities are not well described by the available non-diffractive soft-hadron production models. A study of about 300 events with no significant energy deposited in one of the forward calorimeters, corresponding to a pseudorapidity gap of at least 1.9 units, is also presented. An indication for a diffractive component in these events comes from the observation that the majority of the charged leptons from the (W/Z) decays are found in the hemisphere opposite to the gap. When fitting the signed lepton pseudorapidity distribution of these events with predicted distributions from an admixture of diffractive (POMPYT) and non-diffractive (PYTHIA) Monte Carlo simulations, the diffractive component is determined to be (50.0 +/- 9.3 (stat.) +/- 5.2 (syst.))%.

  1. Measurements of Four-Lepton Production at the Z Resonance in pp Collisions at ?s = 7 and 8 TeV with ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Measurements of four-lepton (4?, ? = e,?) production cross sections at the Z resonance in pp collisions at the LHC with the ATLAS detector are presented. For dilepton and four-lepton invariant mass regions m[subscript ?+??] ...

  2. Sewerage service charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Samuel Robert

    1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEWER&.GE SERVICE CHARGES A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Major Subject* Municipal suid Sanitary... Engineering By Samuel Robert Wright May 1946 BA.GRV ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The writer wishes to express appreciation to the State Health Department and to Mr* E. E. McA-dams of the League of Texas Municipalities for their aid and assistance in the collection...

  3. A Heavy Flavor Tracker for STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chasman, C.; Beavis, D.; Debbe, R.; Lee, J.H.; Levine, M.J.; Videbaek, F.; Xu, Z.; Kleinfelder, S.; Li, S.; Cendejas, R.; Huang, H.; Sakai, S.; Whitten, C.; Joseph, J.; Keane, D.; Margetis, S.; Rykov, V.; Zhang, W.M.; Bystersky, M.; Kapitan, J.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Baudot, J.; Hu-Guo, C.; Shabetai, A.; Szelezniak, M.; Winter, M.; Kelsey, J.; Milner, R.; Plesko, M.; Redwine, R.; Simon, F.; Surrow, B.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Anderssen, E.; Dong, X.; Greiner, L.; Matis, H.S.; Morgan, S.; Ritter, H.G.; Rose, A.; Sichtermann, E.; Singh, R.P.; Stezelberger, T.; Sun, X.; Thomas, J.H.; Tram, V.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H.H.; Xu, N.; Hirsch, A.; Srivastava, B.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Bichsel, H.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR Collaboration proposes to construct a state-of-the-art microvertex detector,the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT), utilizing active pixel sensors and silicon strip technology. The HFT will significantly extend the physics reach of the STAR experiment for precision measurement of the yields and spectra of particles containing heavy quarks. This will be accomplished through topological identification of D mesons by reconstruction of their displaced decay vertices with a precision of approximately 50 mu m in p+p, d+A, and A+A collisions. The HFT consists of 4 layers of silicon detectors grouped into two sub-systems with different technologies, guaranteeing increasing resolution when tracking from the TPC and the Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) towards the vertex of the collision. The Intermediate Silicon Tracker (IST), consisting of two layers of single-sided strips, is located inside the SSD. Two layers of Silicon Pixel Detector (PIXEL) are inside the IST. The PIXEL detectors have the resolution necessary for a precision measurement of the displaced vertex. The PIXEL detector will use CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS), an innovative technology never used before in a collider experiment. The APSsensors are only 50 mu m thick and at a distance of only 2.5 cm from the interaction point. This opens up a new realm of possibilities for physics measurements. In particular, a thin detector (0.28percent radiation length per layer) in STAR makes it possible to do the direct topological reconstruction of open charm hadrons down to very low pT by the identification of the charged daughters of the hadronic decay.

  4. Texture Zero Mass Matrices and Flavor Mixing of Quarks and Leptons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss mass matrices with four texture zeros for the quarks and leptons. The three mixing angles for the quarks and leptons are functions of the fermion masses. The results agree with the experimental data. The ratio of the masses of the first two neutrinos is given by the solar mixing angle. The neutrino masses are calculated: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV , $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV , $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  5. A Stable Massive Charged Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Rajasekaran

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility of the existence of a stable massive charged particle by a minimal extension of the standard model particle content. Absolute stability in the case of singly charged particle is not possible if the usual doublet Higgs exists, unless a discrete symmetry is imposed.But a doubly charged particle is absolutely stable.

  6. Tools for charged Higgs bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oscar Stĺl

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the status of publicly available software tools applicable to charged Higgs physics. A selection of codes are highlighted in more detail, focusing on new developments that have taken place since the previous charged Higgs workshop in 2008. We conclude that phenomenologists now have the tools ready to face the LHC data. A new webpage collecting charged Higgs resources is presented.

  7. Holography, charge and baryon asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Mongan

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The reason for baryon asymmetry in our universe has been a pertinent question for many years. The holographic principle suggests a charged preon model underlies the Standard Model of particle physics and any such charged preon model requires baryon asymmetry. This note estimates the baryon asymmetry predicted by charged preon models in closed inflationary Friedmann universes.

  8. Two heavy fermions bound via Higgs boson exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Flambaum; Michael Kuchiev

    2011-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of two heavy fermions, leptons or quarks of the fourth generation, which are bound together via the Higgs boson exchange is studied. The conventional Yukawa-type interaction produced by this exchange is accompanied by several important corrections. We derived the Hamiltonian, which describes the correction arising from the retardation (compare the Breit correction in QED); we also calculated the relativistic and radiative corrections. The Higgs-induced bound state appears for the fermion mass m>m_{cr} \\approx 500 GeV. When the long-range Coulomb interaction or the gluon exchange are included, the bound states exist for any mass, but the Higgs exchange drastically increases the binding energy of these states when m is approaching m_{cr}. In the region m>m_{cr} the gluon exchange gives a sizable correction to the Higgs induced binding energy. This correction greatly exceeds typical binding energies in the states produced via the gluon exchange only. The possibility of detection of the considered bound states at LHC is discussed.

  9. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser plasma accelerator, charge diagnostics, Lanex, ICT,Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators K .CHARGE DIAGNOSTICS CROSS-CALIBRATIONS WITH LASER PLASMA

  10. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ce001musculus2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel...

  11. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ce001musculus2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel...

  12. Charged particle assisted nuclear reactions in solid state environment: renaissance of low energy nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kálmán, Péter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The features of electron assisted neutron exchange processes in crystalline solids are survayed. It is stated that, contrary to expectations, the cross section of these processes may reach an observable magnitude even in the very low energy case because of the extremely huge increment caused by the Coulomb factor of the electron assisted processes and by the effect of the crystal-lattice. The features of electron assisted heavy charged particle exchange processes, electron assisted nuclear capure processes and heavy charged particle assisted nuclear processes are also overviewed. Experimental observations, which may be related to our theoretical findings, are dealt with. The anomalous screening phenomenon is related to electron assisted neutron and proton exchange processes in crystalline solids. A possible explanation of observations by Fleischmann and Pons is presented. The possibility of the phenomenon of nuclear transmutation is qualitatively explained with the aid of usual and charged particle assisted r...

  13. Charged-Higgs-boson production at the LHC: Next-to-leading-order supersymmetric QCD corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittmaier, Stefan; Kraemer, Michael; Spira, Michael; Walser, Manuel [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dominant production process for heavy charged-Higgs bosons at the LHC is the associated production with heavy quarks. We have calculated the next-to-leading-order supersymmetric QCD corrections to charged-Higgs production through the parton processes qq,gg{yields}tbH{sup {+-}} and present results for total cross sections and differential distributions. The QCD corrections reduce the renormalization and factorization scale dependence and thus stabilize the theoretical predictions. We present a comparison of the next-to-leading-order results for the inclusive cross section with a calculation based on bottom-gluon fusion gb{yields}tH{sup {+-}} and discuss the impact of the next-to-leading-order corrections on charged-Higgs searches at the LHC.

  14. Measurement of the Electric Charge of the Top Quark in $\\boldsymbol{t\\bar{t}}$ Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the electric charge of top quarks using $t\\bar{t}$ events produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Tevatron. The analysis is based on fully reconstructed $t\\bar{t}$ pairs in lepton+jets final states. Using data corresponding to 5.3 $\\rm fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity, we exclude the hypothesis that the top quark has a charge of $Q=-4/3\\,e$ at a significance greater than 5 standard deviations. We also place an upper limit of 0.46 on the fraction of such quarks that can be present in an admixture with the standard model top quarks ($Q=+2/3\\,e$) at a 95\\% confidence level.

  15. Bound-free pair production cross section in heavy-ion colliders from the equivalent photon approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Aste

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Exact calculations of the electron-positron pair production by a single photon in the Coulomb field of a nucleus with simultaneous capture of the electron into the K-shell are discussed for different nuclear charges. Using the equivalent photon method of Weizsaecker and Williams, a simple expression for the bound-free production of electron-positron pairs by colliding very-high-energy fully stripped heavy ions is derived for nuclei of arbitrary charge.

  16. Measurement of electrons from heavy-flavor decays from $p$+$p$, $d$+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions in the PHENIX experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanghoon Lim

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Charm and bottom quarks are formed predominantly by gluon fusion in the initial hard scatterings at RHIC, making them good probes of the full medium evolution. Previous measurements at RHIC have shown large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of open heavy-flavor hadrons in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200~{\\rm GeV}$. Explaining the simultaneously large suppression and flow of heavy quarks has been challenging. To further understand the heavy-flavor transport in the hot and dense medium, it is imperative to also measure cold nuclear matter effects which affect the initial distribution of heavy quarks as well as the system size dependence of the final state suppression. In this talk, new measurements by the PHENIX collaboration of electrons from heavy-flavor decays in $p$+$p$, $d$+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200~{\\rm GeV}$ are presented. In particular, a surprising enhancement of intermediate transverse momentum heavy-flavor decay leptons in $d$+Au at mid and backward rapidity are also seen in mid-central Cu+Cu collisions. This enhancement is much larger than the expectation from anti-shadowing of the parton distributions and is theoretically unexplained.

  17. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  18. NERSC HPSS Charging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscale SubsurfaceExascalePhase-1 HPSS Charging NERSC uses

  19. A Better Method for Evaluating Heavy Metal Water Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hering, Janet

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efforts to control heavy metal pollution have focused oncomponent of heavy metal pollution, Dr. Hering found thatthat makes measuring heavy metal pollution a moving target.

  20. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuffner, Francis K. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W. (Richland, WA); Hammerstrom, Donald J. (West Richland, WA); Pratt, Richard M. (Richland, WA)

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  1. A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in Clifford-m@orange.fr August 27, 2014 Abstract A wave equation with mass term is studied for all particles and an- tiparticles of color and antiquarks u and d. This wave equation is form invariant under the Cl 3 group generalizing

  2. Higher twist contributions to lepton-pair production and other QCD processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Berger, E.L.; Lepage, G.P.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general discussion of the calculations and phenomenological consequences of power-law suppressed QCD processes is given with emphasis on tests in massive lepton pair production. Absolutely normalized predictions are given for the leading twist (transverse current) and higher twist (longitudinal current) contributions to the meson structure function in the region of large x.

  3. Inclusive Higgs Boson Searches in Four-Lepton Final States at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evelyne Delmeire

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The inclusive search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in four-lepton final states with the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC pp collider is presented. The discussion focusses on the H-> ZZ^(*)->4l+X decay mode for a Higgs boson in the mass range 120 ~Higgs boson properties is also given.

  4. Novel inclusive search for the Higgs boson in the four-lepton final state at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    An inclusive search for the standard model Higgs boson using the four-lepton final state in proton-antiproton collisions produced by the Tevatron at ?s=1.96??TeV is conducted. The data are recorded by the CDF II detector ...

  5. Evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of ? leptons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of ? leptons is performed using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 ...

  6. NEUTRON IZATI ON, LEPTON ESCAPE,AND STELLAR HYDRODYNAMICS* W. David Arnett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    NEUTRON IZATI ON, LEPTON ESCAPE,AND STELLAR HYDRODYNAMICS* W. David Arnett Enrico Fermi Institute University of Chicago 1. The Process of Neutronization.-Aftersili- con burning stellar matter has roughly equal numbers of neutrons and protons. Because neutron-star matter has a large excess of neutrons

  7. Forschung an Lepton Collidern Abbildung 49: Perspektivische Ansicht des TESLA-Detektors.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forschung an Lepton Collidern Abbildung 49: Perspektivische Ansicht des TESLA-Detektors. 86 #12An- strengung vieler Gruppen und Institute der ,,Tech- nical Design Report" für TESLA veröffentlicht wer- den von TESLA, besonders in Bereichen, die im TDR nicht ausreichend behandelt werden konnten, und die

  8. Search for Associated Production of a Single Top Quark and a Higgs Boson in Leptonic Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the production of a Higgs boson in association with a single top quark is presented, focusing on leptonic signatures provided by the $\\mathrm{H}\\rightarrow\\mathrm{W}\\mathrm{W}$ and $\\mathrm{H}\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay modes.

  9. K->e nu decays and lepton flavor violation searches with Kaons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Spadaro

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent Kaon decay studies seeking lepton-flavor violating (LFV) new-physics effects are briefly discussed. The main focus is set on precise measurements of rare or not-so-rare decays aiming at finding evidence of deviations from the SM prediction rather than on the results from direct searches of LFV transitions forbidden or ultra-rare in the SM.

  10. TeV Scale Lepton Number Violation and Baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Mohapatra, R N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to the common lore based on naive dimensional analysis, the seesaw scale for neutrino masses can be naturally in the TeV range, with small parameters coming from radiative corrections. We present one such class of type-I seesaw models, based on the left-right gauge group $SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R\\times U(1)_{B-L}$ realized at the TeV scale, which fits the observed neutrino oscillation parameters as well as other low energy constraints. We discuss how the small parameters of this scenario can arise naturally from one loop effects. The neutrino fits in this model use quasi-degenerate heavy Majorana neutrinos, as also required to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in our Universe via resonant leptogenesis mechanism. We discuss the constraints implied by the dynamics of this mechanism on the mass of the right-handed gauge boson in this class of models with enhanced neutrino Yukawa couplings compared to the canonical seesaw model and find a lower bound of $m_{W_R}\\geq 9.9$ TeV for successful leptogenesi...

