National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for heavy charged lepton

  1. ATLAS search for a heavy gauge boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2012-12-08

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W'), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb-1. No excess beyond Standard Model expectations is observed. A W' with Sequential Standard Model couplings is excluded at the 95% credibility level for masses up to 2.55 TeV. Excited chiral bosons (W*) with equivalent coupling strength are excluded for masses up to 2.42 TeV.

  2. Leptonic Decays of the Charged B Meson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, Luke A.; /Ohio State U.; ,

    2010-06-11

    The authors present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} ({ell} = {tau}, {mu}, or e) in (458.9 {+-} 5.1) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed exclusive semi-leptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} signal is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. The analysis strategy and the statistical procedure is set up for branching fraction extraction or upper limit determination. They determine from the dataset a preliminary measurement of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -4}, which excludes zero at 2.4{sigma}, and f{sub B} = 255 {+-} 58 MeV. Combination with the hadronically tagged measurement yields {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4}. They also set preliminary limits on the branching fractions at {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}) < 7.7 x 10{sup -6} (90% C.L.), {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}) < 11 x 10{sup -6} (90% C.L.), and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -4} (90% C.L.).

  3. Search for Charged Lepton Violation in Narrow Upsilon Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Columbus Supercond., Genova /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    Charged lepton flavor violating processes are unobservable in the standard model, but they are predicted to be enhanced in several extensions to the standard model, including supersymmetry and models with leptoquarks or compositeness. We present a search for such processes in a sample of 99 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) decays and 117 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector. We place upper limits on the branching fractions {Beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} e{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}) and {Beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}) (n = 2, 3) at the 10{sup -6} level and use these results to place lower limits of order 1 TeV on the mass scale of charged lepton flavor violating effective operators.

  4. Search for doubly charged Higgs bosons with lepton-flavour-violating decays involving tau leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2007-12-01

    The authors search for pair production of doubly charged Higgs particles (H{sup {+-}{+-}}) followed by decays into electron-tau (e{tau}) and muon-tau ({mu}{tau}) pairs using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 350 pb{sup -1} collected from {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by the CDF II experiment. They search separately for cases where three or four final-state leptons are detected, and then combine the results into limits for each exclusive flavor decay mode of the H{sup {+-}{+-}}. Assuming 100% branching ratios of the H{sup {+-}{+-}} to left-handed e{tau} ({mu}{tau}) pairs, they set an H{sup {+-}{+-}} lower mass limit of 114 (112) GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level (C.L.).

  5. Exclusion of an Exotic Top Quark with -4/3 Electric Charge Using Soft Lepton Tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-06-01

    We present a measurement of the electric charge of the top quark using p{bar p} collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} at the CDF II detector. We reconstruct t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets final state and use kinematic information to determine which b-jet is associated with the leptonically- or hadronically-decaying t-quark. Soft lepton taggers are used to determine the b-jet flavor. Along with the charge of the W boson decay lepton, this information permits the reconstruction of the top quark's electric charge. Out of 45 reconstructed events with 2.4 {+-} 0.8 expected background events, 29 are reconstructed as tt with the standard model +2/3 charge, whereas 16 are reconstructed as t{bar t} with an exotic -4/3 charge. This is consistent with the standard model and excludes the exotic scenario at 95% confidence level. This is the strongest exclusion of the exotic charge scenario and the first to use soft leptons for this purpose.

  6. Review of Heavy Lepton Production in e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Perl, M. L.

    1977-10-01

    The existing data on e{sup +-}..mu..{sup -+}, e{sup +-}x{sup -+}, ..mu..{sup +-}x{sup -+}, and related events produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation are reviewed. All data are consistent with the existence of a new charged lepton, tau{sup +-}, of mass 1.9 +- .1 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. Search for type-III seesaw heavy leptons in pp collisions at s=8 TeVwith the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-08-03

    A search for the pair production of heavy leptons (N⁰,L±) predicted by the type-III seesaw theory formulated to explain the origin of small neutrino masses is presented. The decay channels N⁰→W±l∓ (ℓ=e,μ,τ) and L±→W±ν (ν=νe,νμ,ντ) are considered. The analysis is performed using the final state that contains two leptons (electrons or muons), two jets from a hadronically decaying W boson and large missing transverse momentum. The data used in the measurement correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at s√=8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No evidence of heavy lepton pair productionmore » is observed. Heavy leptons with masses below 325–540 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level, depending on the theoretical scenario considered.« less

  8. Search for heavy lepton resonances decaying to a Z boson and a lepton in pp collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-16

    In this study, a search for heavy leptons decaying to a Z boson and an electron or a muon is presented. The search is based on pp collision data taken at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹. Three high-transverse-momentum electrons or muons are selected, with two of them required to be consistent with originating from a Z boson decay. No significant excess above Standard Model background predictions is observed, and 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section of high-mass trilepton resonances are derived. The results are interpreted in the context of vector-like lepton and type-III seesaw models. For the vector-like lepton model, most heavy lepton mass values in the range 114–176 GeV are excluded. For the type-III seesaw model, most mass values in the range 100–468 GeV are excluded.

  9. Search for heavy lepton resonances decaying to a Z boson and a lepton in pp collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-16

    In this study, a search for heavy leptons decaying to a Z boson and an electron or a muon is presented. The search is based on pp collision data taken at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹. Three high-transverse-momentum electrons or muons are selected, with two of them required to be consistent with originating from a Z boson decay. No significant excess above Standard Model background predictions is observed, and 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section of high-mass trilepton resonances aremore » derived. The results are interpreted in the context of vector-like lepton and type-III seesaw models. For the vector-like lepton model, most heavy lepton mass values in the range 114–176 GeV are excluded. For the type-III seesaw model, most mass values in the range 100–468 GeV are excluded.« less

  10. Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: AVL Powertrain Engineering ...

  11. Measurement of the lepton charge asymmetry in inclusive $W$ production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, V.; et al.,

    2011-04-01

    A measurement of the lepton charge asymmetry in inclusive pp to WX production at sqrt(s)= 7 TeV is presented based on data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. This high precision measurement of the lepton charge asymmetry, performed in both the W to e nu and W to mu nu channels, provides new insights into parton distribution functions.

  12. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  13. Beam charge and current neutralization of high-charge-state heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, B.G.; Callahan, D.A.

    1997-10-29

    High-charge-state heavy-ions may reduce the accelerator voltage and cost of heavy-ion inertial fusion drivers, if ways can be found to neutralize the space charge of the highly charged beam ions as they are focused to a target in a fusion chamber. Using 2-D Particle-In- Cell simulations, we have evaluated the effectiveness of two different methods of beam neutralization: (1) by redistribution of beam charge in a larger diameter, preformed plasma in the chamber, and (2), by introducing a cold-electron-emitting source within the beam channel at the beam entrance into the chamber. We find the latter method to be much more effective for high-charge-state ions.

  14. ATLAS DISCOVERY POTENTIAL FOR A HEAVY CHARGED HIGGS BOSON.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ASSAMAGAN,K.A.; COADOU,Y.; DEANDREA,A.

    2002-02-01

    The sensitivity of the ATLAS detector to the discovery of a heavy charged Higgs boson is presented. Assuming a heavy SUSY spectrum, the most promising channels above the top quark mass are H{sup {+-}} {yields} tb and h{sup {+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}} which provide coverage in the low and high tan {beta} regions up to {approx} 600 GeV. The achievable precisions on the charged Higgs mass and tan {beta} determination are also discussed. The H{sup {+-}} {yields} W{sup {+-}}h{sup 0} channel, though restricted to a small MSSM parameter space, shows a viable signal in NMSSM where the parameter space is less constrained. The observation of the channel H{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sub L}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} + c.c. may constitute a distinctive evidence for models with singlet neutrinos in large extra dimensions.

  15. THE STATUS OF HEAVY-LEPTON SEARCHES*+ Martin L. Per1 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SCIENCES | Department of Energy THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY ADVISORY BOARD (SEAB) TASK FORCE ON BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY ADVISORY BOARD (SEAB) TASK FORCE ON BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Biomedical Sciences is comprised of SEAB members and experts from, for example, universities, the NIH intramural program, DOE National Laboratories, and various components of industry, and charged with identifying new areas for research by DOE

  16. Phenomenology of the SU(3){sub c}xSU(3){sub L}xU(1){sub X} model with exotic charged leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, Juan C.; Ponce, William A.; Gutierrez, Diego A.

    2007-04-01

    A phenomenological analysis of the three-family model based on the local gauge group SU(3){sub c}xSU(3){sub L}xU(1){sub X} with exotic charged leptons, is carried out. Instead of using the minimal scalar sector able to break the symmetry in a proper way, we introduce an alternative set of four Higgs scalar triplets, which combined with an anomaly-free discrete symmetry, produce quark and charged lepton mass spectrum without hierarchies in the Yukawa coupling constants. We also embed the structure into a simple gauge group and show some conditions to achieve a low energy gauge coupling unification, avoiding possible conflict with proton decay bounds. By using experimental results from the CERN-LEP, SLAC linear collider, and atomic parity violation data, we update constraints on several parameters of the model.

  17. Search for the production of ZW and ZZ boson pairs decaying into charged leptons and jets in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; et al,

    2013-11-01

    We present a measurement of the production cross section for ZW and ZZ boson pairs in final states with a pair of charged leptons, from the decay of a Z boson, and at least two jets, from the decay of a W or Z boson, using the full sample of proton-antiproton collisions recorded with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to 8.9 fb^(-1) of integrated luminosity. We increase the sensitivity to vector boson decays into pairs of quarks using a neural network discriminant that exploits the differences between the spatial spread of energy depositions and charged-particle momenta contained within the jet of particles originating from quarks and gluons. Additionally, we employ new jet energy corrections to Monte Carlo simulations that account for differences in the observed energy scales for quark and gluon jets. The number of signal events is extracted through a simultaneous fit to the dijet mass spectrum in three classes of events: events likely to contain jets with a heavy-quark decay, events likely to contain jets originating from light quarks, and events that fail these identification criteria. We determine the production cross section to be 2.5 +2.0 -1.0 pb (< 6.1 pb at the 95% confidence level), consistent with the standard model prediction of 5.1 pb.

  18. Lepton spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, G.J.

    1981-10-01

    Selected topics on the lepton spectrum are presented with special emphasis on tau decays and unpublished Mark II results from SPEAR and PEP. 42 references.

  19. Search for new phenomena in events with three or more charged leptons in pp collisions at s = 8 $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. 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H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-08-01

    A generic search for anomalous production of events with at least three charged leptons is presented. The data sample consists of pp collisions at √s=8 TeV collected in 2012 by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. Events are required to have at least three selected lepton candidates, at least two of which must be electrons or muons, while the third may be a hadronically decaying tau. Selected events are categorized based on their lepton flavour content and signal regions are constructed using several kinematic variables of interest. No significant deviations from Standard Model predictions are observed. Model-independent upper limits on contributions from beyond the Standard Model phenomena are provided for each signal region, along with prescription to re-interpret the limits for any model. Constraints are also placed on models predicting doubly charged Higgs bosons and excited leptons. For doubly charged Higgs bosons decaying to eτ or μτ, lower limits on the mass are set at 400 GeV at 95% confidence level. For excited leptons, constraints are provided as functions of both the mass of the excited state and the compositeness scale Λ, with the strongest mass constraints arising in regions where the mass equals Λ. In such scenarios, lower mass limits are set at 3.0 TeV for excited electrons and muons, 2.5 TeV for excited taus, and 1.6 TeV for every excited-neutrino flavour.

  20. Heavy ion beam induced charge transfer in Ar-Cs mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murnick, D.E.; Gernhauser, R.; Ulrich, A.; Krotz, W.; Wieser, J.

    1993-12-01

    In situ production of target ions in cold, dense matter by heavy ion collisions and subsequent selective charge transfer may provide an effective pumping scheme for heavy ion beam pumped lasers. Charge transfer from cesium atoms to doubly charged argon ions was used for selective population of 4d-levels in Ar II. The argon ions were produced in an argon-cesium gas target by a pulsed beam of 100 MeV {sup 32}S{sup 8+} ions from the Munich Tandem van de Graaff accelerator. The ion beam of 12 {times} 10{sup 6} ions/pulse had a pulse width of 2 ns and a repetition rate of 32 kHz. The argon pressure was typically 250 mbar. The cesium partial pressure was adjusted by heating the gas target, including a cesium reservoir, to temperatures between 250 and 500{degrees}C. Time resolved wavelength spectra showed large intensity increases corresponding to 4d {sup 4}D and 4d {sup 4}F to 4p transitions in Ar II in the ultraviolet wavelength region between 300 and 400 nm. This is interpreted as a resonant charge transfer of outer electrons of cesium to 4d levels in Ar II in Cs{sup 0} + Ar{sup 2+} collisions.

  1. Measurement of the production and lepton charge asymmetry of W bosons in Pb+Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of W boson production in lead-lead collisions at √sNN=2.76 TeV is presented. It is based on the analysis of data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2011 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.14 nb–1 and 0.15 nb–1 in the muon and electron decay channels, respectively. The differential production yields and lepton charge asymmetry are each measured as a function of the average number of participating nucleons (Npart) and absolute pseudorapidity of the charged lepton. The results are compared to predictions based on next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. As a result, these measurements are, in principle, sensitivemore »to possible nuclear modifications to the parton distribution functions and also provide information on scaling of W boson production in multi-nucleon systems.« less

  2. Measurement of the production and lepton charge asymmetry of W bosons in Pb+Pb collisions at ?sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of W boson production in lead-lead collisions at ?sNN=2.76 TeV is presented. It is based on the analysis of data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2011 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.14 nb1 and 0.15 nb1 in the muon and electron decay channels, respectively. The differential production yields and lepton charge asymmetry are each measured as a function of the average number of participating nucleons (Npart) and absolute pseudorapidity of the charged lepton. The results are compared to predictions based on next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. As a result, these measurements are, in principle, sensitive to possible nuclear modifications to the parton distribution functions and also provide information on scaling of W boson production in multi-nucleon systems.

  3. Measurement of the production and lepton charge asymmetry of W bosons in Pb+Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of W boson production in lead-lead collisions at √sNN=2.76 TeV is presented. It is based on the analysis of data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2011 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.14 nb–1 and 0.15 nb–1 in the muon and electron decay channels, respectively. The differential production yields and lepton charge asymmetry are each measured as a function of the average number of participating nucleons (Npart) and absolute pseudorapidity of the charged lepton. The results are compared to predictions based on next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. As a result, these measurements are, in principle, sensitivemore » to possible nuclear modifications to the parton distribution functions and also provide information on scaling of W boson production in multi-nucleon systems.« less

  4. Charge conservation at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and contributions to local parity violation observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlichting, Soeren; Pratt, Scott

    2011-01-15

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions provide laboratory environments from which one can study the creation of a novel state of matter, the quark-gluon plasma. The existence of such a state is postulated to alter the mechanism and evolution of charge production, which then becomes manifest in charge correlations. We study the separation of balancing charges at kinetic freeze-out by analyzing recent results on balancing charge correlations for Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. We find that in central collisions, the spatial points from which balancing charges are emitted are characterized by smaller relative angles. These results are consistent with the expectation that charge production occurred later in the collision, as would be expected for delayed hadronization. An alternative explanation would be that the charges were produced early, perhaps with a different mechanism where the charge production mechanism was altered from string breaking which tends to separate the charges in relative rapidity. The alternative explanation would also rely on the diffusion of charges being small. In addition we calculate the contributions from charge-balance correlations to STAR's local parity violation observable. We find that local charge conservation, when combined with elliptic flow, explains the bulk of STAR's measurement.

  5. Analysis of events with b-jets and a pair of leptons of the same charge in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-10-22

    An analysis is presented of events containing jets including at least one b -tagged jet, sizeable missing transverse momentum, and at least two leptons including a pair of the same electric charge, with the scalar sum of the jet and lepton transverse momenta being large. A data sample with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is used. Standard Model processes rarely produce these final states, but there are several models of physics beyond the Standard Model that predict an enhanced rate ofmore » production of such events; the ones considered here are production of vector-like quarks, enhanced four-top-quark production, pair production of chiral b'-quarks, and production of two positively charged top quarks. Eleven signal regions are defined; subsets of these regions are combined when searching for each class of models. In the three signal regions primarily sensitive to positively charged top quark pair production, the data yield is consistent with the background expectation. There are more data events than expected from background in the set of eight signal regions defined for searching for vector-like quarks and chiral b'-quarks, but the significance of the discrepancy is less than two standard deviations. Furthermore, the discrepancy reaches 2.5 standard deviations in the set of five signal regions defined for searching for four-top-quark production. The results are used to set 95% CL limits on various models.« less

  6. Analysis of events with b-jets and a pair of leptons of the same charge in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. 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R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-10-22

    An analysis is presented of events containing jets including at least one b -tagged jet, sizeable missing transverse momentum, and at least two leptons including a pair of the same electric charge, with the scalar sum of the jet and lepton transverse momenta being large. A data sample with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is used. Standard Model processes rarely produce these final states, but there are several models of physics beyond the Standard Model that predict an enhanced rate of production of such events; the ones considered here are production of vector-like quarks, enhanced four-top-quark production, pair production of chiral b'-quarks, and production of two positively charged top quarks. Eleven signal regions are defined; subsets of these regions are combined when searching for each class of models. In the three signal regions primarily sensitive to positively charged top quark pair production, the data yield is consistent with the background expectation. There are more data events than expected from background in the set of eight signal regions defined for searching for vector-like quarks and chiral b'-quarks, but the significance of the discrepancy is less than two standard deviations. Furthermore, the discrepancy reaches 2.5 standard deviations in the set of five signal regions defined for searching for four-top-quark production. The results are used to set 95% CL limits on various models.

  7. Properties of leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perl, M.L.

    1989-12-01

    The properties of the electron, muon, tau, and their neutrinos are reviewed. Three discrepancies in our understanding of those properties are discussed: the lifetime of orthopositronium, the mass spectra of e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs produced in heavy ion collisions, and the 1-charged particle modes problem in tau decays. The review concludes with a discussion of what we need to learn about the tau and the consequent need for a tau-charm factory. 68 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Lepton-mediated electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Garbrecht, Bjorn [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, 53706-1390 (United States); Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, 53706-1390 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Tulin, Sean [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the impact of the tau and bottom Yukawa couplings on the transport dynamics for electroweak baryogenesis in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. Although it has generally been assumed in the literature that all Yukawa interactions except those involving the top quark are negligible, we find that the tau and bottom Yukawa interaction rates are too fast to be neglected. We identify an illustrative 'lepton-mediated electroweak baryogenesis' scenario in which the baryon asymmetry is induced mainly through the presence of a left-handed leptonic charge. We derive analytic formulas for the computation of the baryon asymmetry that, in light of these effects, are qualitatively different from those in the established literature. In this scenario, for fixed CP-violating phases, the baryon asymmetry has opposite sign compared to that calculated using established formulas.

  9. Search for High-Mass States with One Lepton Plus Missing Transverse Momentum in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} with the ATLAS Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; /Freiburg U. /Oklahoma U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Geneva U. /Oxford U. /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Oklahoma State U. /Michigan State U. /Tel Aviv U. /Orsay, LAL /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Udine /ICTP, Trieste /Brookhaven /Hampton U. /Yale U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Munich U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Rutherford

    2012-06-20

    The ATLAS detector is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W{prime},W*), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of ppcollisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb{sup -1}. No excess beyond standard model expectations is observed. A W{prime} with sequential standard model couplings is excluded at 95% confidence level for masses below 1.49 TeV, and a W* (charged chiral boson) for masses below 1.35 TeV.

  10. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in top-quark pair production in the lepton-plus-jets final state in pp collision data at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-02-19

    This paper reports inclusive and differential measurements of the tt¯ charge asymmetry AC in 20.3 fb–1 of √s = 8 TeV pp collisions recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Three differential measurements are performed as a function of the invariant mass, transverse momentum and longitudinal boost of the tt¯ system. The tt¯ pairs are selected in the single-lepton channels (e or μ) with at least four jets, and a likelihood fit is used to reconstruct the tt¯ event kinematics. A Bayesian unfolding procedure is performed to infer the asymmetry at parton level from themore » observed data distribution. The inclusive tt¯ charge asymmetry is measured to be AC = 0.009 ± 0.005) (stat. + syst.). As a result, the inclusive and differential measurements are compatible with the values predicted by the Standard Model.« less

  11. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  12. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  13. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.

    2009-02-06

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta}=1.37{+-}0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub perpendicular}.

  14. Indications of conical emission of charged hadrons at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06} (syst), independent of p.

  15. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic HeavyIon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2009-02-09

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au + Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub {perpendicular}}.

  16. Search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number-violating Τ → ℓhh' decay modes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miyazaki, Y.; Hayasaka, K.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D.M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A.M.; Bay, A.; Bhardwaj, V.; et al

    2013-02-01

    We search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number-violating τ decays into a lepton (ℓ = electron or muon) and two charged mesons (h,h'=π± or K±) using 854 fb⁻¹of data collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider. We obtain 90% confidence level upper limits on the τ→ℓhh' branching fractions in the range (2.0–8.4)×10⁻⁸. These results improve upon our previously published upper limits by factors of about 1.8 on average.

  17. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    photon at the Tevatron (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron We present results of a search for the anomalous production of events containing a high-transverse momentum charged lepton ({ell}, either e or {mu}) and photon ({gamma}),

  18. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at √s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at √s = 8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  19. Performance of τq-lepton reconstruction and identification in CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of tau-lepton reconstruction and identification algorithms is studied using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The tau leptons that decay into one or three charged hadrons, zero or more short-lived neutral hadrons, and a neutrino are identified using final-state particles reconstructed in the CMS tracker and electromagnetic calorimeter. The reconstruction efficiency of the algorithms is measured using tau leptons produced in Z-boson decays. The tau-lepton misidentification rates for jets and electrons are determined.

  20. A Search for Neutrinoless Tau Decays to Three Leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, Jeffrey A.; /Oregon U. /SLAC; ,

    2008-09-24

    Using approximately 350 million {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pair events recorded with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center between 1999 and 2006, a search has been made for neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating tau decays to three lighter leptons. All six decay modes consistent with conservation of electric charge and energy have been considered. With signal selection efficiencies of 5-12%, we obtain 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fraction {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}{ell}{ell}) in the range (4-8) x 10{sup -8}.

  1. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at ?s = 8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a DrellYan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  2. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8$$ s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J. Da; Via, C. Da; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. 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R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Saadi, D. Shoaleh; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at √s=8 TeV TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q|=2e to |q|=6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  3. Medium-modified jets and initial state fluctuations as sources of charge correlations measured at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, Hannah; Bass, Steffen A.; Renk, Thorsten

    2011-01-15

    We investigate the contribution of medium-modified jets and initial state fluctuations to the asymmetry in charged-particle production with respect to the reaction plane. This asymmetry has been suggested as a compelling signature for the chiral magnetic effect in QCD and makes the study of conventional scenarios for the creation of such charged-particle multiplicity fluctuations a timely endeavor. The different path-length combinations of jets through the medium in noncentral heavy ion collisions result in finite correlations of like and different charged particles emitted in the different hemispheres. Our calculation is based on the combination of jet events from Yet another Jet Energy-Loss Model (YaJEM) and a bulk-medium evolution. It is found that the jet production probabilities are too small to observe this effect. The influence of initial state fluctuations on this observable is explored by using an event-by-event (3+1)-dimensional hybrid approach that is based on Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) with an ideal hydrodynamic evolution. In this calculation, momentum conservation and elliptic flow are explicitly taken into account. The asymmetries in the initial state are translated to a final state momentum asymmetry by the hydrodynamic flow profile. Dependent on the size of the initial state fluctuations, the resulting charged-particle asymmetries are in qualitative agreement with the preliminary STAR (solenoid tracker at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) results. The multiparticle correlation as proposed by the PHENIX Collaboration can, in principle, be used to disentangle the different contributions, however, in practice, is affected substantially by the procedure to subtract trivial resonance decay contributions.

  4. Electronic branching ratio of the. tau. lepton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Sung, M.K.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; Goldberg, M.; Haupt, T.; Horwitz, N.; Kennett, R.; Moneti, G.C.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Thulasidas, M.; Yao, W.; Zhu, G.; Barnes, A.V.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; Letson, T.; Mestayer, M.D.; Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.

    1992-06-01

    Using data accumulated by the CLEO I detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have measured the ratio {ital R}={Gamma}({tau}{r arrow}{ital e}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Gamma}{sub 1}, where {Gamma}{sub 1} is the {tau} decay rate to final states with one charged particle. We find {ital R}=0.2231{plus minus}0.0044{plus minus}0.0073 where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Together with the measured topological one-charged-particle branching fraction, this yields the branching fraction of the {tau} lepton to electrons, {ital B}{sub {ital e}}=0.192{plus minus}0.004{plus minus}0.006.

  5. Summary of Lepton Photon 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2012-03-14

    In this lecture, I summarize developments presented at the Lepton Photon 2011 conference and give my perspective on the current situation in high-energy physics. I am grateful to the organizers of Lepton Photon 2011 for providing us a very pleasant and simulating week in Mumbai. This year's Lepton Photon conference has covered the full range of subjects that fall within the scope of high-energy physics, including connections to cosmology, nuclear physics, and atomic physics. The experiments that were discussed detect particles ranging in energy from radio frequencies to EeV.

  6. Observation of charge asymmetry dependence of pion elliptic flow and the possible chiral magnetic wave in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-06-26

    We present measurements of ?? and ?? elliptic flow, v?, at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, Ach, based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that ?? (??) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at ?sNN = 27 GeV and higher. At ?sNN = 200 GeV, the slope of the difference of v? between ?? and ?? as a function of Ach exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations that incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. In addition, similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.

  7. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} = 8}$ s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-03

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(18.4\\) fb\\(^{-1}\\) of pp collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 8\\) TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 \\(\\%\\) confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.

