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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Ventilation and Solar Heat Storage System Offers Big Energy Savings  

Ventilation and Solar Heat Storage System Offers Big Energy Savings ... Heat is either reflected away from the building with radiant barriers, or heat is absorbed

2

Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

Metz, Philip D. (Rocky Point, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Experimental Research on Solar Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the status quo that conventional energy sources are more and more reduced and environmental pollution is increasingly serious, this paper presents a new model system of conserving energy and environmental protection, namely, a Solar Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage. In this system, solar energy is the major heat source for a heat pump, and the supplementary heat source is soil. The disagreement in time between the space heat load and heat collected by solar heat collector is solved by latent heat storage. In order to obtain such system running conditions and effects in different heating periods, an experiment has been carried out during the whole heating period in Harbin, China. The experimental results show that this system is much better for heating in initial and late periods than that in middle periods. The average heating coefficient is 6.13 for heating in initial and late periods and 2.94 for heating in middle periods. At the same time, this paper also predicts system running properties in other regions.

Han, Z.; Zheng, M.; Liu, W.; Wang, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Chemical heat pump and chemical energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump and storage system employs sulfuric acid and water. In one form, the system includes a generator and condenser, an evaporator and absorber, aqueous acid solution storage and water storage. During a charging cycle, heat is provided to the generator from a heat source to concentrate the acid solution while heat is removed from the condenser to condense the water vapor produced in the generator. Water is then stored in the storage tank. Heat is thus stored in the form of chemical energy in the concentrated acid. The heat removed from the water vapor can be supplied to a heat load of proper temperature or can be rejected. During a discharge cycle, water in the evaporator is supplied with heat to generate water vapor, which is transmitted to the absorber where it is condensed and absorbed into the concentrated acid. Both heats of dilution and condensation of water are removed from the thus diluted acid. During the discharge cycle the system functions as a heat pump in which heat is added to the system at a low temperature and removed from the system at a high temperature. The diluted acid is stored in an acid storage tank or is routed directly to the generator for reconcentration. The generator, condenser, evaporator, and absorber all are operated under pressure conditions specified by the desired temperature levels for a given application. The storage tanks, however, can be maintained at or near ambient pressure conditions. In another form, the heat pump system is employed to provide usable heat from waste process heat by upgrading the temperature of the waste heat.

Clark, Edward C. (Woodinville, WA); Huxtable, Douglas D. (Bothell, WA)

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

5

Integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system performance evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Performance verification tests of an integrated heat pipe-thermal energy storage system have been conducted. This system is being developed as a part of an Organic Rankine Cycle-Solar Dynamic Power System (ORC-SDPS) receiver for future space stations. The integrated system consists of potassium heat pipe elements that incorporate thermal energy storage (TES) canisters within the vapor space along with an organic fluid (toluene) heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. During the insolation period of the earth orbit, solar energy is delivered to the surface of the heat pipe elements of the ORC-SDPS receiver and is internally transferred by the potassium vapor for use and storage. Part of the thermal energy is delivered to the heater tube and the balance is stored in the TES units. During the eclipse period of the orbit, the stored energy in the TES units is transferred by the potassium vapor to the toluene heater tube. A developmental heat pipe element was fabricated that employs axial arteries and a distribution wick connecting the wicked TES units and the heater to the solar insolation surface of the heat pipe. Tests were conducted to verify the heat pipe operation and to evaluate the heat pipe/TES units/heater tube operation by interfacing the heater unit to a heat exchanger.

Keddy, E.; Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Heat Storage Within the Earth System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the earth's heat budget provide a real-world constraint on the radiative forcing which is simulated in global climate change models. Assessments, such as the IPCC, would more effectively depict changes over time in the climate ...

Roger A. Pielke Sr.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Preliminary Analysis of a Solar Heat Pump System with Seasonal Storage for Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For higher solar fraction and suitability for both heating and cooling, a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage was studied in this paper. The system scheme and control strategy of a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage for heating and cooling were set up, which is responsible for the space heating and cooling and domestic hot water for a residential block. Through hourly simulation, the performance and the economics of such systems were analyzed, for the different tank volumes, operating modes and weather conditions. The results show that 1) for most areas of China, the solar systems with seasonal storage can save energy; 2) for areas with cold winter and hot summer, it is suitable to store heat from summer to winter and store cold energy from winter to summer, but for chilly areas, it is suitable to only store heat from summer to winter; 3) when the ratio of volume of seasonal storage tank to collector areas is 2~3, the system performance is optimal and the payback period is shortest for most areas of north China; and 4) if cooling storage is needed, the seasonal storage coupled with short-term storage may raise the solar fraction largely.

Yu, G.; Chen, P.; Dalenback, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Heat storage system utilizing phase change materials government rights  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy transport and storage system is provided which includes an evaporator containing a mixture of a first phase change material and a silica powder, and a condenser containing a second phase change material. The silica powder/PCM mixture absorbs heat energy from a source such as a solar collector such that the phase change material forms a vapor which is transported from the evaporator to the condenser, where the second phase change material melts and stores the heat energy, then releases the energy to an environmental space via a heat exchanger. The vapor is condensed to a liquid which is transported back to the evaporator. The system allows the repeated transfer of thermal energy using the heat of vaporization and condensation of the phase change material.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

9

Heat storage duration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Study of Applications of Solar Heating Systems with Seasonal Storage in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In most northern parts of China, it is cold in winter and needs space heating in winter. This paper studies applications of solar heating systems with seasonal storage in China. A typical residential district was selected, and a solar heating system with seasonal storage was designed and simulated based on various conditions. The results indicate that 1) for many places of China, solar systems with seasonal storage can save conventional energy and can be competitive with gas-fired boiler heating; 2) when the ratio of volume of seasonal storage tank to collector areas is 3~5, the system performance is optimal for many places in China; 3) the obtained solar heat is mainly dependent on the solar irradiance, length of heating period and ambient temperature. Solar heating with seasonal storage in chilly places may also get good performance.

Yu, G.; Zhao, X.; Chen, P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Heat pipe cooling system for underground, radioactive waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

An array of 37 heat pipes inserted through the central hole at the top of a radioactive waste storage tank will remove 100,000 Btu/h with a heat sink of 70/sup 0/F atmospheric air. Heat transfer inside the tank to the heat pipe is by natural convection. Heat rejection to outside air utilizes a blower to force air past the heat pipe condenser. The heat pipe evaporator section is axially finned, and is constructed of stainless steel. The working fluid is ammonia. The finned pipes are individually shrouded and extend 35 ft down into the tank air space. The hot tank air enters the shroud at the top of the tank and flows downward as it is cooled, with the resulting increased density furnishing the pressure difference for circulation. The cooled air discharges at the center of the tank above the sludge surface, flows radially outward, and picks up heat from the radioactive sludge. At the tank wall the heated air rises and then flows inward to comple the cycle.

Cooper, K.C.; Prenger, F.C.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Two well storage systems for combined heating and airconditioning by groundwater heatpumps in shallow aquifers  

SciTech Connect

The use of soil and ground water as an energy source and heat storage systems for heat pumps in order to conserve energy in heating and air conditioning buildings is discussed. Information is included on heat pump operation and performance, aquifer characteristics, soil and ground water temperatures, and cooling and heating demands. Mathematical models are used to calculate flow and temperature fields in the aquifer. It is concluded that two well storage systems with ground water heat pumps are desirable, particularly in northern climates. (LCL)

Pelka, W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Two-tank working gas storage system for heat engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-tank working gas supply and pump-down system is coupled to a hot gas engine, such as a Stirling engine. The system has a power control valve for admitting the working gas to the engine when increased power is needed, and for releasing the working gas from the engine when engine power is to be decreased. A compressor pumps the working gas that is released from the engine. Two storage vessels or tanks are provided, one for storing the working gas at a modest pressure (i.e., half maximum pressure), and another for storing the working gas at a higher pressure (i.e., about full engine pressure). Solenoid valves are associated with the gas line to each of the storage vessels, and are selectively actuated to couple the vessels one at a time to the compressor during pumpdown to fill the high-pressure vessel with working gas at high pressure and then to fill the low-pressure vessel with the gas at low pressure. When more power is needed, the solenoid valves first supply the low-pressure gas from the low-pressure vessel to the engine and then supply the high-pressure gas from the high-pressure vessel. The solenoid valves each act as a check-valve when unactuated, and as an open valve when actuated.

Hindes, Clyde J. (Troy, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A Novel Integrated Frozen Soil Thermal Energy Storage and Ground-Source Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a novel integrated frozen soil thermal energy storage and ground-source heat pump (IFSTS&GSHP) system in which the GHE can act as both cold thermal energy storage device and heat exchanger for GSHP is first presented. The IFSTS&GSHP system can serve as cold energy thermal storage at night, produce chilled water in the daytime in summer and provide hot water for heating in winter. This is followed by its schematic and characteristic description. Then the various operation modes of such system according to different operational strategies are demonstrated in sequence. The system, firstly seen in open literature, is energy-saving, environmental-friendly and promising in the field of air-conditioning systems, and will help solve the problems currently existing with the GSHP system and ITES air conditioning system.

Jiang, Y.; Yao, Y.; Rong, L.; Ma, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Energy Absorption and Storage in a Hamiltonian System in Partial Contact with a Heat Bath  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the mechanism allowing for long-term storage of excess energy in proteins, we study a Hamiltonian system consisting of several coupled pendula in partial contact with a heat bath. It is found that energy absorption and storage are possible when the motion of each pendulum switches between oscillatory (vibrational) and rotational modes. The relevance of our mechanism to protein motors is discussed.

Naoko Nakagawa; Kunihiko Kaneko

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

17

Maintenance and storage of fuel oil for residential heating systems: A guide for residential heating system maintenance personnel  

SciTech Connect

The quality of No. 2 fuel affects the performance of the heating system and is an important parameter in the proper and efficient operation of an oil-burning system. The physical and chemical characteristics of the fuel can affect the flow, atomization and combustion processes, all of which help to define and limit the overall performance of the heating system. The use of chemical additives by fuel oil marketershas become more common as a method of improving the quality of the fuel, especially for handling and storage. Numerous types of additives are available, but reliable information on their effectiveness and proper use is limited. This makes selecting an additive difficult in many situations. Common types of problems that contribute to poor fuel quality and how they affect residential heating equipment are identified inof this booklet. It covers the key items that are needed in an effective fuel quality monitoring program, such as what to look for when evaluating the quality of fuel as it is received from a supplier, or how to assess fuel problems associated with poor storage conditions. References to standard procedures and brief descriptions of the procedures also are given. Approaches for correcting a fuel-related problem, including the potential uses of chemical additives are discussed. Different types of additives are described to help users understand the functions and limitations of chemical treatment. Tips on how to select andeffectively use additives also are included. Finally, the importance of preventative maintenance in any fuel monitoring program is emphasized.

Litzke, Wai-Lin

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

Schneider, A.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Numerical Simulation of a Latent Heat Storage System of a Solar-Aided Ground Source Heat Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the rectangular phase change storage tank (PCST) linked to a solar-aided ground source heat pump (SAGSHP) system is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The container of the phase change material (PCM) is the controlling unit of the phase change heat transfer model. It was solved numerically by an enthalpy-based finite difference method and was validated by experimental data. CaCl2•6H2O was used as the PCM in the latent heat storage system of SAGSHP system. In the tank, the PCMs are encapsulated in plastic kegs that are setting on the serpentine coil. The experiments were performed from March 12 to April 10, 2004 in the heating season of the transition period. In order to reflect the effects of the system, two days were chosen to compare the numerical results with experimental data. The inlet and outlet temperature of the water in the PCST, temperature of PCM and storage and emission heat of PCST were measured. The trends of the variation of numerical results and experimental data were in close agreement. Numerical results can reflect the operation mode of the system very well.

Wang, F.; Zheng, M.; Li, Z.; Lei, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Consumer thermal energy storage costs for residential hot water, space heating and space cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost of household thermal energy storage (TES) in four utility service areas that are representative for hot water, space heating, and space cooling systems in the United States is presented. There are two major sections of the report: Section 2.0 is a technology characterization of commercially available and developmental/conceptual TES systems; Section 3.0 is an evaluation of the consumer cost of the three TES systems based on typical designs in four utility service areas.

None

1976-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of an integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system for a solar receiver  

SciTech Connect

The Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) Solar Dynamic Power System (SDPS) is one of the candidates for Space Station prime power application. In the low earth orbit of the Space Station approximately 34 minutes of the 94-minute orbital period is spent in eclipse with no solar energy input to the power system. For this period the SDPS will use thermal energy storage (TES) material to provide a constant power output. Sundstrand Corporation is developing a ORC-SDPS candidate for the Space Station that uses toluene as the organic fluid and LiOH as the TES material. An integrated heat-pipe thermal storage receiver system is being developed as part of the ORC-SDPS solar receiver. This system incorporates potassium heat pipe elements to absorb and transfer the solar energy within the receiver cavity. The heat pipes contain the TES canisters within the potassium vapor space with the toluene heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. During the insolation period of the earth orbit, solar energy is delivered to the heat pipe in the ORC-SDPS receiver cavity. The heat pipe transforms the non-uniform solar flux incident in the heat pipe surface within the receiver cavity to an essentially uniform flux at the potassium vapor condensation interface in the heat pipe. During solar insolation, part of the thermal energy is delivered to the heater tube and the balance is stored in the TES units. During the eclipse period of the orbit, the balance stored in the TES units is transferred by the potassium vapor to the toluene heater tube. 3 refs., 8 figs.

Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.A.; Heidenreich, G.; Johnson, S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

System for thermal energy storage, space heating and cooling and power conversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated system for storing thermal energy, for space heating and cong and for power conversion is described which utilizes the reversible thermal decomposition characteristics of two hydrides having different decomposition pressures at the same temperature for energy storage and space conditioning and the expansion of high-pressure hydrogen for power conversion. The system consists of a plurality of reaction vessels, at least one containing each of the different hydrides, three loops of circulating heat transfer fluid which can be selectively coupled to the vessels for supplying the heat of decomposition from any appropriate source of thermal energy from the outside ambient environment or from the spaces to be cooled and for removing the heat of reaction to the outside ambient environment or to the spaces to be heated, and a hydrogen loop for directing the flow of hydrogen gas between the vessels. When used for power conversion, at least two vessels contain the same hydride and the hydrogen loop contains an expansion engine. The system is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators, but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Fields, Paul R. (Chicago, IL)

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Closed loop chemical systems for energy storage and transmission (chemical heat pipe). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work documents the anlaysis of closed loop chemical systems for energy storage and transmission, commonly referred to as the Chemical Heat Pipe (CHP). Among the various chemical reaction systems and sources investigated, the two best systems were determined to be the high temperature methane/steam reforming reaction (HTCHP) coupled to a Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR) and the lower temperature, cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction (LTCHP) coupled to existing sources such as coal or light water reactors. Solar and other developing technologies can best be coupled to the LTCHP. The preliminary economic and technical analyses show that both systems could transport heat at an incremental cost of approximately $1.50/GJ/160 km (in excess of the primary heat cost of $2.50/GJ), at system efficiencies above 80%. Solar heat can be transported at an incremental cost of $3/GJ/160 km. The use of the mixed feed evaporator concept developed in this work contributes significantly to reducing the transportation cost and increasing the efficiency of the system. The LTCHP shows the most promise of the two systems if the technical feasibility of the cyclic closed loop chemical reaction system can be established. An experimental program for establishing this feasibility is recommended. Since the VHTR is several years away from commercial demonstration and the HTCHP chemical technology is well developed, future HTCHP programs should be aimed at VHTR and interface problems.