  11. Pionic Fusion of Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Horn; G. C. Ball; D. R. Bowman; W. G. Davies; D. Fox; A. Galindo-Uribarri; A. C. Hayes; G. Savard; L. Beaulieu; Y. Larochelle; C. St-Pierre

    1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first experimental observation of the pionic fusion of two heavy ions. The 12C(12C,24Mg)pi0 and 12C(12C,24Na)pi+ cross sections have been measured to be 208 +/- 38 and 182 +/- 84 picobarns, respectively, at E_cm = 137 MeV. This cross section for heavy-ion pion production, at an energy just 6 MeV above the absolute energy-conservation limit, constrains possible production mechanisms to incorporate the kinetic energy of the entire projectile-target system as well as the binding energy gained in fusion.

  12. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. During this period, our program focuses on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus central collisions. We participated in the preparation of letters of intent for two RHIC experiments -- the OASIS proposal and the Di-Muon proposal -- and worked on two RHIC R D efforts -- a silicon strip detector project and a muon-identifier project. A small fraction of time was also devoted to physics programs outside the realm of heavy ion reactions by several individuals.

  13. Heavy Ions - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCIResearchGulfCenterHeavy Ions Heavy ions

  14. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Simultaneously in Dilepton and Lepton + Jets Decay Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorko, Wojciech T.; /Chicago U.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present the first measurement of the top quark mass using simultaneously data from two decay channels. They use a data sample of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collisions with integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector. They select dilepton and lepton + jets channel decays of t{bar t} pairs and reconstruct two observables in each topology. They use non-parametric techniques to derive probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the reconstructed top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the dilepton topology and the reconstructed top quark mass and the invariant mass of jets from the W boson decay in lepton + jets channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson resonance from the lepton + jets channel. Using 144 dilepton candidate events and 332 lepton + jets candidate events they measure: M{sub top} = 171.9 {+-} 1.7 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} = 171.9 {+-} 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}. The measurement features a robust treatment of the systematic uncertainties, correlated between the two channels and develops techniques for a future top quark mass measurement simultaneously in all decay channels. Measurements of the W boson mass and the top quark mass provide a constraint on the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. The Higgs boson mass implied by measurement presented here is higher than Higgs boson mass implied by previously published, most precise CDF measurements of the top quark mass in lepton + jets and dilepton channels separately.

  15. Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The report also examines when consumers want to recharge vehicles, and to what extent pricing and incentives can encourage consumers to charge during off-peak periods. Evaluating...

  16. Dipolar degrees of freedom and Isospin equilibration processes in Heavy Ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papa, M; Acosta, L; Amorini, F; Agodi, C; Anzalone, A; Auditore, L; Cardella, G; Cavallaro, S; Chatterjee, M B; De Filippo, E; Francalanza, L; Geraci, E; Grassi, L; Gnoffo, B; Han, J; La Guidara, E; Lanzalone, G; Lombardo, I; Pagano, C Maiolino T Minniti A; Pagano, E V; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Quattrocchi, L; Rizzo, F; Rosato, E; Russotto, P; Trifirň, A; Trimarchi, M; Verde, G; Vigilante, and M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: In heavy ion collision at the Fermi energies Isospin equilibration processes occur- ring when nuclei with different charge/mass asymmetries interacts have been investigated to get information on the nucleon-nucleon Iso-vectorial effective interaction. Purpose: In this paper, for the system 48Ca +27 Al at 40 MeV/nucleon, we investigate on this process by means of an observable tightly linked to isospin equilibration processes and sensitive in exclusive way to the dynamical stage of the collision. From the comparison with dynamical model calculations we want also to obtain information on the Iso-vectorial effective microscopic interaction. Method: The average time derivative of the total dipole associated to the relative motion of all emitted charged particles and fragments has been determined from the measured charges and velocities by using the 4? multi-detector CHIMERA. The average has been determined for semi- peripheral collisions and for different charges Zb of the biggest produced fragment. E...

  17. Plasma effect in Silicon Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Estrada; Jorge Molina; J. Blostein; G. Fernandez

    2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma effect is observed in CCDs exposed to heavy ionizing alpha-particles with energies in the range 0.5 - 5.5 MeV. The results obtained for the size of the charge clusters reconstructed on the CCD pixels agrees with previous measurements in the high energy region (>3.5 MeV). The measurements were extended to lower energies using alpha-particles produced by (n,alpha) reactions of neutrons in a Boron-10 target. The effective linear charge density for the plasma column is measured as a function of energy. The results demonstrate the potential for high position resolution in the reconstruction of alpha particles, which opens an interesting possibility for using these detectors in neutron imaging applications.

  18. Title Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy J. Glauber

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I shall try to say a few words about two particular ways in which my own work has a certain relation to your work with heavy ions. My title is therefore "Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics".

  19. Heavy quarks in effective field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Ambar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy quark physics serves as a probe to understand QCD, measure standard model parameters, and look for signs of new physics. We study several aspects of heavy quark systems in an effective field theory framework, including ...

  20. High dynamic range charge measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A charge amplifier for use in radiation sensing includes an amplifier, at least one switch, and at least one capacitor. The switch selectively couples the input of the switch to one of at least two voltages. The capacitor is electrically coupled in series between the input of the amplifier and the input of the switch. The capacitor is electrically coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. A method of measuring charge in radiation sensing includes selectively diverting charge from an input of an amplifier to an input of at least one capacitor by selectively coupling an output of the at least one capacitor to one of at least two voltages. The input of the at least one capacitor is operatively coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. The method also includes calculating a total charge based on a sum of the amplified charge and the diverted charge.

  1. Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remsberg, L.P.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

  2. Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remsberg, L.P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

  3. Heavy quark physics from LEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dornan, P.J. [Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of some of the latest results on heavy flavor physics from the LEP Collaborations is presented. The emphasis is on B physics, particularly new results and those where discrepancies is given of the many techniques which have been developed to permit these analyses.

  4. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  5. Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy baryon/meson ratios Lambda(c)/D(0) and Lambda(b)/(B) over bar (0) in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the quark coalescence model. For heavy baryons, we include production from coalescence of heavy quarks with free light quarks...

  6. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -see http://videos.komando.com/2008/08/19/water-painting/]. #12;12/7/08 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual12/7/08 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory 1 Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and fusion* Presented by B. Grant Logan on behalf of the U.S. Heavy Ion

  7. DIESEL/HEAVY The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    DIESEL/HEAVY EQUIPMENT The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance and repair of heavy equipment and trucks. Students will learn to work on electrical and air systems, diesel · Small Engines · Automotive Maintenance · Welding · Training for entry level heavy diesel equipment

  8. Hadron attenuation in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falter, T.; Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation of hadron attenuation in deep inelastic scattering off complex nuclei in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment. The analysis is carried out in the framework of a probabilistic coupled-channel transport model based on the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation, which allows for a treatment of the final-state interactions beyond simple absorption mechanisms. Furthermore, our event-by-event simulations account for the kinematic cuts of the experiments as well as the geometrical acceptance of the detectors. We calculate the multiplicity ratios of charged hadrons for various nuclear targets relative to deuterium as a function of the photon energy {nu}, the hadron energy fraction z{sub h}=E{sub h}/{nu}, and the transverse momentum p{sub T}. We also confront our model results on double-hadron attenuation with recent experimental data. Separately, we compare the attenuation of identified hadrons ({pi}{sup {+-}}, {pi}{sup 0}, K{sup {+-}}, p, and p) on {sup 20}Ne and {sup 84}Kr targets with the data from the HERMES Collaboration and make predictions for a {sup 131}Xe target. At the end we turn towards hadron attenuation on {sup 63}Cu nuclei at EMC energies. Our studies demonstrate that (pre-)hadronic final-state interactions play a dominant role in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment while our present approach overestimates the attenuation at EMC energies.

  9. Neutron observables from inclusive lepton scattering on nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinat, A. S.; Taragin, M. F. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze new data from Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) for inclusive electron scattering on various targets. Computed and measured total inclusive cross sections in the range 0.3 < or approx. x < or approx. 0.95 show reasonable agreement on a logarithmic scale for all targets. However, closer inspection of the quasielastic components reveals serious discrepancies. European Muon Collaboration (EMC) ratios with conceivably smaller systematic errors fare the same. As a consequence, the new data do not enable the extraction of the magnetic form factor G{sub M}{sup n} and the structure function F{sub 2}{sup n} of the neutron, although the application of exactly the same analysis to older data had been successful. We incorporate in the above analysis older CLAS Collaboration data on F{sub 2}{sup 2H}. Removal of some scattered points from those makes it appear possible to obtain the desired neutron information. We compare our results with others from alternative sources. Special attention is paid to the A=3 isodoublet cross sections and EMC ratios. Present data exist only for {sup 3}He, but the available input in combination with charge symmetry enables computations for {sup 3}H. Their average is the computed isoscalar part and is compared with the empirical modification of {sup 3}He EMC ratios toward a fictitious A=3 isosinglet.

  10. Light-Quark Decays in Heavy Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faller, Sven

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider weak decays of heavy hadrons (bottom and charmed) where the heavy quark acts as a spectator. Theses decays are heavily phase-space suppressed but may become experimentally accessible in the near future. These decays are interesting as a QCD laboratory to study the behaviour of the light quarks in the colour-background field of the heavy spectator.

  11. Heavy Quark Production in ep Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heavy Quark Production in ep Collisions o Introduction o Charm Production o Beauty Production o in ep collisions 23 February 2007 2/17 Heavy Flavor Production Boson-Gluon Fusion, dominant process Hard of the proton: #12;G. Leibenguth, Heavy Quarks Production in ep collisions 23 February 2007 3/17 HERA, Electron

  12. 3, 37453768, 2003 Heavy hydrogen in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 3, 3745­3768, 2003 Heavy hydrogen in the stratosphere T. R¨ockmann et al. Title Page Abstract/3745/ © European Geosciences Union 2003 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Heavy hydrogen Heavy hydrogen in the stratosphere T. R¨ockmann et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  13. Heavy oil production from Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K. [NIPER/BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Thomas, C.P. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    North Slope of Alaska has an estimated 40 billion barrels of heavy oil and bitumen in the shallow formations of West Sak and Ugnu. Recovering this resource economically is a technical challenge for two reasons: (1) the geophysical environment is unique, and (2) the expected recovery is a low percentage of the oil in place. The optimum advanced recovery process is still undetermined. Thermal methods would be applicable if the risks of thawing the permafrost can be minimized and the enormous heat losses reduced. Use of enriched natural gas is a probable recovery process for West Sak. Nearby Prudhoe Bay field is using its huge natural gas resources for pressure maintenance and enriched gas improved oil recovery (IOR). Use of carbon dioxide is unlikely because of dynamic miscibility problems. Major concerns for any IOR include close well spacing and its impact on the environment, asphaltene precipitation, sand production, and fines migration, in addition to other more common production problems. Studies have indicated that recovering West Sak and Lower Ugnu heavy oil is technically feasible, but its development has not been economically viable so far. Remoteness from markets and harsh Arctic climate increase production costs relative to California heavy oil or Central/South American heavy crude delivered to the U.S. Gulf Coast. A positive change in any of the key economic factors could provide the impetus for future development. Cooperation between the federal government, state of Alaska, and industry on taxation, leasing, and permitting, and an aggressive support for development of technology to improve economics is needed for these heavy oil resources to be developed.

  14. Hybrid combustion-premixed gasoline homogeneous charge ignited by injected diesel fuel-4-stroke cycle engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonetani, H.; Okanishi, N.; Fukutani, I.; Watanabe, E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the formation and testing of two hybrid combustion engines, wherein a premixed gasoline homogeneous charge was ignited by a small amount of injected diesel fuel under high compression ratio, by modifying open chamber and prechamber 4-stroke cycle diesel engines. It was found that the premixed gasoline was effective not only for decreasing the fuel consumption but also for reducing the smoke density both in the heavy and over-load regions. The effect of introducing a small amount N/sub 2/ gas for suppressing the diesel knock in the heavy load region also was examined.

  15. Neutrinos from Stellar Collapse: Comparison of signatures in water and heavy water detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautam Dutta; D. Indumathi; M. V. N. Murthy; G. Rajasekaran

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Signatures of neutrino and antineutrino signals from stellar collapse in heavy water detectors are contrasted with those in water detectors. The effects of mixing, especially due to the highly dense matter in the supernova core, are studied. The mixing parameters used are those sets allowed by current understanding of available neutrino data: from solar, atmospheric and laboratory neutrino experiments. Signals at a heavy water detector, especially the dominant charged current reactions on deuteron, are very sensitive to some of these sets of allowed mixing parameters. Theoretical uncertainties on supernova neutrino spectra notwithstanding, a combination of supernova measurements with water and heavy water detectors may be able to distinguish many of these mixing possibilities and thus help in ruling out many of them.

  16. Open heavy flavor production at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. P. Suaide

    2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of heavy flavor production in relativistic heavy ion collisions is an extreme experimental challenge but provides important information on the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) created in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Heavy-quarks are believed to be produced in the initial stages of the collision, and are essential on the understanding of parton energy loss in the dense medium created in such environment. Moreover, heavy-quarks can help to investigate fundamental properties of QCD in elementary p+p collisions. In this work we review recent results on heavy flavor production and their interaction with the hot and dense medium at RHIC.

  17. R-charge Kills Monopoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borut Bajc; Antonio Riotto; Goran Senjanovic

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Large charge density, unlike high temperature, may lead to nonrestoration of global and gauge symmetries. Supersymmetric GUTs with the appealing scenario of unification scale being generated dynamically naturally contain global continuous $R$ symmetries. We point out that the presence of a large $R$ charge in the early Universe can lead to GUT symmetry nonrestoration. This provides a simple way out of the monopole problem.

  18. A Search for Prompt Lepton-Jets in pp Collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    We present a search for a light (<2 GeV) boson predicted by Hidden Valley supersymmetric models that decays into a final state consisting of collimated muons or electrons, denoted “lepton-jets”. The analysis uses 5 ...