  8. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at $${\\sqrt{s} = 8}$$ s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-03

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data samplemore » corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(18.4\\) fb\\(^{-1}\\) of pp collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 8\\) TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 \\(\\%\\) confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.« less

  9. Search for a Vectorlike Quark with Charge 2/3 in t+Z Events from pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2011-12-29

    A search for pair-produced heavy vectorlike charge-2/3 quarks, T, in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with the flavor-changing-neutral-current decay of a T quark to a top quark and a Z boson are selected by requiring two leptons from the Z-boson decay, as well as an additional isolated charged lepton. In a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.14 fb⁻¹, the number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model background prediction. Assuming a branching fraction of 100% for themore » decay T→tZ, a T quark with a mass less than 475 GeV/c² is excluded at the 95% confidence level.« less

  10. Search for a Vectorlike Quark with Charge 2/3 in t+Z Events from pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2011-12-29

    A search for pair-produced heavy vectorlike charge-2/3 quarks, T, in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with the flavor-changing-neutral-current decay of a T quark to a top quark and a Z boson are selected by requiring two leptons from the Z-boson decay, as well as an additional isolated charged lepton. In a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.14 fb⁻¹, the number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model background prediction. Assuming a branching fraction of 100% for themore »decay T→tZ, a T quark with a mass less than 475 GeV/c² is excluded at the 95% confidence level.« less

  11. Observation of charge asymmetry dependence of pion elliptic flow and the possible chiral magnetic wave in heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-06-26

    We present measurements of π⁻ and π⁺ elliptic flow, v₂, at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, Ach, based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that π⁻ (π⁺) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at √sNN = 27 GeV and higher. At √sNN = 200 GeV, the slope of the difference of v₂ between π⁻ and π⁺ as a function of Ach exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations thatmore » incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. In addition, similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.« less

  12. A search for charge 1/3 third generation leptoquarks in muon channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzunyan, Sergey A.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2006-08-01

    Leptoquarks are exotic particles that have color, electric charge, and lepton number and appear in extended gauge theories and composite models. Current theory suggests that leptoquarks would come in three different generations corresponding to the three quark and lepton generations. We are searching for charge 1/3 third generation leptoquarks produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the D0 detector. Such leptoquarks would decay into either a tau-neutrino plus a b-quark or, if heavy enough, to a tau-lepton plus a t-quark. We present preliminary results on an analysis where both leptoquarks decay into neutrinos giving a final state with missing energy and two b-quarks using 367 pb{sup -1} of Run II D0 data taken between August 2002 and September 2004. We place upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} LQ{ovr LQ})B{sup 2} as a function of the leptoquark mass M{sub LQ}. Assuming B = 1, we exclude at the 95% confidence level third generation leptoquarks with M{sub LQ} < 197 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. Two Complementary Strategies for New Physics Searches at Lepton Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    In this thesis I present two complementary strategies for probing beyond-the-Standard Model physics using data collected in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at lepton colliders. One strategy involves searching for effects at low energy mediated by new particles at the TeV mass scale, at which new physics is expected to manifest. Several new physics scenarios, including Supersymmetry and models with leptoquarks or compositeness, may lead to observable rates for charged lepton-flavor violating processes, which are forbidden in the Standard Model. I present a search for lepton-flavor violating decays of the {Upsilon}(3S) using data collected with the BABAR detector. This study establishes the 90% confidence level upper limits BF({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} e{tau}) < 5.0 x 10{sup -6} and BF({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {mu}{tau}) < 4.1 x 10{sup -6} which are used to place constraints on new physics contributing to lepton-flavor violation at the TeV mass scale. An alternative strategy is to increase the collision energy above the threshold for new particles and produce them directly. I discuss research and development efforts aimed at producing a vertex tracker which achieves the physics performance required of a high energy lepton collider. A small-scale vertex tracker prototype is constructed using Silicon sensors of 50 {mu}m thickness and tested using charged particle beams. This tracker achieves the targeted impact parameter resolution of {sigma}{sub LP} = (5{circle_plus}10 GeV/p{sub T}) as well as a longitudinal vertex resolution of (260 {+-} 10) {mu}m, which is consistent with the requirements of a TeV-scale lepton collider. This detector research and development effort must be motivated and directed by simulation studies of physics processes. Investigation of a dark matter-motivated Supersymmetry scenario is presented, in which the dark matter is composed of Supersymmetric neutralinos. In this scenario, studies of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} H{sup 0}A{sup 0} production process allow for precise measurements of the properties of the A{sup 0} Supersymmetric Higgs boson, which improve the achievable precision on the neutralino dark matter candidate relic density to 8%. Comparison between this quantity and the dark matter density determined from cosmological observations will further our understanding of dark matter by allowing us to determine if it is of Supersymmetric origin.

  14. Search for W' decaying to tau lepton and neutrino in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-08-19

    We found that the first search for a heavy charged vector boson in the final state with a tau lepton and a neutrino is reported, using 19.7 fb-1 of LHC data at √s = 8 TeV. A signal would appear as an excess of events in kinematic regions where the standard model background is low. No excess is observed. Limits are set on a model in which the W' decays preferentially to fermions of the third generation. Our results substantially extend previous constraints on this model. Masses below 2.0 to 2.7 TeV are excluded, depending on the model parameters. In addition, the existence of a W' boson with universal fermion couplings is excluded at 95% confidence level, for W' masses below 2.7 TeV.

  15. Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-14

    Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles are performed using a data sample of 19.1 fb-1 from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No excess is observed above the estimated background and limits are placed on the mass of long-lived particles in various supersymmetric models. Long-lived tau sleptons in models with gauge-mediated symmetry breaking are excluded up to masses between 440 and 385 GeV for tan β between 10 and 50, with a 290 GeV limit in the case where only direct tau slepton production ismore » considered. In the context of simplified LeptoSUSY models, where sleptons are stable and have a mass of 300 GeV, squark and gluino masses are excluded up to a mass of 1500 and 1360 GeV, respectively. Directly produced charginos, in simplified models where they are nearly degenerate to the lightest neutralino, are excluded up to a mass of 620 GeV. As a result, R-hadrons, composites containing a gluino, bottom squark or top squark, are excluded up to a mass of 1270, 845 and 900 GeV, respectively, using the full detector; and up to a mass of 1260, 835 and 870 GeV using an approach disregarding information from the muon spectrometer.« less

  16. Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-14

    Searches for heavy long-lived charged particles are performed using a data sample of 19.1 fb-1 from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No excess is observed above the estimated background and limits are placed on the mass of long-lived particles in various supersymmetric models. Long-lived tau sleptons in models with gauge-mediated symmetry breaking are excluded up to masses between 440 and 385 GeV for tan ? between 10 and 50, with a 290 GeV limit in the case where only direct tau slepton production is considered. In the context of simplified LeptoSUSY models, where sleptons are stable and have a mass of 300 GeV, squark and gluino masses are excluded up to a mass of 1500 and 1360 GeV, respectively. Directly produced charginos, in simplified models where they are nearly degenerate to the lightest neutralino, are excluded up to a mass of 620 GeV. As a result, R-hadrons, composites containing a gluino, bottom squark or top squark, are excluded up to a mass of 1270, 845 and 900 GeV, respectively, using the full detector; and up to a mass of 1260, 835 and 870 GeV using an approach disregarding information from the muon spectrometer.

  17. Effects of T-odd asymmetry of the emission of light charged particles and photons during fission of heavy nuclei by polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagarskii, A. M.; Guseva, I. S.; Goennenwein, F.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Mutterer, M.; Kuz'mina, T. E.; Petrov, G. A.; Tyurin, G.; Nesvizhevsky, V.

    2011-12-15

    The new physical effects of T-odd asymmetry of the emission of light charged particles (LCPs) during the ternary fission of some heavy nuclei by cold polarized neutrons have been experimentally studied. The coefficients of triple scalar and vector correlation of the pulses of light particles and fission fragments (TRI effect) and the fivefold correlation of the same vectors (ROT effect) have been measured. These effects are believed to be caused by the rotation of polarized fissioning system around its polarization direction. The treatment of the experimental data for LCPs in the framework of this hypothesis leads to a good agreement between the calculation results and experimental data. The calculated value of the angle of rotation of the fission axis in the ternary fission of the polarized fissioning {sup 236}U* compound nucleus was used to process the results of measuring the ROT effect for {gamma} photons from binary-fission fragments of the same nucleus. A satisfactory description of these experimental data is obtained which serves a convincing confirmation of the rotation hypothesis.

  18. Search for Maximal Flavor Violating Scalars in Same-Charge Lepton Pairs in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Models of Maximal Flavor Violation (MxFV) in elementary particle physics may contain at least one new scalar SU(2) doublet field {Phi}{sub FV} = ({eta}{sup 0},{eta}{sup +}) that couples the first and third generation quarks (q{sub 1}; q{sub 3}) via a Lagrangian term L{sub FV} = {zeta}{sub 13}{Phi}{sub FV}q{sub 1}q{sub 3}. These models have a distinctive signature of same-charge top-quark pairs and evade flavor-changing limits from meson mixing measurements. Data corresponding to 2 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are analyzed for evidence of the MxFV signature. For a neutral scalar {eta}{sup 0} with m{sub {eta}{sup 0}} = 200 GeV/c{sup 2} and coupling {zeta}{sub 13} = 1, {approx} 11 signal events are expected over a background of 2.1 {+-} 1.8 events. Three events are observed in the data, consistent with background expectations, and limits are set on the coupling {zeta}{sub 13} for m{sub {eta}{sup 0}} = 180-300 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. Searches for Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Silke; /SLAC

    2012-04-25

    Measurements of the branching fractions of purely leptonic decays of B-mesons translate into constraints in the plane of the charged Higgs mass versus tan {beta} which are relatively insensitive to the particular theoretical model. Using the full BABAR dataset of 450 million B-decays we search for these decays. No significant signal is found in the decays into electrons or muons and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of the order of a 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. We measure the branching fraction of B {yields} {tau}{mu} to be (1.7 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4}.

  20. Flavor Physics Data from the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) was established at the May 2002 Flavor Physics and CP Violation Conference in Philadelphia, and continues the LEP Heavy Flavor Steering Group's tradition of providing regular updates to the world averages of heavy flavor quantities. Data are provided by six subgroups that each focus on a different set of heavy flavor measurements: B lifetimes and oscillation parameters, Semi-leptonic B decays, Rare B decays, Unitarity triangle parameters, B decays to charm final states, and Charm Physics.

  1. Symmetrical parametrizations of the lepton mixing matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    Advantages of the original symmetrical form of the parametrization of the lepton mixing matrix are discussed. It provides a conceptually more transparent description of neutrino oscillations and lepton number violating processes like neutrinoless double beta decay, clarifying the significance of Dirac and Majorana phases. It is also ideal for parametrizing scenarios with light sterile neutrinos.

  2. Measurement of the top quark mass in lepton+jets events with secondary vertex tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Robert Duane; /Northeastern U.

    2007-02-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton + jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events with single isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), exactly four calorimeter jets, and significant missing transverse energy are selected. Probabilities used to discriminate between signal and background are assumed to be proportional to differential cross-sections, calculated using event kinematics and folding in object resolutions and parton distribution functions. The event likelihoods constructed using these probabilities are varied with the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and the jet energy scale, JES, to give the smallest possible combined statistical + JES uncertainty.

  3. Kinematical correlations of dielectrons from semileptonic decays of heavy mesons and Drell-Yan processes at BNL RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maciula, R.; Slipek, G.; Szczurek, A.

    2011-03-01

    We discuss kinematical correlations between charged leptons from semileptonic decays of open charm/bottom leptons produced in the Drell-Yan mechanism as well as some other mechanisms not included so far in the literature in proton-proton scattering at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The distributions of charm and bottom quarks/antiquarks are calculated in the framework of the k{sub t}-factorization approach. For this calculation we use different unintegrated parton distributions from the literature. The hadronization of heavy quarks is done with the help of well-known fragmentation functions. Uncertainties of our predictions related to heavy quark masses, factorization, and renormalization scales as well as due to the choice of fragmentation model are also discussed. We use semileptonic decay functions found by fitting recent semileptonic data obtained by the CLEO and BABAR collaborations. The Drell-Yan processes were calculated including transverse momenta of quarks and antiquarks, using the Kwiecinski parton distributions. We have also taken into consideration reactions initiated by purely QED {gamma}{sup *{gamma}*} fusion in elastic and inelastic pp collisions as well as a recently proposed diffractive mechanism of exclusive charm-anticharm production. The contribution of the latter mechanism is rather small. We get a good description of the dilepton invariant mass spectrum measured recently by the PHENIX Collaboration and present predictions for the dilepton pair transverse momentum distribution as well as the distribution in the azimuthal angle between electron and positron.

  4. Measurement of the [tau]-lepton mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balest, R.; Daoudi, M.; Ford, W.T.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Lohner, M.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Jones, C.D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; O'Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Wuerthwein, F.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Stephens, R.; Yelton, J.; Cinabro, D.; Henderson, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Ball, S.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Savino

    1993-05-01

    Using data from the CLEO II detector at CESR, we measure the [tau]-lepton mass by exploiting the unique kinematics of events in which both [tau]'s decay hadronically. The result is [ital m][sub [tau

  5. Search for vectorlike B quarks in events with one isolated lepton, missing transverse momentum, and jets at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-06-19

    A search has been performed for pair production of heavy vectorlike down-type (B) quarks. The analysis explores the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterized by events with one isolated charged lepton (electron or muon), significant missing transverse momentum, and multiple jets. One or more jets are required to be tagged as arising from b quarks, and at least one pair of jets must be tagged as arising from the hadronic decay of an electroweak boson. The analysis uses the full data sample of pp collisions recorded in 2012 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC, operating at a center-of-mass energy of 8more » TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹. No significant excess of events is observed above the expected background. Limits are set on vectorlike B production, as a function of the B branching ratios, assuming the allowable decay modes are B → Wt/Zb/Hb. In the chiral limit with a branching ratio of 100% for the decay B → Wt, the observed (expected) 95% C.L. lower limit on the vectorlike B mass is 810 GeV (760 GeV). In the case where the vectorlike B quark has branching ratio values corresponding to those of an SU(2) singlet state, the observed (expected) 95% C.L. lower limit on the vectorlike B mass is 640 GeV (505 GeV). The same analysis, when used to investigate pair production of a colored, charge 5/3 exotic fermion T5/3, with subsequent decay T5/3 → Wt, sets an observed (expected) 95% C.L. lower limit on the T5/3 mass of 840 GeV (780 GeV).« less

  6. Search for a new charged heavy vector boson decaying to an electron-neutrino pair in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jieun

    2005-06-01

    We present results on a search for a heavy charged vector boson, W', decaying to an electron-neutrino pair in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 205 pb{sup -1}. We found no evidence of this decay channel, and set 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section times branching fraction assuming the light neutrino. We also set the limit on the W' boson mass at M{sub W'} > 788 GeV/c{sup 2}, assuming the standard model strength couplings.

  7. Exotic Leptons. Higgs, Flavor and Collider Phenomenology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela

    2014-01-15

    We study extensions of the standard model by one generation of vector-like leptons with non-standard hypercharges, which allow for a sizable modification of the h → γγ decay rate for new lepton masses in the 300 GeV-1 TeV range. We also analyze vacuum stability implications for different hypercharges. Effects in h → Zγ are typically much smaller than in h → γγ, but distinct among the considered hypercharge assignments. Non-standard hypercharges constrain or entirely forbid possible mixing operators with standard model leptons. As a consequence, the leading contributions to the experimentally strongly constrained electric dipole moments of standard model fermionsmore » are only generated at the two loop level by the new CP violating sources of the considered setups. Furthermore, we derive the bounds from dipole moments, electro-weak precision observables and lepton flavor violating processes, and discuss their implications. Finally, we examine the production and decay channels of the vector-like leptons at the LHC, and find that signatures with multiple light leptons or taus are already probing interesting regions of parameter space.« less

  8. Exotic Leptons. Higgs, Flavor and Collider Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela

    2014-01-15

    We study extensions of the standard model by one generation of vector-like leptons with non-standard hypercharges, which allow for a sizable modification of the h → γγ decay rate for new lepton masses in the 300 GeV-1 TeV range. We also analyze vacuum stability implications for different hypercharges. Effects in h → Zγ are typically much smaller than in h → γγ, but distinct among the considered hypercharge assignments. Non-standard hypercharges constrain or entirely forbid possible mixing operators with standard model leptons. As a consequence, the leading contributions to the experimentally strongly constrained electric dipole moments of standard model fermions are only generated at the two loop level by the new CP violating sources of the considered setups. Furthermore, we derive the bounds from dipole moments, electro-weak precision observables and lepton flavor violating processes, and discuss their implications. Finally, we examine the production and decay channels of the vector-like leptons at the LHC, and find that signatures with multiple light leptons or taus are already probing interesting regions of parameter space.

  9. Top physics: measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev using lepton + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-07

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using events with one charged lepton and jets from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96TeV. In these events, heavy flavor quarks from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, a total of 48 candidate events are selected, where 13.5 {+-} 1.8 events are expected from background contributions. We measure a t{bar t} production cross section of 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup _1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb.

  10. Search for heavy Majorana neutrinos with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-29

    A search for heavy Majorana neutrinos in events containing a pair of high-pT leptons of the same charge and high-pT jets is presented. The search uses 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. The data are found to be consistent with the background-only hypothesis based on the Standard Model expectation. In the context of a Type-I seesaw mechanism, limits are set on the production cross-section times branching ratio for production of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the mass range between 100 andmore » 500 GeV. The limits are subsequently interpreted as limits on the mixing between the heavy Majorana neutrinos and the Standard Model neutrinos. In the context of a left-right symmetric model, limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio are set with respect to the masses of heavy Majorana neutrinos and heavy gauge bosons WR and Z'.« less

  11. Search for heavy Majorana neutrinos with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-29

    A search for heavy Majorana neutrinos in events containing a pair of high-pT leptons of the same charge and high-pT jets is presented. The search uses 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. The data are found to be consistent with the background-only hypothesis based on the Standard Model expectation. In the context of a Type-I seesaw mechanism, limits are set on the production cross-section times branching ratio for production of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the mass range between 100 and 500 GeV. The limits are subsequently interpreted as limits on the mixing between the heavy Majorana neutrinos and the Standard Model neutrinos. In the context of a left-right symmetric model, limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio are set with respect to the masses of heavy Majorana neutrinos and heavy gauge bosons WR and Z'.

  12. Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-30

    Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

  13. Sneutrino Higgs models explain lepton non-universality in eejj, eνjj excesses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berger, Joshua; Dror, Jeff Asaf; Ng, Wee Hao

    2015-09-23

    Recent searches for first-generation leptoquarks and heavy right-handed WR bosons have seen excesses in final states with electrons and jets. A bizarre property of these excesses is that they appear to violate lepton universality. With these results in mind, we study the phenomenology of supersymmetric models in which the Higgs arises as the sneutrino in an electron supermultiplet. Since the electron is singled out in this approach, one can naturally account for the lepton flavor structure of the excesses. In this work, we show that in such a framework, one can significantly alleviate the tension between the Standard Model andmore » the data and yet evade current constraints from other searches. Finally we point out that correlated excesses are expected to be seen in future multilepton searches.« less

  14. Model independent interpretation of recent CR lepton data after AMS-02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaggero, Daniele; Maccione, Luca E-mail: luca.maccione@lmu.de

    2013-12-01

    We model the CR leptonic fluxes above 20 GeV in terms of a superposition of a standard and a charge symmetric extra component, which we generically describe as power-laws in momentum. We investigate under these hypotheses the compatibility between AMS-02, Fermi-LAT and PAMELA datasets on positron fraction, electron+positron spectrum and electron spectrum respectively. We find that it is possible to reconcile AMS and Fermi-LAT data within uncertainties, if energy-dependent effects are present in Fermi-LAT systematics. We also study possible deviations from charge symmetry in the extra component and find no compelling evidence for them.

  15. Precision Measurements of Tau Lepton Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, Ian M.; /Victoria U.

    2010-03-16

    Using data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, the branching fractions {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (8.83 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.13)%, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.273 {+-} 0.002 {+-} 0.009)%, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.1346 {+-} 0.0010 {+-} 0.0036)%, and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.58 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -5} are measured where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The invariant mass distribution for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays are unfolded to correct for detector effects. A measurement of {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (3.42 {+-} 0.55 {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -5}, a measurement of {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.28) x 10{sup -5} and an upper limit on {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}[ex.{phi}]) {le} 2.5 x 10{sup -6} {at} 905 CL are determined from a binned maximum likelihood fit of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} K{sup +}K{sup -} invariant mass distributions. The branching ratio {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is measured to be (6.531 {+-} 0.056 {+-} 0.093) x 10{sup -2} from which |V{sub us}| is determined to be 0.2255 {+-} 0.0023. The branching ratio {Beta}/({tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}) = (9.796 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.035) x 10{sup -1} is measured enabling a precision test of the Standard Model assumption of charged current lepton universality, g{sub {mu}}/g{sub e} = 1.0036 {+-} 0.0020. The branching ratios {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}) = (3.882 {+-} 0.032 {+-} 0.057) x 10{sup -2}, and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}) = (5.9545 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.061) x 10{sup -1} are measured which provide additional tests of charged current lepton universality, (g{sub {tau}}/g{sub {mu}}){sub {pi}} = 0.9856 {+-} 0.0057 and (g{sub {tau}}/g{sub {mu}}){sub K} = 0.9827 {+-} 0.0086 which can be combined to give (g{sub {tau}}/g{sub {mu}}){sub {pi}/K} = 0.9850 {+-} 0.0054. Any deviation of these measurements from the expected Standard Model values would be an indication of new physics.

  16. Gamma-ray constraints on hadronic and leptonic activities of decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chuan-Ren; Mandal, Sourav K.; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: sourav.mandal@berkeley.edu

    2010-01-01

    While the excess in cosmic-ray electrons and positrons reported by PAMELA and Fermi may be explained by dark matter decaying primarily into charged leptons, this does not necessarily mean that dark matter should not have any hadronic decay modes. In order to quantify the allowed hadronic activities, we derive constraints on the decay rates of dark matter into WW, ZZ, hh, q q-bar and gg using the Fermi and HESS gamma-ray data. We also derive gamma-ray constraints on the leptonic e{sup +}e{sup −}, μ{sup +}μ{sup −} and τ{sup +}τ{sup −} final states. We find that dark matter must decay primarily into μ{sup +}μ{sup −} or τ{sup +}τ{sup −} in order to simultaneously explain the reported excess and meet all gamma-ray constraints.

  17. Semi-inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moreno, O.; Donnelly, T. W.; Van Orden, J. W.; Ford, W. P.

    2014-07-17

    The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case ofmore » the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. As a result, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.« less

  18. Semi-inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, O.; Donnelly, T. W.; Van Orden, J. W.; Ford, W. P.

    2014-07-17

    The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case of the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. As a result, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.

  19. Leptonic mixing, family symmetries, and neutrino phenomenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medeiros Varzielas, I. de [Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Dortmund D-44221 Dortmund (Germany); Gonzalez Felipe, R. [Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Serodio, H. [Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-02-01

    Tribimaximal leptonic mixing is a mass-independent mixing scheme consistent with the present solar and atmospheric neutrino data. By conveniently decomposing the effective neutrino mass matrix associated to it, we derive generic predictions in terms of the parameters governing the neutrino masses. We extend this phenomenological analysis to other mass-independent mixing schemes which are related to the tribimaximal form by a unitary transformation. We classify models that produce tribimaximal leptonic mixing through the group structure of their family symmetries in order to point out that there is often a direct connection between the group structure and the phenomenological analysis. The type of seesaw mechanism responsible for neutrino masses plays a role here, as it restricts the choices of family representations and affects the viability of leptogenesis. We also present a recipe to generalize a given tribimaximal model to an associated model with a different mass-independent mixing scheme, which preserves the connection between the group structure and phenomenology as in the original model. This procedure is explicitly illustrated by constructing toy models with the transpose tribimaximal, bimaximal, golden ratio, and hexagonal leptonic mixing patterns.

  20. Search for Bs Mixing with Inclusive Leptons at SLD (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    exploiting the high psub T lepton and the semileptonic decay topology. No significant mixing signal was found and the following ranges of the oscillation frequency of Bsub ...

  1. Low-mass lepton pair production at large transverse momentum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We also discuss the sensitivity of the transverse momentum distribution of low-mass lepton pairs to the gluon distribution. Authors: Kang Zhongbo ; Qiu Jianwei 1 ; Vogelsang, ...

  2. Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair production at a linear collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring new physics ...

  3. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  4. AN in inclusive lepton-proton collisions: TMD and twist-3 approaches

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2015-01-23

    We consider the inclusive production of hadrons in lepton-nucleon scattering. For a transversely polarized nucleon this reaction shows a left-right azimuthal asymmetry, which we compute this asymmetry in both TMD and in twist-3 collinear factorization formalisms. All non-perturbative parton correlators of the calculation are fixed through information from other hard processes. Our results for the left-right asymmetry agree in sign with recent data for charged pion production from the HERMES Collaboration and from Jefferson Lab. As a result, we discuss similarities and differences of two formalisms.

  5. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armesto, N; Borghini, N; Jeon, S; Wiedemann, U A; Abreu, S; Akkelin, V; Alam, J; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonuv, D; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Arsene, I C; Barnafoldi, G G; Barrette, J; Bauchle, B; Becattini, F; Betz, B; Bleicher, M; Bluhm, M; Boer, D; Bopp, F W; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Busza, W; Cacciari, M; Capella, A; Casalderrey-Solana, J; Chatterjee, R; Chen, L; Cleymans, J; Cole, B A; delValle, Z C; Csernai, L P; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; de Deus, J D; Ding, H; Djordjevic, M; Drescher, H; Dremin, I M; Dumitru, A; El, A; Engel, R; d'Enterria, D; Eskola, K J; Fai, G; Ferreiro, E G; Fries, R J; Frodermann, E; Fujii, H; Gale, C; Gelis, F; Goncalves, V P; Greco, V; Gyulassy, M; van Hees, H; Heinz, U; Honkanen, H; Horowitz, W A; Iancu, E; Ingelman, G; Jalilian-Marian, J; Jeon, S; Kaidalov, A B; Kampfer, B; Kang, Z; Karpenko, I A; Kestin, G; Kharzeev, D; Ko, C M; Koch, B; Kopeliovich, B; Kozlov, M; Kraus, I; Kuznetsova, I; Lee, S H; Lednicky, R; Letessier, J; Levin, E; Li, B; Lin, Z; Liu, H; Liu, W; Loizides, C; Lokhtin, I P; Machado, M T; Malinina, L V; Managadze, A M; Mangano, M L; Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C; Martinez, G; Milhano, J G; Mocsy, A; Molnar, D; Nardi, M; Nayak, J K; Niemi, H; Oeschler, H; Ollitrault, J; Paic, G; Pajares, C; Pantuev, V S; Papp, G; Peressounko, D; Petreczky, P; Petrushanko, S V; Piccinini, F; Pierog, T; Pirner, H J; Porteboeuf, S; Potashnikova, I; Qin, G Y; Qiu, J; Rafelski, J; Rajagopal, K; Ranft, J; Rapp, R; Rasanen, S S; Rathsman, J; Rau, P; Redlich, K; Renk, T; Rezaeian, A H; Rischke, D; Roesler, S; Ruppert, J; Ruuskanen, P V; Salgado, C A; Sapeta, S; Sarcevic, I; Sarkar, S; Sarycheva, L I; Schmidt, I; Shoski, A I; Sinha, B; Sinyukov, Y M; Snigirev, A M; Srivastava, D K; Stachel, J; Stasto, A; Stocker, H; Teplov, C Y; Thews, R L; Torrieri, G; Pop, V T; Triantafyllopoulos, D N; Tuchin, K L; Turbide, S; Tywoniuk, K; Utermann, A; Venugopalan, R; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Wang, E; Wang, X N; Werner, K; Wessels, E; Wheaton, S; Wicks, S; Wiedemann, U A; Wolschin, G; Xiao, B; Xu, Z; Yasui, S; Zabrodin, E; Zapp, K; Zhang, B

    2008-02-25

    In August 2006, the CERN Theory Unit announced to restructure its visitor program and to create a 'CERN Theory Institute', where 1-3 month long specific programs can take place. The first such Institute was held from 14 May to 10 June 2007, focusing on 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions'. It brought together close to 100 scientists working on the theory of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The aim of this workshop was to review and document the status of expectations and predictions for the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider LHC before its start. LHC will explore heavy ion collisions at {approx} 30 times higher center of mass energy than explored previously at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC. So, on the one hand, the charge of this workshop provided a natural forum for the exchange of the most recent ideas, and allowed to monitor how the understanding of heavy ion collisions has evolved in recent years with the data from RHIC, and with the preparation of the LHC experimental program. On the other hand, the workshop aimed at a documentation which helps to distinguish pre- from post-dictions. An analogous documentation of the 'Last Call for Predictions' [1] was prepared prior to the start of the heavy-ion program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC, and it proved useful in the subsequent discussion and interpretation of RHIC data. The present write-up is the documentation of predictions for the LHC heavy ion program, received or presented during the CERN TH Institute. The set-up of the CERN TH Institute allowed us to aim for the wide-most coverage of predictions. There were more than 100 presentations and discussions during the workshop. Moreover, those unable to attend could still participate by submitting predictions in written form during the workshop. This followed the spirit that everybody interested in making a prediction had the right to be heard. To arrive at a concise document, we required that each prediction should be summarized on at most two pages, and that predictions should be presented, whenever possible, in figures which display measurable quantities. Full model descriptions were not accepted--the authors were encouraged to indicate the relevant references for the interested reader. Participants had the possibility to submit multiple contributions on different topics, but it was part of the subsequent editing process to ensure that predictions on neighboring topics were merged wherever possible. The contributions summarized here are organized in several sections,--though some of them contain material related with more than one section--roughly by going from low transverse momentum to high transverse momentum and from abundant to rare measurements. In the low transverse momentum regime, we start with predictions on multiplicity distributions, azimuthal asymmetries in particle production and hadronic flavor observables, followed by correlation and fluctuation measurements. The contributions on hard probes at the LHC start with predictions for single inclusive high transverse momentum spectra, and jets, followed by heavy quark and quarkonium measurements, leptonic probes and photons. A final section 'Others' encompasses those predictions which do not fall naturally within one of the above-mentioned categories, or discuss the more speculative phenomena that may be explored at the LHC.