Vakil, H.B.; Flock, J.W.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Development and testing of thermal-energy-storage modules for use in active solar heating and cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional development work on thermal-energy-storage modules for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is summarized. Performance testing, problems, and recommendations are discussed. Installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included. (MHR)

Parker, J.C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Economic analysis of community solar heating systems that use annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economics of community-scale solar systems that incorporate a centralized annual cycle thermal energy storage (ACTES) coupled to a distribution system is examined. Systems were sized for three housing configurations: single-unit dwellings, 10-unit, and 200-unit apartment complexes in 50-, 200-, 400-, and 1000-unit communities in 10 geographic locations in the United States. Thermal energy is stored in large, constructed, underground tanks. Costs were assigned to each component of every system in order to allow calculation of total costs. Results are presented as normalized system costs per unit of heat delivered per building unit. These methods allow: (1) identification of the relative importance of each system component in the overall cost; and (2) identification of the key variables that determine the optimum sizing of a district solar heating system. In more northerly locations, collectors are a larger component of cost. In southern locations, distribution networks are a larger proportion of total cost. Larger, more compact buildings are, in general, less expensive to heat. For the two smaller-scale building configurations, a broad minima in total costs versus system size is often observed.

Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.; Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Geometry, Heat Removal and Kinetics Scoping Models for Hydrogen Storage Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WSRC-TR-2007-00439, REVISION 0 WSRC-TR-2007-00439, REVISION 0 Keywords: Hydrogen Kinetics, Hydrogen Storage Vessel Metal Hydride Retention: Permanent Geometry, Heat Removal and Kinetics Scoping Models for Hydrogen Storage Systems Bruce J. Hardy November 16, 2007 Washington Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DEAC09-96-SR18500 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Neither the United States Department of Energy, nor WSRC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for accuracy, completeness, or

27

Collector: storage wall systems  

SciTech Connect

Passive Trombe wall systems require massive masonry walls to minimize large temperature swings and movable night insulation to prevent excessive night heat losses. As a solar energy collection system, Trombe wall systems have low efficiencies because of the nature of the wall and, if auxiliary heat is needed, because of absorption of this heat. Separation of collector and storage functions markedly improves the efficiency. A simple fiberglass absorber can provide high efficiency while phase change storage provides a compact storage unit. The need for movable insulation is obviated.

Boardman, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Thermal analysis of heat storage canisters for a solar dynamic, space power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal analysis was performed of a thermal energy storage canister of a type suggested for use in a solar receiver for an orbiting Brayton cycle power system. Energy storage for the eclipse portion of the cycle is provided by the latent heat of a eutectic mixture of LiF and CaF/sub 2/ contained in the canister. The chief motivation for the study is the prediction of vapor void effects on temperature profiles and the identification of possible differences between ground test data and projected behavior in microgravity. The first phase of this study is based on a two-dimensional, cylindrical coordinates model using an interim procedure for describing void behavior in 1/minus/g and microgravity. The thermal anaylsis includes the effects of solidification front behavior, conduction in liquid/solid salt and canister materials, void growth and shrinkage, radiant heat transfer across the void, and convection in the melt due to Marangoni-induced flow and, in 1/minus/g, flow due to density gradients. A number of significant differences between 1/minus/g and 0/minus/g behavior were found. These resulted from differences in void location relative to the maximum heat flux and a significantly smaller effective conductance in 0/minus/g due to the absence of gravity-induced convection.

Wichner, R.P.; Solomon, A.D.; Drake, J.B.; Williams, P.T.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

GEOMETRY, HEAT REMOVAL AND KINETICS SCOPING MODELS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is recognized that detailed models of proposed hydrogen storage systems are essential to gain insight into the complex processes occurring during the charging and discharging processes. Such insight is an invaluable asset for both assessing the viability of a particular system and/or for improving its design. The detailed models, however, require time to develop and run. Clearly, it is much more efficient to begin a modeling effort with a good system design and to progress from that point. To facilitate this approach, it is useful to have simplified models that can quickly estimate optimal loading and discharge kinetics, effective hydrogen capacities, system dimensions and heat removal requirements. Parameters obtained from these models can then be input to the detailed models to obtain an accurate assessment of system performance that includes more complete integration of the physical processes. This report describes three scoping models that assess preliminary system design prior to invoking a more detailed finite element analysis. The three models address the kinetics, the scaling and heat removal parameters of the system, respectively. The kinetics model is used to evaluate the effect of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the loading and discharge kinetics. As part of the kinetics calculations, the model also determines the mass of stored hydrogen per mass of hydride (in a particular reference form). As such, the model can determine the optimal loading and discharge rates for a particular hydride and the maximum achievable loading (over an infinite period of time). The kinetics model developed with the Mathcad{reg_sign} solver, runs in a mater of seconds and can quickly be used to identify the optimal temperature and pressure for either the loading or discharge processes. The geometry scoping model is used to calculate the size of the system, the optimal placement of heat transfer elements, and the gravimetric and volumetric capacities for a particular geometric configuration and hydride. This scoping model is developed in Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} and inputs the mass of hydrogen to be stored, mass of stored hydrogen to mass of hydride (from the kinetics model), component densities, etc. The heat removal scoping model is used to calculate coolant flowrates, pressure drops and temperature increases over the length of the cooling channels. The model also calculates the convection heat transfer coefficient required to remove the heat of reaction associated with hydrogen uptake. The heat removal model inputs dimensions and the mass of hydrogen to be stored directly from the geometry scoping model. Additionally, the model inputs the heats of reaction, the thermal properties of the coolant and the time required to charge the bed.

Hardy, B

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

32

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electricity and natural gas DER No Heat Storage: therecovery and storage) utility electricity and natural gasbut no heat storage, a 200 kW natural gas reciprocating

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Transient thermal analysis of three fast-charging latent heat storage configurations for a space-based power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A space-based thermal storage application must accept large quantities of heat in a short period of time at an elevated temperature. A model of a lithium hydride phase change energy storage system was used to estimate reasonable physical dimensions for this application which included the use of a liquid metal heat transfer fluid. A finite difference computer code was developed and used to evaluate three methods of enhancing heat transfer in the PCM energy storage system. None of these three methods, inserting thin fins, reticulated nickel, or liquid lithium, significantly improved the system performance. The use of a 95% void fraction reticulated nickel insert was found to increase the storage capacity (total energy stored) of the system slightly with only a small decrease in the system energy density (energy storage/system mass). The addition of 10% liquid lithium was found to cause minor increases in both storage density and storage capacity with the added benefit of reducing the hydrogen pressure of the lithium hydride. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Stovall, T.K.; Arimilli, R.V.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Energy Storage in a Hamiltonian System in Partial Contact with a Heat Bath  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the mechanism allowing for the long-term storage of excess energy in proteins, we study a Hamiltonian system consisting of several coupled pendula in partial contact with a heat bath. It is found that energy storage is possible when the motion of each pendulum switches between oscillatory (vibrational) and rotational (phase-slip) modes. The storage time increases almost exponentially to the square root of the injected energy. The relevance of our mechanism to protein motors is discussed. Proteins are among the most important biopolymers for living systems. They transform chemical energy to mechanical energy, and vice versa, and contribute to biological functions. However, the question of how proteins work dynamically remains unanswered. Recently, a noteworthy experiment concerning protein motors was performed [1]. In this experiment, the working process of a single molecule was directly investigated. The results suggest that proteins often store energy obtained from a reaction with ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and use it later (e.g., for enzymatic reactions with other proteins). The interval for energy storage was found to sometimes be very long, up to the order of seconds, while typical timescales for normal vibrations are several picoseconds. How can proteins store excess energy for such a long time, somehow overcoming the relaxation process toward thermal equilibrium? In order for a protein to store energy for a sufficiently long time, energy must be absorbed into a certain part of the protein, in accordance with its own dynamics. Furthermore, some characteristic type of dynamics is required to store the excess energy without losing it to the surrounding aqueous solution.

Naoko Nakagawa; Kunihiko Kaneko

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Heat storage materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of various alloys, eutectics, and salts in respect to their usefulness for latent and sensible heat storage are surveyed and reported. (TFD)

Birchenall, C.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between heat storage costs and capacity can be determineda given kWh of heat storage capacity is worth to a typicalequation (22) sets the heat storage capacity to the maximum

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electricity and natural gas DER No Heat Storage: thefired natural gas AC (a) Capacity of heat storage unit (but no heat storage, a 200 kW natural gas reciprocating

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source scheme in economical, technical, and environmental aspects, it is determined that the scheme of the groundwater source heat pump has better energy efficiency than others. The GHPWTS can take full advantage of the heat source from groundwater and benefit of electricity difference pricing during a day. Its character is a combination of a strength and another strength. It is the lowest cycle cost of all chide and heat source schemes. The GHPWTS has the best economic benefit and runs stably and reliably. Its advantage is clearly compared with other schemes. There is a real value for the project that is similar to the characteristic of this project and the condition of the water source.

Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Open-cycle chemical heat pump and energy storage system. Final report of Research Program, June 1982-September 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A liquid desiccant heat pump that can heat, cool, humidify, and dehumidify, as well as heat domestic water, has been designed, developed, and tested over a six-year period. Successful operation of the machine demonstrated that a heating cycle utilizing the heat of sorption of a desiccant solution could be added to a desiccant cooling system, thus creating an open-cycle liquid desiccant heat pump. The liquid system was shown to possess a unique capability: the ability to store energy, not as sensible heat but as chemical potential energy, in an uninsulated storage tank with a volume that is an order of magnitude smaller than the insulated volumes needed for water or rock bed storage systems. The spent absorbent solution was reconcentrated in a roof-top solar-collector/reconcentrator. Additionally, it was shown that a packed-column could also act as the reconcentrator; for this operation, the desiccant solution was heated by flat-plate solar collectors, by off-peak electricity, and by waste heat from a vapor compressor.

Robison, H.I.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analysis of community solar systems for combined space and domestic hot water heating using annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified design procedure is examined for estimating the storage capacity and collector area for annual-cycle-storage, community solar heating systems in which 100% of the annual space heating energy demand is provided from the solar source for the typical meteorological year. Hourly computer simulations of the performance of these systems were carried out for 10 cities in the United States for 3 different building types and 4 community sizes. These permitted the use of design values for evaluation of a more simplified system sizing method. Results of this study show a strong correlation between annual collector efficiency and two major, location-specific, annual weather parameters: the mean air temperature during daylignt hours and the total global insolation on the collector surface. Storage capacity correlates well with the net winter load, which is a measure of the seasonal variation in the total load, a correlation which appears to be independent of collector type.

Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.; Cook, J.D.; Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume V. Thermal storage subsystem. [Sensible heat storage using Caloria HT43 and mixture of gravel and sand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed 100-MWe Commercial Plant Thermal Storage System (TSS) employs sensible heat storage using dual liquid and solid media for the heat storage in each of four tanks, with the thermocline principle applied to provide high-temperature, extractable energy independent of the total energy stored. The 10-MW Pilot Plant employs a similar system except uses only a single tank. The high-temperature organic fluid Caloria HT43 and a rock mixture of river gravel and No. 6 silica sand were selected for heat storage in both systems. The system design, installation, performance testing, safety characteristics, and specifications are described in detail. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doubling combined heat and power capacity in the UnitedCost Savings from Heat Storage Capacity Figure 49. LargeR 2 = 0.6683 Heat Storage Capacity (kWh) Fig. 48 Weekday

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Solar heating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, James M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Concord, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Improved solar heating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Potential benefits of thermal energy storage in the proposed Twin Cities district heating-cogeneration system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new, large, cogeneration-district heating system has been proposed for the Twin Cities area, using hot water in a closed-loop system. The proposed system, as described by Studsvik Energiteknik AB of Sweden, does not employ thermal energy storage (TES). Four cases have been developed, describing system configurations which would employ TES, to evaluate the potential benefits of incorporating annual-cycle TES into the Twin Cities system. The potential benefits are found to be substantial, confirming results of earlier, generic studies of aquifer TES. The reference (Studsvik) system employs oil-fired boilers to supplement cogenerated heat, for handling peak loads and providing standby reserve. TES can serve the same function, with net energy savings in spite of heat losses during storage, by making it possible to operate the cogeneration equipment at higher capacity factors. Coal replaces oil as the fuel consumed. Energy savings of the reference system are impressive; energy savings with TES are 2 to 22% better. Capital cost requirements for boilers, cogeneration equipment, and pipelines are reduced by $66 to $258 million. The breakeven capital cost of TES is estimated to range from $43 to $76 per kilowatt peak thermal input to or withdrawal from aquifer TES. A factor in evaluating the breakeven operating cost of TES is the $14 to $31 million per year saving in cost of fuel. Abatement of air pollution and thermal pollution are concomitant benefits.

Meyer, C.F.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Advanced Heat Transfer and Thermal Storage Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of the next generation solar parabolic trough systems for power production will require the development of new thermal energy storage options with improved economics or operational characteristics. Current heat-transfer fluids such as VP-1?, which consists of a eutectic mixture of biphenyl and diphenyl oxide, allow a maximum operating temperature of ca. 300 C, a limit above which the vapor pressure would become too high and would require pressure-rated tanks. The use of VP-1? also suffers from a freezing point around 13 C that requires heating during cold periods. One of the goals for future trough systems is the use of heat-transfer fluids that can act as thermal storage media and that allow operating temperatures around 425 C combined with lower limits around 0 C. This paper presents an outline of our latest approach toward the development of such thermal storage fluids.

Moens, L.; Blake, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Advanced technology thermal energy storage and heat exchange systems for solar applications: a survey of current research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey is presented of the advanced research and development projects underway in the U.S. in all of the known media and methods for storing and transferring thermal energy in solar applications. The technologies reviewed include innovative heat exchange and heat transport methods, advanced sensible heat storage in water, rocks, earth and combinations of these for both short term and annual storage, phase change materials, and reversible chemical reactions. This survey is presented in a structure of categories and subcategories of thermal energy storage and heat transfer technology. Within a given subcategory the project descriptions are listed under the name of the organizations conducting the work, arranged in alphabetical order.