  19. A Meaurement of the W+- production cross section in p anti-p collisions at sqroot(s)=1.96 TeV in the DiLepton channel and limits on anomalous WWZ/gamma couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGivern, Dustin; /University Coll. London

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the production cross section of W{sup +}W{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV and limits on trilinear gauge boson coupling (TGC) parameters are presented. The data were recorded with the CDF experiment at Tevatron during the 2001 and 2002 data taking periods in which a total integrated luminosity of 184 pb{sup -1} was collected. The data sample was filtered for events with two leptonic w boson decays where the charged leptons can be either electrons or muons. 17 events are observed against an expected background of 5.0{sub -0.8}{sup +2.2} events. The resulting cross-section is found to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 14.5{sub -5.1}{sup +5.8}(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.9(lum) pb and agrees well with the Standard Model expectation. Limits on the TGC parameters {Delta}{kappa} and {lambda} are set under both the equal coupling scheme, that assumes the W boson couples identically to the Z and {gamma}, and the HISZ coupling scheme, that requires the couplings to respect SU(2){sub L} x &(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry. In both cases this is achieved by using a likelihood fit to the lepton-P{sub T} distribution of the 17 candidate events. The resulting limits are found to be: -0.4 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.6({lambda} = 0); -0.3 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the EQUAL couplings and -0.7 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.9 ({lambda} = 0); -0.4 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the HISZ couplings.

  20. Piston-assisted charge pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, D; Mourokh, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine charge transport through a system of three sites connected in series in the situation when an oscillating charged piston modulates the energy of the middle site. We show that with an appropriate set of parameters, charge can be transferred against an applied voltage. In this scenario, when the oscillating piston shifts away from the middle site, the energy of the site decreases and it is populated by a charge transferred from the lower energy site. On the other hand, when the piston returns to close proximity, the energy of the middle site increases and it is depopulated by the higher energy site. Thus through this process, the charge is pumped against the potential gradient. Our results can explain the process of proton pumping in one of the mitochondrial enzymes, Complex I. Moreover, this mechanism can be used for electron pumping in semiconductor nanostructures.

  1. Low-Energy Fusion-Fission Dynamics of Heavy Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagrebaev, Valery [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reaction, JINR, Dubna, 141980, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Greiner, Walter [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach is proposed for a unified description of strongly coupled deep-inelastic (DI) scattering, fusion, fission, and quasi-fission (QF) processes of heavy ion collisions. A unified driving-potential and a unified set of dynamic Langevin-type equations of motion are used in this approach. This makes it possible to perform a full (continuous) time analysis of the evolution of heavy nuclear systems, starting from the approaching stage, moving up to the formation of the compound nucleus or emerging into two final fragments. The calculated mass, charge, energy and angular distributions of the reaction products agree well with the corresponding experimental data for heavy and superheavy nuclear systems. Collisions of very heavy nuclei (such as 238U+248Cm) are investigated as an alternative way for production of superheavy elements. Large charge and mass transfer was found in these reactions due to the inverse (anti-symmetrizing) quasi-fission process leading to formation of surviving superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei.

  2. Lepton Universality Test in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guido, Elisa; /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we measure the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} = BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -})/BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}); the measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a possible search for a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson in Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) scenarios. Such a boson could appear in a deviation of the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} from the Standard Model expectation, that is 1, except for small lepton mass corrections. The analysis exploits the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}, where l = {mu},{tau}.

  3. CPT and lepton number violation in neutrino sector: Modified mass matrix and oscillation due to gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monika Sinha; Banibrata Mukhopadhyay

    2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the consequences of CPT and lepton number violation in neutrino sector. For CPT violation we take gravity with which neutrino and antineutrino couple differently. Gravity mixes neutrino and antineutrino in an unequal ratio to give two mass eigenstates. Lepton number violation interaction together with CPT violation gives rise to neutrino-antineutrino oscillation. Subsequently, we study the neutrino flavor mixing and oscillation under the influence of gravity. It is found that gravity changes flavor oscillation significantly which influences the relative abundance of different flavors in present universe. We show that the neutrinoless double beta decay rate is modified due to presence of gravity- the origin of CPT violation, as the mass of the flavor state is modified.

  4. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau, and jets final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; et al.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb?1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H ? ? ? decays or H ? WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

  5. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau lepton final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with zero, one, or two or more jets using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 7.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, and to Higgs boson decays to tau lepton pairs or W boson pairs. Observed (expected) limits are set on the ratio of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio, relative to those predicted by the Standard Model, of 14 (22) at a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV and 7.7 (6.8) at 165 GeV.

  6. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau lepton pair final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with zero, one, or two or more jets using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 7.3 fb^{-1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, and to Higgs boson decays to tau lepton pairs or W boson pairs. Observed (expected) limits are set on the ratio of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio, relative to those predicted by the Standard Model, of 14 (22) at a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV and 7.7 (6.8) at 165 GeV.

  7. An infrared origin of leptonic mixing and its test at DeepCore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Terranova

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermion mixing is generally believed to be a low-energy manifestation of an underlying theory whose energy scale is much larger than the electroweak scale. In this paper we investigate the possibility that the parameters describing lepton mixing actually arise from the low-energy behavior of the neutrino interacting fields. In particular, we conjecture that the measured value of the mixing angles for a given process depends on the number of unobservable flavor states at the energy of the process. We provide a covariant implementation of such conjecture, draw its consequences in a two neutrino family approximation and compare these findings with current experimental data. Finally we show that this infrared origin of mixing will be manifest at the Ice Cube DeepCore array, which measures atmospheric oscillations at energies much larger than the tau lepton mass; it will hence be experimentally tested in a short time scale.

  8. Measurement of J/psi leptonic width with the KEDR detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Beloborodova, O L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Grigoriev, D N; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kolmogorov, V V; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kudryavtsev, V N; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Prisekin, V G; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a new precise determination of the leptonic widths of the J/psi meson performed with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider. The measured values of the J/psi parameters are: \\Gamma_{ee}\\times\\Gamma_{ee}/\\Gamma = 0.3323 \\pm 0.0064 (stat.) \\pm 0.0048 (syst.) keV \\Gamma_{ee}\\times\\Gamma_{\\mu\\mu}/\\Gamma=0.3318 \\pm 0.0052 (stat.) \\pm 0.0063 (syst.) keV. Assuming $e\\mu$ universality and using the table value of the branching ratios the leptonic \\Gamma_{ll}= 5.59 \\pm 0.12 keV width and the total \\Gamma=94.1 \\pm 2.7 keV widths were obtained. We also discuss in detail a method to calculate radiative corrections at a narrow resonance.

  9. Events with Isolated Leptons and Missing Transverse Momentum and Measurement of W Production at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M.P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H.-U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; 10.1140/epjc/s10052-009-1160-6

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Events with high energy isolated electrons, muons or tau leptons and missing transverse momentum are studied using the full e^\\pm p data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 474 pb^{-1}. Within the Standard Model, events with isolated leptons and missing transverse momentum mainly originate from the production of single W bosons. The total single W boson production cross section is measured as 1.14 \\pm 0.25 (stat.) \\pm 0.14 (sys.) pb, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. The data are also used to establish limits on the WW\\gamma gauge couplings and for a measurement of the W boson polarisation.

  10. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau and jets final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb^{-1} of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H -> tau tau decays or H -> WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

  11. Charged Slepton Flavor post the 8 TeV LHC: A Simplified Model Analysis of Low-Energy Constraints and LHC SUSY Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calibbi, Lorenzo; Masiero, Antonio; Paradisi, Paride; Shadmi, Yael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the null results of LHC searches, which together with the Higgs mass, severely constrain minimal supersymmetric extensions of the standard model, we adopt a model-independent approach to study charged slepton flavor. We examine a number of simplified models, with different subsets of sleptons, electroweak gauginos, and Higgsinos, and derive the allowed slepton flavor dependence in the region probed by current LHC searches, and in the region relevant for the 14 TeV LHC. We then study the impact of the allowed flavor dependence on lepton plus missing energy searches. In some cases, flavor dependence significantly modifies the reach of the searches. These effects may be even larger at the next LHC run, since for the higher masses probed at 14 TeV, larger flavor mixings and relative mass splittings are compatible with low-energy constraints. Retaining the full lepton flavor information can increase the sensitivity of the searches.

  12. Search for the associated production of chargino and neutralino in the final state with three leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canepa, Anadi; /Purdue U.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supersymmetry, if realized in nature, predicts the existence of new particles, as chargino and neutralino, which might manifest themselves with peculiar signatures. Three leptons and large missing transverse energy in the event could signal their associated production. They report the latest results of the search performed by the CDF Collaboration in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at Tevatron Run II.

  13. PoS(EPS-HEP2013)326 Measurement of the ratio of the leptonic widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PoS(EPS-HEP2013)326 Measurement of the ratio of the leptonic widths ee/µµ for the J/ V. M. The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics EPS-HEP2013 18-24 July 2013 Stockholm, Sweden-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Licence. http://pos.sissa.it/ #12;PoS(EPS-HEP2013)326 ee(J/)/µµ (J/) measurement E. M. Baldin 1 2 3 4 5 6

  14. The physics of kaon decays: CP violation and lepton flavor nonconservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William R. Molzon; Bruce D. Winstein

    1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B188 The physics of kaon decays: CP violation and lepton flavor nonconservation. We discuss here the research that is likely to be done in the 1990's in the study of kaon decays. We concentrate on searches for direct CP violation and for the violation of electron- and muon-number, including approved and proposed experiments at existing facilities, and those which could be done at a facility using the proposed Fermilab Main Injector.

  15. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  16. Charge-pump voltage converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  17. Correlation between conserved charges in PNJL Model with multi-quark interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Bhattacharyya; Paramita Deb; Anirban Lahiri; Rajarshi Ray

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of correlations among conserved charges like baryon number, electric charge and strangeness in the framework of 2+1 flavor Polyakov loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model at vanishing chemical potentials, up to fourth order. Correlations up to second order have been measured in Lattice QCD which compares well with our estimates given the inherent difference in the pion masses in the two systems. Possible physical implications of these correlations and their importance in understanding the matter obtained in heavy-ion collisions are discussed. We also present comparison of the results with the commonly used unbound effective potential in the quark sector of this model.

  18. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Cross Section in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zhenbin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the single top quark cross section in the lepton plus jets final state using an integrated luminosity corresponding to 7.5~\\text{fb}^{-1} of p\\bar p collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The single top candidate events are identified by the signature of a charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and two or three jets with at least one of them identified as originating from a bottom quark. A new Monte Carlo generator \\textsc{powheg} is used to model the single top quark production processes, which include {s}-channel, {t}-channel, and {Wt}-channel. A neural network multivariate method is exploited to discriminate the single top quark signal from the comparatively large backgrounds. We measure a single top production cross section of $3.04^{+0.57}_{-0.53}$ (\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.}) pb assuming $m_{\\rm top}=172.5$~GeV/$c^2$. In addition, we extract the CKM matrix element value $|V_{tb}|=0.96\\pm 0.09~(\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})\\pm 0.05~(\\mathrm{theory})$ and set a lower limit of |V_{tb}|>0.78 at the 95\\% credibility level.

  19. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, J.F. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  20. Femtoscopically Probing the Freeze-out Configuration in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Annan Lisa; Scott Pratt

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-particle femtoscopy reveals the space-time substructure of the freeze-out configuration from heavy ion collisions. Detailed fingerprints of bulk collectivity are evident in space-momentum correlations, which have been systematically measured as a function of particle type, three-momentum, and collision conditions. A clear scenario, dominated by hydrodynamic-type flow emerges. Reproducing the strength and features of the femtoscopic signals in models involves important physical quantities like the Equation of State, as well as less fundamental technical details. An interesting approximate "factorization" in the measured systematics suggests that the overall physical freeze-out scale is set by final state chemistry, but the kinematic substructure is largely universal. Referring to previous results from hadron and lepton collisions, we point to the importance of determining whether these "universal" trends persist from the largest to the smallest systems. We review theoretical expectations for heavy ion femtoscopy at the LHC, and point to directions needing further theory and experimental work at RHIC and the LHC.

  1. Collective thermoelectrophoresis of charged colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arghya Majee; Alois Würger

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermally driven colloidal transport is, to a large extent, due to the thermoelectric or Seebeck effect of the charged solution.We show that, contrary to the generally adopted single-particle picture, the transport coefficient depends on the colloidal concentration. For solutions that are dilute in the hydrodynamic sense, collective effects may significantly affect the thermophoretic mobility. Our results provide an explanation for recent experimental observations on polyelectrolytes and charged particles and suggest that for charged colloids collective behavior is the rule rather than the exception.

  2. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher (Los Alamos, NM); Fraser, Andrew Mcleod (Los Alamos, NM); Schultz, Larry Joe (Los Alamos, NM); Borozdin, Konstantin N. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich (Maynard, MA); Sossong, Michael James (Los Alamos, NM); Blanpied, Gary (Lexington, SC)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  3. New mechanism for neutrino mass generation and triply charged Higgs bosons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, K. S.; Nandi, S.; Tavartkiladze, Zurab [Department of Physics and Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new mechanism for generating small neutrino masses which predicts the relation m{sub {nu}}{approx}v{sup 4}/M{sup 3}, where v is the electroweak scale, rather than the conventional seesaw formula m{sub {nu}}{approx}v{sup 2}/M. Such a mass relation is obtained via effective dimension seven operators LLHH(H{sup {dagger}}H)/M{sup 3}, which arise when an isospin 3/2 Higgs multiplet {phi} is introduced along with isotriplet leptons. The masses of these particles are naturally in the TeV scale. The triply charged Higgs boson contained in {phi} can be pair produced at the LHC and the Tevatron, with {phi}{sup +++} decaying into W{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup +} or W{sup +}W{sup +}W{sup +}, possibly with displaced vertices. The leptonic decays of {phi}{sup +++} will help discriminate between normal and inverted hierarchies of neutrino masses. This scenario also allows for raising the standard Higgs boson mass to values in excess of 500 GeV.

  4. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbćk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect (CME). The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this paper, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39 and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy, and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. The implications of these results for the CME will be discussed.

  5. Turbo-Charged Lighting Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W. H. II

    TURBO-CHARGED LIGHTING DESIGN William H. Clark II Design Engineer O'Connell Robertson & Assoc Austin/ Texas ABSTRACT The task of the lighting designer has become very complex, involving thousands of choices for fixture types and hundreds...