  6. Search for a heavy vector boson decaying to two gluons in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khader, M.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Rao, K.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.

    2012-12-01

    We present a search for a new heavy vector boson Z' that decays to gluons. Decays to on-shell gluons are suppressed, leading to a dominant decay mode of Z'?g*g. We study the case where the off-shell gluon g* converts to a pair of top quarks, leading to a final state of ttg. In a sample of events with exactly one charged lepton, large missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb? collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio of this chromophilic Z' at 95% confidence level from 300 to 40 fb for Z' masses ranging from 400 to 1000 GeV/c, respectively.

  7. Search for a heavy vector boson decaying to two gluons in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; et al

    2012-12-05

    We present a search for a new heavy vector boson Z' that decays to gluons. Decays to on-shell gluons are suppressed, leading to a dominant decay mode of Z'→g*g. We study the case where the off-shell gluon g* converts to a pair of top quarks, leading to a final state of tt¯g. In a sample of events with exactly one charged lepton, large missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb⁻¹ collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set upper limitsmore » on the production cross section times branching ratio of this chromophilic Z' at 95% confidence level from 300 to 40 fb for Z' masses ranging from 400 to 1000 GeV/c², respectively.« less

  8. Design of heavy oil upgrading units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, W.D.; Phodes, R.P.; Zeno, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Heavy oil upgrading has become an increasingly important aspect of ER and E's research. Due to high costs of experimental catalysts, small catalyst charges are used (20-150cc). Tubular design and tree-stage stirred design are discussed with emphasis on the techniques and equipment used to handle heavy oil. Mechanical design and fluid mechanics are discussed.

  9. Search for anomalous production of multi-lepton events in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a search for the anomalous production of events with multiple charged leptons in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 346 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The search is divided into three-lepton and four-or-more-lepton data samples. They observe six events in the three-lepton sample and zero events in the {ge}4-lepton sample. Both numbers of events are consistent with standard model background expectations. Within the framework of an R-parity violating supergravity model, the results are interpreted as mass limits on the lightest neutralino ({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) and chargino ({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) particles. For one particular choice of model parameters, the limits are M({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) > 110 GeV/c{sup 2} and M({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) > 203 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level; the variation of these mass limits with model parameters is presented.

  10. Low and high energy phenomenology of quark-lepton complementarity scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany); Rodejohann, Werner [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2007-04-01

    We conduct a detailed analysis of the phenomenology of two predictive seesaw scenarios leading to quark-lepton complementarity. In both cases we discuss the neutrino mixing observables and their correlations, neutrinoless double beta decay and lepton flavor violating decays such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma}. We also comment on leptogenesis. The first scenario is disfavored on the level of one to two standard deviations, in particular, due to its prediction for |U{sub e3}|. There can be resonant leptogenesis with quasidegenerate heavy and light neutrinos, which would imply sizable cancellations in neutrinoless double beta decay. The decays {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} are typically observable unless the SUSY masses approach the TeV scale. In the second scenario leptogenesis is impossible. It is, however, in perfect agreement with all oscillation data. The prediction for {mu}{yields}e{gamma} is in general too large, unless the SUSY masses are in the range of several TeV. In this case {tau}{yields}e{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} are unobservable.

  11. Averages of B-Hadron, C-Hadron, and tau-lepton properties as of early 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amhis, Y.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    This article reports world averages of measurements of b-hadron, c-hadron, and tau-lepton properties obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) using results available through the end of 2011. In some cases results available in the early part of 2012 are included. For the averaging, common input parameters used in the various analyses are adjusted (rescaled) to common values, and known correlations are taken into account. The averages include branching fractions, lifetimes, neutral meson mixing parameters, CP violation parameters, parameters of semileptonic decays and CKM matrix elements.

  12. Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    production at a linear collider (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair production at a linear collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair production at a linear collider If a contact interaction type correction to a Standard Model process is observed, studying its detailed properties can provide information on the fundamental physics responsible for

  13. Survey of lepton number violation via effective operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea, Andre de; Jenkins, James [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2008-01-01

    We survey 129 lepton number violating effective operators, consistent with the minimal standard model gauge group and particle content, of mass dimension up to and including 11. Upon requiring that each one radiatively generates the observed neutrino masses, we extract an associated characteristic cutoff energy scale which we use to calculate other observable manifestations of these operators for a number of current and future experimental probes, concentrating on lepton number violating phenomena. These include searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay and rare meson, lepton, and gauge boson decays. We also consider searches at hadron/lepton collider facilities in anticipation of the CERN LHC and the future ILC. We find that some operators are already disfavored by current data, while more are ripe to be probed by next-generation experiments. We also find that our current understanding of lepton mixing disfavors a subset of higher dimensional operators. While neutrinoless double-beta decay is the most promising signature of lepton number violation for the majority of operators, a handful is best probed by other means. We argue that a combination of constraints from various independent experimental sources will help to pinpoint the ''correct'' model of neutrino mass, or at least aid in narrowing down the set of possibilities.

  14. Self-sustained asymmetry of lepton-number emission: a new phenomenon during the supernova shock-accretion phase in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamborra, Irene; Raffelt, Georg G. [Max-Planck-Institut fr Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Fhringer Ring 6, D-80805 Mnchen (Germany); Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mller, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut fr Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Marek, Andreas [Rechenzentrum der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    During the stalled-shock phase of our three-dimensional, hydrodynamical core-collapse simulations with energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, the lepton-number flux (? {sub e} minus ?-bar {sub e}) emerges predominantly in one hemisphere. This novel, spherical-symmetry breaking neutrino-hydrodynamical instability is termed LESA for 'Lepton-number Emission Self-sustained Asymmetry'. While the individual ? {sub e} and ?-bar {sub e} fluxes show a pronounced dipole pattern, the heavy-flavor neutrino fluxes and the overall luminosity are almost spherically symmetric. Initially, LESA seems to develop stochastically from convective fluctuations. It exists for hundreds of milliseconds or more and persists during violent shock sloshing associated with the standing accretion shock instability. The ? {sub e} minus ?-bar {sub e} flux asymmetry originates predominantly below the neutrinosphere in a region of pronounced proto-neutron star (PNS) convection, which is stronger in the hemisphere of enhanced lepton-number flux. On this side of the PNS, the mass accretion rate of lepton-rich matter is larger, amplifying the lepton-emission asymmetry, because the spherical stellar infall deflects on a dipolar deformation of the stalled shock. The increased shock radius in the hemisphere of less mass accretion and minimal lepton-number flux ( ?-bar {sub e} flux maximum) is sustained by stronger convection on this side, which is boosted by stronger neutrino heating due to ??{sub ?-bar{sub e}}?>??{sub ?{sub e}}?. Asymmetric heating thus supports the global deformation despite extremely nonstationary convective overturn behind the shock. While these different elements of the LESA phenomenon form a consistent picture, a full understanding remains elusive at present. There may be important implications for neutrino-flavor oscillations, the neutron-to-proton ratio in the neutrino-heated supernova ejecta, and neutron-star kicks, which remain to be explored.

  15. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  16. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  17. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  18. Possibility of observing an MSSM charged Higgs boson in association with a W boson at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashemi, M.

    2011-03-01

    The possibility of observing associated production of the charged Higgs and W boson in the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) at LHC is studied. Both leptonic and hadronic decays of the W boson are studied while the charged Higgs boson is considered to decay to a {tau} lepton and a neutrino. Therefore two search categories are defined based on the leptonic and hadronic final states, i.e., l{tau}+E{sub T}{sup miss} and jj{tau}+E{sub T}{sup miss} where l=e or {mu} and j is a light jet from W decay. The discovery chance of the two categories is evaluated at an integrated luminosity of 300 fb{sup -1} at LHC. It is shown that both leptonic and hadronic final states have the chance of discovery at high tan{beta}. Finally 5{sigma} and 3{sigma} contours are provided for both search categories.

  19. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the Standard Model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the Standard Model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  20. Measurement of $ZZ$ production in leptonic final states at $\\surd{s}$ of 1.96 TeV at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present a precise measurement of the total ZZ production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using data collected with the CDF II detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 6 fb{sup -1}. The result is obtained by combining separate measurements in the four-charged ({ell}{ell}{ell}{prime}{ell}{prime}), and two-charged-lepton and two-neutral-lepton ({ell}{ell}{nu}{nu}) decay modes of the Z. The combined measured cross section for p{bar p} {yields} ZZ is 1.64{sub -0.38}{sup +0.44} pb. This is the most precise measurement of the ZZ production cross section in 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions to date.

  1. Workplace Charging Challenge: Sample Workplace Charging Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workplace Charging Policy Workplace Charging Challenge: Sample Workplace Charging Policy Review the policy guidelines used by one Workplace Charging Challenge partner to keep their ...

  2. Searches for heavy Higgs bosons in two-Higgs-doublet models and for t ? ch decay using multilepton and diphoton final states in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; et al.,

    2014-12-01

    Searches are presented for heavy scalar (H) and pseudoscalar (A) Higgs bosons posited in the two doublet model (2HDM) extensions of the standard model (SM). These searches are based on a data sample of pp collisions collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of ?s = 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb -1. The decays H ? hh and A ? Zh, where h denotes an SM-like Higgs boson, lead to events with three or more isolated charged leptons or with a photon pair accompanied by one or more isolated leptons. The search results are presented in terms of the H and A production cross sections times branching fractions and are further interpreted in terms of 2HDM parameters. We place 95% CL cross section upper limits of approximately 7 pb on ?? for H ? hh and 2 pb for A ? Zh. Also presented are the results of a search for the rare decay of the top quark that results in a charm quark and an SM Higgs boson, t ? ch, the existence of which would indicate a nonzero flavor-changing Yukawa coupling of the top quark to the Higgs boson. We place a 95% CL upper limit of 0.56% on B(t ? ch).

  3. Search for lepton-flavour-violating decays of the Higgs boson...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Search for lepton-flavour-violating decays of the Higgs boson Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for lepton-flavour-violating decays of the Higgs...

  4. Two-photon interactions with nuclear breakup in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Gorbunov, Yuri; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2009-10-15

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, because the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass, and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distributions for exclusive {gamma}{gamma} production of mesons and lepton pairs and for {gamma}{gamma} reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross sections for {gamma}{gamma} interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission (XnXn) and single-neutron emission (1n1n) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied {gamma}{gamma} interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross sections may be calculated. The typical p{sub T} of {gamma}{gamma} final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so p{sub T} may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  5. Two-Photon Interactions with Nuclear Breakup in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Gorbunov, Yuri; R Klein, Spencer; Nystrand, Joakim

    2010-07-07

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross-sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, since the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distributions for exclusive {gamma}{gamma} production of mesons and lepton pairs, and for {gamma}{gamma} reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross-sections for {gamma}{gamma} interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission (XnXn) and single neutron emission (1n1n) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied {gamma}{gamma} interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross-sections may be calculated. The typical p{sub T} of {gamma}{gamma} final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so p{sub T} may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  6. R. Tayloe, Indiana University Lepton-Photon '07 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lepton-Photon '07 1 Neutrino Oscillation Results from MiniBooNE Outline: - motivation, strategy - experiment - analysis - results - New: further investigations of low-energy region R. Tayloe, Indiana University R. Tayloe, Indiana University Lepton-Photon '07 2 The LSND Result ν e events vs energy The LSND experiment observed an excess ofν e events in beam ofν µ 87.9 ± 22.4 ± 6.0 (4σ) consistent withν µ →ν e oscillations. However, this result, with large ∆m 2 ,does

  7. Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the rare tau decay

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    results (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the rare tau decay results Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the rare tau decay results We study lepton flavor violation (LFV) associated with tau leptons in the framework of the two Higgs doublet model, in which LFV couplings are introduced as a deviation from Model II Yukawa interaction. Parameters of the model are constrained from

  8. Transverse Focussing of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Chromatic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects for Heavy Ion Fusion Inventors..--.. James M. Mitrani, Igor D, Kaganovich, Ronald C, Davidson. | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Transverse Focussing of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Chromatic Effects for Heavy Ion Fusion Inventors..--.. James M. Mitrani, Igor D, Kaganovich, Ronald C, Davidson. A two solenoid lens designed has been designed for tranverse focusing of charged particle beams. Solenoids focus the charged particles in the transverse direction, but chromatic effects in

  9. Lepton number violating processes mediated by Majorana neutrinos at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovalenko, Sergey; Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico, Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile) and Center of Subatomic Physics, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2009-10-01

    We study the lepton number violating like-sign dilepton processes h{sub 1}h{sub 2}{yields}l{sup {+-}}l{sup '{+-}}jjX and h{sub 1}h{sub 2}{yields}l{sup {+-}}l{sup '{+-}}W{sup {+-}}X, mediated by heavy GeV scale Majorana neutrinos. We focus on the resonantly enhanced contributions with a nearly on-mass-shell Majorana neutrino in the s channel. We study the constraints on like-sign dilepton production at the Tevatron and the LHC on the basis of the existing experimental limits on the masses of heavy neutrinos and their mixings U{sub {alpha}}{sub N} with {alpha}={nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}. Special attention is paid to the constraints from neutrinoless double beta decay. We note that searches for like-sign e{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}} events at Tevatron and LHC may provide evidence of CP violation in the neutrino sector. We also discuss the conditions under which it is possible to extract individual constraints on the mixing matrix elements in a model independent way.

  10. Heavy loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, D.

    1982-01-01

    The extreme pressures on the roof and walls of an earth-sheltered residential home are discussed and the need for careful planning is stressed. Pertinent terms are defined. Footings and wall structure (reinforced concrete walls and concrete block walls) are described. Roofing systems are discussed in detail and illustrated: (1) poured-in-place concrete roof slabs; (2) pre-cast concrete planks; and (3) heavy timber roofs. Insulation of earth-sheltered homes is reviewed in terms of using: (1) urethanes; (2) extruded polystyrene; and (3) expanded polystyrene. Advantages, disadvantages, R-factors, costs, and installation are discussed. (MJJ)

  11. Search for an excess of events with an identical flavour lepton pair and significant missing transverse momentum in √s = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2011-07-09

    Results are presented of a search for supersymmetric particles decaying into final states with significant missing transverse momentum and exactly two identical flavour leptons (e, μ) of opposite charge in √s = 7 TeV collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. This channel is particularly sensitive to supersymmetric particle cascade decays producing flavour correlated lepton pairs. Flavour uncorrelated backgrounds are subtracted using a sample of opposite flavour lepton pair events. Observation of an excess beyond Standard Model expectations following this subtraction procedure would offer one of the best routes to measuring the masses of supersymmetric particles. In a data sample correspondingmore » to an integrated luminosity of 35 pb⁻¹ no such excess is observed. Model-independent limits are set on the contribution to these final states from new physics and are used to exclude regions of a phenomenological supersymmetric parameter space.« less

  12. Search for an excess of events with an identical flavour lepton pair and significant missing transverse momentum in √s = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2011-07-09

    Results are presented of a search for supersymmetric particles decaying into final states with significant missing transverse momentum and exactly two identical flavour leptons (e, μ) of opposite charge in √s = 7 TeV collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. This channel is particularly sensitive to supersymmetric particle cascade decays producing flavour correlated lepton pairs. Flavour uncorrelated backgrounds are subtracted using a sample of opposite flavour lepton pair events. Observation of an excess beyond Standard Model expectations following this subtraction procedure would offer one of the best routes to measuring the masses of supersymmetric particles. In a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 pb⁻¹ no such excess is observed. Model-independent limits are set on the contribution to these final states from new physics and are used to exclude regions of a phenomenological supersymmetric parameter space.

  13. HPSS Charging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charging HPSS Charging NERSC uses Storage Resource Units (SRUs) to help manage HPSS storage. The goal is to provide a balanced computing environment with appropriate amounts of storage and adequate bandwidth to keep the compute engines fed with data. Performance and usage tracking allows NERSC to anticipate demand and maintain a responsive storage environment. Storage management also recognizes storage as a distinct resource in support of an increasing amount of data intensive computing. Storage

  14. Workplace Charging Challenge: Sample Municipal Workplace Charging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Municipal Workplace Charging Agreement Workplace Charging Challenge: Sample Municipal Workplace Charging Agreement Review the agreement proposed by one municipality to register PEV ...

  15. The Heavy Photon Search experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Napoli, Marzio

    2015-06-01

    Many beyond Standard Model theories predict a new massive gauge boson, a.k.a. 'dark' or 'heavy photon', directly coupling to hidden sector particles with dark charge. The heavy photon is expected to mix with the Standard Model photon through kinetic mixing and therefore couple weakly to normal charge. The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment will search for the heavy photon at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), in the mass range 20-1000 MeV/c2 and coupling to electric charge ϵ2 = α'/α in the range 10-5 to 10-10. HPS will look for the e+e- decay channel of heavy photons radiated by electron Bremsstrahlung, employing both invariant mass search and detached vertexing techniques. The experiment employs a compact forward spectrometer comprising silicon microstrip detectors for vertexing and tracking and an electromagnetic calorimeter for particle identification and triggering.

  16. Partial Quark-Lepton Universality and Neutrino CP Violation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.; Whisnant, K.

    2015-01-01

    We smore » tudy a model with partial quark-lepton universality that can naturally arise in grand unified theories. We find that constraints on the model can be reduced to a single condition on the Dirac CP phase δ in the neutrino sector. Using our current knowledge of the CKM and PMNS mixing matrices, we predict - 32 . 4 ° ≤ δ ≤ 32 . 0 ° at 2 σ .« less

  17. Theory of hadronic production of heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, C.

    1981-07-01

    Conventional theoretical predictions for hadronic production of heavy quarks (Q anti Q) are reviewed and confronted with data. Perturbative hard scattering predictions agree qualitatively well with hidden Q anti Q production (e.g., psi, chi, T) whereas for open Q anti Q-production (e.g., pp ..-->.. ..lambda../sub c//sup +/X) additional mechanisms or inputs are needed to explain the forwardly produced ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ at ISR. It is suggested that the presence of c anti c-pairs on the 1 to 2% level in the hadron Fock state decomposition (intrinsic charm) gives a natural description of the ISR data. The theoretical foundations of the intrinsic charm hypotheses together with its consequences for lepton-induced reactions is discussed in some detail.

  18. Search for supersymmetry at $$$\\sqrt{s}=13$$$ TeV in final states with jets and two same-sign leptons or three leptons with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2016-05-07

    Here, a search for strongly produced supersymmetric particles is conducted using signatures involving multiple energetic jets and either two isolated leptons (e or μ) with the same electric charge or at least three isolated leptons. The search also utilises b-tagged jets, missing transverse momentum and other observables to extend its sensitivity. The analysis uses a data sample of proton–proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2015 corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb–1. No significant excess over the Standard Model expectation is observed. The results are interpretedmore » in several simplified supersymmetric models and extend the exclusion limits from previous searches. In the context of exclusive production and simplified decay modes, gluino masses are excluded at 95% confidence level up to 1.1–1.3 TeV for light neutralinos (depending on the decay channel), and bottom squark masses are also excluded up to 540 GeV. In the former scenarios, neutralino masses are also excluded up to 550–850 GeV for gluino masses around 1 TeV.« less

  19. Heavy metal biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  20. Discovery and Characterization of a Higgs boson using four-lepton...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: Discovery and Characterization of a Higgs boson using four-lepton events from the CMS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovery and Characterization ...

  1. Precision measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... FERMILAB TEVATRON; INTERMEDIATE BOSONS; LEPTONS; LUMINOSITY; MATRIX ELEMENTS; NEURAL NETWORKS; QUARKS; RESOLUTION; T QUARKS Experiment-HEP Word Cloud More Like This Full Text ...

  2. Precision measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FERMILAB TEVATRON; INTERMEDIATE BOSONS; LEPTONS; LUMINOSITY; MATRIX ELEMENTS; NEURAL NETWORKS; QUARKS; RESOLUTION; T QUARKS Experiment-HEP Word Cloud More Like This Full Text ...

  3. Electromagnetic calorimeter for the Heavy Photon Search Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Emma

    2014-11-01

    The Heavy Photon Search Experiment (HPS) seeks to detect a hypothesised hidden sector boson, the A', predicted to be produced in dark matter decay or annihilation. Theories suggest that the A' couples weakly to electric charge through kinetic mixing, allowing it, as a result, to decay to Standard Matter (SM) lepton pair, which may explain the electron and positron excess recently observed in cosmic rays. Measuring the lepton pair decay of the A' could lead to indirect detection of dark matter. The HPS experiment is a fixed target experiment that will utilize the electron beam produced at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). The detector set-up includes a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) and an Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECal). The ECal will provide the trigger and detect e+e- pairs and its construction and testing forms the focus of this thesis. The ECal consists of 442 PbWO4} tapered crystals with a length 16cm and a 1.6x1.6cm^2 cross-section, stacked into a rectangular array and are coupled to Large Area APDs and corresponding pre-amplifiers. Supplementary to the ECal is a Light Monitoring System (LMS) consisting of bi-coloured LEDs that will monitor changes in APD gain and crystal transparency due to radiation damage. Before construction of the ECal each of the components were required to be individually tested to determine a number of different characteristics. Irradiation tests were performed on PbWO4 ECal crystals and, as a comparison, one grown by a different manufacturer to determine their radiation hardness. A technique for annealing the radiation damage by optical bleaching, which involves injecting light of various wavelengths into the crystal, was tested using the blue LED from the LMS as a potential candidate. The light yield dependence on temperature was also measured for one of the PbWO4 crystal types. Each APD was individually tested to determine if they functioned correctly and within the requirements of the experiment, then arranged into groups of similar gain at chosen applied voltages, for connection to High Voltage (HV) supplies. Each bi-coloured LED was also tested to determine if they functioned within the specifications of the experiment; including their signal quality at high frequency and their radiation hardness. The HPS crystals were recycled from a previous Jefferson Lab detector, the Inner Calorimeter from CLAS, which needed to be dismantled and reconditioned using various removal and cleaning techniques. The HPS ECal was then constructed in a new formation using a combination of different gluing and construction techniques, and initial functionality tests were performed.

  4. Search for anomalous production of prompt like-sign lepton pairs at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7\\;\\mathrm{TeV} $$ with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2012-12-03

    An inclusive search for anomalous production of two prompt, isolated leptons with the same electric charge is presented. The search is performed in a data sample corresponding to 4.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected in 2011 at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Pairs of leptons (e± e±, e± μ±, and μ± μ±) with large transverse momentum are selected, and the dilepton invariant mass distribution is examined for any deviation from the Standard Model expectation. No excess is found, and upper limits on the production cross section of like-sign lepton pairs from physics processes beyondmore » the Standard Model are placed as a function of the dilepton invariant mass within a fiducial region close to the experimental selection criteria. The 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of anomalous e± e±, e± μ±, or μ± μ± production range between 1.7 fb and 64 fb depending on the dilepton mass and flavour combination.« less

  5. Heavy Higgs bosons and the 2 TeV $W'$ boson

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Liu, Zhen

    2015-10-19

    The hints from the LHC for the existence of a W' boson of mass around 1.9 TeV point towards a certain SU(2) L × SU(2) R × U(1) B-L gauge theory with an extended Higgs sector. We show that the decays of the W' boson into heavy Higgs bosons have sizable branching fractions. Interpreting the ATLAS excess events in the search for same-sign lepton pairs plus b jets as arising from W' cascade decays, we then estimate that the masses of the heavy Higgs bosons are in the 400-700 GeV range.

  6. Strong focus space charge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Booth, Rex

    1981-01-01

    Strong focus space charge lens wherein a combination of current-carrying coils and charged electrodes form crossed magnetic and electric fields to focus charged particle beams.

  7. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the Workplace Charging Challenge Workplace Charging Challenge Do you already own an EV? Are you...

  8. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the Workplace Charging Challenge Workplace Charging Challenge Do you already own an EV? Are you ...

  9. Muon g-2 Anomaly and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hye-Sung

    2014-11-01

    One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a potentially alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.

  10. The role of top in heavy flavor physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The implications of the massive top quark on heavy flavor transitions are explored. We review the generation of quark masses and mixings and the determination techniques, and present the status of the elements of the weak mixing matrix. Purely leptonic decays of heavy mesons are briefly summarized. We present a general introduction to flavor changing neutral currents and an extensive summary of radiative and other rare decay modes. The physics of neutral meson mixing is reviewed and applied to each meson system. We describe the phenomenology of CP violation and how it may be measured in meson decays. Standard Model predictions are given in each case and the effects of physics beyond the Standard Model are also discussed. Throughout, we contrast these transitions in the K and B meson systems to those in the D meson and top-quark sectors.

  11. Measurement of Higgs boson production and properties in the WW decay channel with leptonic final states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-17

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair at the LHC is reported. The event sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 and 19.4 inverse femtobarns collected with the CMS detector in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV, respectively. The Higgs boson candidates are selected in events with two or three charged leptons. An excess of events above background is observed, consistent with the expectation from the standard model Higgs boson with a mass of around 125 GeV. The probability to observe an excess equal or larger than the one seen,more » under the background-only hypothesis, corresponds to a significance of 4.3 standard deviations for mH = 125.6 GeV. The observed signal cross section times the branching fraction to WW for mH = 125.6 GeV is 0.72+0.20-0.18 times the standard model expectation. The spin-parity JP=0+ hypothesis is favored against a narrow resonance with JP=2+ or JP=0– that decays to a W-boson pair. Lastly, this result provides strong evidence for a Higgs-like boson decaying to a W-boson pair.« less

  12. Study of the top quark electric charge at the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartos, Pavol; /Comenius U.