Michaels, A. I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process. In the first heat exchanger (evaporator)_ heat fromand fed into a second heat exchanger As the It is thenfrom a well to the heat exchanger of the heat pump's outer

Pelka, Walter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

52

Laundry heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

A laundry heat recovery system includes a heat exchanger associated with each dryer in the system, the heat exchanger being positioned within the exhaust system of the dryer. A controller responsive to the water temperature of the heat exchangers and the water storage for the washer selectively circulates the water through a closed loop system whereby the water within the exchangers is preheated by the associated dryers. By venting the exhaust air through the heat exchanger, the air is dehumidified to permit recirculation of the heated air into the dryer.

Alio, P.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

53

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings often have extensive periods where one space needs cooling and another heating. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If a building's heating and cooling system could be integrated with the building's structural mass such that the mass can be used to collect, store, and deliver energy, significant energy might be saved. Computer models were developed to simulate this interaction for an existing office building in Seattle, Washington that has a decentralized water-source heat pump system. Metered data available for the building was used to calibrate a base'' building model (i.e., nonintegrated) prior to simulation of the integrated system. In the simulated integration strategy a secondary water loop was manifolded to the main HVAC hydronic loop. tubing in this loop was embedded in the building's concrete floor slabs. Water was routed to this loop by a controller to charge or discharge thermal energy to and from the slabs. The slabs were also in thermal communication with the conditioned spaces. Parametric studies of the building model, using weather data for five other cities in addition to Seattle, predicted that energy can be saved on cooling dominated days. On hot, dry days and during the night the cooling tower can beneficially be used as a free cooling'' source for thermally charging'' the floor slabs using cooled water. Through the development of an adaptive/predictive control strategy, annual HVAC energy savings as large as 30% appear to be possible in certain climates. 8 refs., 13 figs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

German central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central solar heating plants contribute to the reduction of CO{sub 2}-emissions and global warming. The combination of central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage enables high solar fractions of 50% and more. Several pilot central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage (CSHPSS) built in Germany since 1996 have proven the appropriate operation of these systems and confirmed the high solar fractions. Four different types of seasonal thermal energy stores have been developed, tested and monitored under realistic operation conditions: Hot-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Friedrichshafen), gravel-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Steinfurt-Borghorst), borehole thermal energy store (in Neckarsulm) and aquifer thermal energy store (in Rostock). In this paper, measured heat balances of several German CSHPSS are presented. The different types of thermal energy stores and the affiliated central solar heating plants and district heating systems are described. Their operational characteristics are compared using measured data gained from an extensive monitoring program. Thus long-term operational experiences such as the influence of net return temperatures are shown. (author)

Bauer, D.; Marx, R.; Nussbicker-Lux, J.; Ochs, F.; Heidemann, W. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller-Steinhagen, H. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute of Technical Thermodynamics (ITT), German Aerospace Centre (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

since during the heating season the solar radiation is atHeating and cooling demand compared with air temperature and solarHeating and cooling demand compared with air temperature and solar

Pelka, Walter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

together with the low heat capacity of air implies large airBulk density and bulk heat capacity P and c ' are calculatedaT) ax. J = o The bulk heat capacity and density, as well as

Pelka, Walter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Design and simulation of latent heat storage units  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C. (Houston Univ., TX (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Design and simulation of latent heat storage units. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of two years of research and development on passive latent heat storage systems. Analytical models have been developed and extended, and a computer code for simulating the performance of a latent heat storage has been developed. The code is intended to be merged into a larger solar energy system simulation code and used for making realistic system studies. Simulation studies using a code which has a flexible and accurate routine for handling the storage subsystem should lead to the development of better systems than those in which storage is added on after the rest of the system has already been selected and optimized.

Shamsundar, N.; Stein, E.; Rooz, E.; Bascaran, E.; Lee, T.C. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Initial findings: The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

This report is one in a series of reports describing research activities in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Building System Integration Research Program. The goal of the program is to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving integrated decision-making during design and construction. Improved decision-making could significantly reduce buildings' energy use by the year 2010. The objectives of the Commercial Building System Integration Research Program are: to identify and quantify the most significant energy-related interactions among building subsystems; to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving energy related interactions in building subsystems; and to provide guidance to designers, owners, and builders for improving the integration of building subsystems for energy efficiency. The lead laboratory for this program is the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A wide variety of expertise and resources from industry, academia, other government entities, and other DOE laboratories are used in planning, reviewing and conducting research activities. Cooperative and complementary research, development, and technology transfer activities with other interested organizations are actively pursued. In this report, the interactions of a water loop heat pump system and building structural mass and their effect on whole-building energy performance is analyzed. 10 refs., 54 figs., 1 tab.

Marseille, T.J.; Johnson, B.K.; Wallin, R.P.; Chiu, S.A.; Crawley, D.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage ‡energy resources (DER), distributed generation (DG), andload of Figure 2. distributed generation of part or all of

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fact that the off-peak power plant might be coal and substitute "clean" on- peak natural gas plants@lbl.gov Keywords Combined heat and power, CO2 emissions, demand response, electric storage, energy efficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal systems Abstract The addition

63

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy; Grid systems; Optimization; Heat flow; Financialof grid power and by utilizing combined heat and power (CHP)

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to electricity. Pumped-hydroelectric storage and batteryis pumped between the heat exchangers and the storage unit.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculations for the Heat Exchanger Network Heat-Exchangepower-generation heat exchangers. and storage vessels.and Valves None Heat Exchangers. Distillation Column, Low

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

On the Accuracy of Heat Storage Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Routinely taken oceanographic data from 55 temperature sections across the North Pacific Current along 158°W between Hawaii and Alaska are used to determine the accuracy of heat storage computations. Errors caused by the use of different ...

Klaus Wyrtki; Leslie Uhrich

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Alternatives for metal hydride storage bed heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of hydrogen isotopes with the storage bed hydride material is exothermic during absorption and endothermic during desorption. Therefore, storage bed operation requires a cooling system to remove heat during absorption, and a heating system to add the heat needed for desorption. Three storage bed designs and their associated methods of heating and cooling and accountability are presented within. The first design is the current RTF (Replacement Tritium Facility) nitrogen heating and cooling system. The second design uses natural convection cooling with ambient glove box nitrogen and electrical resistance for heating. This design is referred to as the Naturally Cooled/Electrically Heated (NCEH) design. The third design uses forced convection cooling with ambient glove box nitrogen and electrical resistance for heating. The design is referred to as the Forced Convection Cooled/Electrically Heated (FCCEH) design. In this report the operation, storage bed design, and equipment required for heating, cooling, and accountability of each design are described. The advantages and disadvantages of each design are listed and discussed. Based on the information presented within, it is recommended that the NCEH design be selected for further development.

Fisher, I.A.; Ramirez, F.B.; Koonce, J.E.; Ward, D.E.; Heung, L.K.; Weimer, M.; Berkebile, W.; French, S.T.

1991-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

69

THERMOCHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage (TES) is an integral part of a concentrated solar power (CSP) system. It enables plant operators to generate electricity beyond on sun hours and supply power to the grid to meet peak demand. Current CSP sensible heat storage systems employ molten salts as both the heat transfer fluid and the heat storage media. These systems have an upper operating temperature limit of around 400 C. Future TES systems are expected to operate at temperatures between 600 C to 1000 C for higher thermal efficiencies which should result in lower electricity cost. To meet future operating temperature and electricity cost requirements, a TES concept utilizing thermochemical cycles (TCs) based on multivalent solid oxides was proposed. The system employs a pair of reduction and oxidation (REDOX) reactions to store and release heat. In the storage step, hot air from the solar receiver is used to reduce the oxidation state of an oxide cation, e.g. Fe3+ to Fe2+. Heat energy is thus stored as chemical bonds and the oxide is charged. To discharge the stored energy, the reduced oxide is re-oxidized in air and heat is released. Air is used as both the heat transfer fluid and reactant and no storage of fluid is needed. This project investigated the engineering and economic feasibility of this proposed TES concept. The DOE storage cost and LCOE targets are $15/kWh and $0.09/kWh respectively. Sixteen pure oxide cycles were identified through thermodynamic calculations and literature information. Data showed the kinetics of re-oxidation of the various oxides to be a key barrier to implementing the proposed concept. A down selection was carried out based on operating temperature, materials costs and preliminary laboratory measurements. Cobalt oxide, manganese oxide and barium oxide were selected for developmental studies to improve their REDOX reaction kinetics. A novel approach utilizing mixed oxides to improve the REDOX kinetics of the selected oxides was proposed. It partially replaces some of the primary oxide cations with selected secondary cations. This causes a lattice charge imbalance and increases the anion vacancy density. Such vacancies enhance the ionic mass transport and lead to faster re-oxidation. Reoxidation fractions of Mn3O4 to Mn2O3 and CoO to Co3O4 were improved by up to 16 fold through the addition of a secondary oxide. However, no improvement was obtained in barium based mixed oxides. In addition to enhancing the short term re-oxidation kinetics, it was found that the use of mixed oxides also help to stabilize or even improve the TES properties after long term thermal cycling. Part of this improvement could be attributed to a reduced grain size in the mixed oxides. Based on the measurement results, manganese-iron, cobalt-aluminum and cobalt iron mixed oxides have been proposed for future engineering scale demonstration. Using the cobalt and manganese mixed oxides, we were able to demonstrate charge and discharge of the TES media in both a bench top fixed bed and a rotary kiln-moving bed reactor. Operations of the fixed bed configuration are straight forward but require a large mass flow rate and higher fluid temperature for charging. The rotary kiln makes direct solar irradiation possible and provides significantly better heat transfer, but designs to transport the TES oxide in and out of the reactor will need to be defined. The final reactor and system design will have to be based on the economics of the CSP plant. A materials compatibility study was also conducted and it identified Inconel 625 as a suitable high temperature engineering material to construct a reactor holding either cobalt or manganese mixed oxides. To assess the economics of such a CSP plant, a packed bed reactor model was established as a baseline. Measured cobalt-aluminum oxide reaction kinetics were applied to the model and the influences of bed properties and process parameters on the overall system design were investigated. The optimal TES system design was found to be a network of eight fixed bed reactors at 18.75 MWth each with charge and

PROJECT STAFF

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun’s not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MIT’s heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat well—this makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MIT’s low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

Norman, John H. (LaJolla, CA)

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A variety of heating technologies are available today. In addition to heat pumps, which are discussed separately, many homes and buildings use the following approaches:

75

Heat recovery and thermal storage : a study of the Massachusetts State Transportation Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the energy system at the Massachusetts State Transportation Building was conducted. This innovative energy system utilizes internal-source heat pumps and a water thermal storage system to provide building heating ...

Bjorklund, Abbe Ellen

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Commercial laundry heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

Waste water of above ambient temperature in a commercial laundry is directed through a self-cleaning plate and frame heat exchanger to heat incoming fresh water. Some of the fresh water heated to a first temperature is directed to a cold water storage tank to raise the water therein above ambient temperature which results in substantially lessened downstream requirements for heat input with commensurate cost reductions. The remainder of the fresh water is heated to a higher second temperature and is directed to a hot water storage tank. A system of valves regulates the temperature of the water flowing into each of the hot and cold water storage tanks to maintain a preset temperature in each of the storage tanks.

Kaufmann, R.O.

1983-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

INTEGRATED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEM MODEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage is recognized as a key technical hurdle that must be overcome for the realization of hydrogen powered vehicles. Metal hydrides and their doped variants have shown great promise as a storage material and significant advances have been made with this technology. In any practical storage system the rate of H2 uptake will be governed by all processes that affect the rate of mass transport through the bed and into the particles. These coupled processes include heat and mass transfer as well as chemical kinetics and equilibrium. However, with few exceptions, studies of metal hydrides have focused primarily on fundamental properties associated with hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics. A full understanding of the complex interplay of physical processes that occur during the charging and discharging of a practical storage system requires models that integrate the salient phenomena. For example, in the case of sodium alanate, the size of NaAlH4 crystals is on the order of 300nm and the size of polycrystalline particles may be approximately 10 times larger ({approx}3,000nm). For the bed volume to be as small as possible, it is necessary to densely pack the hydride particles. Even so, in packed beds composed of NaAlH{sub 4} particles alone, it has been observed that the void fraction is still approximately 50-60%. Because of the large void fraction and particle to particle thermal contact resistance, the thermal conductivity of the hydride is very low, on the order of 0.2 W/m-{sup o}C, Gross, Majzoub, Thomas and Sandrock [2002]. The chemical reaction for hydrogen loading is exothermic. Based on the data in Gross [2003], on the order of 10{sup 8}J of heat of is released for the uptake of 5 kg of H{sub 2}2 and complete conversion of NaH to NaAlH{sub 4}. Since the hydride reaction transitions from hydrogen loading to discharge at elevated temperatures, it is essential to control the temperature of the bed. However, the low thermal conductivity of the hydride makes it difficult to remove the heat of reaction, especially in the relatively short target refueling times, see Attachment 3. This document describes a detailed numerical model for general metal hydride beds that couples reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer, for both hydriding and dehydriding of the bed. The detailed model is part of a comprehensive methodology for the design, evaluation and modification of hydrogen storage systems. In Hardy [2007], scoping models for reaction kinetics, bed geometry and heat removal parameters are discussed. The scoping models are used to perform a quick assessment of storage systems and identify those which have the potential to meet DOE performance targets. The operational characteristics of successful candidate systems are then evaluated with the more detailed models discussed in this document. The detailed analysis for hydrogen storage systems is modeled in either 2 or 3-dimensions, via the general purpose finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics{reg_sign}. The two-dimensional model serves to provide rapid evaluation of bed configurations and physical processes, while the three-dimensional model, which requires a much longer run time, is used to investigate detailed effects that do not readily lend themselves to two-dimensional representations. The model is general and can be adapted to any geometry or storage media. In this document, the model is applied to a modified cylindrical shell and tube geometry with radial fins perpendicular to the axis, see Figures 4.1-1 and 4.1-2. Sodium alanate, NaAlH{sub 4}, is used as the hydrogen storage medium. The model can be run on any DOS, LINUX or Unix based system.

Hardy, B

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermophysical Properties In our Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, we use a variety of instruments to measure the thermophysical properties of heat transfer fluids and storage...