  6. CHARGE STATE EVOLUTION IN THE SOLAR WIND. II. PLASMA CHARGE STATE COMPOSITION IN THE INNER CORONA AND ACCELERATING FAST SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, E.; Gruesbeck, J. R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, we calculate the evolution of the charge state distribution within the fast solar wind. We use the temperature, density, and velocity profiles predicted by Cranmer et al. to calculate the ionization history of the most important heavy elements in the solar corona and solar wind: C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe. The evolution of each charge state is calculated from the source region in the lower chromosphere to the final freeze-in point. We show that the solar wind velocity causes the plasma to experience significant departures from equilibrium at very low heights, well inside the field of view (within 0.6 R{sub sun} from the solar limb) of nearly all the available remote-sensing instrumentation, significantly affecting observed spectral line intensities. We also study the evolution of charge state ratios with distance from the source region, and the temperature they indicate if ionization equilibrium is assumed. We find that virtually every charge state from every element freezes in at a different height, so that the definition of freeze-in height is ambiguous. We also find that calculated freeze-in temperatures indicated by charge state ratios from in situ measurements have little relation to the local coronal temperature of the wind source region, and stop evolving much earlier than their correspondent charge state ratio. We discuss the implication of our results on plasma diagnostics of coronal holes from spectroscopic measurements as well as on theoretical solar wind models relying on coronal temperatures.

  7. Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

  8. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Fayolle; T. Bickel; A. Würger

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  9. Hiding a Heavy Higgs Boson at the 7 TeV LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Yang; Fan, JiJi; Hewett, JoAnne L.

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A heavy Standard Model Higgs boson is not only disfavored by electroweak precision observables but is also excluded by direct searches at the 7 TeV LHC for a wide range of masses. Here, we examine scenarios where a heavy Higgs boson can be made consistent with both the indirect constraints and the direct null searches by adding only one new particle beyond the Standard Model. This new particle should be a weak multiplet in order to have additional contributions to the oblique parameters. If it is a color singlet, we find that a heavy Higgs with an intermediate mass of 200-300 GeV can decay into the new states, suppressing the branching ratios for the standard model modes, and thus hiding a heavy Higgs at the LHC. If the new particle is also charged under QCD, the Higgs production cross section from gluon fusion can be reduced significantly due to the new colored particle one-loop contribution. Current collider constraints on the new particles allow for viable parameter space to exist in order to hide a heavy Higgs boson. We categorize the general signatures of these new particles, identify favored regions of their parameter space and point out that discovering or excluding them at the LHC can provide important indirect information for a heavy Higgs. Finally, for a very heavy Higgs boson, beyond the search limit at the 7 TeV LHC, we discuss three additional scenarios where models would be consistent with electroweak precision tests: including an additional vector-like fermion mixing with the top quark, adding another U(1) gauge boson and modifying triple-gauge boson couplings.

  10. A holographic charged preon model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Mongan

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model (SM) is a successful approach to particle physics calculations. However, there are indications that the SM is only a good approximation to an underlying non-local reality involving fundamental entities (preons) that are not point particles. Furthermore, our universe seems to be dominated by a vacuum energy/cosmological constant. The holographic principle then indicates only a finite number of bits of information will ever be available to describe the observable universe, and that requires a holographic preon model linking the (0,1) holographic bits to SM particles. All SM particles have charges 0, 1/3, 2/3 or 1 in units of the electron charge, so the bits in a holographic preon model must be identified with fractional electric charge. Such holographic charged preon models require baryon asymmetry and also suggest a mechanism for stationary action. This paper outlines a holographic charged preon model where preons are strands with finite energy density specified by bits of information identifying the charge on each end. In the model, SM particles consist of three strands with spin states corresponding to wrapped states of the strands. SM particles in this wrapped preon model can be approximated by preon bound states in non-local dynamics based on three-preon Bethe-Salpeter equations with instantaneous three-preon interactions. The model can be falsified by data from the Large Hadron Collider because it generates baryon asymmetry without axions, and does not allow more than three generations of SM fermions.

  11. Consequences of energy conservation in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete characterization of particle production and emission in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is in general not feasible experimentally. This work demonstrates, however, that the availability of essentially complete pseudorapidity distributions for charged particles allows for a reliable estimate of the average transverse momenta and energy of emitted particles by requiring energy conservation in the process. The results of such an analysis for Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}= 130 and 200 GeV are compared with measurements of mean-p_T and mean-E_T in regions where such measurements are available. The mean-p_T dependence on pseudorapidity for Au+Au collisions at 130 and 200 GeV is given for different collision centralities.

  12. The thermodynamics of heavy light hadrons at freezeout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayantan Sharma

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In the discussion of hadronization at or close to the freeze-out curve statistical (hadron resonance gas) models play an important role. In particular, in the charmonium sector, regeneration models are considered which rely on the fact that charmonium states can form again already at temperatures well above the QCD transition or hadronization temperature. An important ingredient in these considerations is the regeneration or hadronization of open charm states. In this talk we report on a lattice QCD analysis of correlations of open strange and charm with other conserved quantum numbers like the net baryon number and electric charge. We analyze the temperature range in which an uncorrelated hadron resonance gas (HRG) provides an adequate description of such correlations. This limits the range of validity of HRG based thermodynamics in open flavor channels and provides an estimate for the melting temperature of heavy-light hadrons.

  13. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ce001musculus2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review...

  14. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. ace01musculus.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review...

  15. Search for new light gauge boson in Higgs boson decays to four-lepton events in pp collisions at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Search for new light gauge boson in Higgs boson decays to four-lepton events in pp collisions at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

  16. Emission Controls for Heavy-Duty Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DEER Conference Emission Controls for Heavy-Duty Trucks Overview Emission Standards - US and Worldwide Technology Options for Meeting Emissions System Integration ...

  17. Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed look at the removal of the Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal. A project sponsored by the Recovery Act on the Savannah River Site.

  18. Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a future in which vehicle automation technologies are ableto support the heavy vehicle automation including PrecisionCommittee on Vehicle-Highway Automation, and the attendees

  19. Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program helps heavy oil consumers move toward sustainable development while improving their competitive position by reducing their consumption. Financial assistance is offered to carry out...

  20. Course Notes: United States Particle Accelerator School Beam Physics with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, J.J.; Lund, S.M.

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the physics of beams with intense space charge. This course is suitable for graduate students and researchers interested in accelerator systems that require sufficient high intensity where mutual particle interactions in the beam can no longer be neglected. This course is intended to give the student a broad overview of the dynamics of beams with strong space charge. The emphasis is on theoretical and analytical methods of describing the acceleration and transport of beams. Some aspects of numerical and experimental methods will also be covered. Students will become familiar with standard methods employed to understand the transverse and longitudinal evolution of beams with strong space charge. The material covered will provide a foundation to design practical architectures. In this course, we will introduce you to the physics of intense charged particle beams, focusing on the role of space charge. The topics include: particle equations of motion, the paraxial ray equation, and the Vlasov equation; 4-D and 2-D equilibrium distribution functions (such as the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij, thermal equilibrium, and Neuffer distributions), reduced moment and envelope equation formulations of beam evolution; transport limits and focusing methods; the concept of emittance and the calculation of its growth from mismatches in beam envelope and from space-charge non-uniformities using system conservation constraints; the role of space-charge in producing beam halos; longitudinal space-charge effects including small amplitude and rarefaction waves; stable and unstable oscillation modes of beams (including envelope and kinetic modes); the role of space charge in the injector; and algorithms to calculate space-charge effects in particle codes. Examples of intense beams will be given primarily from the ion and proton accelerator communities with applications from, for example, heavy-ion fusion, spallation neutron sources, nuclear waste transmutation, etc.

  1. Search for charged Higgs bosons decaying via H+ -> tau nu in top quark pair events using pp collision data at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Dumlupinar U. /Gazi U. /TOBB ETU, Ankara /TAEK, Ankara /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a search for charged Higgs bosons are presented. The analysis is based on 4.6 fb{sup -1} of proton-proton collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, using top quark pair events with a {tau} lepton in the final state. The data are consistent with the expected background from Standard Model processes. Assuming that the branching ratio of the charged Higgs boson to a {tau} lepton and a neutrino is 100%, this leads to upper limits on the branching ratio of top quark decays to a b quark and a charged Higgs boson between 5% and 1% for charged Higgs boson masses ranging from 90 GeV to 160 GeV, respectively. In the context of the m{sub h}{sup max} scenario of the MSSM, tan {beta} above 12-26, as well as between 1 and 2-6, can be excluded for charged Higgs boson masses between 90 GeV and 150 GeV.

  2. The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -consistent power plant design for a multi- beam induction linac, final focus and chamber propagationThe Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy Grant Logan Director Heavy-Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Presented to FESAC Workshop on Development Paths

  3. Impact of heavy hole-light hole coupling on optical selection rules in GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belhadj, T.; Amand, T.; Kunz, S.; Marie, X.; Urbaszek, B. [INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, Universite de Toulouse, 135 Av. Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse (France); Kunold, A. [INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, Universite de Toulouse, 135 Av. Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse (France); Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, UAM-A, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Simon, C.-M. [INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, Universite de Toulouse, 135 Av. Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS-UPS, LCAR, IRSAMC, Universite de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse (France); Kuroda, T.; Abbarchi, M.; Mano, T.; Sakoda, K. [National Institute for Material Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report strong heavy hole-light hole mixing in GaAs quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy. Using the neutral and charged exciton emission as a monitor we observe the direct consequence of quantum dot symmetry reduction in this strain free system. By fitting the polar diagram of the emission with simple analytical expressions obtained from k{center_dot}p theory we are able to extract the mixing that arises from the heavy-light hole coupling due to the geometrical asymmetry of the quantum dot.

  4. Study of space charge compensation phenomena in charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veltri, P.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35100 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, Viale dell'Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of a charged particle beam is accompanied by the production of secondary particles created in the interaction of the beam itself with the background gas flowing in the accelerator tube. In the drift region, where the electric field of the electrodes is negligible, secondary particles may accumulate giving a plasma which shields the self-induced potential of the charged beam. This phenomenon, known as space charge compensation is a typical issue in accelerator physics, where it is usually addressed by means of 1D radial transport codes or Monte Carlo codes. The present paper describes some theoretical studies on this phenomenon, presenting a Particle in Cell-Monte Carlo (PIC-MC) Code developed ad hoc where both radial and axial confinements of secondary particles are calculated. The features of the model, offering a new insight on the problem, are described and some results discussed.

  5. Charge dependent relation between the masses of different generations and Neutrino masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sazdovic, Branislav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the enormous achievements, the Standard model of Particle physics can not be consider as complete theory of fundamental interactions. Among other things, it can not describe the gravitational interaction and it depends on 19 parameters. The Standard model includes 12 fermions (matter elementary particles with spin $\\frac{1}{2}$) which are divided in three generations, groups with same interactions but different masses. Each generation can be classified into two leptons (with electric charges $Q=-1$, electron-like and $Q=0$, neutrino) and two quarks (with electric charges $Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$, down-type and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$, up-type). However, the understanding of the relationship between generations and ratio of masses of different generations are unknown. Here we show that there exists the simple relation between masses of different generations which depend only on the electric charges for $Q=-1,\\, \\, Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$ and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$. It is in pretty good agreement with experimental data. Assuming that...

  6. Charge dependent relation between the masses of different generations and Neutrino masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branislav Sazdovic

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the enormous achievements, the Standard model of Particle physics can not be consider as complete theory of fundamental interactions. Among other things, it can not describe the gravitational interaction and it depends on 19 parameters. The Standard model includes 12 fermions (matter elementary particles with spin $\\frac{1}{2}$) which are divided in three generations, groups with same interactions but different masses. Each generation can be classified into two leptons (with electric charges $Q=-1$, electron-like and $Q=0$, neutrino) and two quarks (with electric charges $Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$, down-type and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$, up-type). However, the understanding of the relationship between generations and ratio of masses of different generations are unknown. Here we show that there exists the simple relation between masses of different generations which depend only on the electric charges for $Q=-1,\\, \\, Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$ and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$. It is in pretty good agreement with experimental data. Assuming that the same relation valid for $Q=0$, we are able to calculate neutrino masses. Therefore, our results could pave the way for further investigations beyond Standard model.

  7. Nuclear Effects in Deep Inelastic Scattering of Charged-Current Neutrino off Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan ChunGui; Li GuangLie; Shen PengNian

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear effect in the neutrino-nucleus charged-Current inelastic scattering process is studied by analyzing the CCFR and NuTeV data. Structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $xF_3(x,Q^2)$ as well as differential cross sections are calculated by using CTEQ parton distribution functions and EKRS and HKN nuclear parton distribution functions, and compared with the CCFR and NuTeV data. It is found that the corrections of nuclear effect to the differential cross section for the charged-current anti-neutrino scattering on nucleus are negligible, the EMC effect exists in the neutrino structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$ in the large $x$ region, the shadowing and anti-shadowing effect occurs in the distribution functions of valence quarks in the small and medium $x$ region,respectively. It is also found that shadowing effects on $F_2(x,Q^2)$ in the small $x$ region in the neutrino-nucleus and the charged-lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering processes are different. It is clear that the neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering data should further be employed in restricting nuclear parton distributions.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion &...

  9. New precise determination of the $\\tau$ lepton mass at KEDR detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Y; Barnyakov, M Y; Baru, S E; Bedny, I V; Beloborodova, O L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A B; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Bondarev, D V; Buzykaev, A R; Cherepanov, V P; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kremyanskaya, E V; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S E; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Petrosyan, S S; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Pospelov, G E; Prisekin, V G; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shubin, E I; Shwartz, B A; Sidorov, V A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skovpen, Y I; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Soukharev, A M; Struchalin, M V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Y; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhuravlev, A N

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of the experiment on the precise $\\tau$ lepton mass measurement running at the VEPP-4M collider with the KEDR detector is reported. The mass value is evaluated from the $\\tau^+\\tau^-$ cross section behaviour around the production threshold. The preliminary result based on 6.7 pb$^{-1}$ of data is $m_{\\tau}=1776.80^{+0.25}_{-0.23} \\pm 0.15$ MeV. Using 0.8 pb$^{-1}$ of data collected at the $\\psi'$ peak the preliminary result is also obtained: $\\Gamma_{ee}B_{\\tau\\tau}(\\psi') = 7.2 \\pm 2.1$ eV.