    2011-09-01

    We report on the measurement of the top quark electric charge using the jet charge tagging method on events containing a single lepton collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab between February 2002 and February 2010 at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. There are three main components to this measurement: determining the charge of the W (using the charge of the lepton), pairing the W with the b-jet to ensure that they are from the same top decay branch and finally determining the charge of the b-jet using the Jet Charge algorithm. We found, on a sample of 5.6 fb{sup -1} of data, that the p-value under the standard model hypothesis is equal to 13.4%, while the p-value under the exotic model hypothesis is equal to 0.014%. Using the a priori criteria generally accepted by the CDF collaboration, we can say that the result is consistent with the standard model, while we exclude an exotic quark hypothesis with 95% confidence. Using the Bayesian approach, we obtain for the Bayes factor (2ln(BF)) a value of 19.6, that favors very strongly the SM hypothesis over the XM one. The presented method has the highest sensitivity to the top quark electric charge among the presented so far top quark charge analysis.

  13. Proposal to Search for Magnetically Charged Particles with Magnetic Charge 1e

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Michael K.; Fryberger, David

    2015-11-02

    A model for composite elementary Standard Model (SM) particles based upon magnetically bound vorton pairs, we briefly introduce here, predicts the existence of a complete family of magnetically charged particles, as well as their neutral isotopic partners (all counterparts to the SM elementary particles), in which the lowest mass (charged) particle would be an electrically neutral stable lepton, but which carries a magnetic charge equivalent to 1e. This new particle, which we call a magneticon (a counterpart to the electron) would be pair produced at all e+e- colliders at an Ecm above twice its mass. In addition, PP and PPbar colliders should also be able to produce these new particles through the Drell-Yan process. To our knowledge, no monopole search experiment has been sensitive to such a low-charged magnetic monopole above a particle mass of about 5 GeV/c2. Hence, we propose that a search for such a stable particle of magnetic charge 1e should be undertaken. We have taken the ATLAS detector at the LHC as an example in which this search might be done. To this end, we modeled the magnetic fields and muon trigger chambers of this detector. We show results from a simple Monte Carlo simulation program to indicate how these particles might look in the detector and describe how one might search for these new particles in the ATLAS data stream.

  14. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the Lepton+Jets Channel Using the Lepton Transverse Momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-01-01

    This letter reports a measurement of the top quark mass, M{sub top}, in data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 2.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Events with the lepton+jets topology are selected. An unbinned likelihood is constructed based on the dependence of the lepton transverse momentum, P{sub T}, on M{sub top}. A maximum likelihood fit to the data yields a measured mass M{sub top} = 176.9 {+-} 8.0{sub stat} {+-} 2.7{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}. In this measurement, the contribution by the jet energy scale uncertainty to the systematic error is negligible. The result provides an important consistency test for other M{sub top} measurements where explicit use of the jet energy is made for deriving the top quark mass.

  15. Workplace Charging: Charging Up University Campuses

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Workplace Charging: Charging Up University Campuses Carrie Giles, ICF International Carrie Ryder, ICF International Stephen Lommele, National Renewable Energy Laboratory March 2016 DRAFT REPORT Workplace 2 Workplace Charging: Charging Up University Campuses As leading regional employers, colleges and universities are on the front line of local- and national-level technology trends. To remain competitive, many schools are offering plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging to their faculty, staff,

  16. Low-mass lepton pair production at large transverse momentum (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Low-mass lepton pair production at large transverse momentum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-mass lepton pair production at large transverse momentum We study the transverse momentum distribution of low-mass lepton pairs produced in hadronic scattering, using the perturbative QCD factorization approach. We argue that the distribution at large transverse momentum, Q{sub T}>>Q, with the pair's invariant mass Q as low as Q{approx}{lambda}{sub

  17. Soft supersymmetry breaking terms from D{sub 4}xZ{sub 2} lepton flavor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    symmetry (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Soft supersymmetry breaking terms from D{sub 4}xZ{sub 2} lepton flavor symmetry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Soft supersymmetry breaking terms from D{sub 4}xZ{sub 2} lepton flavor symmetry We study the supersymmetric model with D{sub 4}xZ{sub 2} lepton flavor symmetry. We evaluate soft supersymmetry breaking terms, i.e., soft slepton masses and A-terms, which are predicted in the D{sub 4} flavor model. We consider constraints due to

  18. Workplace Charging Challenge: Promote Charging at Work

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Employees with access to workplace charging are six times more likely to drive a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) than the average worker. Promoting PEV charging at workplaces is one great way that...

  19. Workplace Charging Challenge: Sample Workplace Charging Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review the policy guidelines used by one Workplace Charging Challenge partner to keep their program running safe and successfully.

  20. Workplace Charging Equipment Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Charging stations are available from a variety of manufacturers in a range of models for all charging applications. For a single port charging station, Level 1 hardware costs range from $300-$1,500...

  1. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest. The Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (HMEM)...

  2. Searches with Mono-Leptons (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Searches with Mono-Leptons Citation Details In-Document ... Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15221 arXiv:1208.4361 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  3. Search for new physics in lepton + photon + x events with 929...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Search for new physics in lepton + photon + x events with 929 pb**-1 of p anti-p collisions at s**(12) 1.96 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for ...

  4. Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of the t-tbar production cross ...

  5. Search for new physics in lepton + photon + x events with 929...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for new physics in lepton + photon + x events with 929 pb**-1 of p anti-p collisions at s**(12) 1.96 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for new physics ...

  6. Workplace Charging Challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    Fact sheet about the EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge which is to increase the number of American employers offering workplace charging by tenfold in the next five years.

  7. Workplace Charging Challenge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge, committing to install charging for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) at their worksites. By taking on this Challenge, they are helping...

  8. Electric Vehicle Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or Twitter Attend local EV events Share your story Currently have 13 ChargePoint charging stations scattered throughout Vermont 2015 - 12 Freedom Stations & 10...

  9. Workplace Charging Challenge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pioneering U.S. employers are accepting the EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge, ... by increasing charging available in the workplace, is essential to making that transition. ...

  10. Electric Vehicle Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    work EV Ambassador Work Attach "Ask me about my ... 13 ChargePoint charging stations scattered throughout ... GMP will provide on-site test drives GMP will offer ...

  11. Dynamic Wireless Charging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-13

    ORNL successfully demonstrated in-motion wireless charging in the laboratory using a small GEM vehicle and a series of six charging coils.

  12. Utilities and Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vehicles and the associated need and desire for workplace charging Aid in forecasting similar workplace charging needs with commercial customers across the Duke Energy ...

  13. 2007-2009 USA Emission Solutions for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulations - A Progress Report State-of-the-Art and Emergin Truck Engine Technologies Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

  14. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji; Aronson, Samuel H.; Young, Glenn R.; Paffrath, Leo

    1993-01-29

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

  15. Kubo relations and radiative corrections for lepton number washout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bdeker, Dietrich; Laine, M. E-mail: laine@itp.unibe.ch

    2014-05-01

    The rates for lepton number washout in extensions of the Standard Model containing right-handed neutrinos are key ingredients in scenarios for baryogenesis through leptogenesis. We relate these rates to real-time correlation functions at finite temperature, without making use of any particle approximations. The relations are valid to quadratic order in neutrino Yukawa couplings and to all orders in Standard Model couplings. They take into account all spectator processes, and apply both in the symmetric and in the Higgs phase of the electroweak theory. We use the relations to compute washout rates at next-to-leading order in g, where g denotes a Standard Model gauge or Yukawa coupling, both in the non-relativistic and in the relativistic regime. Even in the non-relativistic regime the parametrically dominant radiative corrections are only suppressed by a single power of g. In the non-relativistic regime radiative corrections increase the washout rate by a few percent at high temperatures, but they are of order unity around the weak scale and in the relativistic regime.

  16. How usage is charged

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    usage is charged How usage is charged MPP Charging (Computational Systems) When a job runs on a NERSC MPP system, such as Hopper, charges accrue against one of the user's repository allocations. The unit of accounting for these charges is the "MPP Hour". A parallel job is charged for exclusive use of each multi-core node allocated to the job. The MPP charge for such a job is calculated as the product of: the job's elapsed wall-clock time in hours the number of nodes allocated to the

  17. Effect of charge polarization on the Coulomb barrier for cold-fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira

    2005-06-01

    We estimate the decrease of the Coulomb-barrier height between colliding partners due to charge polarizations in the entrance channel for cold-fusion reactions. The resulting charge displacements between protons and neutrons are the sum of the surface- and volume-charge components. We show the difference between the charge polarization of light and heavy nuclei and the decrease of the Coulomb barrier height for synthesizing superheavy elements.

  18. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Using the Invariant Mass of Lepton Pairs in Soft Muon b-tagged Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    We present the first measurement of the mass of the top quark in a sample of t{bar t} {yields} {ell}{bar {nu}}b{bar b}q{bar q} events (where {ell} = e, {mu}) selected by identifying jets containing a muon candidate from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor hadrons (soft muon b-tagging). The p{bar p} collision data used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2 fb{sup -1} and was collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurement is based on a novel technique exploiting the invariant mass of a subset of the decay particles, specifically the lepton from the W boson of the t {yields} Wb decay, and the muon from a semileptonic b decay. We fit template histograms, derived from simulation of t{bar t} events and a modeling of the background, to the mass distribution observed in the data and measure a top quark mass of 180.5 {+-} 12.0(stat.) {+-} 3.6(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, consistent with the current world average.

  19. Super-Heavy Element Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Targets for Super-Heavy Element Research Presented at International Workshop on Super-Heavy Element Research SHE-15 J. B. Roberto Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge,...

  20. CP violation in heavy MSSM Higgs scenarios

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Lee, J. S.; Pilaftsis, A.; Wagner, C. E. M.

    2016-02-18

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales MS above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass MH+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenarios with amore » charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization-group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG effects from the effective two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) scale MH± to the scale MS. Here, we illustrate the possibility of non-decoupling CP-violating effects in the heavy Higgs sector using new benchmark scenarios named.« less

  1. Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Mueller; L. Grisham; I. Kaganovich; R. L. Watson; V. Horvat; K. E. Zaharakis; Y. Peng

    2002-06-25

    One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters.

  2. Search for excited leptons in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-05

    Our search for compositeness of electrons and muons is presented using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(s) = 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. Excited leptons (ℓ*) produced via contact interactions in conjunction with a standard model lepton are considered, and a search is made for their gauge decay modes. The decays considered are ℓ* →ℓγ and ℓ* → ℓZ, which give final states of two leptons and a photon or, depending on the Z-boson decay mode, four leptons or two leptons and two jets. The number of events observed in data is consistent with the standard model prediction. Exclusion limits are set on the excited lepton mass, and the compositeness scale L. For the case Mℓ* = L the existence of excited electrons (muons) is excluded up to masses of 2.45 (2.47) TeV at 95% confidence level. The neutral current decays of excited leptons are considered for the first time, and limits are extended to include the possibility that the weight factors f and f ', which determine the couplings between standard model leptons and excited leptons via gauge mediated interactions, have opposite sign.

  3. Upgrading heavy gas oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, S.; Reese, D.D.

    1986-05-20

    A method is described of neutralizing the organic acidity in heavy gas oils to produce a neutralization number less than 1.0 whereby they are rendered suitable as lube oil feed stocks which consists essentially of treating the heavy gas oils with a neutralizing amount of monoethanolamine to form an amine salt with the organic acids and then heating the thus-neutralized heavy gas oil at a temperature at least about 25/sup 0/F greater than the boiling point of water and for a time sufficient to convert the amine salts to amides.

  4. Hyperon axial charges in two-flavor chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Fujiun; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2009-10-01

    We use two-flavor heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory to investigate the isovector axial charges of the spin one-half hyperons. Expressions for these hyperon axial charges are derived at next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion. We utilize phenomenological and lattice QCD inputs to assess the convergence of the two-flavor theory, which appears to be best for cascades.

  5. Chiral corrections and the axial charge of the delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Fujiun; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2008-07-01

    Chiral corrections to the delta axial charge are determined using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. Knowledge of this axial coupling is necessary to assess virtual-delta contributions to nucleon and delta observables. We give isospin relations useful for a lattice determination of the axial coupling. Furthermore, we detail partially quenched chiral corrections, which are relevant to address partial quenching and/or mixed action errors in lattice calculations of the delta axial charge.

  6. Evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $$\\tau$$ leptons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-20

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of tau leptons is performed using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV. Each tau lepton decays hadronically or leptonically to an electron or a muon, leading to six different final states for the tau-lepton pair, all considered in this analysis. An excess of events is observed over the expected background contributions, with a local significance largermore » than 3 standard deviations for m[H] values between 115 and 130 GeV. The best fit of the observed H to tau tau signal cross section for m[H] = 125 GeV is 0.78 +- 0.27 times the standard model expectation. These observations constitute evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of tau leptons.« less

  7. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y.; Boysen, John E.; Branthaver, Jan F.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  8. Charge regulation circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply in the range of 0.01%. The charge regulation circuit is utilized in a preferred embodiment in providing regulated voltage for controlling the operation of a laser.

  9. Workplace Charging Challenge: Promote Charging at Work | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Plug-in Electric Vehicles & Batteries » Workplace Charging Challenge » Workplace Charging Challenge: Promote Charging at Work Workplace Charging Challenge: Promote Charging at Work Workplace Charging Challenge: Promote Charging at Work Employees with access to workplace charging are six times more likely to drive a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) than the average worker. Promoting PEV charging at workplaces is one great way that states, cities and other organizations can

  10. Workplace Charging Challenge: Install and Manage PEV Charging at Work |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Install and Manage PEV Charging at Work Workplace Charging Challenge: Install and Manage PEV Charging at Work pev_workplace_charging_hosts_150x194.jpg To determine if workplace charging is right for your organization, use the employer resources to learn more about PEVs and charging stations. The PEV Handbook for Workplace Charging Hosts is particularly helpful for employers deciding if and how to install charging stations to ensure a successful workplace charging

  11. Search for supersymmetry in events with a lepton, a photon, and large missing transverse energy in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-06-01

    A search is performed for an excess of events, over the standard model expectations, with a photon, a lepton, and large missing transverse energy in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. Such events are expected in many new physics models, in particular a supersymmetric theory that is broken via a gauge-mediated mechanism, when the lightest charged and neutral gauginos are mass degenerate. The data sample used in this search corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse picobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. No evidence of such an excess above the standard model backgrounds, dominated by W-gamma production, is found. The results are presented as 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section for a benchmark gauge-mediated scenario, and are then converted into exclusion limits on the squark, gluino, and wino masses.

  12. Workplace Charging Challenge: Higher Education PEV Charging Webinar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenge: Higher Education PEV Charging Webinar Workplace Charging Challenge: Higher Education PEV Charging Webinar Review the slides from our webinar which highlighted workplace ...

  13. A search for double-charged Higgs bosons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baraoiant, Sasha; /UC, Davis

    2006-01-01

    We search for the pair production of doubly charged Higgs particles followed by the lepton-flavor violating decay of each Higgs into electron-and-tau and muon-and-tau pairs using 350 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. Separate searches investigate cases where three or four final state leptons are detected, and the limits for each exclusive decay mode reflect the combined results of both searches. Assuming the H{sup {+-}{+-}}{sub L} decays exclusively into like sign electron-and-tau pairs, we set a lower limit on its mass of 114 GeV/c2 at the 95 % confidence level. In the case of exclusive muon-and-tau decays, we set a lower mass limit of 112 GeV/c2 also at the 95% confidence level.

  14. Probing lepton flavour violation via neutrinoless τ→3μ decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-26

    This article presents the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to the lepton-flavour-violating decays of τ→3μ. A method utilising the production of τ leptons via W→τν decays is used. This method is applied to the sample of 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012. Lastly, no event is observed passing the selection criteria, and the observed (expected) upper limit on the τ lepton branching fraction into three muons, Br(τ→3μ), is 3.76×10-7 (3.94×10-7 ) at 90 % confidence level.

  15. Search for anomalous production of multiple leptons in association with $W$ and $Z$ bosons at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a search for anomalous production of multiple low-energy leptons in association with a W or Z boson using events collected at the CDF experiment corresponding to 5.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This search is sensitive to a wide range of topologies with low-momentum leptons, including those with the leptons near one another. The observed rates of production of additional electrons and muons are compared with the standard model predictions. No indications of phenomena beyond the standard model are found. A 95% confidence level limit is presented on the production cross section for a benchmark model of supersymmetric hidden-valley Higgs production. Particle identification efficiencies are also provided to enable the calculation of limits on additional models.

  16. Charge exchange system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  17. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the H -> WW -> lepton+neutrino+q'qbar Decay Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2011-04-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV in events containing a charged lepton (ell), missing transverse energy, and at least two jets, using 5.4 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primarily to Higgs bosons produced through the fusion of two gluons or two electroweak bosons, with subsequent decay H->WW->ell+nu+q'qbar, where ell is an electron or muon. The search is also sensitive to contributions from other production channels, such as WH->ell+nu+bbbar In the absence of signal, we set limits at the 95% C.L. on the cross section for H production sigma(ppbar->H+X) in these final states. For a mass of MH=160 GeV, the limit is a factor of 3.9 larger than the cross section in the standard model, and consistent with expectation.

  18. ON THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF GeV/TeV COSMIC RAY LEPTONS (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect ON THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF GeV/TeV COSMIC RAY LEPTONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ON THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF GeV/TeV COSMIC RAY LEPTONS Recent observations of cosmic ray (CR) electrons from several instruments have revealed various degrees of deviation in the measured electron energy distribution from a simple power law, in the form of an excess around 0.1-1 TeV energies. An even more prominent deviation and excess has been observed in the fraction of CR positrons

  19. On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons Recent observations of cosmic ray electrons from several instruments have revealed various degrees of deviation in the measured electron energy distribution from a simple power-law, in a form of an excess around 0.1 to 1 TeV energies. An even more prominent deviation and excess has been observed in the fraction of cosmic ray

  20. Precision measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets channel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using a matrix element method with Quasi-Monte Carlo integration (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Precision measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets channel using a matrix element method with Quasi-Monte Carlo integration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Precision measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets channel using a matrix element method with Quasi-Monte Carlo integration This thesis presents a measurement of the top quark

  1. Discovery and Characterization of a Higgs boson using four-lepton events

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from the CMS (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Discovery and Characterization of a Higgs boson using four-lepton events from the CMS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovery and Characterization of a Higgs boson using four-lepton events from the CMS A new particle decaying to a pair of vector bosons was discovered in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. In the wake of this discovery a rush of measurements was made to

  2. Search for supersymmetry in events with a photon, a lepton, and missing

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transverse momentum in pp collisions at s=8 TeV (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Search for supersymmetry in events with a photon, a lepton, and missing transverse momentum in pp collisions at s = 8 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for supersymmetry in events with a photon, a lepton, and missing transverse momentum in pp collisions at s = 8 TeV Publication Date: 2016-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1242864 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physics Letters. Section B

  3. Search for supersymmetry in events with soft leptons, low jet multiplicity,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s=8 TeV (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Search for supersymmetry in events with soft leptons, low jet multiplicity, and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV « Prev Next » Title: Search for supersymmetry in events with soft leptons, low jet multiplicity, and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV Publication Date: 2016-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1253644 Type: Published Article

  4. Search for supersymmetry in events with soft leptons, low jet multiplicity,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s=8 TeV (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Search for supersymmetry in events with soft leptons, low jet multiplicity, and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for supersymmetry in events with soft leptons, low jet multiplicity, and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV Publication Date: 2016-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1253644

  5. Thermite charge - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Trademark Office Marketing Summary: Linear Thermite Charge Abstract: The present invention provides for cutting operations using linear thermite charges; the charges cut one...

  6. Evolution of collectivity as a signal of quark gluon plasma formation in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Payal; Alam, Jan-e; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2011-08-15

    A measurement for studying the mass dependence of dilepton interferometry in relativistic heavy-ion collision experiments as a tool to characterize the quark gluon phase is proposed. In calculations involving dileptons, we show that the mass dependence of radii extracted from the virtual photon (dilepton) interferometry provide access to the development of collective flow with time. It is argued that the nonmonotonic variation of Hanbury Brown-Twiss radii with invariant mass of the lepton pairs signals the formation of quark gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions. Our proposal of experimentally measuring the ratio, R{sub out}/R{sub side} for dileptons can be used to estimate the average lifetimes of the partonic as well as the hadronic phases.

  7. Study of heavy-ion collisions in the PHENIX experiment: Survey of the most recent results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riabov, V. G. Samsonov, V. M.

    2011-03-15

    The first experimental results obtained at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) over the period between 2000 and 2005 are indicative of the production of dense and hot partonic matter in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Investigations performed in recent years make it possible to extend the list of measured signatures and to study their dependence on the greater number of variables. The most recent results obtained in the PHENIX experiment by studying proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions are surveyed. Particular attention is given to studying the properties of the initial state, dynamical evolution of the product medium, and its response to the propagation of high-energy partons through it. The aforementioned effects are studied via measuring the properties of identified hadrons and leptons over a broad region of transverse momenta at various rapidities.

  8. Drell-Yan Lepton pair production at NNLO QCD with parton showers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoeche, Stefan; Li, Ye; Prestel, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    We present a simple approach to combine NNLO QCD calculations and parton showers, based on the UNLOPS technique. We apply the method to the computation of Drell-Yan lepton-pair production at the Large Hadron Collider. We comment on possible improvements and intrinsic uncertainties.

  9. Probing properties of hot and dense QCD matter with heavy flavor in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2015-05-29

    Hadrons carrying heavy quarks, i.e. charm or bottom, are important probes of the hot and dense medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Heavy quark-antiquark pairs are mainly produced in initial hard scattering processes of partons. While some of the produced pairs form bound quarkonia, the vast majority hadronize into particles carrying open heavy flavor. Heavy quark production has been studied by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC via measurements of single leptons from semi-leptonic decays in both the electron channel at mid-rapidity and in the muon channel at forward rapidity. A large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of single electrons have been observed in Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. The PHENIX experiment has also measured J/ψ production at 200 GeV in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions, both at mid- and forward-rapidities, and additionally Cu + Au and U + U at forward-rapidities. In the most energetic collisions, more suppression is observed at forward rapidity than at central rapidity. This can be interpreted either as a sign of quark recombination, or as a hint of additional cold nuclear matter effects. The centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor, RAA(pT), for J/ψ in U + U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV shows a similar trend to the lighter systems, Au + Au and Cu + Cu, at similar energy 200 GeV.

  10. Probing properties of hot and dense QCD matter with heavy flavor in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2015-05-29

    Hadrons carrying heavy quarks, i.e. charm or bottom, are important probes of the hot and dense medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Heavy quark-antiquark pairs are mainly produced in initial hard scattering processes of partons. While some of the produced pairs form bound quarkonia, the vast majority hadronize into particles carrying open heavy flavor. Heavy quark production has been studied by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC via measurements of single leptons from semi-leptonic decays in both the electron channel at mid-rapidity and in the muon channel at forward rapidity. A large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of single electrons havemore » been observed in Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. The PHENIX experiment has also measured J/ψ production at 200 GeV in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions, both at mid- and forward-rapidities, and additionally Cu + Au and U + U at forward-rapidities. In the most energetic collisions, more suppression is observed at forward rapidity than at central rapidity. This can be interpreted either as a sign of quark recombination, or as a hint of additional cold nuclear matter effects. The centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor, RAA(pT), for J/ψ in U + U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV shows a similar trend to the lighter systems, Au + Au and Cu + Cu, at similar energy 200 GeV.« less

  11. Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

    2000-04-11

    Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

  12. Automakers and Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenge Initiative Arguably the most important infrastructure strategy to accelerate adoption of PEVs. Why are we doing Workplace Charging? * PEV Market Growth - Critical now...

  13. Automakers and Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - Charger usage peak is during shift-change when both shifts are charging More ... Happy to share this and make it available to anyone. EV Barriers and Opportunities * ...

  14. System Benefits Charge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire's 1996 electric-industry restructuring legislation authorized the creation of a system benefits charge (SBC) to support energy efficiency programs and energy assistance programs for...

  15. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Simultaneously in Dilepton and Lepton + Jets Decay Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorko, Wojciech T.; /Chicago U.

    2008-09-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the top quark mass using simultaneously data from two decay channels. They use a data sample of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collisions with integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector. They select dilepton and lepton + jets channel decays of t{bar t} pairs and reconstruct two observables in each topology. They use non-parametric techniques to derive probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the reconstructed top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the dilepton topology and the reconstructed top quark mass and the invariant mass of jets from the W boson decay in lepton + jets channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson resonance from the lepton + jets channel. Using 144 dilepton candidate events and 332 lepton + jets candidate events they measure: M{sub top} = 171.9 {+-} 1.7 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} = 171.9 {+-} 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}. The measurement features a robust treatment of the systematic uncertainties, correlated between the two channels and develops techniques for a future top quark mass measurement simultaneously in all decay channels. Measurements of the W boson mass and the top quark mass provide a constraint on the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. The Higgs boson mass implied by measurement presented here is higher than Higgs boson mass implied by previously published, most precise CDF measurements of the top quark mass in lepton + jets and dilepton channels separately.

  16. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel using lepton+track selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Robert Emil; /Princeton U.

    2008-09-01

    The production cross section for t{bar t} pairs decaying into two lepton final states was measured using data from the D0 detector at Fermilab. The measurement was made using a lepton+track selection, where one lepton is fully identified and the second lepton is observed as an isolated track. This analysis is designed to complement similar studies using two fully identified leptons [1]. The cross section for the lepton+track selection was found to be {sigma} = 5.2{sub -1.4}{sup +1.6}(stat){sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(syst) {+-} 0.3(lumi) pb. The combined cross section using both the lepton+track data and the data from the electron+electron, electron+muon, and muon+muon samples is: {sigma} = 6.4{sub -0.9}{sup +0.9}(stat){sub -0.7}{sup +0.8}(syst) {+-} 0.4(lumi) pb.

  17. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS Experimental Determination of the Symmetry Energy of a Low Density Nuclear Gas ......II-1 S. ...

  18. Process for upgrading heavy oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LePage, J.F.; Marlino, G.

    1983-07-05

    The viscosity of heavy oils is reduced in order to facilitate pipe line transportation thereof. A fraction of the heavy oil is deasphalted in the presence of C/sub 5/-C/sub 7/ hydrocarbons, a portion of the separated asphalt is converted to synthesis gas, at least a portion of said gas is used to manufacture an alcohol mixture including methanol and C/sub 2/ to C/sub 10/ alcohols, which mixture is admixed with the heavy oil before transportation thereof. This procedure is more beneficial to the transported heavy oil than the prior processes which do not comprise the conversion of the asphalt fraction of the heavy oil.

  19. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  20. Effective field theory for a heavy Majorana fermion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koepp, Karoline; Okui, Takemichi

    2011-11-01

    We formulate an effective theory for systems containing a heavy Majorana fermion, such as bound states of a long-lived gluino. This 'Majorana HQET' has the same degrees of freedom as the well-studied Dirac HQET. It respects an emergent U(1) symmetry despite the fundamental absence of a U(1) for Majorana fermions. Reparametrization invariance works identically in the two HQETs. Remarkably, while a Dirac HQET may or may not be charge conjugation symmetric, a charge conjugation symmetry emerges in all Majorana HQETs, potentially offering low energy probes to distinguish the two theories.