79

Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Central unresolved issues in thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document explores the frontier of the rapidly expanding field of thermal energy storage, investigates unresolved issues, outlines research aimed at finding solutions, and suggests avenues meriting future research. Issues related to applications include value-based ranking of storage concepts, temperature constraints, consistency of assumptions, nomenclature and taxonomy, and screening criteria for materials. Issues related to technologies include assessing seasonal storage concepts, diurnal coolness storage, selection of hot-side storage concepts for cooling-only systems, phase-change storage in building materials, freeze protection for solar water heating systems, and justification of phase-change storage for active solar space heating.

Swet, C.J.; Baylin, F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy Basics: Heat Pump Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating Heat...

82

Rock bed storage with heat pump. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study, Rock Bed Storage with Heat Pump, established the feasibility of mating a heat pump to a rock bed storage to effect optimal performance at the lowest cost in single family residences. The operating characteristics of off-the-shelf components of heat pump/rock bed storage systems were studied, and the results were used to formulate configurations of representative systems. These systems were modeled and subsequently analyzed using the TRNSYS computer program and a life cycle cost analysis program called LCCA. A detailed load model of a baseline house was formulated as part of the TRNSYS analysis. Results of the analysis involved the development of a technique to confine the range of heat pump/rock bed storage systems to those systems which are economical for a specific location and set of economic conditions. Additionally, the results included a comparison of the detailed load model with simple UA models such as the ASHRAE bin method. Several modifications and additions were made to the TRNSYS and LCCA computer programs during the course of the study.

Remmers, H.E.; Mills, G.L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States Title Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Stadler, Michael, Chris Marnay, Afzal S. Siddiqui, Judy Lai, Brian Coffey, and Hirohisa Aki Pagination 106 Date Published 03/2006 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords consortium for electric reliability technology solutions (certs), energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals:

84

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve March 14, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington,...

85

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

selection of on-site power generation with combined heat andsingle-cycle thermal power generation is typically lesshighly centralized power generation and delivery system

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity generated by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficient than central station generation, but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and utilizing combined heat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scale on-site generation to displace fuel purchases, then DER can become attractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts, the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressed using a mixed-integer linear programme, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, and information (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies, DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selecting the units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. In this paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion of the option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep an inventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lower costs even further by reducing off-peak generation and relying on storage. This and other effects of storages are demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in San Francisco, California, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacity of heat storage is calculated.

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

87

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an average efficiency of 0.5 for solar thermal and 0.13 forefficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

89

Analysis of selected surface characteristics and latent heat storage for passive solar space heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an analysis of the value of various technical improvements in the solar collector and thermal storage subsystems of passive solar residential, agricultural, and industrial systems for two regions of the country. The evaluated improvements are: decreased emissivity and increased absorptivity of absorbing surfaces, decreased reflectivity, and decreased emissivity of glazing surface, and the substitution of sensible heat storage media with phase change materials. The value of each improvement is estimated by the additional energy savings resulting from the improvement.

Fthenakis, V.; Leigh, R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Transportable Energy Storage Systems Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project will define the requirements and specification for a transportable energy storage system and then screen various energy storage options and assess their capability to meet that specification. The application will be designed to meet peak electrical loads (3-4 hours of storage) on the electrical distribution system.

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

SciTech Connect

Electricity produced by distributed energy resources (DER)located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumerrequirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid.Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associatedwith transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricitydelivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities topurchase energy when attractive. On-site, single-cycle thermal powergeneration is typically less efficient than central station generation,but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and by utilizing combinedheat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scaleon-site thermal generation to displace fuel purchases, DER can becomeattractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts,the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressedusing a mixed-integer linear program, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, andinformation (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies,DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selectingthe units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. Inthis paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion ofthe option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep aninventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lowercosts even further by reducing lucrative peak-shaving generation whilerelying on storage to meet heat loads. This and other effects of storageare demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in SanFrancisco, California, USA, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacityof heat storage is calculated.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to international energy storage programs are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - DOE-CEC Energy Storage Program FY07 Projects - Daniel Borneo, SNL.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Joint NYSERDA-DOE Energy Storage Initiative Projects

93

Energy storage for hybrid remote power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy storage can be a cost-effective component of hybrid remote power systems. Storage serves the special role of taking advantage of intermittent renewable power sources. Traditionally this role has been played by lead-acid batteries, which have high life-cycle costs and pose special disposal problems. Hydrogen or zinc-air storage technologies can reduce life-cycle costs and environmental impacts. Using projected data for advanced energy storage technologies, LLNL ran an optimization for a hypothetical Arctic community with a reasonable wind resource (average wind speed 8 m/s). These simulations showed the life-cycle annualized cost of the total energy system (electric plus space heating) might be reduced by nearly 40% simply by adding wind power to the diesel system. An additional 20 to 40% of the wind-diesel cost might be saved by adding hydrogen storage or zinc-air fuel cells to the system. Hydrogen produced by electrolysis of water using intermittent, renewable power provides inexpensive long-term energy storage. Conversion back to electricity with fuel cells can be accomplished with available technology. The advantages of a hydrogen electrolysis/fuel cell system include low life-cycle costs for long term storage, no emissions of concern, quiet operation, high reliability with low maintenance, and flexibility to use hydrogen as a direct fuel (heating, transportation). Disadvantages include high capital costs, relatively low electrical turn-around efficiency, and lack of operating experience in utility settings. Zinc-air fuel cells can lower capital and life-cycle costs compared to hydrogen, with most of the same advantages. Like hydrogen systems, zinc-air technology promises a closed system for long-term storage of energy from intermittent sources. The turn around efficiency is expected to exceed 60%, while use of waste heat can potentially increase overall energy efficiency to over 80%.

Isherwood, W., LLNL

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

Grossman, G.

1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

96

Research of Heat Storage Tank Operation Modes in Cogeneration Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dissertation investigates typical operation modes of the heat storage tank in the small-scale cogeneration (CHP) plant, analyses formation of thermal stratifi-cation in such storage… (more)

Streckien?, Giedr?

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage with Embedded Heat Pipes for Concentrating Solar Power Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? An innovative, novel concept of combining heat pipes with latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications is explored. The… (more)

Robak, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Solar heat storages in district heating Klaus Ellehauge Thomas Engberg Pedersen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 2007 . #12;#12;Solar heat storages in district heating networks July 2007 Klaus Ellehauge 97 22 11 tep@cowi.dk www.cowi.com #12;#12;Solar heat storages in district heating networks 5 in soil 28 5.3 Other experienced constructions: 30 6 Consequences of establishing solar heat in CHP areas

99

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchangers and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Solar-powered saline sorbent-solution heat pump/storage system. [Coastal Energy Laboratory-Chemical Heat Pump (CEL-CHEAP)  

SciTech Connect

Coastal Energy Laboratory Chemical Heat Pump (CEL-CHEAP) is a redesigned open-cycle liquid desiccant air conditioner. Heat is discharged to shallow-well water by dehumidification-humidification for cooling and extracted by humidification-dehumidification for heating. Direct solar radiation concentrates the desiccant. For continuous operation, a small uninsulated tank stores concentrated solution. 6 refs.

Robison, H.; Houston, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program...

103

Heat storage in alloy transformations. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study conducted to determine the feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media is described. The study had the following major elements: (1) the identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements, (2) the development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients, (3) the development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase-change materials, and (4) the identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases have been determined. A new method employing x-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data that are obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase-change media. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide has been identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were considered.

Birchenall, C E; Gueceri, S I; Farkas, D; Labdon, M B; Nagaswami, N; Pregger, B

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Energy Basics: Heating Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of energy sources, including electricity, boilers, solar energy, and wood and pellet-fuel heating. Small Space Heaters Used when the main heating system is inadequate or when...

105

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flows and stream conditions in steam power cycle. Table 4.1in the low-temperature reactor system. Steam power cycle 8.1Heat Storage System for a Solar Steam Power Plant." 12th

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Installation package for a solar heating system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Installation information is presented for a solar heating system installed in Concho Indian School at El Reno, Oklahoma. This package includes a system Operation and Maintenance Manual, hardware brochures, schematics, system operating modes and drawings. The Solar Engineering and Equipment Company (SEECO) developed this prototype solar heating system consisting of the following subsystems: solar collectors, control and storage.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Other Innovative Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Efficiency Electrical Energy Storage Using Reversible Solid Oxide Cells: Scott Barnett1; Gareth Hughes1; Kyle Yakal-Kremski1; Zhan Gao1; 1 Northwestern ...

108

Comparison of Four Methods to Estimate Urban Heat Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative performance of four independent methods to estimate the magnitude and diurnal behavior of net heat storage fluxes (?QS) in a city center is assessed. This heat flux is a significant but understudied component of the urban surface ...

Sarah M. Roberts; T. R. Oke; C. S. B. Grimmond; J. A. Voogt

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Investigation of methods to transfer heat from solar liquid-heating collectors to heat storage tanks. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was made of the methods available to transfer heat from the collector to the water storage tank in water heating systems. In counterflow heat exchangers used in double loop water heating systems, it was found to be more important to use a high water flowrate than a high heat transfer fluid flowrate. It was earlier thought to be best to have matched WC/sub p/ (mass flowrate-specific heat) products in the loops. It was shown in this study that the water WC/sub p/ product should be about twice as large as that of the heat transfer fluid. It was found that neither the heat exchanger type nor the size was very critical, so that very simple criteria were adequate in determining optimum heat exchanger size. It was found that there is a definite system size below which one should use a traced tank or a coil in a tank. Equations and optimization criteria were developed for traced tanks or tanks with coils. At present, there is no quantitative understanding of liquid to liquid (direct contact) heat exchangers, though they are clearly quite effective. Draindown systems are discussed, and several appendices are included on heat transfer and other characteristics of fluid and of equipment.

Horel, J. D.; de Winter, F.

1978-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

111

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

112

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve September 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the acquisition of commercial storage services for the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Two awards totaling 350,000 barrels have been made to companies that had earlier received storage contracts totaling 650,000 barrels. Hess Corporation in Groton, CT has been awarded a second contract for 100,000 barrels, increasing its storage obligation to 500,000 barrels. Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA was awarded a second contract for 250,000 barrels, increasing its obligation to 500,000 barrels.

113

DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 18, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that new contracts have been awarded for commercial storage of 650,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate (ULSD) for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Awards were made to two companies for storage in New England--Hess Corporation in Groton, CT for 400,000 barrels, and Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA for 250,000 barrels. The procurement was conducted by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA Energy), acting as the agent for DOE. Acquisition of storage services for an additional 350,000 barrels is planned to complete the establishment of a

114

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve September 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the acquisition of commercial storage services for the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Two awards totaling 350,000 barrels have been made to companies that had earlier received storage contracts totaling 650,000 barrels. Hess Corporation in Groton, CT has been awarded a second contract for 100,000 barrels, increasing its storage obligation to 500,000 barrels. Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA was awarded a second contract for 250,000 barrels, increasing its obligation to 500,000 barrels.

115

Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

Lee, S.Y.

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

116

A method to determine stratification efficiency of thermal energy storage processes independently from storage heat losses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for the calculation of a stratification efficiency of thermal energy storages based on the second law of thermodynamics is presented. The biasing influence of heat losses is studied theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, it does not make a difference if the stratification efficiency is calculated based on entropy balances or based on exergy balances. In practice, however, exergy balances are less affected by measurement uncertainties, whereas entropy balances can not be recommended if measurement uncertainties are not corrected in a way that the energy balance of the storage process is in agreement with the first law of thermodynamics. A comparison of the stratification efficiencies obtained from experimental results of charging, standby, and discharging processes gives meaningful insights into the different mixing behaviors of a storage tank that is charged and discharged directly, and a tank-in-tank system whose outer tank is charged and the inner tank is discharged thereafter. The new method has a great potential for the comparison of the stratification efficiencies of thermal energy storages and storage components such as stratifying devices. (author)

Haller, Michel Y.; Streicher, Wolfgang [Institute of Thermal Engineering, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 25/B, 8010 Graz (Austria); Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon [Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Brovej, Building 118, DK-2800, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bales, Chris [Solar Energy Research Center SERC, Hoegskolan Dalarna, 781 88 Borlaenge (Sweden)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Experimental Research of Sleeping Bed Integrated with PCM Heat Storage and Solar Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper puts forward a new way of using solar energy and Phase Change Material (PCM): the integration of PCM, sleeping bed and solar energy. The cavity of sleeping bed is filled with PCM. The sleeping bed is a heat storage device charged by solar ... Keywords: Solar heating, Sleeping bed, PCM heat storage

Guoqing Yu; Ji Qiang; Huizhong Zhao; Zonghu Lv

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during experimentation.

Mathur, Anoop [Terrafore Inc.] [Terrafore Inc.

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

A thermal energy storage system for adsorbent low-pressure natural gas storage  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-based adsorbents were determined to be the best enhanced storage media that would store more natural gas at low pressures than achieved with compression only. Thermal energy storage (TES) was previously demonstrated to be a potentially promising technique to mitigate heat effects associated with low-pressure carbon adsorption systems for natural gas storage. Further investigations were conducted to develop information for the design of an optimized adsorption system that incorporates TES heat management. The selection of appropriate phase-change materials and nucleating agents, encapsulant materials, and corrosion inhibitors for a TES heat management system are discussed and the results of extended thermal cyclic behavior are presented. Engineering analyses and finite element analyses are employed to calculate adsorption rates, heat generation, temperatures, and heat transfer within the adsorbent bed. The size, volume, and arrangement of components for an operational TES system designed to accommodate fast-fill within a defined time limit is presented.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.; Kountz, K.J.; Tiller, A.J. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gauthier, S.W.; Takagishi, S.K. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program...

122

Electric storage heating: the experience in England and Wales and in the Federal Republic of Germany  

SciTech Connect

Electric storage heating, a space-heating system for buildings, incorporates a resistively heated storage medium to store energy during off-peak hours for use during peak-load hours. The system, which is widely used in Europe, smooths the utility's daily load curve and retards the growth of the winter peak by displacing new space-heating loads into the off-peak ''valleys'' of the load curve. The most extensive application of this form of space heating has occurred in England and Wales and in the Federal Republic of Germany. This report reviews the policies, methods, and circumstances under which electric storage heating was commercialized in these two market regions, and provides background information for evaluating the feasibility of commercial applications in the United States.