  10. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; ATLAS Collaboration; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Ĺkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Ĺsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarăes da Costa, Joăo; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a search for $H \\to \\tau \\tau$ decays are presented, based on the full set of proton--proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 $\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ and 20.3 $\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic ($\\tau \\to \\ell \

  11. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to today's large NP accelerators like GSI-FAIR, RHIC economical for 1-2 GWe baseload power plants. Heavy chambers. · Competitive economics: projected in several power plant studies and with no high levelSlide 1 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Briefing for the National Academy

  12. A Heavy Flavor Tracker for STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Kleinfelder, S.; Koohi, A.; Li, S.; Huang, H.; Tai, A.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W.; Himmi,A.; Hu, C.; Shabetai, A.; Szelezniak, M.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.; Surrow,B.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Bieser, F.; Gareus, R.; Greiner, L.; Lesser,F.; Matis, H.S.; Oldenburg, M.; Ritter, H.G.; Pierpoint, L.; Retiere, F.; Rose, A.; Schweda, K.; Sichtermann, E.; Thomas, J.H.; Wieman, H.; Yamamoto, E.; Kotov, I.

    2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to construct a Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment at RHIC. The HFT will bring new physics capabilities to STAR and it will significantly enhance the physics capabilities of the STAR detector at central rapidities. The HFT will ensure that STAR will be able to take heavy flavor data at all luminosities attainable throughout the proposed RHIC II era.

  13. Electron loss from fast heavy ions: Target-scaling dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuBois, R. D. [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Santos, A. C. F.; Montenegro, E. C. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRJ, Caixa Postal 68528 Rio de Janeiro, BR-21941-972 RJ (Brazil); Sigaud, G. M. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, BR-22452-970 RJ (Brazil)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The target dependence for projectile electron loss is investigated using experimental data taken from the literature. Impact energies range from a few tens of eV/u to tens of MeV/u. For energies less than several MeV/u, the target dependences are shown to be very similar, independent of projectile species and charge state. Overall, however, with increasing impact energy the cross-section dependence on the target nuclear charge systematically increases. It is shown that none of the existing cross-section target scaling models reproduce these features. A model, based on Born scaling and including both the antiscreening and screening contributions to projectile electron loss, is developed. With the inclusion of relativistic effects, which increase the contribution from both channels at high energies, and ''target saturation'' effects, which reduce the contribution from the screening term for heavy targets and lower impact energies, this model describes quite reasonably all available experimental data. A simple scaling formula that reproduces the measured atomic number and impact velocity dependences is provided. This formula is applicable for projectile electron loss in collisions with either atomic or molecular targets and for impact energies ranging from a few to tens of MeV/u.

  14. Heavy photon search experiment at JLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanyan, S. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Collaboration: HPS Collaboration

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab will search for new heavy vector boson(s), aka 'heavy photons', in the mass range of 20 MeV/c{sup 2} to 1000 MeV/c{sup 2} using the scattering of high energy, high intensity electron beams off a high Z target. The proposed measurements will cover the region of parameter space favored by the muon g-2 anomaly, and will explore a significant region of parameter space, not only at large couplings (??/? > 10{sup ?7}), but also in the regions of small couplings, down to ??/??10{sup ?10}. The excellent vertexing capability of the Si-tracker uniquely enables HPS to cover the small coupling region. Also, HPS will search for heavy photons in an alternative to the e{sup +}e{sup ?} decay mode, in the heavy photon's decay to ?{sup +}??.

  15. QCD mechanisms for heavy particle production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For very large pair mass, the production of heavy quarks and supersymmetric particles is expected to be governed by ACD fusion subprocesses. At lower mass scales other QCD mechanisms such as prebinding distortion and intrinsic heavy particle Fock states can become important, possibly accounting for the anomalies observed for charm hadroproduction. We emphasize the importance of final-state Coulomb interactions at low relative velocity in QCD and predict the existence of heavy narrow four quark resonances (c c-bar u u-bar) and (cc c-bar c-bar) in ..gamma gamma.. reactions. Coherent QCD contributions are discussed as a contribution to the non-additivity of nuclear structure functions and heavy particle production cross sections. We also predict a new type of amplitude zero for exclusive heavy meson pair production which follows from the tree-graph structure of QCD. 35 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  17. Magnetic moment versus tensor charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mekhfi

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We express the baryon magnetic moments in terms of the baryon tensor charges, considering the quarks as relativistic interacting objects. Once tensor charges get measured accurately, the formula for the baryon magnetic moment will serve to extract precise information on the quark anomalous magnetic moment, the quark effective mass and the ratio of the quark constituent mass to the quark effective mass. The analogous formula for the baryon electric dipole moment is of no great use as it gets eventually sizable contributions from various CP- violating sources not necessary associated to the quark electric dipole moment.

  18. Charge amplifier with bias compensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion beam uniformity monitor for very low beam currents using a high-sensitivity charge amplifier with bias compensation. The ion beam monitor is used to assess the uniformity of a raster-scanned ion beam, such as used in an ion implanter, and utilizes four Faraday cups placed in the geometric corners of the target area. Current from each cup is integrated with respect to time, thus measuring accumulated dose, or charge, in Coulombs. By comparing the dose at each corner, a qualitative assessment of ion beam uniformity is made possible. With knowledge of the relative area of the Faraday cups, the ion flux and areal dose can also be obtained.

  19. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three particle azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho} even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  20. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in $p^\\uparrow+p$ at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calder'on de la Barca S'anchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; I. Chakaberia; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; J. H. Chen; X. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; W. Christie; G. Contin; H. J. Crawford; S. Das; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; R. Esha; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; P. Federic; J. Fedorisin; Z. Feng; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; L. Fulek; C. A. Gagliardi; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; S. Gupta; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; L. He; S. Heppelmann; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; X. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; K. Jiang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; L. Kochenda; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; L. K. Kosarzewski; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; X. Li; C. Li; W. Li; Z. M. Li; Y. Li; X. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; Y. G. Ma; G. L. Ma; L. Ma; R. Ma; N. Magdy; R. Majka; A. Manion; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; K. Meehan; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; V. Okorokov; D. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; R. Pak; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; M. Posik; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; M. K. Sharma; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. Sikora; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; L. Song; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; M. Stepanov; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; B. Summa; X. Sun; Z. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; B. Surrow; N. Svirida; M. A. Szelezniak; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; A. N. Tawfik; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; S. K. Tripathy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Upsal; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; R. Varma; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbćk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; G. Wang; Y. Wang; F. Wang; Y. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. G. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; Q. H. Xu; Z. Xu; H. Xu; N. Xu; Y. F. Xu; Q. Yang; Y. Yang; S. Yang; Y. Yang; C. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; X. P. Zhang; J. Zhang; Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; Z. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in $p^\\uparrow+p$ collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of five standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities eta>0.5, and for pair masses around the mass of the rho-meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p+p collisions. Comparing the results to data from lepton-nucleon scattering will test the universality of these spin-dependent quantities.

  1. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magańa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 fb?ą of integrated luminosity in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  2. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at D0 Run II with the Matrix Element Method in the Lepton+Jets Final State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schieferdecker, Philipp; /Munich U.; ,

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model. Its precise knowledge yields valuable insights into unresolved phenomena in and beyond the Standard Model. A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton+jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events are selected requiring an isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), significant missing transverse energy, and exactly four calorimeter jets. For each event, the probabilities to originate from the signal and background processes are calculated based on the measured kinematics, the object resolutions and the respective matrix elements. The jet energy scale is known to be the dominant source of systematic uncertainty. The reference scale for the mass measurement is derived from Monte Carlo events. The matrix element likelihood is defined as a function of both, m{sub top} and jet energy scale JES, where the latter represents a scale factor with respect to the reference scale. The top mass is obtained from a two-dimensional correlated fit, and the likelihood yields both the statistical and jet energy scale uncertainty. Using a dataset of 320 pb{sup -1} of D0 Run II data, the mass of the top quark is measured to be: m{sub top}{sup {ell}+jets} = 169.5 {+-} 4.4(stat. + JES){sub -1.6}{sup +1.7}(syst.) GeV; m{sub top}{sup e+jets} = 168.8 {+-} 6.0(stat. + JES){sub -1.9}{sup +1.9}(syst.) GeV; m{sub top}{sup {mu}+jets} = 172.3 {+-} 9.6(stat.+JES){sub -3.3}{sup +3.4}(syst.) GeV. The jet energy scale measurement in the {ell}+jets sample yields JES = 1.034 {+-} 0.034, suggesting good consistency of the data with the simulation. The measurement forecasts significant improvements to the total top mass uncertainty during Run II before the startup of the LHC, as the data sample will grow by a factor of ten and D0's tracking capabilities will be employed in jet energy reconstruction and flavor identification.

  3. PLUG-IN ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING ONLY Must be ACTIVELY Charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    PLUG-IN ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING ONLY Must be ACTIVELY Charging All Others Subject to Citation. PLUG-IN ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING RATES Monday­Friday, 7:30am­5pm Hours Power Parking Power+Parking 1://chargepoint.net PAYMENT IS REQUIRED FOR USE OF A CHARGING STATION The rate for charging your vehicle is $1/hour. Please

  4. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  5. SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro 4 Emission Standards in 2005 SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro 4 Emission Standards in...

  6. Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Presentation...

  7. Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions Reduction Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions Reduction 2005 Diesel Engine...

  8. Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  9. Design of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing Center Design of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing Center Both simulated and actual diesel emissions...

  10. WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for...

  11. Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ALTERNATIVE. EVERY Advanced Natural Gas Engine Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Dr. Mostafa M Kamel Dr. Mostafa M...

  12. California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty Trucks California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty Trucks Describes system for fueling truck...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions...

  14. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube...

  15. NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation This report provides the results of an...

  16. Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using Model-Based Transient Calibration Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using...

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

  18. Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwoVulnerabilities | Department of|VTA,an

  19. Test of Lepton Universality in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Columbus Supercond., Genova /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U.; /more authors.; ,

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}}({Upsilon}(1S))={Lambda}{sub {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}}/{Lambda}{sub {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}} is measured using a sample of (121.8 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6}{Upsilon}(3S) events recorded by the BABAR detector. This measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a search for a possible light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. In the standard model (SM) this ratio is expected to be close to 1. Any significant deviations would violate lepton universality and could be introduced by the coupling to a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson. The analysis studies the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where l = {mu}, {tau}. The result, R{sub {tau}{mu}}({Upsilon}(1S))=1.005 {+-} 0.013(stat) {+-} 0.022(syst), shows no deviation from the expected SM value, while improving the precision with respect to previous measurements.

  20. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb$^{?1}$, with 4.9 fb$^{?1}$ at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb$^{?1}$ at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, m$_{h}^{max}$ , m$_{h}^{mod?+}$ , m$_{h}^{mod??}$ , light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low-m$_{H}$. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.

  1. NLO QCD and electroweak corrections to W+? production with leptonic W-boson decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansgar Denner; Stefan Dittmaier; Markus Hecht; Christian Pasold

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to W+\\gamma\\ production, including the leptonic decay of the W boson and taking into account all off-shell effects of the W boson, where the finite width of the W boson is implemented using the complex-mass scheme. Corrections induced by incoming photons are fully included and find particular emphasis in the discussion of phenomenological predictions for the LHC. The corresponding next-to-leading-order QCD corrections are reproduced as well. In order to separate hard photons from jets, a quark-to-photon fragmentation function a la Glover and Morgan is employed. Our results are implemented into Monte Carlo programs allowing for the evaluation of arbitrary differential cross sections. We present integrated cross sections for the LHC at 7TeV, 8TeV, and 14TeV as well as differential distributions at 14TeV for bare muons and dressed leptons. Finally, we discuss the impact of anomalous WW\\gamma\\ couplings.

  2. Effective Hamiltonian for non-leptonic |Delta F| = 1 decays at NNLO in QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbahn, Martin; /Durham U., IPPP; Haisch, Ulrich; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors compute the effective hamiltonian for non-leptonic |{Delta}F| = 1 decays in the standard model including next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections. In particular, they present the complete three-loop anomalous dimension matrix describing the mixing of current-current and QCD penguin operators. The calculation is performed in an operator basis which allows to consistently use fully anticommuting {gamma}{sub 5} in dimensional regularization at an arbitrary number of loops. The renormalization scheme dependences and their cancellation in physical quantities is discussed in detail. Furthermore, they demonstrate how the results are transformed to a different basis of effective operators which is frequently adopted in phenomenological applications. They give all necessary two-loop constant terms which allow to obtain the three-loop anomalous dimensions and the corresponding initial conditions of the two-loop Wilson coefficients in the latter scheme. Finally, they solve the renormalization group equation and given the analytic expressions for the low-energy Wilson coefficients relevant for non-leptonic B meson decays beyond next-to-leading order in both renormalization schemes.

  3. Updated fit to three neutrino mixing: status of leptonic CP violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Michele Maltoni; Thomas Schwetz

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a global analysis of solar, atmospheric, reactor and accelerator neutrino data in the framework of three-neutrino oscillations based on data available in summer 2014. We provide the allowed ranges of the six oscillation parameters and show that their determination is stable with respect to uncertainties related to reactor neutrino and solar neutrino flux predictions. We find that the maximal possible value of the Jarlskog invariant in the lepton sector is $0.0329 \\pm 0.0009$ ($\\pm 0.0027$) at the $1\\sigma$ ($3\\sigma$) level and we use leptonic unitarity triangles to illustrate the ability of global oscillation data to obtain information on CP violation. We discuss "tendencies and tensions" of the global fit related to the octant of $\\theta_{23}$ as well as the CP violating phase $\\delta_\\mathrm{CP}$. The favored values of $\\delta_\\mathrm{CP}$ are around $3\\pi/2$ while values around $\\pi/2$ are disfavored at about $\\Delta\\chi^2 \\simeq 6$. We comment on the non-trivial task to assign a confidence level to this $\\Delta\\chi^2$ value by performing a Monte Carlo study of T2K data.