  1. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  2. Retrofitting heavy oil processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, G.L.; Fitzgerald, M.; D'Amico, V.

    1986-01-01

    Refiners, faced with the need to process the bottom end of the heavy high sulfur crude oil barrel in today's uncertain economic environment, are reluctant to commit large amounts of money to expensive upgrading processes. In order to conserve scarce capital while improving operating margins, additional valuable products can be produced by retrofits such as conversion of an idle crude unit to visbreaking, delayed coking or deasphalting service, or conversion of hydrodesulfurizers to mild hydrocracking.

  3. Viscous heavy brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    House, R.F.; Hoover, L.D.

    1984-07-10

    Hydroxyethyl cellulose and a sequestrant are added to a heavy brine containing one or more salts selected from calcium chloride, calcium bromide, and zinc bromide to increase the viscosity of the brine. Preferably the brine contains zinc bromide, has a density in the range from about 14.2-19.2 pounds per gallon, and the sequestrant is a polyphosphonic acid or water soluble salt thereof.

  4. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2013-01-01

    We reviewmore » a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  5. Exotic decays of heavy B quarks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fox, Patrick J.; Tucker-Smith, David

    2016-01-08

    Heavy vector-like quarks of charge –1/3, B, have been searched for at the LHC through the decays B → bZ, bh, tW. In models where the B quark also carries charge under a new gauge group, new decay channels may dominate. We focus on the case where the B is charged under a U(1)' and describe simple models where the dominant decay mode is B → bZ' → b(bb¯¯). With the inclusion of dark matter such models can explain the excess of gamma rays from the Galactic center. We develop a search strategy for this decay chain and estimate thatmore » with integrated luminosity of 300 fb–1 the LHC will have the potential to discover both the B and the Z' for B quarks with mass below ~ 1.6 TeV, for a broad range of Z' masses. Furthermore, a high-luminosity run can extend this reach to 2 TeV.« less

  6. Study of vector boson scattering and search for new physics in events with two same-sign leptons and two jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-02-02

    A study of vector boson scattering in collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 fb1 collected with the CMS detector. Candidate events are selected with exactly two leptons of the same charge, two jets with large rapidity separation and high dijet mass, and moderate missing transverse energy. The signal region is expected to be dominated by electroweak same-sign W-boson pair production. The observation agrees with the standard model prediction. The observed significance is 2.0 standard deviations, where a significance of 3.1 standard deviations is expected based on the standard model. Cross section measurements for W W and WZ processes in the fiducial region are reported. In conclusion, bounds on the structure of quartic vector-boson interactions are given in the framework of dimension-eight effective field theory operators, as well as limits on the production of doubly charged Higgs bosons.

  7. Wireless Charging | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wireless Charging Wireless Charging 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss103_miller_2013_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Wireless Charging Wireless Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Charging Wireless Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Charging

  8. Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    states in pp collisions at 8 TeV and ratio of 8 to 7 TeV cross sections (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp collisions at 8 TeV and ratio of 8 to 7 TeV cross sections Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp collisions at 8 TeV and ratio of 8 to 7 TeV cross sections A measurement of the top quark pair production (t-tbar)

  9. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau lepton final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2012-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with zero, one, or two or more jets using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 7.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, and to Higgs boson decays to tau lepton pairs or W boson pairs. Observed (expected) limits are set on the ratio of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio, relative to those predicted by the Standard Model, of 14 (22) at a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV and 7.7 (6.8) at 165 GeV.

  10. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau, and jets final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; et al.

    2013-09-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb?1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H ? ? ? decays or H ? WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

  11. Search for new physics in lepton + photon + x events with 929 pb**-1 of p

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV (Conference) | SciTech Connect Search for new physics in lepton + photon + x events with 929 pb**-1 of p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for new physics in lepton + photon + x events with 929 pb**-1 of p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV The authors present results of a search in 929 {+-} 56 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV for the anomalous production of events containing

  12. Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging Behaviors: Experiences from Six Smart Grid Investment Grant Projects (December 2014) Evaluating Electric Vehicle ...

  13. Trends in Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Donofrio Ford Motor Company Trends in Workplace Charging Est EV NA NA approx 21 70-100 Miles: What Types of Chargers are Being Used? Considerations for Campus Installations *...

  14. Societal Benefits Charge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During 2011 and 2012 several minor changes were made to the originally enacted SBC law. In 2011 a section was added prohibiting gas utilities from imposing an SBC charge (or several other types o...

  15. Nuclear effects in lepton-pair production in hadron-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdnikov, Ya. A.; Zavatsky, M. E.; Kim, V. T.; Kosmach, V. F.; Ryzhinskiy, M. M. Samsonov, V. M.

    2006-03-15

    The results of experimental investigations of Drell-Yan dimuon production in pBe and pW collisions at an energy of 800 GeV on a fixed target are analyzed. The ratios of the inclusive differential cross sections for lepton-pair production are calculated. It is shown that allowance for the effect of multiple soft rescattering of a projectile-hadron quark inside the target nucleus improves agreement between theoretical and experimental results.

  16. Discovery and Characterization of a Higgs boson using four-lepton events from the CMS experiment

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Discovery and Characterization of a Higgs boson using four-lepton events from the CMS experiment by Christopher B. Martin A dissertation submitted to The Johns Hopkins University in conformity with the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Baltimore, Maryland July, 2015 © Christopher B. Martin 2015 All Rights Reserved Abstract A new particle decaying to a pair of vector bosons was discovered in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. In the wake of

  17. Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy-Duty

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Diesel Engine: New Development Rersults | Department of Energy 4 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: AVT LIST Gmbh, Austria PDF icon 2004_deer_moser.pdf More Documents & Publications Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards A European Perspective of EURO 5/U.S. 07 Heavy-Duty Engine Technologies and Their Related Consequences

  18. Electrically charged targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  19. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel ...

  20. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty ...

  1. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

  2. Same-sign trileptons at the LHC: A window to lepton-number violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Satyanarayan; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup

    2011-11-01

    We present a detailed investigation to establish that lepton-number (L) violating supersymmetry (SUSY) can be effectively probed at the LHC in the practically background-free same-sign trilepton (SS3l) and same-sign four-lepton (SS4l) channels. With this in view, we extend our earlier analysis of SS3l and SS4l signals by considering situations based on minimal supergravity as well as a phenomenological SUSY model. We find that the R-parity violating scenario predicts large event rates, for both the 7 and 14 TeV runs. Furthermore, we show that it is extremely unlikely to ever achieve similar rates in R-parity conserving SUSY. In addition, we show how SS3l and SS4l, in conjunction with the mixed-sign trilepton and four-lepton channels, can be used to extract dynamical information about the underlying SUSY theory, namely, the Majorana character of the decaying lightest neutralino and the nature of L-violating couplings. We define suitable variables and relationships between them which can be verified experimentally and which are largely independent of the SUSY production cross sections and the cascade decay branching fractions. These theoretical predictions are validated by Monte Carlo simulations including detector and background effects.

  3. Forward energy flow, central charged-particle multiplicities, and pseudorapidity gaps in W and Z boson events from pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-01-01

    A study of forward energy flow and central charged-particle multiplicity in events with W and Z bosons decaying into leptons is presented. The analysis uses a sample of 7 TeV pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The observed forward energy depositions, their correlations, and the central charged-particle multiplicities are not well described by the available non-diffractive soft-hadron production models. A study of about 300 events with no significant energy deposited in one of the forward calorimeters, corresponding to a pseudorapidity gap of at least 1.9 units, is also presented. An indication for a diffractive component in these events comes from the observation that the majority of the charged leptons from the (W/Z) decays are found in the hemisphere opposite to the gap. When fitting the signed lepton pseudorapidity distribution of these events with predicted distributions from an admixture of diffractive (POMPYT) and non-diffractive (PYTHIA) Monte Carlo simulations, the diffractive component is determined to be (50.0 +/- 9.3 (stat.) +/- 5.2 (syst.))%.

  4. Measurements of the $$t\\bar{t}$$ charge asymmetry using the dilepton decay channel in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-30

    The t t-bar charge asymmetry in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV is measured using the dilepton decay channel (ee, e mu, or mu mu). The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The t t-bar and lepton charge asymmetries, defined as the differences in absolute values of the rapidities between the reconstructed top quarks and antiquarks and of the pseudorapidities between the positive and negative leptons, respectively, are measured to be Ac = -0.010 +/- 0.017 (stat.) +/- 0.008 (syst.) and Aclep = 0.009 +/- 0.010 (stat.) +/- 0.006 (syst). The lepton charge asymmetry is also measured as a function of the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the t t-bar system. All measurements are consistent with the expectations of the standard model.« less

  5. Nissan EV Workplace Charging Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nissan EV Workplace Charging Program Workplace Charging Value Creation Value Proposition Nissan Support For Employer For Employee For Employee * Unique employee benefit * ...

  6. Demand Charges | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demand Charges Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDemandCharges&oldid488967" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  7. Interactions of Highly Charged Ions With Matter - Research - Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Interactions of Highly Charged Ions With Matter Spectrum of K x rays from a vanadium The interaction of high-energy heavy-ions with matter is a topic of importance in many areas of science. For example, the mechanisms whereby highly ionized atoms de-excite and return to charge neutrality are of great concern in the design of thermonuclear fusion reactors, where energy transfer to impurity ions injected from the walls of the containment vessel can seriously affect the plasma

  8. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Siemens | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Siemens Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Siemens Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Siemens Joined the Challenge: January 2013 Headquarters: Washington, DC Charging ...

  9. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for heavy element production...II-1 P. K.Sahu, J. B. Natowitz, R. Wada, K. Hagel, T. Materna, Z. Chen, L. Qin, M. Barbui,...

  10. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  12. A Meaurement of the W+- production cross section in p anti-p collisions at sqroot(s)=1.96 TeV in the DiLepton channel and limits on anomalous WWZ/gamma couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGivern, Dustin; /University Coll. London

    2005-12-01

    Measurements of the production cross section of W{sup +}W{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV and limits on trilinear gauge boson coupling (TGC) parameters are presented. The data were recorded with the CDF experiment at Tevatron during the 2001 and 2002 data taking periods in which a total integrated luminosity of 184 pb{sup -1} was collected. The data sample was filtered for events with two leptonic w boson decays where the charged leptons can be either electrons or muons. 17 events are observed against an expected background of 5.0{sub -0.8}{sup +2.2} events. The resulting cross-section is found to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 14.5{sub -5.1}{sup +5.8}(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.9(lum) pb and agrees well with the Standard Model expectation. Limits on the TGC parameters {Delta}{kappa} and {lambda} are set under both the equal coupling scheme, that assumes the W boson couples identically to the Z and {gamma}, and the HISZ coupling scheme, that requires the couplings to respect SU(2){sub L} x &(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry. In both cases this is achieved by using a likelihood fit to the lepton-P{sub T} distribution of the 17 candidate events. The resulting limits are found to be: -0.4 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.6({lambda} = 0); -0.3 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the EQUAL couplings and -0.7 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.9 ({lambda} = 0); -0.4 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the HISZ couplings.

  13. Calculation of cross sections for binary reactions between heavy ion projectiles and heavy actinide targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.; Hoffman, M.M.

    1990-11-01

    The computer program, described in this report, is identified as PWAVED5. It was developed to calculate cross sections for nucleon transfer reactions in low energy heavy ion bombardments. The objective was to calculate cross sections that agree with experimental results for ions of different charge and mass and to develop a predictive capability. It was undertaken because previous heavy ion calculations, for which programs were readily available, appeared to focus primarily on reactions resulting in compound nucleus formation and were not particularly applicable to calculations of binary reaction cross sections at low interaction energies. There are to principal areas in which this computation differs from several other partial wave calculations of heavy-ion reaction cross sections. First, this program is designed specifically to calculate cross sections for nucleon exchange interactions and to exclude interactions that are expected to result in fusion of the two nuclei. A second major difference in this calculation is the use of a statistical distribution to assign the total interaction cross section to individual final mass states.

  14. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapiditymore » spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.« less

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Progress...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014 - Employers Take Charge Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014 - Employers Take Charge In ...

  16. EV Everywhere: Workplace Charging | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Charging EV Everywhere: Workplace Charging EV Everywhere: Workplace Charging Most plug-in electric vehicle (EV) owners charge their vehicles primarily at home, but ...

  17. Exclusive heavy quarkonium +{gamma} production from e{sup +}e{sup -}

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    annihilation into a virtual photon (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Exclusive heavy quarkonium +{gamma} production from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into a virtual photon Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exclusive heavy quarkonium +{gamma} production from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into a virtual photon We compute the cross section for exclusive production of a photon associated with a heavy quarkonium H of charge-conjugation parity C=+1 from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation

  18. Search for W' $$\\to $$ tb decays in the lepton + jets final state in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-05-23

    Results are presented from a search for the production of a heavy gauge boson W' decaying into a top and a bottom quark, using a data set collected by the CMS experiment at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. Various models of W'-boson production are studied by allowing for an arbitrary combination of left- and right-handed couplings. The analysis is based on the detection of events with a lepton (e, mu), jets, and missing transverse energy in the final state. No evidence for W'-boson production is found and 95% confidence level uppermore » limits on the production cross section times branching fraction are obtained. For W' bosons with purely right-handed couplings, and for those with left-handed couplings assuming no interference effects, the observed 95% confidence level limit is M(W') > 2.05 TeV. For W' bosons with purely left-handed couplings, including interference effects, the observed 95% confidence level limit is M(W') > 1.84 TeV. The results presented in this paper are the most stringent limits published to date.« less

  19. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty ...

  20. APBF-DEC Heavy Duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul Platform Project Update APBF-DEC Heavy Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul Platform Project Update 2003 DEER ...

  1. Conversion of heavy hydrocarbon oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, N.Y.; Pelrine, B.P.; Yan, T.Y.

    1982-12-14

    This invention provides a process for upgrading a heavy hydrocarbon oil to motor fuel products. The heavy hydrocarbon oil is admixed with a metal halide catalyst and a solvent component under supercritical conditions to form (1) a dense-gas solvent phase which contains refined hydrocarbon crackate, and which is substantially free of metal halide catalyst content; and (2) a residual asphaltic phase.

  2. Search for new physics in lepton + photon + X events with 305 pb**-1 of p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-05-01

    The authors present results of a search for anomalous production of events containing a charged lepton ({ell}, either e or {mu}) and a photon ({gamma}), both with high transverse momentum, accompanied by additional signatures, X, including missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) and additional leptons and photons. We use the same kinematic selection criteria as in a previous CDF search, but with a substantially larger data set, 305 pb{sup -1}, a p{bar p} collision energy of 1.96 TeV, and the upgraded CDF II detector. We find 42 {ell}{gamma}E{sub T} events versus a standard model expectation of 37.3 {+-} 5.4 events. The level of excess observed in Run I, 16 events with an expectation of 7.6 {+-} 0.7 events (corresponding to a 2.7{sigma} effect), is not supported by the new data. In the signature of {ell}{ell}{gamma} + X we observe 31 events versus an expectation of 23.0 {+-} 2.7 events. In this sample we find no events with an extra photon or E{sub T} and so find no events like the one ee{gamma}{gamma}E{sub T} event observed in Run I.

  3. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Cross Section in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zhenbin

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of the single top quark cross section in the lepton plus jets final state using an integrated luminosity corresponding to 7.5~\\text{fb}^{-1} of p\\bar p collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The single top candidate events are identified by the signature of a charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and two or three jets with at least one of them identified as originating from a bottom quark. A new Monte Carlo generator \\textsc{powheg} is used to model the single top quark production processes, which include {s}-channel, {t}-channel, and {Wt}-channel. A neural network multivariate method is exploited to discriminate the single top quark signal from the comparatively large backgrounds. We measure a single top production cross section of $3.04^{+0.57}_{-0.53}$ (\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.}) pb assuming $m_{\\rm top}=172.5$~GeV/$c^2$. In addition, we extract the CKM matrix element value $|V_{tb}|=0.96\\pm 0.09~(\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})\\pm 0.05~(\\mathrm{theory})$ and set a lower limit of |V_{tb}|>0.78 at the 95\\% credibility level.

  4. Advances in heavy oil hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendizabal, O.B. )

    1988-06-01

    The world increase in heavy crudes has forced refiners to develop different processes that upgrade the yields and product properties recovered from these crudes. However, some of the optimized and new processes are not able to handle whole heavy crude oils, due to the high viscosity and corrosion of their long and short residues. The different processes for heavy crudes can be classified in two areas: physical (vg. Liquid Extraction) and chemical processes. The catalytic hydrotreating process, which belongs to this last classification, has demonstrated to be an economical upgrading process for heavy crude oil. This paper describes the development by the Mexican Petroleum Institute of the process to hydrotreat maya heavy crude. The effect of the operating conditions, the catalyst ---- development and the technical - economical analysis are presented. The product properties and yields are compared with the results obtained with light crude oil like isthmus.

  5. Radiative and Leptonic B-meson Decays from the B-factories (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Workshop on Theory, Phenomenology and Experiments in Heavy Flavor Physics, Capri, Italy, 16-18 Jun 2008 Research Org: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) Sponsoring ...

  6. Heavy Isotopes Lead Materials Management Organization (LMMO)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heavy Isotopes Lead Materials Management Organization (LMMO) Update Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heavy Isotopes Lead Materials Management Organization (LMMO) Update ...

  7. Measurements of associated production of vector bosons and heavy flavours with the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casasso, S.; Collaboration: CMS Collaboration

    2012-10-23

    Thanks to its excellent lepton reconstruction and secondary vertex identification, the CMS detector gives a unique possibility to study processes involving the production of a vector boson in association with heavy quarks. These kind of final states are background to many channels of new physics, as well as Standard Model Higgs searches. Moreover, theoretical predictions about these processes have different approaches and large uncertainties making a test of these predictions even more important. Here different measurements related to this topic are presented, based on the data collected in 2010 and 2011 runs by the CMS detector, namely the inclusive production of Z+b(b) jets and the agular correlation of B-hadron pairs.

  8. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a $W$ pair in the fully leptonic final state in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-03-01

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to W+W- in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is reported. The data are collected at the LHC with the CMS detector, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 inverse femtobarns. The W+W- candidates are selected in events with two charged leptons and large missing transverse energy. No significant excess of events above the standard model background expectations is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production relative to the standard model Higgs expectation are derived. The standard model Higgs boson is excluded in the mass range 129-270 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  9. Probing lepton flavour violation via neutrinoless $${\\tau \\longrightarrow 3\\mu }$$ τ → 3 μ decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-26

    This article presents the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to the lepton-flavour-violating decays of τ→3μ. A method utilising the production of τ leptons via W→τν decays is used. This method is applied to the sample of 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012. No event is observed passing the selection criteria, and the observed (expected) upper limit on the τ lepton branching fraction into three muons, Br(τ→3μ), is 3.76×10-7 (3.94×10-7 ) at 90 % confidence level.

  10. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge: Sample Municipal Workplace Charging Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review the agreement proposed by one municipality to register PEV drivers and inform staff of charging policy.

  12. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2014-10-28

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb?, with 4.9 fb? at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, mhmax, mhmod+ , mhmod , light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low-mH. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.

  13. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau and jets final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.

    2013-09-17

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H ? ?? decays or H ? WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. As a result, the observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsample at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0, respectively.

  14. A Direct Top-Quark Width Measurement from Lepton + Jets Events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width using t{bar t} events produced in p{bar p} collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. In the mode where the top quark decays to a W boson and a bottom quark, we select events in which one W decays leptonically and the other hadronically (lepton + jets channel) . From a data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, we identify 756 candidate events. The top-quark mass and the mass of W boson that decays hadronically are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different top-quark widths ({Lambda}{sub t}) and deviations from nominal jet energy scale ({Delta}{sub JES}) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters, where {Delta}{sub JES} is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale. By applying a Feldman-Cousins approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of {Lambda}{sub t} < 7.6 GeV and a two-sided 68% CL interval of 0.3 GeV < {Lambda}{sub t} < 4.4 GeV for a top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}, which are consistant with the standard model prediction. This is the first direct measurement of {Lambda}{sub t} to set a lower limit with 68% CL.

  15. Lepton number violation as a key to low-scale leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abada, Asmaa; Arcadi, Giorgio; Domcke, Valerie; Lucente, Michele

    2015-11-24

    We explore the possibility of having a successful leptogenesis through oscillations between new sterile fermion states added to the Standard Model field content in a well motivated framework, naturally giving rise to the required mass splitting between the sterile states through a small total lepton number violation. We propose a framework with only two sterile states forming a pseudo-Dirac state, in which their mass difference as well as the smallness of the neutrino masses are due to two sources of lepton number violation with ΔL=2, corresponding to an Inverse Seesaw framework extended by a Linear Seesaw mass term. We also explore the pure Inverse Seesaw mechanism in its minimal version, requiring at least four new sterile states in order to comply with neutrino data. Our analytical and numerical studies reveal that one can have a successful leptogenesis at the temperature of the electroweak scale through oscillations between the two sterile states with a “natural” origin of the strong degeneracy in their mass spectrum. We also revisit the analytical expression of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe in the weak washout regime of this framework.

  16. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-28

    Our search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb-1, with 4.9 fb-1 at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSMmore » parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, m h max , m h mod + , m hmod - , light-stop, light-stau, τ-phobic, and low-m H. Lastly, upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.« less

  17. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-28

    Our search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb-1, with 4.9 fb-1 at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, m h max , m h mod + , m hmod - , light-stop, light-stau, τ-phobic, and low-m H. Lastly, upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.

  18. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2014-10-28

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb?, with 4.9 fb? at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSMmoreparameter space for different benchmark scenarios, mhmax, mhmod+ , mhmod , light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low-mH. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.less

  19. Distributed charging of electrical assets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Phan, Dung; Sharma, Mayank; Wu, Chai Wah; Xiong, Jinjun

    2016-02-16

    The present disclosure relates generally to the field of distributed charging of electrical assets. In various examples, distributed charging of electrical assets may be implemented in the form of systems, methods and/or algorithms.

  20. Inclusive and differential measurements of the t t-bar charge asymmetry in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-10-01

    The t t-bar charge asymmetry is measured in events containing a charged lepton (electron or muon) and at least four jets, one of which is identified as originating from b-quark hadronization. The analyzed dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. An inclusive and three differential measurements of the t t-bar charge asymmetry as a function of rapidity, transverse momentum, and invariant mass of the t t-bar system are presented. The measured inclusive t t-bar charge asymmetry is A(C) = 0.004 +/- 0.010 (stat.) +/- 0.011 (syst.). This result and the three differential measurements are consistent with zero asymmetry as well as with the predictions of the standard model.

  1. Charging Your Time - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health & Safety Exposition Charging Your Time About Us Charging Your Time Committee Members Contact Us Electronic Registration Form Exhibitor and Vendor Information EXPO 2016 Sponsors EXPO Award Criteria How to Get to TRAC Special Events What is EXPO Why Should I Participate in EXPO Charging Your Time Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size How Do I Charge My Time Spent at EXPO? Each Hanford Prime Contractor may have different policies for attending

  2. A Novel Technique to Reconstruct the $Z$ mass in $WZ/ZZ$ Events with Lepton(s), Missing Transverse Energy and Three Jets at CDFII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trovato, Marco; Vernieri, Caterina

    2012-01-01

    Observing WZ/ZZ production at the Tevatron in a final state with a lepton, missing transverse energy and jets is extremely difficult because of the low signal rate and the huge background. In an attempt to increase the acceptance we study the sample where three high-energy jets are reconstructed, where about 1/3 of the diboson signal events are expected to end. Rather than choosing the two E{sub T}-leading jets to detect a Z signal, we make use of the information carried by all jets. To qualify the potential of our method, we estimate the probability of observing an inclusive diboson signal at the three standard deviations level (P{sub 3{sigma}}) to be about four times larger than when using the two leading jets only. Aiming at applying the method to the search for the exclusive WZ/ZZ {yields} {ell}{nu}q{bar q} channel in the three jets sample, we analyzed separately the sample with at least one b-tagged jet and the sample with no tags. In WZ/ZZ {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b} search, we observe a modest improvement in sensitivity over the option of building the Z-mass from the two leading jets in E{sub T}. Studies for improving the method further are on-going.

  3. High resolution printing of charge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-06-16

    Provided are methods of printing a pattern of charge on a substrate surface, such as by electrohydrodynamic (e-jet) printing. The methods relate to providing a nozzle containing a printable fluid, providing a substrate having a substrate surface and generating from the nozzle an ejected printable fluid containing net charge. The ejected printable fluid containing net charge is directed to the substrate surface, wherein the net charge does not substantially degrade and the net charge retained on the substrate surface. Also provided are functional devices made by any of the disclosed methods.

  4. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Unum Group | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unum Group Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Unum Group Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Unum Group Joined the Challenge: July 2015 Headquarters: Chattanooga, TN Charging ...

  5. Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Progress Update 2014: Employers Take Charge Available at energy.goveerevehiclesev-everywhere-workplace-charging-challenge Workplace Charging Challenge 5 Cumulative...

  6. Workplace Charging Challenge Summit 2014: Agenda | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda Workplace Charging Challenge Summit 2014: Agenda Final Agenda for the 2014 Workplace Charging Challenge Summit PDF icon 2014 Workplace Charging Challenge Summit Agenda More ...

  7. Car Charging Group Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Car Charging Group, Inc. Place: Miami Beach, Florida Product: Miami Beach, USA based installer of plug-in vehicle charge equipment. References: Car Charging Group,...

  8. Charged pion production in $$\

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eberly, B.; et al.

    2015-11-23

    Charged pion production via charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI wideband neutrino beam at Fermilab. Events with hadronic invariant mass W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV are selected in separate analyses: the lower W cut isolates single pion production, which is expected to occur primarily through the Δ(1232) resonance, while results from the higher cut include the effects of higher resonances. Cross sections as functions of pion angle and kinetic energy are compared to predictions from theoretical calculations and generator-based models for neutrinos ranging in energymore » from 1.5–10 GeV. The data are best described by calculations which include significant contributions from pion intranuclear rescattering. As a result, these measurements constrain the primary interaction rate and the role of final state interactions in pion production, both of which need to be well understood by neutrino oscillation experiments.« less

  9. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace001musculus2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty ...

  10. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Pratt, Richard M.

    2012-05-22

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  11. On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by supernova remnants, and evaluates their expected energy spectrum based on a simple kinetic equation describing the propagation of charged particles in the interstellar medium. ...

  12. Collision Processes of Highly Charged Ions with Electrons Studied with an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ohtani, Shunsuke; Kavanagh, Anthony P.; Currell, Fred J.; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Li Yueming; Tong Xiaoming

    2009-09-10

    The electron beam ion trap in Tokyo (Tokyo-EBIT)is suitable for studying relativistic effects in the collisions of highly charged heavy ions with electrons because it can produce and trap very highly charged heavy ions which interact with a mono-energetic and unidirectional relativistic electron beam with an energy of up to 200 keV. Recently, we have been studying resonant processes in ionization and recombination by measuring the charge abundance inside the EBIT at the equilibrium. The abundance ratio between adjacent charge states varies slowly with the electron energy when there is no resonant process. However, when the electron energy coincides with the resonant energy at which ionization or recombination is enhanced, the abundance ratio can drastically change. Thus, the resonant processes can be studied by measuring the abundance ratio between adjacent ions as a function of electron beam energy. In this talk, recent progress for heavy ions with very high charge states up to He-like Bi{sup 81+}, is presented. For such ions, relativistic effects significantly affect the resonant processes. For example, the generalized Breit interaction (GBI) effect, which treats the retardation in the exchange of single virtual photon between the free and orbital electrons, has been clearly observed in the DR resonant strength in Li-like Bi{sup 80+}. Recently we have also found that the GBI effect plays an important role in the interference between non-resonant and resonant recombinations. Experimental results are presented in comparison with theoretical calculations.