Asbury, J.G.; Kouvalis, A.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involved, supplemental absorption cooling allows downsizingdisplaced by absorption cooling. The same principle appliesof storage and absorption cooling in case of the cooling

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN); Perez-Blanco, Horacio (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Estimation of Biomass Heat Storage Using Thermal Infrared Imagery: Application to a Walnut Orchard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTE Estimation of Biomass Heat Storage Using Thermalmethod to estimate tree biomass heat storage from thermalinfrared (TIR) imaging of biomass surface temperature is

Garai, Anirban; Kleissl, Jan; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

Not Available

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Automatic flue gas heat recovery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic flue gas heat recovery system for supplementing or replacing a conventional, separate hot water system. In the example described, the heat recovery system is applied to a pizza restaurant where large quantities of heat energy are normally wasted up an oven chimney stack, and large quantities of hot water also are required for restaurant operations. An electric motor driven pump circulates water in a closed loop between a storage tank and a heat exchanger tube located in the oven chimney stack. A thermostat control automatically starts the pump when the oven heats the chimney stack to an effective water heating temperature. When temperature in the storage tank reaches a predetermined maximum, the thermostat control stops the pump, opens a drain valve, and dumps water quickly and completely from the heat exchanger tube. Three different embodiments are shown and described illustrating systems with one or more storage tanks and one or more pumps. In the plural storage tank embodiments, an existing hot water heating tank may be converted for use to augment a main tank supplied with the present system.

Whalen, D.A.

1983-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Commercial laundry heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

In a commercial laundry that is connected to a source of fresh water and generates heated waste water, a method is described for recovering heat from the heated waste comprising the steps of: (a) pumping the heated waste water through a heat exchanger; (b) introducing fresh water into the heat exchanger to receive heat from the waste water through a heat transfer effected by the heat exchanger; (c) withdrawing a first proportion of the heated fresh water at a first temperature; (d) conveying the first proportion of the heated fresh water to cold water storage tank; (e) withdrawing a second proportion of the heated fresh water at a second temperature higher than the first temperature; (f) conveying the second proportion of the heated fresh water to a hot water storage tank.

Kaufmann, R.O.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

130

Vapor phase heat transport systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vapor phase heat-transport systems are being tested in two of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The systems consist of an active fin-and-tube solar collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector by a pump or by a self-pumping scheme. In one of the test cells the liquid was self-pumped to the roof-mounted collector 17 ft above the condenser. A mechanical valve was designed and tested that showed that the system could operate in a completely passive mode. Performance comparisons have been made with a passive water wall test cell.

Hedstrom, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L ABORATORY Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery andequal opportunity employer. Distributed Generation with Heatenergy resources (DER), distributed generation (DG), and

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern food processing operations often require that the temperature of the processed foodstuff be raised or lowered. These operations result in energy consumption by refrigeration or heating systems, and a portion of this energy can be recovered from waste heat streams for reuse in the processing operations. This paper addresses the recovery of waste heat and the storage of thermal energy as a means of energy conservation in food processing. An energy conservation project in a poultry processing plant sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and conducted by Georgia Tech is used as an illustrative example of potential applications of heat recovery and thermal energy storage.

Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Thermal Storage Systems at IBM Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1979, IBM commissioned its first large scale thermal storage system with a capacity of 2.7 million gallons of chilled water and 1.2 million gallons of reclaimed, low temperature hot water. The stored cooling energy represents approximately 27,000 ton hours. Through reduced chiller plant capacity and annual operating cost savings in primarily electric demand charges the payback will be approximately 3 1/2 years. The water is stored in multiple, insulated tanks, located above the ground. A similar but smaller system at IBM's Charlotte, North Carolina plant has no provisions for heat reclaim. Instead, it uses cooling tower water directly in the chilled water circuit when outside conditions permit. This paper presents system designs, control modes and economic considerations and describes IBM's experience to date with large volume storage systems.

Koch, G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

NERSC Nick Balthaser NERSC Storage Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archival Storage at NERSC Nick Balthaser NERSC Storage Systems Group nabalthaser@lbl.gov NERSC User Training March 8, 2011 * NERSC Archive Technologies Overview * Use Cases for the...

136

Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Storage System Basics Thermal Storage System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics August 21, 2013 - 10:33am Addthis One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds. Thermal energy storage provides a workable solution to this challenge. In a concentrating solar power (CSP) system, the sun's rays are reflected onto a receiver, which creates heat that is used to generate electricity. If the receiver contains oil or molten salt as the heat-transfer medium, then the thermal energy can be stored for later use. This enables CSP systems to be cost-competitive options for providing clean, renewable energy. Several thermal energy storage technologies have been tested and

137

A parameterized model of heat storage by lake sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of seasonal heat storage by lake sediments is proposed oriented at applications in climate modeling and at lake parameterization in numerical weather prediction. The computational efficiency is achieved by reformulating of the heat transfer problem ... Keywords: Bulk model, Climate modeling, Lake temperature, Sediment processes, Temperature wave, Water-sediment exchange

Sergey Golosov; Georgiy Kirillin

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involved, supplemental absorption cooling allows downsizingwater heating and for absorption cooling) in a day SHPricedisplaced by absorption cooling. The same principle applies

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cement industry is the most energy-intensive industry in the United States in terms of energy cost as a percentage of the product according to a 1973 report by the Cost of Living Council. Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver Division, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been completed and illustrates very attractive cost benefits realized from waste heat recovery/thermal storage systems. This paper will identify and quantify the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establish uses of this energy, exhibit various energy storage concepts, and present a methodology for selection of most promising energy storage systems. Two storage systems show the best promise - rock beds and draw salt storage. Thermal performance and detailed economic analyses have been performed on these systems and will be presented. Through use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 1013 BTU per year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10 barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for utilization and further development.

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Energy Storage Projects Update Conference - DOE 2010 Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through National Energy Technology Laboratory 1 Background 2 Metrics and Benefits Data Flow 3 Contact Information Table of Contents 1 4 Appendix NETL's role in SGDP metrics and benefits reporting 2 NETL Energy Delivery Technologies Division SGDP Technical Project Officers (TPOs) SGDP Principal Investigators (PIs) Project Management and Performance Data Analysis NETL Project Management Center's Analysis & Support Team Data Analysis Team (DAT) Lead Contractors: Booz Allen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Programs | Advanced Storage Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Storage Systems Advanced Storage Systems Tapping Into Fuel Cells and Batteries Page 1 of 2 Imagine being able to drive a forty-mile round-trip commute every day without ever going near a gas pump. As the United States moves towards an energy economy with reduced dependence on foreign oil and fewer carbon emissions, development of alternative fuel sources and transmission of the energy they provide is only part of the equation. An increase in energy generated from intermittent renewable sources and the growing need for mobile energy will require new, efficient means of storing it, and technological advancements will be necessary to support the nation's future energy storage needs. A change toward alternative transportation - hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles and electric

142

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

143

Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A thermal energy storage system for adsorbent low-pressure natural gas storage  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage (TES) was previously demonstrated to be a potentially promising technique to mitigate heat effects associated with low-pressure carbon adsorption systems for natural gas storage. Further investigations were conducted to develop information for the design of an optimized adsorption system that incorporates TES heat management. The selection of appropriate phase-change materials and nucleating agents, encapsulant materials, and corrosion inhibitors for a TES heat management system are discussed and the results of extended thermal cyclic behavior are presented. Engineering analyses and finite element analyses are employed to calculate adsorption rates, heat generation, temperatures, and heat transfer within the adsorbent bed. The size, volume, and arrangement of components for an operational TES system designed to accommodate fast-fill within a defined time limit is presented.

Jasionowski, W.J.; Kountz, K.J.; Blazek, C.F.; Tiller, A.J. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Gauthier, S.W.; Takagishi, S.K. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Heat generation in natural gas adsorption systems  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted using a high-surface-area carbon as an adsorbent for methane to determine the impact of the heat of adsorption upon the storage capacity. The rapid filling of an adsorption storage system under conditions in which the heat of adsorption is not dissipated results in only about 75% of the methane being stored at 3.44 MPa (500 psia) as can be stored by a slow fill rate with heat dissipation. These results depend upon the initial temperature of the absorbent bed and upon the characteristics of the substrate itself. 4 refs., 5 figs.

Remick, R.J.; Tiller, A.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

Swenson, Paul F. (Shaker Heights, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaven, FL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaven, FL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Gossiping over storage systems is practical  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gossip-based mechanisms are touted for their simplicity, limited resource usage, robustness to failures, and tunable system behavior. These qualities make gossiping an ideal mechanism for storage systems that are responsible for maintaining and updating ... Keywords: distributed storage, durability, gossip-based storage, gossiping, mobile ad hoc networks, persistent storage, update propagation, wide-area networks, wireless sensor networks

Hakim Weatherspoon; Hugo Miranda; Konrad Iwanicki; Ali Ghodsi; Yann Busnel

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Heat rejection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

Smith, Gregory C. (Richland, WA); Tokarz, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Parry, Jr., Harvey L. (Richland, WA); Braun, Daniel J. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Prototype solar heating and hot water systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a collection of two quarterly status reports from Colt, Inc., covering the period from October 1, 1977 through June 30, 1978. Colt is developing two prototype solar heating and hot water systems consisting of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, hot water, and auxiliary energy. The two systems are being installed at Yosemite, California and Pueblo, Colorado.

Not Available

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve March 14, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy, through its agent, DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation for new contracts to store two million barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in New York Harbor and New England. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m. EDT on March 29, 2011. Of the U.S. households that use heating oil to heat their homes, 69% reside in the Northeast. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve was established by the Energy Policy Act of 2000 to provide an emergency buffer that can supplement commercial fuel supplies in the event of an actual or imminent severe supply disruption. The Reserve can provide supplemental supplies for

152

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 5. Low Storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Heat6. Low Storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal ElectricityFigure 9. Low Storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Heat

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat to water in a storage tank. Heat-transfer fluids, such as antifreeze, protect the solar collector from freezing in cold weather. Liquid-to-liquid heat exchangers have...

154

Radiant heat transfer from storage casks to the environment  

SciTech Connect

A spent fuel storage cask must efficiently transfer the heat released by the fuel assemblies through the cask walls to the environment. This heat must be transferred through passive means, limiting the energy transfer mechanisms from the cask to natural convection and radiation heat transfer.. Natural convection is essentially independent of the characteristics of the array of casks, provided there is space between casks to permit a convection loop. Radiation heat transfer, however, depends on the geometric arrangement of the array of casks because the peripheral casks will shadow the interior casks and restrict radiant heat transfer from all casks to the environment. The shadowing of one cask by its neighbors is determined by a view factor that represents the fraction of radiant energy that leaves the surface of a cask and reaches the environment. This paper addresses the evaluation of the view factor between a centrally located spent fuel storage cask and the environment. By combining analytic expressions for the view factor of (1) infinitely long cylinders and (2) finite cylinders with a length-to-diameter ratio of 2 to represent spent fuel storage casks, the view factor can be evaluated for any practical array of spent fuel storage casks.

Carlson, R W; Hovingh, J; Thomas, G R

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

156

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Storage Systems TIAX LLC 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2390 Tel. 617- 498-5000 Fax 617-498-7200 www.TIAXLLC.com Reference:...

157

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

158

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

159

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

160

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Poster Session Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3: Poster Session The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking...

162

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

163

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, Session 4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

164

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

165

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, Session 2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

166

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, Session 4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update...

167

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

168

APS storage ring vacuum system  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Field test and assessment of thermal energy storage for residential heating  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage (TES) heating units can be connected to the utility grid to accept electricity only during utility off-peak periods and yet provide round-the-clock comfort heating. Their use by an increasingly larger part of the electric-heat market could provide economic and oil-saving benefits. A field test was carried out over two full heating seasons in Vermont and Maine at 45 TES sites and 30 control sites heated by electric baseboard heaters. The TES users were billed under applicable time-of-day (TOD) rates. All sites were instrumented, and measurements of inside and outside temperatures and electrical energy consumption for heating were made and recorded every 15 min. Analysis of the data has led to the following findings and conclusions: Overall technical performance of the TES units was good under extreme weather conditions. Annualized energy use was the same for the TES and the control households. Proper sizing of the storage systems is much more important for storage heaters than for nonstorage heaters. TES users were satisfied with performance. Electric-heat bills were much lower for TES users. Occupancy effects were large and caused wide variations in energy consumption on days that had the same number of heating degree-days. The individual building heat loss determined experimentally from an analysis of the actual energy consumption per heating degreeday was 30% to 50% smaller than that determined by a walkthrough energy audit.

Hersh, H.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems May 16, 2013 - 3:02pm Addthis Illustration of a solar water heater. Illustration of a solar water heater. Heat-transfer fluids carry heat through solar collectors and a heat exchanger to the heat storage tanks in solar water heating systems. When selecting a heat-transfer fluid, you and your solar heating contractor should consider the following criteria: Coefficient of expansion - the fractional change in length (or sometimes in volume, when specified) of a material for a unit change in temperature Viscosity - resistance of a liquid to sheer forces (and hence to flow) Thermal capacity - the ability of matter to store heat Freezing point - the temperature below which a liquid turns into a

171

Heat or cold storage composition containing a hydrated hydraulic cement  

SciTech Connect

A polyphase composition for the storage of heat or cold is disclosed that utlizes the latent heat of fusion of a salt hydrate continuous phase intimately intermixed with a hydrated hydraulic cement continuous phase and wherein said continuous phases are optionally in contact with a discontinuous crystalline phase comprising a nucleating component and wherein the composition is enveloped, contained, or packaged within a vapor impermeable material.

Boardman, B.J.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Home heating system  

SciTech Connect

A home heating system is disclosed that has a furnace with a combustion chamber for burning fuel and creating heat, and a chimney with a draft therein. An improvement is described that has an exhaust flue connected between the combustion chamber and the chimney for venting heated exhaust products from the furnace, a heat reclaimer connected into the exhaust flue between the combustion chamber and the chimney for reclaiming heat from the heated exhaust product, and an outside air line for supplying air from the outside of the house to the combustion chamber. A first flue portion of the exhaust flue is connected between the combustion chamber and the heat reclaimer, and a second insulated flue portion of the exhaust flue is connected between the heat reclaimer and the chimney. An outside air by-pass or balancing line is connected between the outside air line and the chimney for satisfying the chimney suction at flame-out. A flow sensing and regulating device may be connected into the outside air line for regulating the flow or air so that outside air is supplied to the furnace only when fuel is burned therein.

Bellaff, L.

1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

173

Rate of Change of Heat Storage of the World Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results or a Fourier analysis of climatological fields of the monthly rate of change of heat storage for the world ocean are presented. The amplitude and Phase of the first harmonic are shown, as well as the percent variance of the annual cycle ...