  4. Stability of charged thin shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, C.C. 67, Suc. 28, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Simeone, Claudio [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we study the mechanical stability of spherically symmetric thin shells with charge, in Einstein-Maxwell and Einstein-Born-Infeld theories. We analyze linearized perturbations preserving the symmetry, for shells around vacuum and shells surrounding noncharged black holes.

  5. Simulation studies of the HADES first level trigger PART I: Performance in heavy-ion induced reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schicker; H. Tsertos

    1996-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The first level trigger of the HADES spectrometer is studied for the heavy-ion collision systems Au+Au and Ne+Ne. The trigger efficiency for central events is given in dependence of the imposed charged particle multiplicity condition. The timing properties of the trigger signal are described. The losses due to deadtime are specified. Finally, the first level trigger rate is reported.

  6. Review of Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Carling; Gurpreet Singh

    2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) engine facility is under development. Recent experimental results to be discussed are: the effects of injection timing and diluent addition on late-combustion soot burnout, diesel-spray ignition and premixed-burn behavior, a comparison of the combustion characteristics of M85 (a mixture of 85% methanol and 15% gasoline) and DF2 (No.2 diesel reference fuel), and a description of our HCCI experimental program and modeling work.

  7. Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy-nuclei. We calculate the cross-sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production, and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross-sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times $10^{32}/$cm$^2$/s.

  8. Search for Top Squarks in R-Parity-Violating Supersymmetry Using Three or More Leptons and b-Tagged Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A search for anomalous production of events with three or more isolated leptons and bottom-quark jets produced in pp collisions at ?s = 8??TeV is presented. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an ...

  9. CDF note 10582 Search for SM Higgs boson production in association with tt using no lepton final state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF note 10582 Search for SM Higgs boson production in association with tÂŻt using no lepton final is that tÂŻt decay all hadronic mode (all t decay into bqq ). In both cases we consider that the Higgs boson discriminant variable from different neural network to discriminate the Higgs boson signal from remained

  10. Evidence for Higgs boson decays to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector and prospects for future measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuna, Alexander Naip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results on the search for Higgs boson decays to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector are presented based on approximately 25 $\\text{fb}^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data collected at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 7 and 8 TeV. Prospects of future measurements with proposed ATLAS upgrades at the High Luminosity LHC are also presented.

  11. arXiv:heplat/0610083v1 Hadron and Lepton School and Conference, Tehran, Iran, May 19th 2006 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet,

    arXiv:hep­lat/0610083v1 13 Oct 2006 Hadron and Lepton School and Conference, Tehran, Iran, May 19th, Iran, May 19th 2006 L (a) (b) L # Figure 1: Two potentially relevant graphs to the h#22;qqi

  12. Heavy Metal Tolerance Robert S. Boyd, Nishanta Rajakaruna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    be useful to solve environmental problems caused by heavy metal pollution. General Overviews General: a recent example targeting cellular mechanisms affected by heavy metals is Bánfalvi 2011. Pollution by heavy metals is an important environmental problem, and sources that focus on heavy metal pollution

  13. Detection of Heavy Metal Ions Based on Quantum Point Contacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    . The ability to detect trace amounts of metal ions is important because of the toxicity of heavy metal ionsDetection of Heavy Metal Ions Based on Quantum Point Contacts Vasanth Rajagopalan, Salah Boussaad on many living organisms and the consequence of heavy metal ions not being biodegradable. To date, heavy

  14. Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Daegil

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -heavy oil, and oil shale. Tremendous amounts of heavy oil resources are available in the world. Fig. 1.1 shows the total world oil reserves, and indicates that heavy oil, extra heavy oil, and bitumen make up about 70% of the world?s total oil resources...

  15. HEAVY-ION IMAGING APPLIED TO MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy particles rat h er than the vax~at1.on 1n t h e x-rayprograms on the a PDPll-34 and VAX- 780 computers. The image

  16. Partonic coalescence in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a covariant coalescence model, we study hadron production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from both soft partons in the quark-gluon plasma and hard partons in minijets. Including transverse flow of soft partons and independent...

  17. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The position is a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop) located in Kent, Washington, and will be responsible for the safe and efficient operation of a field garage performing...

  18. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: research with multiple- beam experiment MBE-4; induction linac systems experiments; and long- range research and development of heavy-ion fusion accelerators.

  19. Heavy metals in Antarctic organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, J.E.A. de; Moreno, V.J. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (Argentina); Gerpe, M.S.; Vodopivez, C. [Instituto Antartico Argentino, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate levels of essential (zinc and copper) and non-essential (mercury and cadmium) heavy metals, 34 species of organisms from different areas close to the Antarctic Peninsula were analysed. These included algae, filter-feeders, omnivorous invertebrates and vertebrates. Mercury was not detected, while cadmium was found in the majority of organisms analysed (detection limit was 0.05 ppm for both metals). The highest cadmium concentration was observed in the starfish Odontaster validus. Anthozoans, sipunculids and nudibranchs showed maximum levels of zinc, while the highest copper level was found in the gastropod Trophon brevispira. Mercury and cadmium levels in fishes were below the detection limit. Concentrations of essential and non-essential metals in birds were highest in liver followed by muscle and eggs. Cadmium and mercury levels in muscle of southern elephant seals were above the detection limit, whereas in Antarctic fur seals they were below it. The objective of the study was to gather baseline information for metals in Antarctic Ocean biota that may be needed to detect, measure and monitor future environmental changes. 46 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Search for heavy quarks decaying into a top quark and a W or Z boson using lepton + jets events in pp collisions at s?=7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Kenny, R. P. III; Murray, Michael J.; Noonan, Danny; Sanders, Stephen J.; Stringer, Robert W.; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    . Tuovinen, D. Ungaro, L. Wendland – 14 – J H E P01(2013)154 Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta, Finland K. Banzuzi, A. Karjalainen, A. Korpela, T. Tuuva DSM/IRFU, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France M. Besancon, S. Choudhury, M. Dejardin, D...

  1. Methods for reduction of charging emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuecker, F.J.; Schulte, H. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most critical subjects in coking plants are charging emissions. The paper reviews the systems that have been used over the years to reduce charging emissions. The advantages and disadvantages are summarized for the following systems: Double collecting main with aspiration on both oven sides; Single collecting main with/without aspiration via standpipe, and extraction and cleaning of charging gas on charging car; Single collecting main with aspiration via standpipe and pretreatment of charging gas on the charging car as well as additional stationary exhaust and cleaning of charging gas; Single collecting main with aspiration via single standpipe; and Single collecting main with simultaneous aspiration via two standpipes and a U-tube connecting the oven chamber with the neighboring oven. The paper then briefly discusses prerequisites for reduction of charging emissions.

  2. Transport of elliptic intense charged -particle beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J. (Jing), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport theory of high-intensity elliptic charged-particle beams is presented. In particular, the halo formation and beam loss problem associated with the high space charge and small-aperture structure is addressed, ...

  3. Fast Methods for Bimolecular Charge Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.

    We report a Hessian-implicit optimization method to quickly solve the charge optimization problem over protein molecules: given a ligand and its complex with a receptor, determine the ligand charge distribution that minimizes ...

  4. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved. 8 figs.

  5. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haselman, Jr., Leonard C. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved.

  6. Vortex Structure in Charged Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabadadze, Gregory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study magnetic fields in the charged condensate that we have previously argued should be present in helium-core white dwarf stars. We show that below a certain critical value the magnetic field is entirely expelled from the condensate, while for larger values it penetrates the condensate within flux-tubes that are similar to Abrikosov vortex lines; yet higher fields lead to the disruption of the condensate. We find the solution for the vortex lines in both relativistic and nonrelativistic theories that exhibit the charged condensation. We calculate the energy density of the vortex solution and the values of the critical magnetic fields. The minimum magnetic field required for vortices to penetrate the helium white dwarf cores ranges from roughly 10^7 to 10^9 Gauss. Fields of this strength have been observed in white dwarfs. We also calculate the London magnetic field due to the rotation of a dwarf star and show that its value is rather small.

  7. Vortex Structure in Charged Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Gabadadze; Rachel A. Rosen

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study magnetic fields in the charged condensate that we have previously argued should be present in helium-core white dwarf stars. We show that below a certain critical value the magnetic field is entirely expelled from the condensate, while for larger values it penetrates the condensate within flux-tubes that are similar to Abrikosov vortex lines; yet higher fields lead to the disruption of the condensate. We find the solution for the vortex lines in both relativistic and nonrelativistic theories that exhibit the charged condensation. We calculate the energy density of the vortex solution and the values of the critical magnetic fields. The minimum magnetic field required for vortices to penetrate the helium white dwarf cores ranges from roughly 10^7 to 10^9 Gauss. Fields of this strength have been observed in white dwarfs. We also calculate the London magnetic field due to the rotation of a dwarf star and show that its value is rather small.

  8. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof a blast-resistant naval steel |Impact ofARM-0501

  9. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof a blast-resistant naval steel |Impact ofARM-05012

  10. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof a blast-resistant naval steel |Impact

  11. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheir AtmosphericAnalysisVents Using1 Mixed-Phase Cloud

  12. Probing the Symmetry Energy with Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, W G; Zhang, Y; Danielewicz, P; Famiano, M; Li, Z; Steiner, A W

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints on the EoS for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) at supra-saturation densities have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities. Comparisons are made to other available constraints.

  13. Probing the Symmetry Energy with Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang; Y. Zhang; P. Danielewicz; M. Famiano; Z. Li; A. W. Steiner

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints on the EoS for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) at supra-saturation densities have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities. Comparisons are made to other available constraints.

  14. Charging Graphene for Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 2004, graphene, including single atomic layer graphite sheet, and chemically derived graphene sheets, has captured the imagination of researchers for energy storage because of the extremely high surface area (2630 m2/g) compared to traditional activated carbon (typically below 1500 m2/g), excellent electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and potential for low cost manufacturing. These properties are very desirable for achieving high activity, high capacity and energy density, and fast charge and discharge. Chemically derived graphene sheets are prepared by oxidation and reduction of graphite1 and are more suitable for energy storage because they can be made in large quantities. They still contain multiply stacked graphene sheets, structural defects such as vacancies, and oxygen containing functional groups. In the literature they are also called reduced graphene oxide, or functionalized graphene sheets, but in this article they are all referred to as graphene for easy of discussion. Two important applications, batteries and electrochemical capacitors, have been widely investigated. In a battery material, the redox reaction occurs at a constant potential (voltage) and the energy is stored in the bulk. Therefore, the energy density is high (more than 100 Wh/kg), but it is difficult to rapidly charge or discharge (low power, less than 1 kW/kg)2. In an electrochemical capacitor (also called supercapacitors or ultracapacitor in the literature), the energy is stored as absorbed ionic species at the interface between the high surface area carbon and the electrolyte, and the potential is a continuous function of the state-of-charge. The charge and discharge can happen rapidly (high power, up to 10 kW/kg) but the energy density is low, less than 10 Wh/kg2. A device that can have both high energy and high power would be ideal.

  15. Electrochemically controlled charging circuit for storage batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Onstott, E.I.

    1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemically controlled charging circuit for charging storage batteries is disclosed. The embodiments disclosed utilize dc amplification of battery control current to minimize total energy expended for charging storage batteries to a preset voltage level. The circuits allow for selection of Zener diodes having a wide range of reference voltage levels. Also, the preset voltage level to which the storage batteries are charged can be varied over a wide range.

  16. Definition of heavy oil and natural bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Definition and categorization of heavy oils and natural bitumens are generally based on physical or chemical attributes or on methods of extraction. Ultimately, the hydrocarbon's chemical composition will govern both its physical state and the extraction technique applicable. These oils and bitumens closely resemble the residuum from wholecrude distillation to about 1,000/degree/F; if the residuum constitutes at least 15% of the crude, it is considered to be heavy. In this material is concentrated most of the trace elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen, and metals, such as nickel and vanadium. A widely used definition separates heavy oil from natural bitumen by viscosity, crude oil being less, and bitumen more viscous than 10,000 cp. Heavy crude then falls in the range 10/degree/-20/degree/ API inclusive and extra-heavy oil less than 10/degree/ API. Most natural bitumen is natural asphalt (tar sands, oil sands) and has been defined as rock containing hydrocarbons more viscous than 10,000 cp or else hydrocarbons that may be extracted from mined or quarried rock. Other natural bitumens are solids, such as gilsonite, grahamite, and ozokerite, which are distinguished by streak, fusibility, and solubility. The upper limit for heavy oil may also be set at 18/degree/ API, the approximate limit for recovery by waterflood.

  17. Ultraviolet energy dependence of particle production sources in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolschin, Georg

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy dependence of particle production sources in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is investigated from RHIC to LHC energies. Whereas charged-hadron production in the fragmentation sources follows a ln(s_NN/s_0) law, particle production in the mid-rapidity gluon-gluon source exhibits a much stronger dependence proportional to ln^3(s_NN/s_0), and becomes dominant between RHIC and LHC energies. The production of particles with pseudorapidities beyond the beam rapidity is also discussed.

  18. RECENT PROGRESS IN HEAVY ION SOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of hydrogen into thermonuclear fusion reactors. A summary ofFusion Plasma Sources Other sources of high charge state ions include the dense plasma in magnetic confinement thermonuclear

  19. Electric Vehicle Charging as an Enabling Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric Vehicle Charging as an Enabling Technology Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy technologies, electric vehicles and the appurtenant charging infrastructure, is explored in detail to determine regarding system load profiles, vehicle charging strategies, electric vehicle adoption rates, and storage

  20. Charged Cosmic Rays And Particle Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    #12;Charged Particle Astrophysics With Pamela Combination of tracker and calorimeter enable charge, mass, and energy determinations Very accurate particle ID Tracker Calorimeter e- e+ p+ Dan Hooper screwed up? Charge-dependent solar modulation important below 5-10 GeV! (Pamela's sub-10 GeV positrons

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA CHARGE INDICATOR DISPLAY (CID)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RA3.4.2. If refrigerant charge verification is required for compliance, and a CID has been installed compliance with the refrigerant charge verification requirement for that system, thus submittal of a standard refrigerant charge verification compliance form (MECH 25) is not required for a system that has a passing CID

  2. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich [Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim [Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath [Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond [Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd [Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D [Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D [St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K [Michigan U.; Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O [Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan [Nijmegen U.; Fermilab

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; ? tt? data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of ? + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, we measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.