  13. Upgrading of heavy hydrocarbonaceous feeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, A.K.; Storm, D.A.; DeRosa, T.F.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is based on our work in the area of upgrading of heavy hydrocarbonaceous feedstocks. The work involves the development of a method of catalytically hydroconverting a hydrocarbon feed stream containing a substantial quantity of components boiling above about 538{degrees}C to a substantial portion thereof to components boiling below 538{degrees}C. More particularly, an oil-miscible or oil-soluble poly(ether)diol or a derivative thereof and an aromatic additive oil, such as Heavy Cycle Gas oil, are added to a heavy hydrocarbon feed and the mixed stream is contacted at elevated temperatures with a solid catalyst such as a sulfided nickel molybdenum oxide on alumina in the presence of hydrogen under pressure. This method advantageously affords higher conversion to more valuable liquid products containing lower amounts of heteroatoms such as sulfur, substantially eliminates plugging of the hydroconversion reactor, and reduces the amount of insolubles in the total liquid product.

  14. Workplace Charging - Attracting Tenants through Charged Up Facilities |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy - Attracting Tenants through Charged Up Facilities Workplace Charging - Attracting Tenants through Charged Up Facilities Nationwide, leased facilities constitute almost half of workplaces. Competitive property managers are constantly looking for new, innovative offerings to attract tenants, including advanced building designs and services, mass transit accessibility, and energy-efficient certifications. As more plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) hit the road across the

  15. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton+jets final states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2014-07-17

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton$+$jets final states using the full sample of $p\\bar{p}$ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at $\\sqrt s=1.96 $TeV, corresponding to $9.7 {\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. We use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from $t\\bar t$ production or background. The overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the $W$ boson. We measure $m_t=174.98\\pm0.76$ GeV. In conclusion, this constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.

  16. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton$+$jets final states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-04

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton þ jets final states using the full sample of pp¯ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We also use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from tt¯ production or background. Furthermore, the overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the W boson. We measure mt = 174.98 ± 0.76 GeV. As a result, this constitutes the mostmore » precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.« less

  17. The Discovery of the Tau Lepton and the Changes in Elementary Particle Physics in 40 Years

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Perl, M.

    2003-10-22

    This is a history of my discovery of the tau lepton in the 1970s for which I was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. I have previously described some aspects of the discovery. In 1996 in my collection of papers entitled, ''Reflections on Experimental Science,'' I gave a straightforward account of the experimental method and the physics involved in the discovery as an introduction to the collection. In a 2002 paper written with Mary A. Meyer published in the journal ''Theoria et Historia Scientiarum'' I used the story of the discovery to outline my thoughts on the practice of experimental science. That 2002 paper was written primarily for young women and men who are beginning their lives in science and it was based on a lecture given at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Some of the historical material in this paper has appeared in those two earlier papers.

  18. Lepton flavor violating Higgs bosons and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Sacha; Grenier, Gerald

    2010-05-01

    We update phenomenological constraints on a two Higgs doublet model with lepton flavor nonconserving Yukawa couplings. We review that tan{beta} is ambiguous in such 'type III' models, and define it from the {tau} Yukawa coupling. The neutral scalars {phi} could be searched for at hadron colliders in {phi}{yields}{tau}{mu} and are constrained by the rare decay {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}. The Feynman diagrams for the collider process, with Higgs production via gluon fusion, are similar to the two-loop ''Barr-Zee'' diagrams, which contribute to {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}. Some ''tuning'' is required to obtain a collider cross section of order the standard model expectation for {sigma}(gg{yields}h{sub SM{yields}{tau}}{sup +{tau}-}), while agreeing with the current bound from {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}.

  19. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton$+$jets final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-04

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton þ jets final states using the full sample of pp¯ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We also use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from tt¯ production or background. Furthermore, the overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the W boson. We measure mt = 174.98 ± 0.76 GeV. As a result, this constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.

  20. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; → tt̄ data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of Γ + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, wemore » measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.« less

  1. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets topology at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Tsukuba U.

    2007-03-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. They analyze events from the single lepton plus jets final state (t{bar t} {yields} W{sup +}bW{sup -}{bar b} {yields} lvbq{bar q}{bar b}). The top quark mass is extracted using a direct calculation of the probability density that each event corresponds to the t{bar t} final state. The probability is a function of both the mass of the top quark and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, they achieve the single most precise measurement of the top quark mass, 170.8 {+-} 2.2(stat.) {+-} 1.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; → tt̄ data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of Γ + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, wemore »measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.« less

  3. Workplace Charging Challenge: Higher Education PEV Charging Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review the slides from our webinar which highlighted workplace charging on higher education campuses across the country.

  4. Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014: Employers Take Charge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014 highlights the progress of the Challenge and its partners as determined through the annual partner survey.

  5. Workplace Charging Challenge: Install and Manage PEV Charging...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plug-in Electric Vehicles & Batteries Workplace Charging Challenge Workplace ... Vehicles Home About the Vehicle Technologies Office Plug-in Electric Vehicles & Batteries ...

  6. Charged-Higgs-boson production at the LHC: Next-to-leading-order supersymmetric QCD corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittmaier, Stefan; Kraemer, Michael; Spira, Michael; Walser, Manuel

    2011-03-01

    The dominant production process for heavy charged-Higgs bosons at the LHC is the associated production with heavy quarks. We have calculated the next-to-leading-order supersymmetric QCD corrections to charged-Higgs production through the parton processes qq,gg{yields}tbH{sup {+-}} and present results for total cross sections and differential distributions. The QCD corrections reduce the renormalization and factorization scale dependence and thus stabilize the theoretical predictions. We present a comparison of the next-to-leading-order results for the inclusive cross section with a calculation based on bottom-gluon fusion gb{yields}tH{sup {+-}} and discuss the impact of the next-to-leading-order corrections on charged-Higgs searches at the LHC.

  7. Upgrading Orinoco belt heavy oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcantara, J.; Castillo, O.

    1982-09-01

    The Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt of Venezuela is a subsurface geological formation of petroleum-bearing sands that is approximately 700 km long and between 60 and 80 km wide. The results of recent explorations have shown the area to contain over one trillion barrels of oil in-place, ranging from 8/sup 0/ API to 14/sup 0/ APE gravity. In an effort to develop these resources, Petroleos de Venezuela has undertaken a program to evaluate and develop this heavy oil belt. The objectives of this program are discussed along with the process technology selection, pilot plants, and environmental protection measures. (JMT)

  8. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Sears Holdings Corporation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sears Holdings Corporation Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Sears Holdings Corporation Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Sears Holdings Corporation Joined the Challenge: ...

  9. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Melink Corporation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Melink Corporation Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Melink Corporation Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Melink Corporation Joined the Challenge: July 2014 Headquarters: ...

  10. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Vermont Energy Investment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vermont Energy Investment Corporation Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Vermont Energy Investment Corporation Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Vermont Energy Investment ...

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bosch Automotive Service...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bosch Automotive Service Solutions, Inc. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bosch Automotive Service Solutions, Inc. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bosch Automotive ...

  12. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Northwest Evaluation Association...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Northwest Evaluation ...

  13. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa ...

  14. Explosive bulk charge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  15. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W.H.

    1999-03-09

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector. 5 figs.

  16. High dynamic range charge measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2012-09-04

    A charge amplifier for use in radiation sensing includes an amplifier, at least one switch, and at least one capacitor. The switch selectively couples the input of the switch to one of at least two voltages. The capacitor is electrically coupled in series between the input of the amplifier and the input of the switch. The capacitor is electrically coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. A method of measuring charge in radiation sensing includes selectively diverting charge from an input of an amplifier to an input of at least one capacitor by selectively coupling an output of the at least one capacitor to one of at least two voltages. The input of the at least one capacitor is operatively coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. The method also includes calculating a total charge based on a sum of the amplified charge and the diverted charge.

  17. Heavy Truck Engine Development & HECC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications High Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engine High Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engine Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion ...

  18. Workplace Charging Toolkit: Example Events

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section provides links to previous successful workplace charging events. These link directly to the organization’s website and contain event agendas and presentation materials.

  19. Workplace Charging Program and Initiatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and charging infrastructure * Plug-in hybrid and battery electric vehicles * ... include trucks, buses, vans, passenger cars, low- speed vehicles and off-road ...

  20. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  1. The Search for Heavy Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-04-17

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  2. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  3. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xie, Jianming; Wang, Lei; Wu, Ning; Schultz, Peter G.

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  4. Preliminary result of rapid solenoid for controlling heavy-ion beam parameters of laser ion source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Okamura, M.; Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Kanesue, T.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.

    2015-03-13

    To realize a heavy ion inertial fusion driver, we have studied a possibility of laser ion source (LIS). A LIS can provide high current high brightness heavy ion beams, however it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters. To overcome the issue, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The rapid ramping magnetic field could enhance limited time slice of the current and simultaneously the beam emittance changed accordingly. This approach may also useful to realize an ion source for HIF power plant.

  5. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  6. heavy_oil | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Oil Heavy oil is a vast U.S. oil resource that is underexploited because its highly viscous nature renders it difficult to produce and to refine. As higher-gravity crudes ...

  7. Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop WHEN: Jan 11, 2016 8:30 AM - Jan 13, 2016 5:30 PM WHERE: Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe...

  8. Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remsberg, L.P.

    1992-11-01

    The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

  9. Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remsberg, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

  10. Search for charged Higgs bosons decaying via H+ -> tau nu in top quark pair events using pp collision data at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Dumlupinar U. /Gazi U. /TOBB ETU, Ankara /TAEK, Ankara /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington

    2012-04-01

    The results of a search for charged Higgs bosons are presented. The analysis is based on 4.6 fb{sup -1} of proton-proton collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, using top quark pair events with a {tau} lepton in the final state. The data are consistent with the expected background from Standard Model processes. Assuming that the branching ratio of the charged Higgs boson to a {tau} lepton and a neutrino is 100%, this leads to upper limits on the branching ratio of top quark decays to a b quark and a charged Higgs boson between 5% and 1% for charged Higgs boson masses ranging from 90 GeV to 160 GeV, respectively. In the context of the m{sub h}{sup max} scenario of the MSSM, tan {beta} above 12-26, as well as between 1 and 2-6, can be excluded for charged Higgs boson masses between 90 GeV and 150 GeV.

  11. Stratified charge internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skopil, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine. It comprises: a main cylinder, a main piston within the main cylinder, and means for delivering a combustible charge into the main cylinder; a smaller idle cylinder, and idle piston within the idle cylinder, and means for delivering a combustible charge into the idle cylinder; an ignition passageway leading from the idle cylinder to the main cylinder; and an ignition device within the ignition passageway operable to ignite a compressed charge discharged by the idle cylinder into the ignition passageway. The passageway being positioned to discharge the ignited compressed charge from the idle cylinder into the main cylinder to ignite the compressed charge within the main cylinder.

  12. Search for doubly charged Higgs bosons in like-sign dilepton final states at √s¯= 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2012-12-04

    A search for doubly-charged Higgs bosons decaying to pairs of electrons and/or muons is presented. The search is performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s¯ = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Pairs of prompt, isolated, high-pT leptons with the same electric charge (e±e±, e±μ±, μ±μ±) are selected, and their invariant mass distribution is searched for a narrow resonance. No significant excess over Standard Model background expectations is observed, and limits are placed on the cross section times branching ratio for pair production of doubly-chargedmore » Higgs bosons. The masses of doubly-charged Higgs bosons are constrained depending on the branching ratio into these leptonic final states. Assuming pair production, coupling to left-handed fermions, and a branching ratio of 100% for each final state, masses below 409 GeV, 375 GeV, and 398 GeV are excluded for e±e±, e±μ±, and μ±μ±, respectively.« less

  13. Search for lepton-flavour-violating H → μτ decays of the Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-11-30

    A direct search for lepton-flavour-violating H → μτ decays of the recently discovered Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The analysis is performed in the H → μτ had channel, where τ had is a hadronically decaying τ -lepton. The search is based on the data sample of proton-proton collisions collected by the ATLAS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. No statistically significant excess of data over the predicted background is observed. As a result, the observed (expected) 95% confidence-level upper limit onmore » the branching fraction, Br( H → μτ ), is 1.85% (1.24%).« less

  14. U(2)⁵ flavor symmetry and lepton universality violation in W→τν̄τ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Filipuzzi, Alberto; Portolés, Jorge; González-Alonso, Martín

    2012-06-26

    The seeming violation of universality in the τ lepton coupling to the W boson suggested by LEP-II data is studied using an effective field theory (EFT) approach. Within this framework we explore how this feature fits into the current constraints from electroweak precision observables using different assumptions about the flavor structure of New Physics, namely [U(2)×U(1)]⁵ and U(2)⁵. We show the importance of leptonic and semileptonic tau decay measurements, giving 3–4 TeV bounds on the New Physics effective scale at 90% C.L. We conclude under very general assumptions that it is not possible to accommodate this deviation from universality inmore » the EFT framework, and thus such a signal could only be explained by the introduction of light degrees of freedom or New Physics strongly coupled at the electroweak scale.« less

  15. Search for lepton-flavour-violating H → μτ decays of the Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. 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J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-11-30

    A direct search for lepton-flavour-violating H → μτ decays of the recently discovered Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The analysis is performed in the H → μτ had channel, where τ had is a hadronically decaying τ -lepton. The search is based on the data sample of proton-proton collisions collected by the ATLAS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. No statistically significant excess of data over the predicted background is observed. As a result, the observed (expected) 95% confidence-level upper limit on the branching fraction, Br( H → μτ ), is 1.85% (1.24%).

  16. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-08-20

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H→WW decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  17. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Faur, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.

    2012-08-20

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 fb? of integrated luminosity in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  18. Heavy flavor production from photons and hadrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heusch, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present state of the production and observation of hadrons containing heavy quarks or antiquarks as valence constituents, in reactions initiated by real and (space-like) virtual photon or by hadron beams is discussed. Heavy flavor production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which is well covered in a number of recent review papers is not discussed, and similarly, neutrino production is omitted due to the different (flavor-changing) mechanisms that are involved in those reactions. Heavy flavors from spacelike photons, heavy flavors from real photons, and heavy flavors from hadron-hadron collisions are discussed. (WHK)

  19. Top quark pair production cross section in the lepton+jets channel using b-tagging at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, H.D.; /Brown U.

    2008-05-01

    The top quark pair production cross section measurement in the lepton+jets channel with b-tagging algorithm is described. About 900 pb{sup -1} data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron are used for this analysis. In this thesis, event selection, background estimation, and cross section calculation are discussed in detail. In addition, calibration of the Luminosity Monitor readout electronics and a new b-tagging algorithm, the SLTNN tagger, are also discussed in this thesis.

  20. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, S.; Johnson, D.R.

    1999-04-26

    The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

  1. Charge-pump voltage converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, John P.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2009-11-03

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  2. Workplace Charging Presentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation Workplace Charging Presentation Educate employers about plug-in electric vehicles and workplace charging using this sample presentation. The presentation covers the basics of PEVs and workplace charging as well as the benefit of supporting these sustainable transportation technologies at your organization. File Workplace Charging Ambassador Outreach Presentation Template More Documents & Publications Workplace Charging Toolkit: Workshop Outreach Presentation Template Workplace

  3. Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014: Employers Take Charge

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Progress Update 2014: Employers Take Charge U.S. Department of Energy's EV Everywhere Workplace 2 As the Workplace Charging Challenge nears its second anniversary, I am pleased to reflect on the continued rapid advancement of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), the exciting progress to date of our partners and ambassadors, and the phenomenal growth in the number of organizations that have joined the Challenge since its inception. What began as a commitment by 13 founding employer partners has now

  4. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-04-21

    Results of a search for H → ττ decays are presented, based on the full set of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb–1 and 20.3 fb–1 at centre-of-mass energies of √s=7 TeV and √s=8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic (τ → ℓνν¯ with ℓ = e, μ) and hadronic (τ → hadrons ν) tau decays are considered. An excess of events over the expected background from other Standard Model processes is found with an observed (expected) significance of 4.5 (3.4) standardmore » deviations. This excess provides evidence for the direct coupling of the recently discovered Higgs boson to fermions. The measured signal strength, normalized to the Standard Model expectation, of μ = 1.43–0.37+0.43 is consistent with the predicted Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.« less

  5. The galactic center GeV excess from a series of leptonic cosmic-ray outbursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cholis, Ilias; Evoli, Carmelo; Calore, Francesca; Linden, Tim; Weniger, Christoph; Hooper, Dan

    2015-06-16

    It has been proposed that a recent outburst of cosmic-ray electrons could account for the excess of GeV-scale gamma rays observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center. After studying this possibility in some detail, we identify scenarios in which a series of leptonic cosmic-ray outbursts could plausibly generate the observed excess. The morphology of the emission observed outside of ~1° – 2° from the Galactic Center can be accommodated with two outbursts, one which took place approximately ~106 years ago, and another (injecting only about 10% as much energy as the first) about ~105 years ago. The emission observed from the innermost ~1° – 2° requires one or more additional recent outbursts and/or a contribution from a centrally concentrated population of unresolved millisecond pulsars. Furthermore, in order to produce a spectrum that is compatible with the measured excess (whose shape is approximately uniform over the region of the excess), the electrons from the older outburst must be injected with significantly greater average energy than those injected more recently, enabling their spectra to be similar after ~106 years of energy losses.

  6. Higgs boson pair production in new physics models at hadron, lepton, and photon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asakawa, Eri; Harada, Daisuke; Okada, Yasuhiro; Kanemura, Shinya; Tsumura, Koji

    2010-12-01

    We study Higgs boson pair production processes at future hadron and lepton colliders including the photon collision option in several new physics models; i.e., the two-Higgs-doublet model, the scalar leptoquark model, the sequential fourth generation fermion model and the vectorlike quark model. Cross sections for these processes can deviate significantly from the standard model predictions due to the one-loop correction to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. For the one-loop induced processes such as gg{yields}hh and {gamma}{gamma}{yields}hh, where h is the (lightest) Higgs boson and g and {gamma} respectively represent a gluon and a photon, the cross sections can also be affected by new physics particles via additional one-loop diagrams. In the two-Higgs-doublet model and scalar leptoquark models, cross sections of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}hhZ and {gamma}{gamma}{yields}hh can be enhanced due to the nondecoupling effect in the one-loop corrections to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. In the sequential fourth generation fermion model, the cross section for gg{yields}hh becomes very large because of the loop effect of the fermions. In the vectorlike quark model, effects are small because the theory has decoupling property. Measurements of the Higgs boson pair production processes can be useful to explore new physics through the determination of the Higgs potential.

  7. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-04-21

    Results of a search for H → ττ decays are presented, based on the full set of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb–1 and 20.3 fb–1 at centre-of-mass energies of √s=7 TeV and √s=8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic (τ → ℓνν¯ with ℓ = e, μ) and hadronic (τ → hadrons ν) tau decays are considered. An excess of events over the expected background from other Standard Model processes is found with an observed (expected) significance of 4.5 (3.4) standard deviations. This excess provides evidence for the direct coupling of the recently discovered Higgs boson to fermions. The measured signal strength, normalized to the Standard Model expectation, of μ = 1.43–0.37+0.43 is consistent with the predicted Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.

  8. Search for Lepton-Number Violating Processes in B+ to h- l+ l+ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-05-17

    We have searched for the lepton-number violating processes B{sup +} {yields} h{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup +} with h{sup -} = K{sup -}/{pi}{sup -} and {ell}{sup +} = e{sup +}/{mu}{sup +}, using a sample of 471 {+-} 3 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We find no evidence for these decays and place 90% confidence level upper limits on their branching fractions B (B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup +}) < 2.3 x 10{sup -8}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup +}) < 3.0 x 10{sup -8}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}) < 10.7 x 10{sup -8}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}) < 6.7 x 10{sup -8}.

  9. Search for Rare Multi-Pion Decays of the Tau Lepton Using the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ter-Antonyan, Ruben

    2007-09-18

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to rare multi-pion final states is performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The analysis uses 232 fb-1 of data at center-of-mass energies on or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. In the search for the {tau}- {yields} 3{pi}-2{pi}+2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay, we observe 10 events with an expected background of 6.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.4} events. In the absence of a signal, we calculate the decay branching ratio upper limit {beta}({tau}- {yields} 3{pi}-2{pi}+2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.4 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level. This is more than a factor of 30 improvement over the previously established limit. In addition, we search for the exclusive decay mode {tau}- {yields} 2{omega}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}} with the further decay of {omega} {yields} {pi}-{pi}+{pi}{sup 0}. We observe 1 event, expecting 0.4{sup +1.0}{sub -0.4} background events, and calculate the upper limit {beta}{tau}-{yields} 2{omega}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}} < 5.4 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level. This is the first upper limit for this mode.

  10. Neutrino properties deduced from the study of lepton number violating processes at low and high energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoica, Sabin

    2012-11-20

    There is nowadays a significant progress in understanding the neutrino properties. The results of the neutrino oscillation experiments have convincingly showed that neutrinos have mass and oscillate, in contradiction with the Standard Model (SM) assumptions, and these are the first evidences of beyond SM physics. However, fundamental properties of the neutrinos like their absolute mass, their character (are they Dirac or Majorana particles?), their mass hierarchy, the number of neutrino flavors, etc., still remain unknown. In this context there is an increased interest in the study of the lepton number violating (LNV) processes, since they could complete our understanding on the neutrino properties. Since recently, the neutrinoless double beta decay was considered the only process able to distinguish between Dirac or Majorana neutrinos and to give a hint on the absolute mass of the electron neutrino. At present, the increased luminosity of the LHC experiments makes feasible the search of LNV processes at high energy as well. In this lecture I will make a brief review on our present knowledge of the neutrino properties, on the present status of the double-beta decay studies and on the first attempts to search LNV processes at LHC.

  11. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  12. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher (Los Alamos, NM); Fraser, Andrew Mcleod (Los Alamos, NM); Schultz, Larry Joe (Los Alamos, NM); Borozdin, Konstantin N. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich (Maynard, MA); Sossong, Michael James (Los Alamos, NM); Blanpied, Gary (Lexington, SC)

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  13. EV Charging Stations Take Off Across America

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Finding a charging station is getting more convenient than ever thanks to companies like ChargePoint, which recently finished installing 4,600 charging stations across the United States.

  14. AVTA: Bidirectional Fast Charging Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report is an analysis of bi-directional fast charging, as informed by the AVTA's testing on plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Reports |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Reports Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Reports The EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge aims to have 500 U.S. employers offering workplace charging by 2018. These reports describe the progress made in the Challenge. In 2015, the Workplace Charging Challenge celebrated a major milestone - it reached the halfway point to its goal of 500 Challenge partners committed to installing workplace charging by

  16. Sample Employee Survey for Workplace Charging Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    We are considering the installation of charging infrastructure to assist employees who ... install electric vehicle charging stations at your employee parking garagelot? a. Yes b. ...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Reports...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of workplace charging as a sustainable business practice is growing across the country. ... an impact in their communities and helped identify best practices for workplace charging. ...

  18. Bringing Your Workplace Charging Story to Life

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    charging workshops * Other community events 10 Shannon.shea@ee.doe.gov http:energy.goveerevehiclesvehicle-technologies-office-ev-everywhere- workplace-charging-challenge 11...

  19. Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Update 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Sarah Olexsak Workplace Charging Challenge 2 Ambassador employer workshops & recognition events Workplace Charging Challenge 3 ...

  20. Workplace Charging Challenge Employer Workshop Best Practices...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenge Employer Workshop Best Practices Webinar Workplace Charging Challenge Employer ... and how they planned, organized, and administered successful workplace charging events. ...

  1. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging ...

  2. PosiCharge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: PosiCharge brings to market a next-generation intelligent rapid charging battery system for industrial and other electric vehicle applications. References:...

  3. American Battery Charging Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Battery Charging Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Battery Charging Inc Place: Smithfield, Rhode Island Zip: 2917 Product: Manufacturer of industrial and railroad...

  4. Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

  5. A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print Wednesday, 28 August 2013 00:00 Accentuating the ...

  6. ETA-UTP008 - Battery Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    conduct of charging the main propulsion batteries installed in an electric vehicle while ... The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance on charging traction batteries during ...

  7. ETA-NTP008 Battery Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    conduct of charging the main propulsion batteries installed in an electric vehicle while ... provide guidance on charging traction batteries during the time the vehicle is being ...

  8. Workplace Charging Toolkit: Workshop Outreach Presentation Template...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outreach Presentation Template Workplace Charging Toolkit: Workshop Outreach Presentation Template Educate workshop attendees and employers about the benefits of workplace charging ...

  9. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Suffolk County Community...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The PEV charging stations may be used by faculty, staff, students, and the general public. Multimedia Watch a video by Workplace Charging Partner Suffolk County Community College. ...

  10. Workplace Charging Management Policies: Pricing | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... RESOURCES Workplace Charging Management Webinar - Hear three employers discuss the ... Charging and Driving Behavior of Nissan Leaf Drivers in The EV Project with Access to ...

  11. SECTION II. HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II. HEAVY ION REACTIONS Dynamic Evolution and the Caloric Curve for Medium Mass Nuclei J. Cibor, R. Wada, K. Hagel, M. Lunardon, N. Marie, R. Alfaro, W. Shen, B. Xiao, Y. Zhao, J. Li, M. Murray, J.B. Natowitz, Z. Majka and P. Staszel Search for 5He Emission from Hot Compound Nuclei R. Charity and L.G. Sobotka for the Washington University, NSCL, Legnaro, Padova, TAMU Collaboration IMF Production in 64Zn + 58Ni at 35A-79A MeV R. Wada, K. Hagel, J. Cibor, J. Li, M. Murray, J.B. Natowitz, A. Ono

  12. Upgrading Orinoco Belt heavy oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliantara, J.; Castillo, O.

    1982-05-01

    Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA), in an effort to develop new oil resources, has undertaken a program to evaluate and develop the Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt, in the eastern part of Venezuela. Lagoven, S.A., a subsidiary of PDVSA, has been assigned the responsibility for developing and upgrading part of the Orinoco belt. This paper describes the most relevant aspects of Lagoven's first upgrading module, a facility that will convert Orinoco oil into a premium crude with a very high yield of products of great market demand.

  13. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-27

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX.« less

  14. APEX heavy-ion counters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercer, D.J.

    1993-10-01

    A large solid-angle array of low-pressure multi-wire proportional counters (LPMWPC) forms part of the APEX apparatus. Eight three-element trapezoidal counters provide 360{degrees} coverage in {phi} and 20{degrees} - 70{degrees} coverage in {phi}. Angle information is obtained from a transmission-line delay cathode ({phi}) and from the segmentation ({phi}). Time-of-flight information is obtained from the anode signals. These quantities are used to extract the center-of-mass scattering angle, reaction Q value, and masses of the scattered heavy ions. Design and performance of the counters will be discussed.