Sydney Levitus

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Integrated Hydrogen Storage System Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WSRC-TR-2007-00440, REVISION 0 WSRC-TR-2007-00440, REVISION 0 Keywords: Hydrogen Kinetics, Hydrogen Storage Vessel Metal Hydride Retention: Permanent Integrated Hydrogen Storage System Model Bruce J. Hardy November 16, 2007 Washington Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DEAC09-96-SR18500 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Neither the United States Department of Energy, nor WSRC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information,

175

Inertial and inductive energy storage for fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy storage is necessary for all proposed fusion reactor systems. The plasma physics for confinement and primarily the energy transfer time determine the nature of the storage system. Discharge times vary from 0.7 ms for theta-pinch reactors to one to two seconds for tokamak reactors. Three classes of devices are available for energy storage--inductors, capacitors, and rotating machines. The transfer of the energy from the store imposes unusual switching requirements. The broad requirements for reactor energy stores and more specifically those for tokamak experimental power reactors (EPR) and for the Scyllac fusion test reactor (SFTR) will be presented. Assessments and comparisons of alternative energy storage and transfer systems for these devices are to be discussed. The state of the pulsed superconducting inductive energy storage coils and homopolar development programs will be emphasized. Plans for tokamak ohmic-heating systems will be discussed briefly.

Rogers, J.D.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficienthighly centralised power generation and delivery systemProduction from US Power Generation Note this is only the

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Fuel cell systems for first lunar outpost -- Reactant storage options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Lunar Surface Power Working Group was formed to review candidate systems for providing power to the First Lunar Outpost habitat. The working group met for five days in the fall of 1992 and concluded that the most attractive candidate included a photovoltaic unit, a fuel cell, a regenerator to recycle the reactants, and storage of oxygen and hydrogen gases. Most of the volume (97%) and weight (64%) are taken up by the reactants and their storage tanks. The large volume is difficult to accommodate, and therefore, the working group explored ways of reducing the volume. An alternative approach to providing separate high pressure storage tanks is to use two of the descent stage propellant storage tanks, which would have to be wrapped with graphite fibers to increase their pressure capability. This saves 90% of the volume required for storage of fuel cell reactants. Another approach is to use the descent storage propellant tanks for storage of the fuel cell reactants as cryogenic liquids, but this requires a gas liquefaction system, increases the solar array by 40%, and increases the heat rejection rate by 170% compared with storage of reactants as high pressure gases. For a high power system (>20 kW) the larger energy storage requirement would probably favor the cryogenic storage option.

Nelson, P.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Thermal Solar Energy Systems for Space Heating of Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the simulation and the analysis of a solar flat plate collectors combined with a compression heat pump is carried out. The system suggested must ensure the heating of a building without the recourse to an auxiliary energy source in complement of this heating system. The system is used to heat a building using heating floor. The building considered is located in Constantine-East of Algeria (Latitude 36.28 N, Longitude 6.62 E, Altitude 689m). For the calculation, the month of February was chosen, which is considered as the coldest month according to the weather data of Constantine. The performances of this system were compared to the performances of the traditional solar heating system using solar collectors and an auxiliary heating load to compensate the deficit. In this case a traditional solar heating system having the same characteristics with regard to the solar collecting area and the volume of storage tank is used. It can be concluded that the space heating system using a solar energy combined with heat pump improve the thermal performance of the heat pump and the global system. The performances of the heating system combining heat pump and solar collectors are higher than that of solar heating system with solar collectors and storage tank. The heat pump assisted by solar energy can contribute to the conservation of conventional energy and can be competitive with the traditional systems of heating.

Gomri, R.; Boulkamh, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of a sulfur oxide chemical heat storage process for a steam solar electric plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate technically feasible process configurations for the use of the sulfur oxide system, 2 SO/sub 3/ reversible 2 SO/sub 2/ + O/sub 2/, in energy storage. The storage system is coupled with a conventional steam-cycle power plant. Heat for both the power plant and the storage system is supplied during sunlit hours by a field of heliostats focussed on a central solar receiver. When sunlight is not available, the storage system supplies the heat to operate the power plant. A technically feasible, relatively efficient configuration is proposed for incorporating this type of energy storage system into a solar power plant. Complete material and energy balances are presented for a base case that represents a middle range of expected operating conditions. Equipment sizes and costs were estimated for the base case to obtain an approximate value for the cost of the electricity that would be produced from such an installation. In addition, the sensitivity of the efficiency of the system to variations in design and operating conditions was determined for the most important parameters and design details. In the base case the solar tower receives heat at a net rate of 230 MW(t) for a period of eight hours. Daytime electricity is about 30 MW(e). Nighttime generation is at a rate of about 15 MW(e) for a period of sixteen hours. The overall efficiency of converting heat into electricity is about 26%. The total capital cost for the base case is estimated at about $68 million, of which about 67% is for the tower and heliostats, 11% is for the daytime power plant, and 22% is for the storage system. The average cost of the electricity produced for the base case is estimated to be about 11 cents/kW(e)-hr.

Dayan, J.; Lynn, S.; Foss, A.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Heat transport system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transport system of small size which can be operated in any orientation consists of a coolant loop containing a vaporizable liquid as working fluid and includes in series a vaporizer, a condenser and two one-way valves and a pressurizer connected to the loop between the two valves. The pressurizer may be divided into two chambers by a flexible diaphragm, an inert gas in one chamber acting as a pneumatic spring for the system.

Pierce, Bill L. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Air heating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

Primeau, John J. (19800 Seminole Rd., Euclid, OH 44117)

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Modifying a Mesoscale Meteorological Model to Better Incorporate Urban Heat Storage: A Bulk-Parameterization Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple bulk-parameterization scheme is implemented in modifying a mesoscale meteorological model to better incorporate urban heat storage. The objective is to improve the quantification of the fluxes associated with heat storage change and to ...

Haider Taha

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Ground source heat storage and thermo-physical response of soft clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground source heat storage can condition buildings with reduced consumption of fossil fuels, an important issue in modem building design. However, seasonal heat storage can cause soil temperature fluctuations and possibly ...

Saxe, Shoshanna Dawn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Annual Cycle of Temperature and Heat Storage in the World Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual cycle of temperature and heat storage for the world ocean and individual ocean basins is described based on climatological monthly-mean temperature fields. One well-known feature observed in the fields of temperature and heat storage ...

Sydney Levitus

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Explorations of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems By Andrewof Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems by Andrew

Duffin, Andrew Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric utilities and fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin are developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is being developed. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch systems and 1-to-2-s slow energy transfer tokamak systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of a SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given of a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling, of a 30-MJ coil proposed for system stabilization, and of tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are presented. The common technology base for the various storage systems is discussed.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Geothermal district heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ten district heating demonstration projects and their present status are described. The projects are Klamath County YMCA, Susanville District Heating, Klamath Falls District Heating, Reno Salem Plaza Condominium, El Centro Community Center Heating/Cooling, Haakon School and Business District Heating, St. Mary's Hospital, Diamond Ring Ranch, Pagosa Springs District Heating, and Boise District Heating.

Budney, G.S.; Childs, F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Passive vapor transport solar heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the systems under consideration, refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector and condensed in thermal storage for space or water heating located within the building at a level below that of the collector. Condensed liquid is lifted to an accumulator above the collector by the vapor pressure generated in the collector. Tests of two systems are described, and it is concluded that one of these systems offers distinct advantages.

Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Similarity and generalized analysis of efficiencies of thermal energy storage systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper examined the features of three typical thermal storage systems including: (1) direct storage of heat transfer fluid in containers, (2) storage of thermal energy in a packed bed of solid filler material, with energy being carried in/out by a flowing heat transfer fluid which directly contacts the packed bed, and (3) a system in which heat transfer fluid flows through tubes that are imbedded into a thermal storage material which may be solid, liquid, or a mixture of the two. The similarity of the three types of thermal storage systems was discussed, and generalized energy storage governing equations were introduced in both dimensional and dimensionless forms. The temperatures of the heat transfer fluid during energy charge and discharge processes and the overall energy storage efficiencies were studied through solution of the energy storage governing equations. Finally, provided in the paper are a series of generalized charts bearing curves for energy storage effectiveness against four dimensionless parameters grouped up from many of the thermal storage system properties including dimensions, fluid and thermal storage material properties, as well as the operational conditions including mass flow rate of the fluid, and the ratio of energy charge and discharge time periods. Engineers can conveniently look up the charts to design and calibrate the size of thermal storage tanks and operational conditions without doing complicated individual modeling and computations. It is expected that the charts will serve as standard tools for thermal storage system design and calibration.

Peiwen Li; Jon Van Lew; Cholik Chan; Wafaa Karaki; Jake Stephens; J. E. O'Brien

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

(Thermal energy storage technologies for heating and cooling applications)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent results from selected TES research activities in Germany and Sweden under an associated IEA annex are discussed. In addition, several new technologies for heating and cooling of buildings and automobiles were reviewed and found to benefit similar efforts in the United states. Details of a meeting with Didier-Werke AG, a leading German ceramics manufacturer who will provide TES media necessary for the United States to complete field tests of an advanced high temperature latent heat storage material, are presented. Finally, an overview of the December 1990 IEA Executive Committee deliberations on TES is presented.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1990-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

191

Heat storage and distribution inside passive-solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive-solar buildings are investigated from the viewpoint of the storage of solar heat in materials of the building: walls, floors, ceilings, and furniture. The effects of the location, material, thickness, and orientation of each internal building surface are investigated. The concept of diurnal heat capacity is introduced and a method of using this parameter to estimate clear-day temperature swings is developed. Convective coupling to remote rooms within a building is discussed, including both convection through single doorways and convective loops that may exist involving a sunspace. Design guidelines are given.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy is a high quality form of energy that can be easily converted to other forms of energy with high efficiency and, even more importantly, it can be used to control lower grades of energy quality with ease. However, building a cost-effective ... Keywords: charge, electrical storage, energy, energy storage, hybrid storage, management

Massoud Pedram; Naehyuck Chang; Younghyun Kim; Yanzhi Wang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid geothermal heat pump systems offer many of the benefits of full geothermal systems but at lower installed costs. A hybrid geothermal system combines elements of a conventional water loop heat pump system in order to reduce the geothermal loop heat exchanger costs, which are probably the largest cost element of a geothermal system. These hybrid systems have been used successfully where sufficient ground space to install large heat exchangers for full geothermal options was unavailable, or where the...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Considerations and measurements of latent-heat-storage salts for secondary thermal battery applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given its potential benefits, the practicality of using a latent heat-storage material as the basis for a passive thermal management system is being assessed by Chloride Silent Power Ltd. (CSPL) with technical assistance from Beta Power, Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Based on the experience gained in large-scale solar energy storage programs, fused salts were selected as the primary candidates for the heat-storage material. The initial phase of this assessment was directed to an EV battery being designed at CSPL for the ETX-II program. Specific tasks included the identification and characterization of potential fused salts, a determination of placement options for the salts within the battery, and an assessment of the ultimate benefit to the battery system. The results obtained to date for each of these tasks are presented in this paper.

Koenig, A.A.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Armijo, J.R.

1988-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

Optimization of a solar cooling system with interior energy storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the optimization of the performance of a solar absorption cooling system composed by four units with interior energy storage. A full dynamic simulation model that includes the solar collector field, the absorption heat pump system and the building load calculation has been developed. It has been applied to optimize the coupling of a system based on this new technology of solar powered absorption heat pump, to a bioclimatic building recently constructed in the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in Spain. The absorption heat pump system considered is composed by four heat pumps that store energy in the form of crystallized salts so that no external storage capacity is required. Each heat pump is composed of two separate barrels that can charge (store energy from the solar field) and discharge (deliver heat or cold to the building) independently. Different configurations of the four units have been analysed taking into account the storage possibilities of the system and its capacity to respond to the building loads. It has been shown how strong the influence of the control strategies in the overall performance is, and the importance of using hourly simulations models when looking for highly efficient buildings. (author)

Sanjuan, C.; Soutullo, S.; Heras, M.R. [Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency in Buildings Unit, CIEMAT, Madrid E-28040 (Spain)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Integrated heat pipe-thermal storage design for a solar receiver. [Constant power source with heat from sun or from storage  

SciTech Connect

Light-weight heat pipe wall elements that incorporate a thermal storage subassembly within the vapor space are being developed as part of the Organic Rankine Cycle Solar Dynamic Power Systems (ORC-SDPS) receiver for the space station application. The operating temperature of he heat pipe elements is in the 770 to 810/sup 0/K range with a design power throughput of 4.8 kW per pipe. The total heat pipe length is 1.9 M. The Rankine cycle boiler heat transfer surfaces are positioned within the heat pipe vapor space, providing a relatively constant temperature input to the vaporizer. The heat pipe design employs axial arteries and distribution wicked thermal storage units with potassium as the working fluid. Stainless steel is used as the containment tube and screen material. Performance predictions for this configuration have been conducted and the design characterized as a function of artery geometry, distribution wick thickness, porosity, pore size, and permeability. Details of the analysis and of fabrication and assembly procedures are presented. 2 refs., 8 figs.

Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.; Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.A.; Heidenreich, G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

On-Board Storage Systems Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-Board Storage Systems Analysis On-Board Storage Systems Analysis R. K. Ahluwalia, J-K Peng and T. Q. Hua DOE and FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop Washington, DC 25 January 2006 Work sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy: Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies 2 ANL ANL ' ' s Role in H s Role in H 2 2 Storage Systems Development Storage Systems Development Working with DOE contractors and Centers of Excellence researchers: Model and analyze various developmental hydrogen storage systems Analyze hybrid systems that combine features of more than one concept Develop models that can be used to "reverse-engineer" particular technologies Identify interface issues and opportunities, and data

198

Modeling And Optimal Design Of A Central Solar Heating Plant With Heat Storage In The Ground Using Modelica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper discusses the modeling of a central solar heating plant with seasonal storage in the ground using the new object-oriented physical systems modeling language Modelica. Main emphasis is put on the hierarchical decomposition of the system model and on the re-engineering of an existing Fortran code for the ground store model. The object-oriented physical system model is compiled to a mathematical description in the form of ordinary di#erential equations #ODE#. The ODE model is used to formulate and solve nonlinear optimization problems. We show design optimization results obtained for given weather conditions in Switzerland. The heating system is designed to cover the annual load of a housing area for space heating of about 500 MWh to 95# by solar. The optimization results have been validated with the help of initial-value simulations using TRNSYS, a special-purpose simulation software for thermal energy systems.

R. Franke

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

NERSC Nick Balthaser NERSC Storage Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction to HPSS at NERSC Nick Balthaser NERSC Storage Systems Group nabalthaser@lbl.gov Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA Feb 10, 2011 * NERSC Archive Technologies...