  3. Events with Isolated Leptons and Missing Transverse Momentum in ep Collisions at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Brandt

    2007-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of events with isolated leptons and missing transverse momentum in the H1 experiment is discussed for the electron, muon and tau channels. In the Standard Model (SM) framework, production of real W-bosons gives rise to such topologies. Contributions to the background are dominated by QCD processes. An excess of observed signal over background presents a chance of the discovery of new physics. The results using the HERA 1994-2006 data set corresponding to 341 pb^-1 are presented. While the e- p sample shows good agreement between data and SM expectation, in e+ p collisions an excess over the SM expectation with 3.4 sigma significance is observed at high hadronic transverse momentum.

  4. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich [Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim [Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath [Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond [Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd [Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D [Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D [St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K [Michigan U.; Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O [Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan [Nijmegen U.; Fermilab

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; ? tt? data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of ? + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, we measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.

  5. Chiral sum rules and vacuum condensates from tau-lepton decay data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Dominguez; L. A. Hernandez; K. Schilcher; H. Spiesberger

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD finite energy sum rules, together with the latest updated ALEPH data on hadronic decays of the tau-lepton are used in order to determine the vacuum condensates of dimension $d=2$ and $d=4$. These data are also used to check the validity of the Weinberg sum rules, and to determine the chiral condensates of dimension $d=6$ and $d=8$, as well as the chiral correlator at zero momentum, proportional to the counter term of the ${\\cal{O}}(p^4)$ Lagrangian of chiral perturbation theory, $\\bar{L}_{10}$. Suitable (pinched) integration kernels are introduced in the sum rules in order to suppress potential quark-hadron duality violations. We find no compelling indications of duality violations in the kinematic region above $s \\simeq 2.2$ GeV$^2$ after using pinched integration kernels.

  6. Search for Supersymmetry with Tau Leptons in Data from the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sjursen, Therese Berge; Osland, Per

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the search for Supersymmetry in events with high pT jets, a large amount of missing transverse energy and at least one hadronically decaying ? lepton in data from the ATLAS detector. Two analyses are presented in detail: one performed on the data collected during the year 2010 and one on the full data set recorded by ATLAS in year 2012. The latter analysis is based on two published papers in which the author of this thesis has been involved. These are Paper I and Paper II attached to this thesis. Paper II is an ATLAS conference note. The final version of the analysis is in an advanced stage of preparation with scheduled submission for publication in early Summer 2014.

  7. Space Charge and Equilibrium Emittances in Damping Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, Marco; Oide, Katsunobu; Wolski, Andy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPACE CHARGE AND EQUILIBRIUM EMITTANCES IN DAMPING RINGS ?for the pos- sible impact of space charge on the equilibriumrings. INTRODUCTION Direct space charge effects have the

  8. Charged particle assisted nuclear reactions in solid state environment: renaissance of low energy nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Péter Kálmán; Tamás Keszthelyi

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The features of electron assisted neutron exchange processes in crystalline solids are survayed. It is stated that, contrary to expectations, the cross section of these processes may reach an observable magnitude even in the very low energy case because of the extremely huge increment caused by the Coulomb factor of the electron assisted processes and by the effect of the crystal-lattice. The features of electron assisted heavy charged particle exchange processes, electron assisted nuclear capure processes and heavy charged particle assisted nuclear processes are also overviewed. Experimental observations, which may be related to our theoretical findings, are dealt with. The anomalous screening phenomenon is related to electron assisted neutron and proton exchange processes in crystalline solids. A possible explanation of observations by Fleischmann and Pons is presented. The possibility of the phenomenon of nuclear transmutation is qualitatively explained with the aid of usual and charged particle assisted reactions. The electron assisted neutron exchange processes in pure $Ni$ and $Li-Ni$ composite systems (in the Rossi-type E-Cat) are analyzed and it is concluded that these reactions may be responsible for recent experimental observations.

  9. Workplace Charging Challenge: Promote PEVs and Charging at Work |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf TheViolations |Join the Challenge Workplace ChargingDepartment of

  10. Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A. [GREMI - Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energetique des Milieux Ionises, CNRS/Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar.

  11. Progress in heavy ion driven inertial fusion energy: From scaledexperiments to the integrated research experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, J.J.; Ahle, L.E.; Baca, D.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bieniosek,F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Davidson, R.C.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Franks, R.M.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; deHoon, M.J.L.; Kaganovich, I.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.; Prost, L.R.; Qin, H.; Rose, D.; Sabbi, G-L.; Sangster, T.C.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Shuman, D.; Vay, J.L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.; Yu, S.S.

    2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The promise of inertial fusion energy driven by heavy ion beams requires the development of accelerators that produce ion currents ({approx}100s Amperesheam) and ion energies ({approx}1-10 GeV) that have not been achieved simultaneously in any existing accelerator. The high currents imply high generalized perveances, large tune depressions. and high space charge potentials of the beam center relative to the beam pipe. Many of the scientific issues associated with ion beams of high perveance and large tune depression have been addressed over the last two decades on scaled experiments at Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the University of Maryland, and elsewhere. The additional requirement of high space charge potential (or equivalently high line charge density) gives rise to effects (particularly the role of electrons in beam transport) which must be understood before proceeding to a large scale accelerator. The first phase of a new series of experiments in Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF VNL), the High Current Experiments (HCX), is now being constructed at LBNL. The mission of the HCX will be to transport beams with driver line charge density so as to investigate the physics of this regime, including constraints on the maximum radial filling factor of the beam through the pipe. This factor is important for determining both cost and reliability of a driver scale accelerator. The HCX will provide data for design of the next steps in the sequence of experiments leading to an inertial Fusion energy power plant. The focus of the program after the HCX will be on integration of all of the manipulations required for a driver. In the near term following HCX, an Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) of the same general scale as the HCX is envisioned.

  12. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  13. Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    data from trucks operating in long-haul operations. The research program was designed to be conductedHeavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project. The project involves efforts to collect, analyze and archive data and information related to class -8 truck

  14. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section and |Vtb| in Events with One Charged Lepton, Large Missing Transverse Energy, and Jets at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; D. Hirschbuehl; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucŕ; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu; I. Yu; A. M. Zanetti; Y. Zeng; C. Zhou; S. Zucchelli

    2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of \\sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV using a data set corresponding to 7.5 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events consistent with the single top quark decay process t \\to Wb \\to l{\

  15. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section and |V[subscript tb]| in Events with One Charged Lepton, Large Missing Transverse Energy, and Jets at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T.

    We report a measurement of single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ?s = 1.96??TeV using a data set corresponding to 7.5??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity collected ...

  16. Search for Maximal Flavor Violating Scalars in Same-Charge Lepton Pairs in pp-bar Collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Christopher J.

    Models of maximal flavor violation (MxFV) in elementary particle physics may contain at least one new scalar SU(2) doublet field ?FV=(?[superscript 0],?[superscript +]) that couples the first and third generation quarks ...

  17. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a bb pair in events with two oppositely-charged leptons using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45/fb. In events consistent with the decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-quark pair and the Z boson to electron or muon pairs, we set 95% credibility level upper limits on the ZH production cross section times the H -> bb branching ratio as a function of Higgs boson mass. At a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c^2 we observe (expect) a limit of 7.1 (3.9) times the standard model value.

  18. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to a bb? Pair in Events with Two Oppositely Charged Leptons Using the Full CDF Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45??fb[superscript ...

  19. Dipolar degrees of freedom and Isospin equilibration processes in Heavy Ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Papa; I. Berceanu; L. Acosta; F. Amorini; C. Agodi; A. Anzalone; L. Auditore; G. Cardella; S. Cavallaro; M. B. Chatterjee; E. De Filippo; L. Francalanza; E. Geraci; L. Grassi; B. Gnoffo; J. Han; E. La Guidara; G. Lanzalone; I. Lombardo; C. Maiolino T. Minniti A. Pagano; E. V. Pagano; S. Pirrone; G. Politi; F. Porto; L. Quattrocchi; F. Rizzo; E. Rosato; P. Russotto; A. Trifirň; M. Trimarchi; G. Verde; and M. Vigilante

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: In heavy ion collision at the Fermi energies Isospin equilibration processes occur- ring when nuclei with different charge/mass asymmetries interacts have been investigated to get information on the nucleon-nucleon Iso-vectorial effective interaction. Purpose: In this paper, for the system 48Ca +27 Al at 40 MeV/nucleon, we investigate on this process by means of an observable tightly linked to isospin equilibration processes and sensitive in exclusive way to the dynamical stage of the collision. From the comparison with dynamical model calculations we want also to obtain information on the Iso-vectorial effective microscopic interaction. Method: The average time derivative of the total dipole associated to the relative motion of all emitted charged particles and fragments has been determined from the measured charges and velocities by using the 4? multi-detector CHIMERA. The average has been determined for semi- peripheral collisions and for different charges Zb of the biggest produced fragment. Experimental evidences collected for the systems 27Al+48Ca and 27Al+40Ca at 40 MeV/nucleon used to support this novel method of investigation are also discussed.

  20. Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the unpolarised proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Imazu, Y; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, N; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lorenzon, W; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfré, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrosyan, A; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Taroian, S; Terkulov, A; Truty, R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zagrebelnyy, V; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in the hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons from an unpolarised hydrogen target by a 27.6 GeV lepton beam are extracted from the HERMES data set of 2006-2007 using a missing-mass event selection technique. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted from this data set are more precise than those extracted from the earlier data set of 1996-2005 previously analysed in the same manner by HERMES. The results from the two data sets are compatible with each other. Results from these combined data sets are extracted and constitute the most precise asymmetry amplitude measurements made in the HERMES kinematic region using a missing-mass event selection technique.

  1. Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the unpolarised proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Düren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; Y. Imazu; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; N. Kobayashi; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; L. Lapikás; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; W. Lorenzon; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfré; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; V. Muccifora; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; A. Petrosyan; M. Raithel; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schäfer; G. Schnell; K. P. Schüler; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; J. Stewart; S. Taroian; A. Terkulov; R. Truty; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; Z. Ye; S. Yen; W. Yu; V. Zagrebelnyy; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in the hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons from an unpolarised hydrogen target by a 27.6 GeV lepton beam are extracted from the HERMES data set of 2006-2007 using a missing-mass event selection technique. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted from this data set are more precise than those extracted from the earlier data set of 1996-2005 previously analysed in the same manner by HERMES. The results from the two data sets are compatible with each other. Results from these combined data sets are extracted and constitute the most precise asymmetry amplitude measurements made in the HERMES kinematic region using a missing-mass event selection technique.

  2. Characterizing Pleiotropic Effects of Glucocorticoids in Mice Using Heavy Water Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roohk, Donald Jason

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    turnover rates by heavy water labeling of nonessential aminocell proliferation by heavy water labeling. Nature protocolscell proliferation by heavy water labeling. American journal

  3. DECAY CONSTANTS OF CHARGED PSEUDO-SCALAR MESONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - and D+ s decays, the existence of a charged Higgs boson (or any other charged object beyond the Standard

  4. DECAY CONSTANTS OF CHARGED PSEUDO-SCALAR MESONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the existence of a charged Higgs boson (or any other charged object beyond the Standard Model) would modify

  5. Higher moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at RHIC energies in STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nihar Ranjan Sahoo; for the STAR Collaboration

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the higher order moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions for the Au+Au collisions at \\sNN = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV in the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The energy and centrality dependence of higher moments and their products (such as $\\sigma^2/M$, $S\\sigma$ and $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$) are presented. The data are also compared to Poisson expectations and Hadron Resonance Gas model calculations.

  6. Probing the QCD Critical Point by Higher Moments of Net-Charge Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nihar Ranjan Sahoo

    2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beam Energy Scan program has been undertaken at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to search for the QCD critical point. The presence of the critical point is expected to lead to non-monotonic behavior of several quantities. Here we report the result of higher moments of net-charge distributions for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 39 GeV as measured by the STAR experiment. The STAR results are compared with results from HIJING event generator and Hadron Resonance (HRG) Models.

  7. Potential of Thin Films for use in Charged Particle Tracking Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Metcalfe; I. Mejia; J. Murphy; M. Quevedo; L. Smith; J. Alvarado; B. Gnade; H. Takai

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin Film technology has widespread applications in everyday electronics, notably Liquid Crystal Display screens, solar cells, and organic light emitting diodes. We explore the potential of this technology as charged particle radiation tracking detectors for use in High Energy Physics experiments such as those at the Large Hadron Collider or the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Through modern fabrication techniques, a host of semiconductor materials are available to construct thin, flexible detectors with integrated electronics with pixel sizes on the order of a few microns. We review the material properties of promising candidates, discuss the potential benefits and challenges associated with this technology, and review previously demonstrated applicability as a neutron detector.

  8. Potential of Thin Films for use in Charged Particle Tracking Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metcalfe, J; Murphy, J; Quevedo, M; Smith, L; Alvarado, J; Gnade, B; Takai, H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin Film technology has widespread applications in everyday electronics, notably Liquid Crystal Display screens, solar cells, and organic light emitting diodes. We explore the potential of this technology as charged particle radiation tracking detectors for use in High Energy Physics experiments such as those at the Large Hadron Collider or the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Through modern fabrication techniques, a host of semiconductor materials are available to construct thin, flexible detectors with integrated electronics with pixel sizes on the order of a few microns. We review the material properties of promising candidates, discuss the potential benefits and challenges associated with this technology, and review previously demonstrated applicability as a neutron detector.

  9. Analytical Solutions for the Nonlinear Longitudinal Drift Compression (Expansion) of Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve high focal spot intensities in heavy ion fusion, the ion beam must be compressed longitudinally by factors of ten to one hundred before it is focused onto the target. The longitudinal compression is achieved by imposing an initial velocity profile tilt on the drifting beam. In this paper, the problem of longitudinal drift compression of intense charged particle beams is solved analytically for the two important cases corresponding to a cold beam, and a pressure-dominated beam, using a one-dimensional warm-fluid model describing the longitudinal beam dynamics.