  15. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in

  16. Announcing $4 Million For Wireless EV Charging | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    charging technology to provide hands-free, automated charging of parked vehicles. Static wireless charging - or wireless charging when the vehicle is parked - can ensure easy...

  17. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd Place: Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 108 8215 Product: Integrated technology company and power equipment supplier....

  18. Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    A high speed look at the removal of the Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal. A project sponsored by the Recovery Act on the Savannah River Site.

  19. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (1 Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate will perform preventative, predictive, and corrective maintenance on Bonneville Power Administration (BPA's) light and heavy mobile equipment in maintenance and filed...

  20. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest. The Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic...

  1. Visualizing the Onset of "Heavy Electron" Superconductivity ...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Visualizing the Onset of "Heavy Electron" Superconductivity Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home ... Funding DOE Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences program provided primary ...

  2. CHARGE STATE EVOLUTION IN THE SOLAR WIND. II. PLASMA CHARGE STATE COMPOSITION IN THE INNER CORONA AND ACCELERATING FAST SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, E.; Gruesbeck, J. R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    In the present work, we calculate the evolution of the charge state distribution within the fast solar wind. We use the temperature, density, and velocity profiles predicted by Cranmer et al. to calculate the ionization history of the most important heavy elements in the solar corona and solar wind: C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe. The evolution of each charge state is calculated from the source region in the lower chromosphere to the final freeze-in point. We show that the solar wind velocity causes the plasma to experience significant departures from equilibrium at very low heights, well inside the field of view (within 0.6 R{sub sun} from the solar limb) of nearly all the available remote-sensing instrumentation, significantly affecting observed spectral line intensities. We also study the evolution of charge state ratios with distance from the source region, and the temperature they indicate if ionization equilibrium is assumed. We find that virtually every charge state from every element freezes in at a different height, so that the definition of freeze-in height is ambiguous. We also find that calculated freeze-in temperatures indicated by charge state ratios from in situ measurements have little relation to the local coronal temperature of the wind source region, and stop evolving much earlier than their correspondent charge state ratio. We discuss the implication of our results on plasma diagnostics of coronal holes from spectroscopic measurements as well as on theoretical solar wind models relying on coronal temperatures.

  3. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  4. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Modeling | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace001_musculus_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling High Efficiency Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion

  5. Identification and energy calibration of hadronically decaying tau leptons with the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-02

    This study describes the trigger and offline reconstruction, identification and energy calibration algorithms for hadronic decays of tau leptons employed for the data collected from pp collisions in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC center-of-mass energy √s=8 TeV. The performance of these algorithms is measured in most cases with Z decays to tau leptons using the full 2012 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. An uncertainty on the offline reconstructed tau energy scale of 2–4%, depending on transverse energy and pseudorapidity, is achieved using two independent methods. The offline tau identification efficiency is measured withmore » a precision of 2.5% for hadronically decaying tau leptons with one associated track, and of 4% for the case of three associated tracks, inclusive in pseudorapidity and for a visible transverse energy greater than 20 GeV. For hadronic tau lepton decays selected by offline algorithms, the tau trigger identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2–8%, depending on the transverse energy. The performance of the tau algorithms, both offline and at the trigger level, is found to be stable with respect to the number of concurrent proton–proton interactions and has supported a variety of physics results using hadronically decaying tau leptons at ATLAS.« less

  6. Identification and energy calibration of hadronically decaying tau leptons with the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-02

    This study describes the trigger and offline reconstruction, identification and energy calibration algorithms for hadronic decays of tau leptons employed for the data collected from pp collisions in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC center-of-mass energy ?s=8 TeV. The performance of these algorithms is measured in most cases with Z decays to tau leptons using the full 2012 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb1. An uncertainty on the offline reconstructed tau energy scale of 24%, depending on transverse energy and pseudorapidity, is achieved using two independent methods. The offline tau identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2.5% for hadronically decaying tau leptons with one associated track, and of 4% for the case of three associated tracks, inclusive in pseudorapidity and for a visible transverse energy greater than 20 GeV. For hadronic tau lepton decays selected by offline algorithms, the tau trigger identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 28%, depending on the transverse energy. The performance of the tau algorithms, both offline and at the trigger level, is found to be stable with respect to the number of concurrent protonproton interactions and has supported a variety of physics results using hadronically decaying tau leptons at ATLAS.

  7. Hiding a Heavy Higgs Boson at the 7 TeV LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Yang; Fan, JiJi; Hewett, JoAnne L.

    2012-03-20

    A heavy Standard Model Higgs boson is not only disfavored by electroweak precision observables but is also excluded by direct searches at the 7 TeV LHC for a wide range of masses. Here, we examine scenarios where a heavy Higgs boson can be made consistent with both the indirect constraints and the direct null searches by adding only one new particle beyond the Standard Model. This new particle should be a weak multiplet in order to have additional contributions to the oblique parameters. If it is a color singlet, we find that a heavy Higgs with an intermediate mass of 200-300 GeV can decay into the new states, suppressing the branching ratios for the standard model modes, and thus hiding a heavy Higgs at the LHC. If the new particle is also charged under QCD, the Higgs production cross section from gluon fusion can be reduced significantly due to the new colored particle one-loop contribution. Current collider constraints on the new particles allow for viable parameter space to exist in order to hide a heavy Higgs boson. We categorize the general signatures of these new particles, identify favored regions of their parameter space and point out that discovering or excluding them at the LHC can provide important indirect information for a heavy Higgs. Finally, for a very heavy Higgs boson, beyond the search limit at the 7 TeV LHC, we discuss three additional scenarios where models would be consistent with electroweak precision tests: including an additional vector-like fermion mixing with the top quark, adding another U(1) gauge boson and modifying triple-gauge boson couplings.

  8. Alternator control for battery charging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brunstetter, Craig A.; Jaye, John R.; Tallarek, Glen E.; Adams, Joseph B.

    2015-07-14

    In accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure, an electrical system for an automotive vehicle has an electrical generating machine and a battery. A set point voltage, which sets an output voltage of the electrical generating machine, is set by an electronic control unit (ECU). The ECU selects one of a plurality of control modes for controlling the alternator based on an operating state of the vehicle as determined from vehicle operating parameters. The ECU selects a range for the set point voltage based on the selected control mode and then sets the set point voltage within the range based on feedback parameters for that control mode. In an aspect, the control modes include a trickle charge mode and battery charge current is the feedback parameter and the ECU controls the set point voltage within the range to maintain a predetermined battery charge current.

  9. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Northwest Evaluation Association

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (NWEA) | Department of Energy Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) Joined the Challenge: July 2015 Headquarters: Portland, OR Charging Location: Portland, OR Domestic Employees: 400 Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) encourages and supports many forms of public and personal sustainable transportation modes. Workplace charging is

  10. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Connecticut |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Connecticut Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Connecticut Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Connecticut Joined the Challenge: February 2015 Headquarters: Storrs, CT Charging Location: Storrs, CT Domestic Employees: 4,816 The University of Connecticut is committed to leadership in campus sustainability, including objective measurement and clear, concise communications about its progress. Joining the Workplace Charging Challenge commits

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge: Ambassadors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenge: Ambassadors Workplace Charging Challenge: Ambassadors The Workplace Charging Challenge enlists stakeholder organizations as ambassadors to promote and support workplace charging. Ambassadors, including Clean Cities coalitions across the country, are organizations that are knowledgeable about local incentives, best practices for workplace charging, and other aspects of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) community readiness. Challenge partners can benefit from working with ambassadors in

  12. Sample Employee Survey for Workplace Charging Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Survey to determine employee interest in the benefits of employer installed charging infrastructure for their PEVs.

  13. Study of deuterium charging in palladium by electrolysis of heavy water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ninno, A.De.

    1994-12-01

    Two different polarization regimes have mainly been used during electrolytic deuterium loading of palladium cathodes to produce an excess of heat in {open_quotes}cold fusion{close_quotes} experiments. Most of the experimentalists apply a constant current density, while some prefer to work with a square-wave current. The different effects of the two techniques on the deuterium dynamics through the cathode are not yet very clear. Thus, a transport model supported by a computer code is used to describe the evolution of the deuterium concentration profile inside a palladium membrane cathode for both operation conditions. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Evidence for Strong Breit Interaction in Dielectronic Recombination of Highly Charged Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Kavanagh, Anthony P.; Currell, Fred J.; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Li, Yueming; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2008-02-22

    Resonant strengths have been measured for dielectronic recombination of Li-like iodine, holmium, and bismuth using an electron beam ion trap. By observing the atomic number dependence of the state-resolved resonant strength, clear experimental evidence has been obtained that the importance of the generalized Breit interaction (GBI) effect on dielectronic recombination increases as the atomic number increases. In particular, it has been shown that the GBI effect is exceptionally strong for the recombination through the resonant state [1s2s{sup 2}2p{sub 1/2}]{sub 1}.

  15. Search for a light charged Higgs boson decaying to $$ \\mathrm{ c \\bar{s} } $$ in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-12-29

    Our search for a light charged Higgs boson, originating from the decay of a top quark and subsequently decaying into a charm quark and a strange antiquark, is presented. The data used in the analysis correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The search is performed in the process tt- W±bH∓b-, where the W boson decays to a lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Furthermore, the decays lead to a final state comprising an isolated lepton, at least four jets and largemore » missing transverse energy. No significant deviation is observed in the data with respect to the standard model predictions, and model-independent upper limits are set on the branching fraction B(t→ H+b), ranging from 1.2 to 6.5% for a charged Higgs boson with mass between 90 and 160 GeV, under the assumption that B(H+ →cs-) = 100%.« less

  16. Search for a light charged Higgs boson decaying to $ \\mathrm{ c \\bar{s} } $ in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-12-29

    Our search for a light charged Higgs boson, originating from the decay of a top quark and subsequently decaying into a charm quark and a strange antiquark, is presented. The data used in the analysis correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The search is performed in the process tt- W±bHb-, where the W boson decays to a lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Furthermore, the decays lead to a final state comprising an isolated lepton, at least four jets and large missing transverse energy. No significant deviation is observed in the data with respect to the standard model predictions, and model-independent upper limits are set on the branching fraction B(t→ H+b), ranging from 1.2 to 6.5% for a charged Higgs boson with mass between 90 and 160 GeV, under the assumption that B(H+ →cs-) = 100%.

  17. Charge amplifier with bias compensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    An ion beam uniformity monitor for very low beam currents using a high-sensitivity charge amplifier with bias compensation. The ion beam monitor is used to assess the uniformity of a raster-scanned ion beam, such as used in an ion implanter, and utilizes four Faraday cups placed in the geometric corners of the target area. Current from each cup is integrated with respect to time, thus measuring accumulated dose, or charge, in Coulombs. By comparing the dose at each corner, a qualitative assessment of ion beam uniformity is made possible. With knowledge of the relative area of the Faraday cups, the ion flux and areal dose can also be obtained.

  18. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  19. Search for heavy Majorana neutrinos in e$$^{±}$$e$$^{±}$$+jets and e$$^{±}$$$$\\mu^{±}$$+jets events in proton-proton collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-27

    In this study, a search is performed for heavy Majorana neutrinos (N) decaying into a W boson and a lepton using the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. A signature of two jets and either two same sign electrons or a same sign electron-muon pair is searched for using 19.7 inverse femtobarns of data collected during 2012 in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The data are found to be consistent with the expected standard model (SM) background and, in the context of a Type-1 seesaw mechanism, upper limits are set on the cross section timesmore » branching fraction for production of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the mass range between 40 and 500 GeV. The results are additionally interpreted as limits on the mixing between the heavy Majorana neutrinos and the SM neutrinos. In the mass range considered, the upper limits range between 0.00015 - 0.72 for |VeN|2 and 6.6x10-5 - 0.47 for |VeN V*μN|2 / ( |VeN|2 + |VμN|2), where VlN is the mixing element describing the mixing of the heavy neutrino with the SM neutrino of flavour l. These limits are the most restrictive direct limits for heavy Majorana neutrino masses above 200 GeV.« less

  20. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Shorepower Technologies | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Shorepower Technologies Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Shorepower Technologies Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Shorepower Technologies Joined the Challenge: May 2014 Headquarters: Hillsboro, OR Charging Location: Hillsboro, OR Domestic Employees: 12 Shorepower Technologies began offering workplace charging in 2011 and currently has three plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) charging on a regular basis. Offering this amenity to employees and customers fits with Shorepower

  1. Workplace Charging Station Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Station Basics Workplace Charging Station Basics As your organization moves forward with workplace charging, it is important to understand the fundamental differences and similarities between the types of charging stations, commonly referred to as electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) units. Charging stations deliver electrical energy from an electricity source to a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) battery. There are three primary types of charging stations: AC Level 1, AC Level 2 and DC fast

  2. Workplace Charging Challenge: Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Partners Workplace Charging Challenge: Partners Use the interactive map and list below to learn more about employers who have joined the U.S. Department of Energy's Workplace Charging Challenge. These employers are providing workplace charging for their employees who drive plug-in electric vehicles. Partners receive assistance from DOE to help them establish and expand workplace charging while ambassador organizations work to promote and support partners' workplace charging efforts across the

  3. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  4. Heavy Vehicle Technologies Program Retrospective and Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James J. Eberhardt

    1999-04-10

    OHVT Mission is to conduct, in collaboration with our heavy vehicle industry partners and their suppliers, a customer-focused national program to research and develop technologies that will enable trucks and other heavy vehicles to be more energy efficient and able to use alternative fuels while simultaneously reducing emissions.

  5. A Heavy Flavor Tracker for STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Kleinfelder, S.; Koohi, A.; Li, S.; Huang, H.; Tai, A.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W.; Himmi,A.; Hu, C.; Shabetai, A.; Szelezniak, M.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.; Surrow,B.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Bieser, F.; Gareus, R.; Greiner, L.; Lesser,F.; Matis, H.S.; Oldenburg, M.; Ritter, H.G.; Pierpoint, L.; Retiere, F.; Rose, A.; Schweda, K.; Sichtermann, E.; Thomas, J.H.; Wieman, H.; Yamamoto, E.; Kotov, I.

    2005-03-14

    We propose to construct a Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment at RHIC. The HFT will bring new physics capabilities to STAR and it will significantly enhance the physics capabilities of the STAR detector at central rapidities. The HFT will ensure that STAR will be able to take heavy flavor data at all luminosities attainable throughout the proposed RHIC II era.

  6. Direct Measurement of the W Production Charge Asymmetry in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-01-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the W production charge asymmetry as a function of the W boson rapidity y{sub W} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use a sample of W {yields} e{nu} events in data from 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected using the CDF II detector. In the region |y{sub W}| < 3.0, this measurement is capable of constraining the ratio of up and down quark momentum distributions in the proton more directly than in previous measurements of the asymmetry that are a function of the charged-lepton pseudorapidity.

  7. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  8. HEAVY WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szilard, L.

    1958-04-29

    A nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes uranium fuel elements and a liquid coolant is described. The fuel elements are in the form of elongated tubes and are disposed within outer tubes extending through a tank containing heavy water, which acts as a moderator. The ends of the fuel tubes are connected by inlet and discharge headers, and liquid bismuth is circulated between the headers and through the fuel tubes for cooling. Helium is circulated through the annular space between the outer tubes in the tank and the fuel tubes to cool the water moderator to prevent boiling. The fuel tubes are covered with a steel lining, and suitable control means, heat exchange means, and pumping means for the coolants are provided to complete the reactor assembly.

  9. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-03

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX. The DEC VAX11 version contains an auxiliary program, POLYREAD, which reads the polyplot file created by FEM3.« less

  10. Progress in Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-09-01

    The progress of the field of Heavy Ion Fusion has been documented in the proceedings of the series of International Symposia that, in recent years, have occurred every second year. The latest of these conferences was hosted by Gesellshaft fuer Schwerionenforshung (GSI) in Darmstadt, West Germany, June 28-30, 1988. For this report, a few highlights from the conference are selected, stressing experimental progress and prospects for future advances. A little extra time is devoted to report on the developments at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is the center for most of the HIFAR program. The Director of the HIFAR program at LBL is Denis Keefe, who presented the HIF report at the last two of the meetings in this series, and in whose place the author is appearing now. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  11. A search for prompt lepton-jets in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-02-09

    We present a search for a new, light boson with a mass of about 1 GeV and decaying promptly to jets of collimated electrons and/or muons (lepton-jets). The analysis is performed with 20.3 fb-1 of data collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. Events are required to contain at least two lepton-jets. This study finds no statistically significant deviation from predictions of the Standard Model and places 95% confidence-level upper limits on the contribution of new phenomena beyond the SM, incuding SUSY-portal and Higgs-portal models, on themore » number of events with lepton-jets.« less

  12. Search for baryon-number and lepton-number violating decays of $Lambda$ hyperons using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McCracken, Michael E.

    2015-10-09

    We present a search for ten baryon-number violating decay modes of $\\Lambda$ hyperons using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. Nine of these decay modes result in a single meson and single lepton in the final state ($\\Lambda \\rightarrow m \\ell$) and conserve either the sum or the difference of baryon and lepton number ($B \\pm L$). The tenth decay mode ($\\Lambda \\rightarrow \\bar{p}\\pi^+$) represents a difference in baryon number of two units and no difference in lepton number. We observe no significant signal and set upper limits on the branching fractions of these reactions in the range $(4-200)\\times 10^{-7}$moreat the $90\\%$ confidence level.less

  13. A search for prompt lepton-jets in pp collisions at s = 8 $$ \\sqrt{\\mathrm{s}}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-02-09

    A search is presented for a new, light boson with a mass of about 1 GeV and decaying promptly to jets of collimated electrons and/or muons (lepton-jets). The analysis is performed with 20.3 fb?1 of data collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. Events are required to contain at least two lepton-jets. This study finds no statistically significant deviation from predictions of the Standard Model and places 95% confidence-level upper limits on the contribution of new phenomena beyond the SM, incuding SUSY-portal and Higgs-portal models, on themorenumber of events with lepton-jets.less

  14. Search for baryon-number and lepton-number violating decays of $Lambda$ hyperons using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCracken, Michael E.

    2015-10-09

    We present a search for ten baryon-number violating decay modes of $\\Lambda$ hyperons using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. Nine of these decay modes result in a single meson and single lepton in the final state ($\\Lambda \\rightarrow m \\ell$) and conserve either the sum or the difference of baryon and lepton number ($B \\pm L$). The tenth decay mode ($\\Lambda \\rightarrow \\bar{p}\\pi^+$) represents a difference in baryon number of two units and no difference in lepton number. We observe no significant signal and set upper limits on the branching fractions of these reactions in the range $(4-200)\\times 10^{-7}$ at the $90\\%$ confidence level.

  15. Probing lepton flavour violation via neutrinoless $$$\\varvec{\\tau \\longrightarrow 3\\mu }$$$ τ ⟶ 3 μ decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-26

    This article presents the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to the lepton-flavour-violating decays of τ→3μ. A method utilising the production of τ leptons via W→τν decays is used. This method is applied to the sample of 20.3 fb−1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012. No event is observed passing the selection criteria, and the observed (expected) upper limit on the τ lepton branching fraction into three muons, Br(τ→3μ), is 3.76×10−7 (3.94×10−7) at 90 % confidence level.

  16. Search for baryon-number and lepton-number violating decays of Λ hyperons using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McCracken, Michael E.

    2015-10-09

    We present a search for ten baryon-number violating decay modes of Λ hyperons using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. Nine of these decay modes result in a single meson and single lepton in the final state (Λ → mΙ) and conserve either the sum or the difference of baryon and lepton number (Β ± L). The tenth decay mode (Λ → p¯π+) represents a difference in baryon number of two units and no difference in lepton number. Furthermore, we observe no significant signal and set upper limits on the branching fractions of these reactions in the range (4 –more » 200) x 107 at the 90% confidence level.« less

  17. QCD mechanisms for heavy particle production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-09-01

    For very large pair mass, the production of heavy quarks and supersymmetric particles is expected to be governed by ACD fusion subprocesses. At lower mass scales other QCD mechanisms such as prebinding distortion and intrinsic heavy particle Fock states can become important, possibly accounting for the anomalies observed for charm hadroproduction. We emphasize the importance of final-state Coulomb interactions at low relative velocity in QCD and predict the existence of heavy narrow four quark resonances (c c-bar u u-bar) and (cc c-bar c-bar) in ..gamma gamma.. reactions. Coherent QCD contributions are discussed as a contribution to the non-additivity of nuclear structure functions and heavy particle production cross sections. We also predict a new type of amplitude zero for exclusive heavy meson pair production which follows from the tree-graph structure of QCD. 35 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses data collected in 2012 with the CMS detector, at an LHC center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fbmore » $$^{-1}$$. No significant deviation of the transverse mass distribution of the charged lepton-neutrino system from the standard model prediction is found. Mass exclusion limits of up to 3.28 TeV at a 95% confidence level for a W$$^{\\prime}$$ boson with the same couplings as that of the standard model W boson are determined. Results are also derived in the framework of split universal extra dimensions, and exclusion limits on Kaluza-Klein W$$^{(2)}_{{\\rm KK}}$$ states are found. The final state with large missing transverse energy also enables a search for dark matter production with a recoiling W boson, with limits set on the mass and the production cross section of potential candidates. Finally, limits are established for a model including interference between a left-handed W$$^{\\prime}$$ boson and the standard model W boson, and for a compositeness model.« less

  19. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses data collected in 2012 with the CMS detector, at an LHC center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. No significant deviation of the transverse mass distribution of the charged lepton-neutrino system from the standard model prediction is found. Mass exclusion limits of up to 3.28 TeV at a 95% confidence level for a W$^{\\prime}$ boson with the same couplings as that of the standard model W boson are determined. Results are also derived in the framework of split universal extra dimensions, and exclusion limits on Kaluza-Klein W$^{(2)}_{{\\rm KK}}$ states are found. The final state with large missing transverse energy also enables a search for dark matter production with a recoiling W boson, with limits set on the mass and the production cross section of potential candidates. Finally, limits are established for a model including interference between a left-handed W$^{\\prime}$ boson and the standard model W boson, and for a compositeness model.

  20. Measurement of the azimuthal angle distribution of leptons from W boson decays as a function of the W transverse momentum in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Hiroshima U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-04-01

    We present the first measurement of the A{sub 2} and A{sub 3} angular coefficients of the W boson produced in proton-antiproton collisions. We study W {yields} ev{sub e} and W {yields} {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}} candidate events produced in association with at least one jet at CDF, during Run Ia and Run Ib of the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The corresponding integrated luminosity was 110 pb{sup -1}. The jet balances the transverse momentum of the W and introduces QCD effects in W boson production. The extraction of the angular coefficients is achieved through the direct measurement of the azimuthal angle of the charged lepton in the Collins-Soper rest-frame of the W boson. The angular coefficients are measured as a function of the transverse momentum of the W boson. The electron, muon, and combined results are in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, up to order {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2} in QCD.

  1. Stability of charged thin shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Simeone, Claudio

    2011-05-15

    In this article we study the mechanical stability of spherically symmetric thin shells with charge, in Einstein-Maxwell and Einstein-Born-Infeld theories. We analyze linearized perturbations preserving the symmetry, for shells around vacuum and shells surrounding noncharged black holes.

  2. Leading the Charge: Jim Manion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Change doesn’t happen on its own. It’s led by dedicated and passionate people who are committed to empowering Indian Country to energize future generations. Leading the Charge is a regular Office of Indian Energy newsletter feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands.

  3. High Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engine | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PDF icon deer09zhang.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy Truck Engine Development & HECC High Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engine Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion ...

  4. AVTA: ChargePoint America Recovery Act Charging Infrastructure Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act supported a number of projects that together made up the largest ever deployment of plug-in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure in the U.S. The following reports describe results of data collected through the Chargepoint America project, which deployed 4,600 public and home charging stations throughout the U.S. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  5. Checkerboard seed-blanket thorium fuel core concepts for heavy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    concepts for heavy water moderated reactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Checkerboard seed-blanket thorium fuel core concepts for heavy water moderated reactors ...

  6. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor ...

  7. The Silicon Vertex Tracker for the Heavy Photon Search Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Silicon Vertex Tracker for the Heavy Photon Search Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Silicon Vertex Tracker for the Heavy Photon Search Experiment Authors: ...

  8. Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis Dynamometer Fuel Efficiency of New European HD Vehicles HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND ...

  9. HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis Dynamometer Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance Fuel Efficiency of New European ...

  10. QCD Prediction for Heavy Boson Transverse Momentum Distributions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    QCD Prediction for Heavy Boson Transverse Momentum Distributions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: QCD Prediction for Heavy Boson Transverse Momentum Distributions We ...

  11. Recent Developments in Heavy Quark and Quarkonium Production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Recent Developments in Heavy Quark and Quarkonium Production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent Developments in Heavy Quark and Quarkonium Production ...

  12. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion ...

  13. Heavy Quarks, QCD, and Effective Field Theory Thomas Mehen 72...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heavy Quarks, QCD, and Effective Field Theory Thomas Mehen 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS Heavy Quarks, Quarkonium,...

  14. Heavy-Duty Powertrain and Vehicle Development - A Look Toward...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty Powertrain and Vehicle Development - A Look Toward 2020 Globalization in emissions regulation will be driving freight efficiency improvements and will require heavy-duty ...

  15. Two-dimensional heavy fermions on the strongly correlated boundaries...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Two-dimensional heavy fermions on the strongly correlated boundaries of Kondo topological insulators Prev Next Title: Two-dimensional heavy fermions on the strongly ...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions ...

  17. Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles with Control Technologies for Reduced Diesel Exhaust Emissions Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy-Duty ...

  18. WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and ...

  19. Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using Model-Based Transient Calibration Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using ...

  20. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells ...

  1. Implications of naturalness for the heavy Higgs bosons of supersymmetr...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Implications of naturalness for the heavy Higgs bosons of supersymmetry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Implications of naturalness for the heavy Higgs bosons of ...

  2. Heavy quarkonium in a holographic basis (Journal Article) | DOE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heavy quarkonium in a holographic basis Title: Heavy quarkonium in a holographic basis Authors: Li, Yang Search DOE PAGES for author "Li, Yang" Search DOE PAGES for ORCID ...

  3. Workplace Charging: Safety and Management Policy For AC Level 1 Charging Receptacles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Organizations offering plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging at AC Level 1 charging receptacles, or wall outlets, can ensure a safe and successful workplace charging experience by considering the...

  4. AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Siemens-VersiCharge Level 2 charging system for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory. PDF icon Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 - November

  5. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    001 The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Infrastructure Review Report (AIR): ... DOESC-ARM-0001 The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Infrastructure ...