200

Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 29, 2011 ... The transition from the fossil economy to a greener, sustainable economy cannot, however, be realized without efficient energy storage systems ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Development and Testing of Hydrogen Storage System(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development and Testing of Hydrogen Storage System(s) for Capturing Intermittent Renewable Energy ­ Analysis of Test Results for Hydrogen Storage Systems By Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean of Kahua Ranch Hydrogen Storage System 3 3.1 Kahua Ranch Power System 3 3.2 Electrolyzer Experimental

202

Generalized assessment of heat-storage accumulators based on energy profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analytical and experimental work described in this paper has to do with the development of a new and practical method for designing and rating heat-storage systems operating on a heat-capacity duty cycle of several days. It was carried out as part of a broader project evaluating equipment for exploiting solar energy and heat produced by animals on animal farms. Water-type heat accumulators were found to be an essential component of these systems; however, no generalized or specialized criteria were available for their effective design. Therefore, design optimization was carried out analytically, and the resulting approach was experimentally verified. This process led to the development of generalized criteria for rating the efficiency of stored heat utilization and to the development of reservoir design guidelines that, for practical design purposes, eliminated the need for knowing storage temperature histograms. The analysis is based on defining the storage quality as the degree of perfection ({zeta}{sub e}) in terms of the initial and final exergy (available energy) ratios of the stored heat during the storage period. This function was determined analytically, experimentally verified for four design cases (with and without insulation), and related to the normalized design parameters, rate of temperature degradation, and fluid properties by time-dependent Fourier similarity number Fo. The resulting relationship of the form -- {zeta}{sub e} = k log Fo + q was correlated with the measurements. For a specified storage, the ``degree of perfection`` ({zeta}{sub e}) can then be optimized and the desirable dimensions of a reservoir selected by calculating the characteristic (or normalized) dimension from the Fourier number (Fo).

Hemzal, K. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Wurm, J. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fusion reactor requirements and systems for energy storage and transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy storage and transfer requirements for many of the present day reactor systems are listed. Two ohmic heating (OH) requirements, those for toroidal Z-pinches and Tokamaks, are described in more detail. Technologies envisioned for the power conditioning circuitry are discussed.

Thomassen, K.I.; Hagenson, R.L.; Thullin, P.

1978-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

204

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenge. Hydrogen energy storage density has been steadilya Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and Systema Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a key challenge. Hydrogen energy storage density has beena Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and Systema Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Molten salt thermal energy storage systems: salt selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program aimed at the development of a molten salt thermal energy storage system commenced in June 1976. This topical report describes Work performed under Task I: Salt Selection is described. A total of 31 inorganic salts and salt mixtures, including 9 alkali and alkaline earth carbonate mixtures, were evaluated for their suitability as heat-of-fusion thermal energy storage materials at temperatures of 850 to 1000/sup 0/F. Thermophysical properties, safety hazards, corrosion, and cost of these salts were compared on a common basis. We concluded that because alkali carbonate mixtures show high thermal conductivity, low volumetric expansion on melting, low corrosivity and good stability, they are attractive as heat-of-fusion storage materials in this temperature range. A 35 wt percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-65 wt percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (50 mole percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-50 mole percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) mixture was selected as a model system for further experimental work. This is a eutectoid mixture having a heat of fusion of 148 Btu/lb (82 cal/g) that forms an equimolar compound, LiKCO/sub 3/. The Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ mixture is intended to serve as a model system to define heat transfer characteristics, potential problems, and to provide ''first-cut'' engineering data required for the prototype system. The cost of a thermal energy storage system containing this mixture cannot be predicted until system characteristics are better defined. However, our comparison of different salts indicated that alkali and alkaline earth chlorides may be more attractive from a salt cost point of view. The long-term corrosion characteristics and the effects of volume change on melting for the chlorides should be investigated to determine their overall suitability as a heat-of-fusion storage medium.

Maru, H.C.; Dullea, J.F.; Huang, V.S.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Heat Pump Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Like a refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space into a warm space, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. Because they move heat rather than generate...

208

Distributed Energy Storage Systems: Deployments and Learnings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed Energy Storage Systems (DESS) or so-called “edge-of-grid” systems are small scale energy storage systems that are positioned at the edge of the distribution grid, downstream of the distribution transformer, on the utility side of the meter. These systems have the potential to significantly improve power quality for the consumer, while also having the capability to provide distribution system support. Several field trials of these systems are presently underway or are being ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems May 30, 2012 - 3:40pm Addthis Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar water heating systems use heat exchangers to transfer solar energy absorbed in solar collectors to the liquid or air used to heat water or a space. Heat exchangers can be made of steel, copper, bronze, stainless steel, aluminum, or cast iron. Solar heating systems usually use copper, because it is a good thermal conductor and has greater resistance to corrosion. Types of Heat Exchangers Solar water heating systems use three types of heat exchangers: Liquid-to-liquid A liquid-to-liquid heat exchanger uses a heat-transfer fluid that

210

The use of thermal energy storage for energy system based on cogeneration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usage of thermal energy storage together with cogeneration technology provides an attractive solution by allowing the production of electricity in the periods, when heat load is low and later consumption of heat, when load is high. The purpose of the ... Keywords: CHP, cogeneration, energy efficiency, energy system, thermal storage

Anna Volkova; Andres Siirde

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hydrogen/halogen energy storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen/chlorine energy storage system has been considered at BNL for large scale energy storage. In FY1978 work included an assessment of system safety and cost, investigations of cell performance under conditions elevated pressure and temperature, determination of the transport properties of Nafion membranes and electrochemical engineering studies. Results are summarized.

Spaziante, P M; Sioli, G C; Trotta, R; Perego, A; McBreen, J

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Systems analysis techniques for annual cycle thermal energy storage solar systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Community-scale annual cycle thermal energy storage (ACTES) solar systems are promising options for building heat and cooling. A variety of approaches are feasible in modeling ACTES solar systems. The key parameter in such efforts, average collector efficiency, is first examined, followed by several approaches for simple and effective modeling. Methods are also examined for modeling building loads for structures based on both conventional and passive architectural designs. Two simulation models for sizing solar heating systems with annual storage are presented next. Validation is presented by comparison with the results of a study of seasonal storage systems based on SOLANSIM, an hour-by-hour simulation. These models are presently being used to examine the economic trade-off between collector field area and storage capacity. Finally, programs in the US Department of Energy directed toward developing either other system components such as improved tanks and solar ponds or design tools for ACTES solar systems are examined.

Baylin, F.; Sillman, S.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Heat pipe system  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe diode device for transferring heat from a heat source component to a heat sink wall is described. It contains a heat pipe body member attached to the best source; the heat source having a wall forming at least a portion of the normal evaporator section of the heat pipe diode; a working fluid within the body member; a cover for the heat pipe diode forming at least a portion of the heat sink wall; the cover forming the normal condenser for the heat pipe diode; a wick connected between the condenser and the evaporator of the heat pipe diode; means for retaining the wick adjacent the heat pipe wall; a wick support plate adjacent to the cover; the wick being attached to the support plate; means for holding the wick in contact with the cover; and means, responsive to excessive temperatures at the heat sink wall, for moving the support plate and a portion of the wick away from the cover to thereby substantially reduce heat flow in the reverse direction through said heat pipe diode device.

Kroebig, H.L.; Riha, F.J. III

1974-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

214

Towards Scalable Benchmarks for Mass Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While mass storage systems have been used for several decades to store large quantities of scientific data, there has been little work on devising standard ways of measuring them. Each system is hand-tuned using parameters that seem to work best, but it is difficult to gauge the potential effect of similar changes on other systems. The proliferation of storage management software and policies has made it difficult for users to make the best choices for their own systems. The introduction of benchmarks will make it possible to gather standard performance measurements across disparate systems, allowing users to make intelligent choices of hardware, software, and algorithms for their mass storage system. This paper presents guidelines for the design of a mass storage system benchmark suite, along with preliminary suggestions for programs to be included. The benchmarks will measure both peak and sustained performance of the system as well as predicting both short-term and long-term behav...

Ethan L. Miller

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Optimal design of seasonal storage for 100% solar space heating in buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of seasonal solar systems that contain water as the sensible heat storage medium. A concise model is developed under the assumption of a fully mixed, uniform temperature, storage tank that permits efficient simulation of long-term (multi-day) system performance over the course of the year. The approach explicitly neglects the effects of short-term (sub-daily) fluctuations in insolation and load, effects that will be extremely small for seasonal solar systems. This approach is useful for examining the major design tradeoffs of concern here. The application considered is winter space heating. The thermal performance of seasonal solar systems that are designed to supply 100% of load without any backup is solved for, under ''reference year'' monthly normal ground temperature and insolation conditions. Unit break-even costs of seasonal storage are estimated by comparing the capital and fuel costs of conventional heating technologies against those of a seasonal solar system. A rough comparison between the alternatives for more severe winters was made by examining statistical variations in winter season conditions over the past several decades. (MHR)

Mueller, R.O.; Asbury, J.G.; Caruso, J.V.; Connor, D.W.; Giese, R.F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

Carr, P.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Evaluation and assessment of thermal-energy storage for residential heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a field test in Maine and Vermont involving 75 households, 45 of which used off-peak electricity for heating, the overall technical performance and user acceptance of thermal-energy storage (TES) heaters were found to be satisfactory. Annual energy consumption for households using TES heaters was the same as for control households using conventional electric baseboard heaters. Proper sizing is more critical for TES systems than for conventional heaters. Barriers to rapid market penetration include high capital cost, uncertainties about the long-term availability of incentive rates, and competition from bivalent heating systems and nonstorage heating units that take better advantage of time-of-day rates. Actual building heat losses were 30% to 50% less than estimated by walk-through audits.

Hersh, H.; Mirchandani, G.; Rowe, R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Frugal storage for cloud file systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprises are moving their IT infrastructure to cloud service providers with the goal of saving costs and simplifying management overhead. One of the critical services for any enterprise is its file system, where users require real-time access to files. ... Keywords: caching, cloud computing, storage, storage cost

Krishna P.N. Puttaswamy; Thyaga Nandagopal; Murali Kodialam

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

222

Technical Research of Thermal Adjusting in Pulverizing System Intermediate Storage Bunker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the temperature change effect of the primary air and powder mixture in storage-type milling system, it is difficult to obtain accurate results of the direct measurement of the primary wind speed, resulting in this type of boiler system, the thermal ... Keywords: pulverizing system intermediate storage bunker, thermal adjustment, coal concentration, heat balance

Zhenning Zhao; Yaqin Ge; Hongwei Chen; Ying Zhang; Tao Sun; Xiao Lu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

Pez, Guido Peter (Allentown, PA); Cooper, Alan Charles (Macungie, PA); Scott, Aaron Raymond (Allentown, PA)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

Absorption-heat-pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

225

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of heat loss tests for the Integral Collector Storage unit are shown. Work on unique solar system components is summarized briefly. (MHR)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review The 2006 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program was held in Washington DC on...

227

Modeling a leadership-scale storage system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exascale supercomputers will have the potential for billion-way parallelism. While physical implementations of these systems are currently not available, HPC system designers can develop models of exascale systems to evaluate system design points. Modeling ... Keywords: exascale computing, parallel discrete-event simulation, storage system design

Ning Liu; Christopher Carothers; Jason Cope; Philip Carns; Robert Ross; Adam Crume; Carlos Maltzahn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Inorganic compounds for passive solar energy storage. Solid-state dehydration materials and high specific heat materials. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two classes of hydrated inorganic salts have been studied to assess their potential as materials for passive solar energy storage. The materials are part of the quaternary system CaO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-SO/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O and related chemical systems, and the two classes are typified by ettringite, a trisubstituted salt, and Friedel's salt, a monosubstituted salt. The trisubstituted salts were studied for their possible application in latent heat storage, utilizing a low-temperature dehydration reaction, and both classes were studies for their application in sensible heat storage. In order to assess their potential for energy storage, the salts have been synthesized, characterized by several analytical techniques, and thermal properties measured. The dehydration data of that the trisubstituted salts vary somewhat with chemical composition, with the temperature of the onset of dehydration ranging from 6/sup 0/C to 33/sup 0/C, and enthalpy changes on dehydration ranging from 60 to 200 cal/g. Heat capacity is less variable with composition; values for the trisubstituted phases are 30 cal/g//sup 0/C and for the monosubstituted phases between 0.23 and 0.28 cal/g//sup 0/C. Preliminary experiments indicate that the dehydration is reversible, and suggest that the materials might have additional potential as solar desiccant materials. These thermal data demonstrate the trisubstituted salts have potential as latent heat storage materials, and that both classes of salts have potential as sensible heat storage materials.

Struble, L.J.; Brown, P.W.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Process Heating Systems Optimization Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2003 ... PROCESS HEATING SYSTEMS OPTIMIZATION WORKSHOP. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency ...

230

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Materials Storage Materials Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of

231

Control of Combined Storage and Generation in Dynamic Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery energy storage units provide an added degree of freedom to a microgrid that allows time-shifting between the generation and use of energy. Microgrid energy storage elements are very similar to any other inverter-based source with the exception of bi-directional power flow capabilities. Having the ability to generate and accept power means that the demand and the supply can be disparate by as far as the power capabilities of the energy storage unit allow. This enables combined heat power systems to support a heat load demand independent of local electric power demand. Having an energy storage element on standby also allows for a certain amount of immediately available power to reduce the need for idling or lightly loaded rotating generators under the n-1 stability criterion. The relative speed of any inverter based source allows a sub-cycle change in power output to ensure that dynamic loads will be supplied regardless of the slow reaction of larger rotating sources that require seconds of response time to transients. Thirdly, they can act as a UPS system during grid faults, providing backup power for some time even for non-essential loads while the microgrid is islanded. Lastly, the energy storage element can provide an economic and/or logistical advantage by

Certs Microgrid; Robert Lasseter; Micah Erickson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eere.energy.gov H 2 and FC Technologies Manufacturing R&D Workshop Renaissance Hotel, Washington, DC August 11-12, 2011 Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage Ned T....

233

Water-storage-tube systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive solar collection/storage/distribution systems were surveyed, designed, fabricated, and mechanically and thermally tested. The types studied were clear and opaque fiberglass tubes, metal tubes with plastic liners, and thermosyphoning tubes. (MHR)

Hemker, P.

1981-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

234

Energy Storage Systems 2005 Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on October 20, 2005 in San Francisco, CA. The agenda and ESS program overview presentation are below.

235

Engineering Model of Liquid Storage Utility Tank for Heat Transfer Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The utility or chemical storage tank requires special engineering attention and heat transfer analysis because the tank content is very sensitive to temperature and surrounding environment such as atmospheric or outside air, humidity, and solar radiation heat. A simplified heat transfer model was developed to calculate the liquid content temperature of utility storage tank. The content of the utility storage tanks can be water or any other chemical liquid. An engineering model of liquid storage tank for heat transfer analysis and temperature calculations are presented and discussed in the examples of Tanks No. 1 containing oxalic acid and No. 2 containing sodium tetraphenylborate solution.

Kwon, K.C.