  10. Search for Supersymmetry in Events with Three Leptons and Missing Transverse Momentum in ?s=7??TeV pp Collisions with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the weak production of charginos and neutralinos decaying to a final state with three leptons (electrons or muons) and missing transverse momentum is presented. The analysis uses 2.06??fb[superscript -1] of ...

  11. Search for the Lepton-Flavor-Violating Decays B[0 over s] ? e[superscript ±]?[superscript ?] and B[superscript 0] ? e[superscript ±]?[superscript ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Michael

    A search for the lepton-flavor-violating decays B[0 over s] ? e[superscript ±]?[superscript ?] and B[superscript 0] ? e[superscript ±]?[superscript ?] is performed with a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity ...

  12. Measurement of the t[bar over t] production cross section in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV in dilepton final states containing one ? lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhukova, Victoria

    The top-quark pair production cross section is measured in final states with one electron or muon and one hadronically decaying ? lepton from the process t[bar over t] ? (??[subscript ?])(??[subscript ?])b[bar over b], ...

  13. Measurement of Angular Correlations in Drell–Yan Lepton Pairs to Probe Z/?[superscript ?] Boson Transverse Momentum at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A measurement of angular correlations in Drell–Yan lepton pairs via the ?[* over ?] observable is presented. This variable probes the same physics as the Z/?[superscript ?] boson transverse momentum with a better experimental ...

  14. Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milam, David

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

  15. Fluid catalytic cracking of heavy petroleum fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHenry, K.W.

    1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is claimed for fluid catalytic cracking of residuum and other heavy oils comprising of gas oil, petroleum residue, reduced and whole crudes and shale oil to produce gasoline and other liquid products which are separated in various streams in a fractionator and associated vapor recovery equipment. The heat from combustion of coke on the coked catalyst is removed by reacting sulfur-containing coke deposits with steam and oxygen in a separate stripper-gasifier to produce a low btu gas stream comprising of sulfur compounds, methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide at a temperature of from about 1100/sup 0/F. To about 2200/sup 0/F. The partially regenerated catalyst then undergoes complete carbon removal in a regeneration vessel. The regenerated catalyst is recycled for re-use in the cracking of heavy petroleum fractions. The liquid products are gasoline, distillates, heavy fuel oil, and light hydrocarbons.

  16. High energy heavy ions: techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pioneering work at the Bevalac has given significant insight into the field of relativistic heavy ions, both in the development of techniques for acceleration and delivery of these beams as well as in many novel areas of applications. This paper will outline our experiences at the Bevalac; ion sources, low velocity acceleration, matching to the synchrotron booster, and beam delivery. Applications discussed will include the observation of new effects in central nuclear collisions, production of beams of exotic short-lived (down to 1 ..mu..sec) isotopes through peripheral nuclear collisions, atomic physics with hydrogen-like uranium ions, effects of heavy ''cosmic rays'' on satellite equipment, and an ongoing cancer radiotherapy program with heavy ions. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Heavy-flavour production and multiplicity dependence in pp and p--Pb collisions with ALICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Bruna; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of heavy quarks in pp collisions provides a precision test of perturbative QCD calculations at the LHC energies. More complex collision systems like p--Pb collisions allow studies of cold nuclear matter effects, such as modifications of the parton distribution functions at small x and of the $\\kt$ broadening effect. We present the ALICE results of prompt D-meson production as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity, in pp and p--Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5.02$ TeV respectively. The per-event yield of D mesons in different multiplicity and $\\pt$ intervals are compared for pp and p--Pb collisions to study the contribution of multi-parton interactions to open-charm production. Angular correlations of prompt D mesons and heavy-flavour decay electrons with charged hadrons in pp and p-Pb collisions are also shown in different kinematic ranges and compared to pQCD models. These measurements provide information on the charm fragmentation processes, on cold nuclear matter effects on charm production, and on the participation of charm in the collective motion arising in small collision systems like p-Pb.

  18. Baryon Annihilation and Regeneration in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yinghua Pan; Scott Pratt

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of baryon-antibaryon annihilation during the hadronic stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision is explored by simulating the chemical evolution of a hadron gas. Beginning with a chemically equilibrated gas at an initial temperature of 170 MeV, the chemical composition of a representative hydrodynamic cell is followed throughout the hadronic stage. The cell's volume changes with time according to a parameterization that mimics a three-dimensional hydrodynamic expansion. The chemical evolution includes both annihilation and regeneration of baryons, consistent with detailed balance. During the hadronic stage, the number of baryons drops by approximately $40\\%$ for the case where there is no net baryonic charge. When the calculations are performed without the baryon regenerating processes, e.g. $5\\pi\\rightarrow p\\bar{p}$, the loss of baryons was found to be closer to $50\\%$. After accounting for annihilation, yields are consistent with measurements from the ALICE Collaboration at the LHC. Baryon annihilation is shown to alter the extracted chemical breakup temperature by significantly changing the $p/\\pi$ ratio. Assuming that annihilation cross sections are independent of the strangeness and isospin of the annihilating baryon and anti-baryon, the loss of strange baryons from annihilation is found to be similar.

  19. Chiral vortical wave and induced flavor charge transport in a rotating quark-gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the existence of a new gapless collective excitation in a rotating fluid system with chiral fermions, named as the Chiral Vortical Wave (CVW). The CVW has its microscopic origin at the quantum anomaly and macroscopically arises from interplay between vector and axial charge fluctuations induced by vortical effects. The wave equation is obtained both from hydrodynamic current equations and from chiral kinetic theory and its solutions show nontrivial CVW-induced charge transport from different initial conditions. Using the rotating quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions as a concrete example, we show the formation of induced flavor quadrupole in QGP and estimate the elliptic flow splitting effect for Lambda baryons that may be experimentally measured.

  20. Why do Particle Clouds Generate Electric Charges?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Pähtz; H. J. Herrmann; T. Shinbrot

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Grains in desert sandstorms spontaneously generate strong electrical charges; likewise volcanic dust plumes produce spectacular lightning displays. Charged particle clouds also cause devastating explosions in food, drug, and coal processing industries. Despite the wide-ranging importance of granular charging in both nature and industry, even the simplest aspects of its causes remain elusive, for it is difficult to understand how inert grains in contact with little more than other inert grains can generate the large charges observed. In this paper, we present a simple yet predictive explanation for the charging of granular materials in collisional flows. We argue from very basic considerations that charge transfer can be expected in collisions of identical dielectric grains, and we confirm the model's predictions using discrete element simulations and a tabletop granular experiment.

  1. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  2. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  3. Non-intrusive refrigerant charge indicator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.; Kweller, Esher

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-intrusive refrigerant charge level indicator includes a structure for measuring at least one temperature at an outside surface of a two-phase refrigerant line section. The measured temperature can be used to determine the refrigerant charge status of an HVAC system, and can be converted to a pressure of the refrigerant in the line section and compared to a recommended pressure range to determine whether the system is under-charged, properly charged or over-charged. A non-intrusive method for assessing the refrigerant charge level in a system containing a refrigerant fluid includes the step of measuring a temperature at least one outside surface of a two-phase region of a refrigerant containing refrigerant line, wherein the temperature measured can be converted to a refrigerant pressure within the line section.

  4. Why do Particle Clouds Generate Electric Charges?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Pähtz; H. J. Herrmann; T. Shinbrot

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Grains in desert sandstorms spontaneously generate strong electrical charges; likewise volcanic dust plumes produce spectacular lightning displays. Charged particle clouds also cause devastating explosions in food, drug and coal processing industries. Despite the wide-ranging importance of granular charging in both nature and industry, even the simplest aspects of its causes remain elusive, because it is difficult to understand how inert grains in contact with little more than other inert grains can generate the large charges observed. Here, we present a simple yet predictive explanation for the charging of granular materials in collisional flows. We argue from very basic considerations that charge transfer can be expected in collisions of identical dielectric grains in the presence of an electric field, and we confirm the model's predictions using discrete-element simulations and a tabletop granular experiment.

  5. Review of Variable Generation Integration Charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Buckley, M.; Rogers, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of wind and solar generation in the United States, and the expectation of continued growth of these technologies, dictates that the future power system will be operated in a somewhat different manner because of increased variability and uncertainty. A small number of balancing authorities have attempted to determine an 'integration cost' to account for these changes to their current operating practices. Some balancing authorities directly charge wind and solar generators for integration charges, whereas others add integration charges to projected costs of wind and solar in integrated resource plans or in competitive solicitations for generation. This report reviews the balancing authorities that have calculated variable generation integration charges and broadly compares and contrasts the methodologies they used to determine their specific integration charges. The report also profiles each balancing authority and how they derived wind and solar integration charges.

  6. Measurement of the Michel Parameter xi" in Polarized Muon Decay and Implications on Exotic Couplings of the Leptonic Weak Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Prieels; O. Naviliat-Cuncic; P. Knowles; P. Van Hove; X. Morelle; J. Egger; J. Deutsch; J. Govaerts; W. Fetscher; K. Kirch; J. Lang

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Michel parameter xi" has been determined from a measurement of the longitudinal polarization of positrons emitted in the decay of polarized and depolarized muons. The result, xi" = 0.981 +- 0.045stat +- 0.003syst, is consistent with the Standard Model prediction of unity, and provides an order of magnitude improvement in the relative precision of this parameter. This value sets new constraints on exotic couplings beyond the dominant V-A description of the leptonic weak interaction.

  7. DELAYED ONSET OF HIGH-ENERGY EMISSIONS IN LEPTONIC AND HADRONIC MODELS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asano, Katsuaki [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Meszaros, Peter, E-mail: asano@phys.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temporal-spectral evolution of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts is simulated numerically for both leptonic and hadronic models. For weak enough magnetic fields, leptonic models can reproduce the few seconds delay of the onset of GeV photon emission observed by Fermi-LAT, due to the slow growth of the target photon field for inverse Compton scattering. For stronger magnetic fields, the GeV delay can be explained with hadronic models, due to the long acceleration timescale of protons and the continuous photopion production after the end of the particle injection. While the FWHMs of the MeV and GeV light curves are almost the same in one-zone leptonic models, the FWHMs of the 1-30 GeV light curves in hadronic models are significantly wider than those of the 0.1-1 MeV light curves. The amount of the GeV delay depends on the importance of the Klein-Nishina effect in both the leptonic and hadronic models. In our examples of hadronic models the energies of the escaped neutrons are comparable to the gamma-ray energy, although their contribution to the ultra high-energy cosmic rays is still subdominant. The resulting neutrino spectra are hard enough to avoid the flux limit constraint from IceCube. The delay of the neutrino emission onset is up to several times longer than the corresponding delay of the GeV photon emission onset. The quantitative differences in the light curves for various models may be further tested with future atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes whose effective area is larger than that of Fermi-LAT, such as CTA.

  8. On the Electric Charge of the Neutrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasulkhozha S. Sarafiddinov

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Exact expression is obtained for the differential cross section of elastic electroweak scattering of longitudinal polarized massive Dirac neutrinos with the electric charge and anomalous magnetic moment on a spinless nucleus. This formula contains all necessary information about the nature of the neutrino mass, charge and magnetic moment. Some of them state that between the mass of the neutrino its electric charge there exists an interconnection.

  9. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  10. Magnetic guidance of charged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubbers, Dirk

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many experiments and devices in physics use static magnetic fields to guide charged particles from a source onto a detector, and we ask the innocent question: What is the distribution of particle intensity over the detector surface? One should think that the solution to this seemingly simple problem is well known. We show that, even for uniform guide fields, this is not the case and present analytical point spread functions (PSF) for magnetic transport that deviate strongly from previous results. The "magnetic" PSF shows unexpected singularities, which were recently also observed experimentally, and which make detector response very sensitive to minute changes of position, field amplitude, or particle energy. In the field of low-energy particle physics, these singularities may become a source of error in modern high precision experiments, or may be used for instrument tests, for instance in neutrino mass retardation spectrometers.

  11. EV Project: Solar-Assisted Charging Demo

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Melissa Lapsa 2014 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Review Presentation EV Project - Solar- Assisted Charging Demo VSS138 2014 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  12. EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge: Resources | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the basics of electric vehicles and their charging needs. Vehicle Basics The Alternative Fuel Data Center's section on Plug-in Vehicles provides basic information on these...

  13. Randomly charged polymers in porous environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Blavatska; C. von Ferber

    2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the conformational properties of charged polymers in a solvent in the presence of structural obstacles correlated according to a power law $\\sim x^{-a}$. We work within the continuous representation of a model of linear chain considered as a random sequence of charges $q_i=\\pm q_0$. Such a model captures the properties of polyampholytes -- heteropolymers comprising both positively and negatively charged monomers. We apply the direct polymer renormalization scheme and analyze the scaling behavior of charged polymers up to the first order of an $\\epsilon=6-d$, $\\delta=4-a$-expansion.

  14. Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guidelines: British Columbia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British Columbia Agency...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: EV Everywhere Workplace Charging...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    States are parked at overnight locations with access to plugs, providing a great foundation for the country's plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging infrastructure. However,...

  16. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: National Renewable Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    advance related science and engineering, and transfer knowledge and innovations. A 1,800-car parking garage at NREL's South Table Mountain Campus includes 36 charging stations. In...

  17. Soret Motion of a Charged Spherical Colloid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seyyed Nader Rasuli; Ramin Golestanian

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermophoretic motion of a charged spherical colloidal particle and its accompanying cloud of counterions and co-ions in a temperature gradient is studied theoretically. Using the Debye-Huckel approximation, the Soret drift velocity of a weakly charged colloid is calculated analytically. For highly charged colloids, the nonlinear system of electrokinetic equations is solved numerically, and the effects of high surface potential, dielectrophoresis, and convection are examined. Our results are in good agreement with some of the recent experiments on highly charged colloids without using adjustable parameters.

  18. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in ${p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} =}$1.96 TeV}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in $H\\rightarrow WW$ decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 \\ifb\\ of integrated luminosity in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  19. HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING IN LABORATORY CONDITIONS HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING...

  20. Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview APBF-DEC Heavy Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul Platform Project Update Coal-Derived Liquids to Enable HCCI Technology...