  6. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics for Global Climate Models First Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report January 2007 Xiaohong Liu and Steven J. Ghan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research X. Liu and S.J. Ghan, DOE/SC-ARM-0701 iii Summary Mixed-phase clouds are composed of a mixture of cloud droplets and ice crystals. The partitioning of condensed water into liquid

  7. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characters Characters Meet the characters of the game! Meet the characters of the game! Dr Raoul Fernandez's profile Helena Edison's profile Jerome Zabel's profile Nancy Sanders' profile Roc Bridges' profile

    ARM-0501 Marine Stratus Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) Science Plan June 2005 M.A. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory Earth System Science Division Upton, New York A. Bucholtz Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, California B. Albrecht and P. Kollias Rosenstiel School of

  8. Charge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 DOE Review of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility February 3-4, 2005 American Geophysical Union, Washington, D.C. June 2005 W.R. Ferrell Climate Change Research Division Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DOE/SC-ARM-0502 CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION

  9. Search for a Heavy Top-Like Quark in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at ${\\surd}s = 1.96$~TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-07-01

    We present the results of a search for pair production of a heavy top-like (t') quark decaying to W q final states using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector in p{anti p} collisions at {radical}{ovr s} = 1.96 TeV. We perform parallel searches for t' {yields} W b and t' {yields} W q (where q is a generic down-type quark) in events containing a lepton and four or more jets. By performing a fit to the two-dimensional distribution of total transverse energy versus reconstructed t' quark mass, we set upper limits on the t'{anti t}' production cross section and exclude a standard model fourth-generation t' quark decaying to W b (W q) with mass below 358 (340) GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% CL.

  10. Search for heavy neutrinos and W bosons with right-handed couplings in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-26

    A search for heavy, right-handed neutrinos, N? (?=e,?), and right-handed WR bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model, has been performed by the CMS experiment. The search was based on a sample of two lepton plus two jet events collected in protonproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb?1. For models with strict left-right symmetry, and assuming only one N? flavor contributes significantly to the WR decay width, the region in the two-dimensional (MWR,MN?) mass plane excluded at a 95 % confidence level extends to approximately MWR=3.0TeVmoreand covers a large range of neutrino masses below the WR boson mass, depending on the value of MWR. This search significantly extends the (MWR,MN?) exclusion region beyond previous results.less

  11. Heavy-quark physics in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1991-04-01

    Heavy quarks can expose new symmetries and novel phenomena in QCD not apparent in ordinary hadronic systems. In these lectures I discuss the use of effective-Lagrangian and light-cone Fock methods to analyze exclusive heavy hadron decays such as {Upsilon} {yields} p{bar p} and B {yields} {pi}{pi}, and also to derive effective Schroedinger and Dirac equations for heavy quark systems. Two contributions to the heavy quark structure functions of the proton and other light hadrons are identified: an extrinsic'' contribution associated with leading twist QCD evolution of the gluon distribution, and a higher twist intrinsic'' contribution due to the hardness of high-mass fluctuations of multi-gluon correlations in hadronic wavefunctions. A non-perturbative calculation of the heavy quark distribution of a meson in QCD in one space and one time is presented. The intrinsic higher twist contributions to the pion and proton structure functions can dominate the hadronic production of heavy quark systems at large longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} and give anomalous contributions to the quark structure functions of ordinary hadrons at large x{sub bj}. I also discuss a number of ways in which heavy quark production in nuclear targets can test fundamental QCD phenomena and provide constraints on hadronic wavefunctions. The topics include color transparency, finite formation time, and predictions for charm production at threshold, including nuclear-bound quarkonium. I also discuss a number of QCD mechanisms for the suppression of J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production in nuclear collisions, including gluon shadowing, the peripheral excitation of intrinsic heavy quark components at large x{sub F}, and the coalescence of heavy quarks with co-moving spectators at low x{sub F}.

  12. AVTA: ChargePoint AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy ChargePoint AC Level 2 charging system for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory. PDF icon ChargePoint AC Level 2 - February 2012 More Documents & Publications AVTA: EVSE Charging Protocol for On and Off-Peak Demand AVTA: 2012 Chevrolet Volt PHEV Downloadable Dynamometer Database Reports AVTA: ChargePoint America Recovery Act project map of charging units

  13. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haselman, Jr., Leonard C.

    1996-01-01

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved.

  14. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1996-06-04

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved. 8 figs.

  15. Charging Graphene for Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun

    2014-10-06

    Since 2004, graphene, including single atomic layer graphite sheet, and chemically derived graphene sheets, has captured the imagination of researchers for energy storage because of the extremely high surface area (2630 m2/g) compared to traditional activated carbon (typically below 1500 m2/g), excellent electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and potential for low cost manufacturing. These properties are very desirable for achieving high activity, high capacity and energy density, and fast charge and discharge. Chemically derived graphene sheets are prepared by oxidation and reduction of graphite1 and are more suitable for energy storage because they can be made in large quantities. They still contain multiply stacked graphene sheets, structural defects such as vacancies, and oxygen containing functional groups. In the literature they are also called reduced graphene oxide, or functionalized graphene sheets, but in this article they are all referred to as graphene for easy of discussion. Two important applications, batteries and electrochemical capacitors, have been widely investigated. In a battery material, the redox reaction occurs at a constant potential (voltage) and the energy is stored in the bulk. Therefore, the energy density is high (more than 100 Wh/kg), but it is difficult to rapidly charge or discharge (low power, less than 1 kW/kg)2. In an electrochemical capacitor (also called supercapacitors or ultracapacitor in the literature), the energy is stored as absorbed ionic species at the interface between the high surface area carbon and the electrolyte, and the potential is a continuous function of the state-of-charge. The charge and discharge can happen rapidly (high power, up to 10 kW/kg) but the energy density is low, less than 10 Wh/kg2. A device that can have both high energy and high power would be ideal.

  16. Methods for reduction of charging emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuecker, F.J.; Schulte, H.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most critical subjects in coking plants are charging emissions. The paper reviews the systems that have been used over the years to reduce charging emissions. The advantages and disadvantages are summarized for the following systems: Double collecting main with aspiration on both oven sides; Single collecting main with/without aspiration via standpipe, and extraction and cleaning of charging gas on charging car; Single collecting main with aspiration via standpipe and pretreatment of charging gas on the charging car as well as additional stationary exhaust and cleaning of charging gas; Single collecting main with aspiration via single standpipe; and Single collecting main with simultaneous aspiration via two standpipes and a U-tube connecting the oven chamber with the neighboring oven. The paper then briefly discusses prerequisites for reduction of charging emissions.

  17. Method for controlled hydrogen charging of metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Bo-Ching (Fremont, CA); Adamson, Ronald B. (Fremont, CA)

    1984-05-29

    A method for controlling hydrogen charging of hydride forming metals through a window of a superimposed layer of a non-hydriding metal overlying the portion of the hydride forming metals to be charged.

  18. Heavy hadrons in quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narodetskii, I. M. Simonov, Yu. A.; Veselov, A. I.

    2011-03-15

    We use the nonperturbative quark-antiquark potential derived within the Field Correlator Method and the screened Coulomb potential to calculate binding energies and melting temperatures of heavy mesons and baryons in the deconfined phase of quark-gluon plasma.

  19. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Louisiana State University |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Louisiana State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Louisiana State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Louisiana State University Joined the Challenge: October 2015 Headquarters: Baton Rouge, LA Charging Location: Baton Rouge, LA Domestic Employees: 36,757 Louisiana State University (LSU) has 3 charging stations on campus, and 12 plug-in electric vehicles routinely used the stations in 2015. LSU Campus Sustainability aims to promote energy

  20. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Southern California Edison |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy California Edison Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Southern California Edison Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Southern California Edison Joined the Challenge: February 2013 Headquarters: Rosemead, CA Charging Location: Rosemead, CA Domestic Employees: 13,000 Southern California Edison (SCE) installed 49 Level 2 Electric Vehicle Service Equipment (EVSEs) at various locations between 2010-2012 for both employee and fleet charging. In early 2013, SCE began a

  1. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: WESCO International, Inc. |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy WESCO International, Inc. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: WESCO International, Inc. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: WESCO International, Inc. Joined the Challenge: April 2013 Headquarters: Pittsburgh, PA Charging Locations: Pittsburgh, PA; Phoenix, AZ Domestic Employees: 7,000 As a leading distributor of electrical products, WESCO provides plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations to its customers and employees. WESCO is committed to supporting

  2. Electrochemically controlled charging circuit for storage batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Onstott, E.I.

    1980-06-24

    An electrochemically controlled charging circuit for charging storage batteries is disclosed. The embodiments disclosed utilize dc amplification of battery control current to minimize total energy expended for charging storage batteries to a preset voltage level. The circuits allow for selection of Zener diodes having a wide range of reference voltage levels. Also, the preset voltage level to which the storage batteries are charged can be varied over a wide range.

  3. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks decaying to a tau lepton and a b quark in 1.96 TeV ppbar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khotilovich, Vadim, G.; /Texas A-M

    2008-05-01

    I present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks ({tilde t}{sub 1}) in an R-parity violating supersymmetric scenario using 322 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. I assume each {tilde t}{sub 1} decays into a {tau} lepton and a b quark, with branching ratio {beta}, and search for final states containing either an electron or a muon from a leptonic {tau} decay, a hadronically decaying {tau} lepton, and two or more jets. Two candidate events pass my final selection criteria, consistent with the expectation from standard model processes. I present upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio squared {sigma}({tilde t}{sub 1}{bar {tilde t}}{sub 1}) x {beta}{sup 2} as a function of the stop mass m({tilde t}{sub 1}). Assuming {beta} = 1, I set a 95% confidence level limit m({tilde t}{sub 1}) > 153 GeV=c{sup 2}. These limits are also fully applicable to the case of a pair produced third generation scalar leptoquark that decays into a {tau} lepton and a b quark.

  4. Search for Charged Massive Long-Lived Particles Using the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yunhe; /Brown U.

    2009-05-01

    A search for charged massive stable particles has been performed with the D0 detector using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data. The speed of the particle has been calculated based on the time-of-flight and position information in the muon system. The present research is limited to direct pair-production of the charged massive long-lived particles. We do not consider CMSPs that result from the cascade decays of heavier particles. In this analysis, the exact values of the model parameters of the entire supersymmetric particle mass spectrum, relevant for cascade decays, are not important. We found no evidence of the signal. 95% CL cross-section upper limits have been set on the pair-productions of the stable scaler tau lepton, the gaugino-like charginos, and the higgsino-like charginos. The upper cross section limits vary from 0.31 pb to 0.04 pb, for stau masses in the range between 60 GeV and 300 GeV. We use the nominal value of the theoretical cross section to set limits on the mass of the pair produced charginos. We exclude the pair-produced stable gaugino-like charginos with mass below 206 GeV, and higgsino-like charginos below 171 GeV, respectively. Although the present sensitivity is insufficient to test the model of the pair produced stable staus, we do set cross section limits which can be applied to the pair production of any charged massive stable particle candidates with similar kinematics. These are the most restrictive limits to the present on the cross sections for CMSPs and the first published from the Tevatron Collider Run II. The manuscript has been published by Physical Review Letters in April 2009 and is available at arXiv as.

  5. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass)

  6. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass)

  7. Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop WHEN: Jan 11, 2016 8:30 AM - Jan 13, 2016 5:30 PM WHERE: Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 USA CONTACT: Ivan Vitev CATEGORY: Science TYPE: Conference INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description This workshop will bring together senior researchers, postdoctoral fellows and talented graduate students to discuss the exciting recent developments and future directions in high energy

  8. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass)

  9. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass)

  10. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass)

  11. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass)

  12. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass)

  13. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  14. The physics and chemistry of heavy Fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, Z.; Sarrao, J.L. |; Smith, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    The heavy Fermions are a subset of the f-element intermetallics straddling the magnetic/non-magnetic boundary. Their low temperature properties are characterized by an electronic energy scale of order 1--10 K. Among the low temperature ground states observed in heavy Fermion compounds are exotic superconductors and magnets, as well as unusual semiconductors. We review here the current experimental and theoretical understanding of these systems.

  15. Heavy Ion Reactions - Research - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Ion Reactions Fast and slow components of CsI #4 are plotted. Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium isotopes are visible. The availability of energetic, light- and heavy-ion beams from the K500 Superconducting Cyclotron provides many possibilities for exploring new aspects of nuclear behavior. Using a wide variety of projectiles and bombarding energies, we achieve a more detailed understanding of the dynamics of nuclear collisions, casting new light onto the temporal evolution of quantal systems

  16. 2.10 Heavy Element Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 6/1/2011 2.10 Heavy Element Chemistry For more than 50 years, the Office of Science and predecessor agencies have supported the discovery and study of the actinide elements, in particular the transuranium elements-atoms that are heavier than uranium. Glenn Seaborg and Ed McMillan of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1951 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry for the discovery of plutonium and other actinide elements, began this quest. Today, the Heavy Element Chemistry program continues the

  17. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Argonne National Laboratory |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Argonne National Laboratory Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Argonne National Laboratory Joined the Challenge: June 2014 Headquarters: Argonne, IL Charging Location: Argonne, IL Domestic Employees: 3,400 Argonne National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary science and engineering research center where researchers work to address vital national challenges in clean energy, environment, technology and

  18. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  19. EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge: Benefits of Joining

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Workplace charging plays a critical role in America's plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging infrastructure. Installing workplace charging is a sign of corporate leadership, showing a willingness...

  20. Universality of Charged Multiplicity Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulianos, K.; /Rockefeller U.

    1981-12-01

    The charged multiplicity distributions of the diffractive and non-diffractive components of hadronic interactions, as well as those of hadronic states produced in other reactions, are described well by a universal Gaussian function that depends only on the available mass for pionization, has a maximum at n{sub o} {approx_equal} 2M{sup 1/2}, where M is the available mass in GeV, and a peak to width ratio n{sub o}/D {approx_equal} 2.

  1. Leading the Charge: Christine Klein

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Change doesn’t happen on its own. It’s led by dedicated and passionate people who are committed to empowering Indian Country to energize future generations. Leading the Charge is a regular Office of Indian Energy newsletter feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands. In this issue, we talk to Christine Klein, an adopted Haida who is leading efforts to help Alaska Native villages address their energy challenges in her role as Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the Calista Corporation.

  2. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  3. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  4. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  5. Competition between complete fusion and quasifission in reactions with heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.; Adamian, G. G.; Volkov, V. V.

    1998-02-15

    A model based on the dinuclear system concept is suggested for the calculation of the competition between complete fusion and quasifission in reactions with heavy nuclei. The fusion rate through the inner fusion barrier in mass asymmetry is found by using the Kramers-type expression. The calculated cross sections for the heaviest nuclei are in a good agreement with the experimental data. The experimentally observed rapid fall-off of the cross section of the cold fusion with increasing charge number Z of the compound nucleus is explained.

  6. Search for charged Higgs bosons in decays of top quarks in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-07-01

    We report on the first direct search for charged Higgs bosons in decays of top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The search uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab, and looks for a resonance in the invariant mass distribution of two jets in the lepton+jets sample of t{bar t} candidates. We observe no evidence of charged Higgs bosons in top quark decays. Hence, 95% upper limits on the top quark decay branching ratio are placed at {Beta}(t {yields} H{sup +}b) < 0.1 to 0.3 for charged Higgs boson masses of 60 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}, assuming {Beta}(H{sup +} {yields} c{bar s}) = 1.0. The upper limits on {Beta}(t {yields} H{sup +}b) can also be used as model-independent limits on the decay branching ratio of top quarks to generic scalar charged bosons beyond the standard model.

  7. Search for charged Higgs bosons in decays of top quarks in proton - antiproton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Geum Bong; /Rochester U.

    2009-08-01

    In this dissertation we report on the first direct search for charged Higgs bosons in decays of top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The search uses a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab and looks for a resonance in the invariant mass distribution of two jets in the lepton+jets sample of t{bar t} candidates. We observe no evidence of charged Higgs bosons in top quark decays; hence 95% C.L. upper limits on the branching ratio are placed at {Beta}(t {yields} H{sup +}b) < 0.1 to 0.3 for charged Higgs boson masses of 60 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2} assuming {Beta}(H{sup +} {yields} c{bar s}) = 1.0 and {Beta}(t {yields} Wb)+{Beta}(t {yields} H{sup +}b) = 1.0. The upper limits on {Beta}(t {yields} H{sup +}b) are also used as model independent limits on the decay branching ratio of top quarks to any charged scalar bosons beyond the standard model.

  8. Acceleration of highly charged GeV Fe ions from a low-Z substrate by intense femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishiuchi, M. Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Nishio, K.; Orlandi, R.; Koura, H.; Imai, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Sako, H.; Matsukawa, K.; and others

    2015-03-15

    Almost fully stripped Fe ions accelerated up to 0.9?GeV are demonstrated with a 200 TW femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiating a micron-thick Al foil with Fe impurity on the surface. An energetic low-emittance high-density beam of heavy ions with a large charge-to-mass ratio can be obtained, which is useful for many applications, such as a compact radio isotope source in combination with conventional technology.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 - Employers Take Charge | Department of Energy Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014 - Employers Take Charge Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update 2014 - Employers Take Charge In the 2014 Workplace Charging Challenge annual survey, partners shared for the first time how their efforts were making an impact in their communities and helped identify best practices for workplace charging. The Workplace Charging Challenge Progress Update

  10. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Washington Area New Automobile...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington Area New Automobile Dealers Association Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Washington Area New Automobile Dealers Association Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: ...

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Capital One Financial Corporatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capital One Financial Corporation Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Capital One Financial Corporation Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Capital One Financial Corporation ...

  12. AVTA: EVSE Testing - NYSERDA Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing - NYSERDA Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Reports AVTA: EVSE Testing - NYSERDA Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Reports The Vehicle Technologies Office's ...

  13. Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milam, David

    2006-12-31

    This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

  14. Process for upgrading a heavy viscous hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, I.H.

    1984-06-12

    A process for upgrading a heavy viscous hydrocarbon, for example, rendering a heavy viscous crude pipelinable, includes visbreaking, distillation and solvent extraction steps. A heavy viscous hydrocarbon is fed through the visbreaker which forms a feed to the distillation step. A heavier fraction from distillation is fed to a solvent extraction unit which produces a fraction which contains resin. At least a portion of the resin containing fraction separated in the solvent extraction unit is recycled and combined with the feed which is to be subjected to visbreaking so that the total yield of products, residual and gas-free, is increased. The recycled resin reduces the tendency of the asphaltenes to separate from the oil and thereby reduces the tendency to lay down coke in the visbreaker; this allows higher conversion to upgraded liquid products.

  15. Charged rotating dilaton black strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, M.H.; Farhangkhah, N.

    2005-02-15

    In this paper we, first, present a class of charged rotating solutions in four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity with zero and Liouville-type potentials. We find that these solutions can present a black hole/string with two regular horizons, an extreme black hole or a naked singularity provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitable. We also compute the conserved and thermodynamic quantities, and show that they satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. Second, we obtain the (n+1)-dimensional rotating solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity with Liouville-type potential. We find that these solutions can present black branes, naked singularities or spacetimes with cosmological horizon if one chooses the parameters of the solutions correctly. Again, we find that the thermodynamic quantities of these solutions satisfy the first law of thermodynamics.

  16. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-15

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent ''minimum-B'' structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 {mu}s) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  17. Evaluation of heavy oil upgrading/refining process designs for HRI Dynacracking and UOP Aurabon Process. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.; Adams, D.G.; Fox, J.V.

    1984-04-01

    The process designs examined consist of two non-commercialized heavy oil upgrading processes; namely, the Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) Dynacracking Process and the UOP Process Division (UOP) Aurabon Process. The latter process design includes, besides the Aurabon Process, an integrated hydrotreating section which does have commercial stature. The Dynacracking Process designs cover six cases involving three heavy crude feedstocks. The Aurabon Complex designs are based on four cases, two for each of two heavy crude feedstocks. The engineering support services involved engineering review and assessment of data, drawings, reports and other information generated by the two process designers. Background information, the review and assessment methodology employed for evaluating the process designs, and a detailed discussion of the process design data generated by both process contractors are presented in this report. Significant findings for both processes may be summarized as follows: (1) The process designs were executed using sound engineering principles and practices; (2) Both processes may be deemed to perform in accordance with their process design; (3) a wide variety of heavy oil charge stocks can be upgraded by either process to products generally suitable for further refinery processing; (4) no insurmountable operating or environmental problems are anticipated; (5) the estimated capital investments and operating utility requirements are indicative of the increased cost to process contaminated heavy crudes; (6) the cost differential between the higher quantity lighter crudes and the poorer quality heavy crudes must be sufficient to justify these higher expenditures; and (7) both processes merit consideration by refiners contemplating contaminated heavy oil upgrading. 53 references, 40 tables.

  18. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  19. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, Robert W.; Dobelbower, M. Christian

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  20. Non-intrusive refrigerant charge indicator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.; Kweller, Esher

    2005-03-22

    A non-intrusive refrigerant charge level indicator includes a structure for measuring at least one temperature at an outside surface of a two-phase refrigerant line section. The measured temperature can be used to determine the refrigerant charge status of an HVAC system, and can be converted to a pressure of the refrigerant in the line section and compared to a recommended pressure range to determine whether the system is under-charged, properly charged or over-charged. A non-intrusive method for assessing the refrigerant charge level in a system containing a refrigerant fluid includes the step of measuring a temperature at least one outside surface of a two-phase region of a refrigerant containing refrigerant line, wherein the temperature measured can be converted to a refrigerant pressure within the line section.

  1. Review of Variable Generation Integration Charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Buckley, M.; Rogers, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-03-01

    The growth of wind and solar generation in the United States, and the expectation of continued growth of these technologies, dictates that the future power system will be operated in a somewhat different manner because of increased variability and uncertainty. A small number of balancing authorities have attempted to determine an 'integration cost' to account for these changes to their current operating practices. Some balancing authorities directly charge wind and solar generators for integration charges, whereas others add integration charges to projected costs of wind and solar in integrated resource plans or in competitive solicitations for generation. This report reviews the balancing authorities that have calculated variable generation integration charges and broadly compares and contrasts the methodologies they used to determine their specific integration charges. The report also profiles each balancing authority and how they derived wind and solar integration charges.

  2. Future of heavy crude and tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.; Steele, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    The 106 papers which were presented at the First International Conference on the Future of Heavy Crude and Tar Sands, held in Edmonton, Alberta are incorporated in this volume. They are grouped under the following sections: (1) role of heavy crude oils and tar sands in world energy; (2) major known occurrences; (3) chemistry and geochemistry; (4) geology; (5) resource evaluation techniques; (6) production research and pilot projects; (7) current production; (8) upgrading and refining; (9) transportation; (10) environmental research; (11) economics; (12) technological problems; (13) institutional factors; and (14) bibliography. All papers have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  3. Recovery and upgrading of heavy oil analyzed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornoff, L.L.; Van Driesen, R.P.; Viens, C.H.

    1980-10-13

    An analysis has been made of recovery and upgrading of Venezuelan heavy crudes by integrating steam-drive production data with an upgraded computer processing program. A study used 110 computer cases to analyze a project using Venezuelan heavy crude from the Jobo field with gravity of 9.2 API and 4.1% by wt sulfur for the base case. Sensitivity cases used 12.2 API oil from the Lot 9 field, Monagas state, Venezuela, with sulfur content of 2.3%. Four upgrading methods were studied (deasphalting, delayed coking, flexicoking, and LC-fining), all with favorable resulting economics.

  4. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  5. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Colorado State University |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Colorado State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Colorado State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Colorado State University Joined the Challenge: July 2015 Headquarters: Fort Collins, CO Charging Location: Fort Collins, CO Domestic Employees: 6,985 Colorado State University (CSU) has received the first Platinum rating and the highest score ever submitted in STARS, the American Association of Sustainability in Higher Education's

  6. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Washington University |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Washington University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Washington University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Washington University Joined the Challenge: August 2015 Headquarters: Cheney, WA Charging Locations: N/A Domestic Employees: 1,989 In 2007 Eastern Washington University accepted the challenge to reduce campus emissions by becoming signatory to the American Colleges and University President's Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). Installing

  7. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Heartland Community College |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Heartland Community College Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Heartland Community College Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Heartland Community College Joined the Challenge: June 2014 Headquarters: Normal, IL Charging Location: Normal, IL Domestic Employees: 872 Heartland Community College values ethical decision-making and responsible use of environmental, financial, and community resources to promote a sustainable future. The college installed two Level 2

  8. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Portland General Electric |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Portland General Electric Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Portland General Electric Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Portland General Electric Joined the Challenge: October 2013 Headquarters: Portland, OR Charging Locations: Portland, OR; Gresham, OR; Beaverton, OR; Salem, OR; Tualatin, OR; Wilsonville, OR; Woodburn, OR; Oregon City, OR; Clackamas, OR Domestic Employees: 2,596 Since the late 1990s, Portland General Electric (PGE) has offered plug-in electric

  9. A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print Wednesday, 28 August 2013 00:00 Accentuating the Positive (or the Negative) Spintronics-a type of electronics that makes use of electron spin as well as charge-is already here to a certain extent. The discovery of giant magnetoresistance, a spin-based effect, has revolutionized the information storage industry. Beyond this, however, scientists envision the possibility of

  10. Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Mapping Particle Charges in Battery Electrodes Print Friday, 26 July 2013 14:18 The deceivingly simple appearance of batteries masks their chemical complexity. A typical lithium-ion battery in a cell phone consists of trillions of particles. When a lithium-ion battery is charged or discharged lithium ions move from one electrode to another, filling and unfilling individual, variably-sized battery particles. The rates of these processes determine how

  11. First charge breeding results at CARIBU EBIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondrashev, S. Barcikowski, A. Dickerson, C. Ostroumov, P. N. Sharamentov, S. Vondrasek, R.; Pikin, A.

    2015-01-09

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) developed to breed CARIBU radioactive beams at ATLAS is currently in the off-line commissioning stage. The beam commissioning is being performed using a low emittance surface ionization source producing singly-charged cesium ions. The primary goal of the off-line commissioning is the demonstration of high-efficiency charge breeding in the pulsed injection mode. An overview of the final design of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder, the off-line commissioning installation and the first results on charge breeding of stable cesium ions are presented and discussed.

  12. An optimization framework for workplace charging strategies ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    addressing different eligible levels of charging technology and employees' demographic distributions. The optimization model is to minimize the lifetime cost of...

  13. Workplace Charging Management Policies Webinar | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Learn about effective workplace charging policies and procedures in the areas of administration, registration and liability, pricing and sharing. Read the text version. PDF icon ...

  14. Interested in joining the Workplace Charging Challenge?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thinking of joining the Workplace Charging Challenge? Tell us a little more about your organization, industry, and sustainability goals. After receiving your inquiry, one of our account managers...

  15. Workplace Charging Management Policies: Registration & Liability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Organizations offering plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging at work can benefit from setting clear guidelines in the areas of administration, registration and liability, ...

  16. Workplace Charging Management Policies: Administration | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at work can benefit from setting clear guidelines in the areas of administration, ... Sample Workplace Charging Policy - Review the policy guidelines used by one Workplace ...

  17. ADA Requirements for Workplace Charging Installation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    individuals with disabilities. This Guidance provides best practices, special design guidelines and requirements for installing plug-in electric vehicle charging stations in ...

  18. Workplace Charging Toolkit: Workshop Best Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These best practices for planning, organizing, and executing a successful and educational workplace charging event have been developed based on lessons learned from more than 20 employer workplace...

  19. Workplace Charging: Comparison of Sustainable Commuting Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workplace Charging: Comparison of Sustainable Commuting Options November 18, 2014 Austin Brown National Renewable Energy Laboratory vehicles.energy.gov Relevance of ROI ...

  20. Smart Charge Adaptor | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    smart EV-charging infrastructure with applications world-wide across residential, workplace, and public locations. The SCA is EV and EVSE agnostic, so customers are not limited...