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): National Lab Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster...

237

Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced Title Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at...

238

Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service Country Denmark...

239

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Economics Presentations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economics Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Economics Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September...

240

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Power Electronics Presentati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Electronics Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Power Electronics Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

242

Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 2 morning presentations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Peer Review - Day 2 morning presentations Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 2 morning presentations The 2006 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage Systems...

243

NERSC Increases System Storage and Security for Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increases System Storage and Security for Users NERSC Increases System Storage and Security for Users April 28, 2009 Franklin Upgrades Improve IO Performance Throughout the month...

244

CRBRP decay heat removal systems  

SciTech Connect

The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented.

Hottel, R.E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C.E.; Kiley, M.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Why Systems Analysis for Energy Storage?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost Effectiveness Evaluation, Cost Effectiveness Evaluation, DNV KEMA Modeling for CPUC Energy Storage Proceeding Energy Storage Panel, EAC Meeting June 6, 2013 Common Pitfalls  Using historical prices - Prices are likely to change due to rule modifications, changes in regulation supply resources over time, changes in regulation needs over time - Depending on the amount of storage added to the market, the introduction of storage can change market prices  Modeling deterministic behavior (perfect performance assuming knowledge of upcoming prices) - Future prices are unknown and actual revenues will likely not reflect strategy that gets maximum revenue 100% of the time  Ignoring system effects - In addition to affecting prices, certain amounts of storage can affect imports/exports

246

Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating  

SciTech Connect

Homebuilders are exploring more cost effective combined space and water heating systems (combo systems) with major water heater manufacturers that are offering pre-engineered forced air space heating combo systems. In this project, unlike standardized tests, laboratory tests were conducted that subjected condensing tankless and storage water heater based combo systems to realistic, coincidental space and domestic hot water loads with the following key findings: 1) The tankless combo system maintained more stable DHW and space heating temperatures than the storage combo system. 2) The tankless combo system consistently achieved better daily efficiencies (i.e. 84%-93%) than the storage combo system (i.e. 81%- 91%) when the air handler was sized adequately and adjusted properly to achieve significant condensing operation. When condensing operation was not achieved, both systems performed with lower (i.e. 75%-88%), but similar efficiencies. 3) Air handlers currently packaged with combo systems are not designed to optimize condensing operation. More research is needed to develop air handlers specifically designed for condensing water heaters. 4) System efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved only on days where continual and steady space heating loads were required with significant condensing operation. For days where heating was more intermittent, the system efficiencies fell below 90%.

Kingston, T.; Scott, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Test report : Princeton power systems prototype energy storage system.  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Princeton Power Systems has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lithium ion phosphate batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Princeton Power Systems Prototype Energy Storage System.

Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Stirling engine heating system  

SciTech Connect

A hot gas engine is described wherein a working gas flows back and forth in a closed path between a relatively cooler compression cylinder side of the engine and a relatively hotter expansion cylinder side of the engine and the path contains means including a heat source and a heat sink acting upon the gas in cooperation with the compression and expansion cylinders to cause the gas to execute a thermodynamic cycle wherein useful mechanical output power is developed by the engine, the improvement in the heat source which comprises a plurality of individual tubes each forming a portion of the closed path for the working gas.

Johansson, L.N.; Houtman, W.H.; Percival, W.H.

1988-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage...

250

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for...

251

Assessment of energy storage concepts for use in pulsed space power systems  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary assessments have been completed for thermal energy storage in heat rejection systems as well as for regenerable electrical storage modules in systems having nuclear sources with Rankine power conversion and solar sources with Brayton and Rankine power conversion. Storage technologies considered for the regenerable modules include flywheels, batteries, fuel cells, superconducting magnets and capacitors. Both source and sink thermal storage were examined for the solar energy based systems. Benefits derived from incorporating thermal storage in the heat rejection system depend on the storage density and the radiator specific mass. The analysis shows that inclusion of a thermal store results in heat rejection system mass reductions for generation times of up to 1100 seconds. Results show that the storage system value (mass reduction) increases with decreasing total generation time. In general, the value is greatest for generation times of 600 seconds or less although mass savings are realized for generation times nearly twice as long. For a total generation time of 500 seconds, incorporating storage in a nuclear Rankine power system results in a mass reduction of 50%. System masses similar to the nuclear Rankine are obtainable for solar Rankine and Brayton cycles using regenerable electrical storage modules. However, a 100-orbit recharge time is required, when the constraint of keeping concentrator areas smaller than 1000 m/sup 2/ is also imposed.

Olszewski, M.; Morris, D.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Control system for electric water heater with heat pump external heat source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A control system for an electric water heater operatively associated with an external heat source, such as a heat pump. The water heater includes a water storage tank provided with an electric tank heating unit having a tank thermostat which closes in response to water temperature in the tank, allowing a flow of current through the tank heating unit so as to turn it on to heat the water, and which opens when the tank thermostat has been satisfied, interrupting the current flow so as to turn the tank heating unit off. The control system as responsive to the initial current surge through the tank heating unit when the tank thermostat closes to interrupt the current flow to the tank heating unit so as to maintain the heating unit off and to turn on the external heat source and maintain it on until the tank thermostat opens. The initial current surge cleans the contacts of the tank thermostat by burning off any insulating oxide residues which may have formed on them. The control system includes means responsive to abnormal conditions which would prevent the external heat source from heating water effectively for turning off the external heat source and turning on the tank heating unit and maintaining the external heat source off and the tank heating unit on until the tank thermostat is satisfied.

Shaffer Jr., J. E.; Picarello, J. F.

1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

Remote power systems with advanced storage technologies for Alaskan villages  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Remote Alaskan communities pay economic and environmental penalties for electricity, because they must import diesel as their primary fuel for electric power production, paying heavy transportation costs and potentially causing environmental damage with empty drums, leakage, and spills. For these reasons, remote villages offer a viable niche market where sustainable energy systems based on renewable resources and advanced energy storage technologies can compete favorably on purely economic grounds, while providing environmental benefits. These villages can also serve as a robust proving ground for systematic analysis, study, improvement, and optimization of sustainable energy systems with advanced technologies. This paper presents an analytical optimization of a remote power system for a hypothetical Alaskan village. The analysis considers the potential of generating renewable energy (e.g., wind and solar), along with the possibility of using energy storage to take full advantage of the intermittent renewable sources available to these villages. Storage in the form of either compressed hydrogen or zinc pellets can then provide electricity from hydrogen or zinc-air fuel cells when renewable sources are unavailable.The analytical results show a great potential to reduce fossil fuel consumption and costs basing renewable energy combined with advanced energy storage devices. The best solution for our hypothetical village appears to be a hybrid energy system, which can reduce consumption of diesel fuel by over 50% with annualized cost savings by over 30% by adding wind turbines to the existing diesel generators. When energy storage devices are added, diesel fuel consumption and costs can be reduced substantially more. With optimized energy storage, use of the diesel generatorss can be reduced to almost zero, with the existing equipment only maintained for added reliability. However about one quarter of the original diesel consumption is still used for heating purposes. (We use the term diesel to encompass the fuel, often called heating or fuel oil, of similar or identical properties.)

Isherwood, W.; Smith, R.; Aceves, S.; Berry, G.; Clark, W.; Johnson, R.; Das, D.; Goering, D.; Seifert, R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuesday, February 15, 2011 - Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Tuesday, February 15, 2011 - Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Purpose: Identify R&D needs and technical pathways associated with the continued development and validation of cryo-compressed and cryo-sorption hydrogen storage technologies, highlighting those aspects common to both technologies as well as identifying their unique requirements and issues that should be addressed. 8:30 Welcome/Introductions/Workshop objectives/Recap of previous day Ned Stetson, DOE 9:00 OEM Perspective on Cryogenic H 2 Storage (20 min presentation/20 min discussion) Tobias Brunner, BMW 9:40 Performance Comparison and Cost Review (20 min presentation/20 min discussion) Rajesh Ahluwalia, ANL 10:20 Break (10 minutes) 10:30 Expert Panel Discussion (Members will each have 15 minutes for presentations)

255

Energy storage systems cost update : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports the methodology for calculating present worth of system and operating costs for a number of energy storage technologies for representative electric utility applications. The values are an update from earlier reports, categorized by application use parameters. This work presents an update of energy storage system costs assessed previously and separately by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program. The primary objective of the series of studies has been to express electricity storage benefits and costs using consistent assumptions, so that helpful benefit/cost comparisons can be made. Costs of energy storage systems depend not only on the type of technology, but also on the planned operation and especially the hours of storage needed. Calculating the present worth of life-cycle costs makes it possible to compare benefit values estimated on the same basis.

Schoenung, Susan M. (Longitude 122 West, Menlo Park, CA)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling applications. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of quarterly progress reports covering activities at ORNL to develop thermal energy storage (TES) technology applicable to building heating and cooling. Studies to be carried out will emphasize latent heat storage in that sensible heat storage is held to be an essentially existing technology. Development of a time-dependent analytical model of a TES system charged with a phase-change material was started. A report on TES subsystems for application to solar energy sources is nearing completion. Studies into the physical chemistry of TES materials were initiated. Preliminary data were obtained on the melt-freeze cycle behavior and viscosities of sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate and a mixture of Glauber's salt and Borax; limited melt-freeze data were obtained on two paraffin waxes. A subcontract was signed with Monsanto Research Corporation for studies on form-stable crystalline polymer pellets for TES; subcontracts are being negotiated with four other organizations (Clemson University, Dow Chemical Company, Franklin Institute, and Suntek Research Associates). Review of 10 of 13 unsolicited proposals received was completed by the end of June 1976.

Hoffman, H.W.; Kedl, R.J.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative energy storages for land-atmosphere interactions, an issue that has been largely neglected so far. We the representation of biomass energy storages against measurements of surface energy and CO2 fluxes. We

258

FRASH: Exploiting storage class memory in hybrid file system for hierarchical storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we develop a novel hybrid file system, FRASH, for storage-class memory and NAND Flash. Despite the promising physical characteristics of storage-class memory, its scale is an order of magnitude smaller than the current storage device scale. ... Keywords: Flash storage, log-structured file system

Jaemin Jung; Youjip Won; Eunki Kim; Hyungjong Shin; Byeonggil Jeon

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO 2Fluid, Proceedings, World Geothermal Congress 2010, Bali,Remain? Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 17,

Pruess, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. |...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reassessment of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) Transmission System Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reassesses the benefits of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) for enhancing transmission system performance.

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

262

Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using ...  

Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies United States Patent

263

STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION AND DISPOSAL SYSTEM FOR USED NUCLEAR ...  

STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION AND DISPOSAL SYSTEM FOR USED NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES United States Patent Application

264

Prefeasibility analysis and study of the seasonal storage systems for the Pennsylvania Avenue Redevelopment Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Annual Cycle Energy Storage (ACES) concept as applied on a community scale to Market Square Complex on Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C. is discussed. Four alternatives of seasonal energy storage are examined. Each alternative was examined on the energy saving aspect and its operational and economic feasibility. Of the alternatives considered the most efficient system from the point of view of energy and economic feasibility was found to be system No. 3 dealing with heat pump generated ice for seasonal storage and it was thus selected and recommended for further study. The system utilizes the heat pump for heating the buildings in winter and for meeting the domestic hot water requirements. The heat pump obtains its heat by extracting the heat of fusion of water and thereby converting it to ice. The method suggested is to use the ice maker evaporator with water sprayed over the evaporator coil and being converted to ice. The ice would be used to cool the buildings during the summer by circulating chilled water through the ice bin. This system is expected to supply about 70% of the summer cooling requirements and provide a 100% cut in electric peak demand. The heat pumpsystem using the slab as storage of the heat rejected for reusing in winter time was found inefficient from the energy point of view. Only about 4% of the heat required during winter could be stored in the slab. The solar energy annual storage was found efficient energywise but prohibitive from the economical point of view. The winter cold air potential to make ice for storage was found efficient from the energy point of view but prohibitive from the economical point of view and because of unpredictability of system performance. It is therefore, recommended that the heat pump system with ice storage be taken up for a further feasibility study.

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluation of thermal-energy-storage materials for advanced compressed-air energy-storage systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Proposed designs of adiabatic and hybrid advanced compressed air energy storage (ACAS) plants have utilized sensible heat storage systems to store the heat developed during air compression for subsequent use during the power generation phase of operation. This experimental study was performed to screen four porposed heat storage materials for performance and durability: 3/8-in. sintered iron oxide pellets, 1/2-in. Denstone pellets, 1-in. cast iron alloy balls, and crushed Dresser basalt. Specific concerns addressed included particle formation and thermal ratcheting of the materials during thermal cycling and the chemical attack on the materials by the high temperature and moist environment in an ACAS heat storage bed. The results indicated that from the durability standpoint Denstone, cast iron containing 27% or more chromium, and crushed Dresser basalt would possible stand up to ACAS conditions. If costs are considered in addition to durability and performance, the crushed Dresser basalt would probably be the most desirable heat storage material for adiabatic and hybrid ACAS plants.

Zaloudek, F.R.; Wheeler, K.R.; Marksberry, L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Annual collection and storage of solar energy for the heating of buildings. Report No. 2. Annual progress report, May 1976--July 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new system for year-round collection and storage of solar heated water for heating of buildings has been designed and constructed at the University of Virginia. The system is composed of an energy storage sub-system which stores hot water in an underground pool and of a solar collector sub-system which acts not only to collect solar energy throughout the year but also to limit the evaporative and convective heat losses from the storage system. The annual collection and storage system began operation in late February 1977. Data are presented which illustrates the transient heat transfer which occurs during the start-up phase of operation. Thermal performance results are presented illustrating the efficiency of the solar collector and the variation of solar energy input to storage during a typical day's operation in May. Data are also presented which show the transient build-up of energy storage in the earth which surrounds the storage pool. An analog model has been developed to analyze the transient energy phenomena which occur within the earth surrounding the pool. These include transient heat losses from the pool to the earth and energy storage within the earth. Results of the analog model for idealized conditions are confirmed by exact mathematical solutions and by numerical analysis using a digital computer.

Beard, J. T.; Iachetta, F. A.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Dickey, J. W.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Encapsulated sink-side thermal energy storage for pulsed space power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In sprint mode space applications, which require high power for relatively short durations, energy storage devices may be employed to reduce the size and mass of the thermal management system. This is accomplished by placing the reject heat in the thermal store during the sprint mode. During the remaining nonoperational portion of the orbit the stored heat is dissipated to space. The heat rejection rate is thus reduced, and this results in a smaller radiator being required. Lithium hydride (LiH) has been identfied as the best candidate for use in power system sink-side thermal energy storage applications due to its superior heat storage properties and suitable melt temperature (T/sub m/ = 962K). To maximize storage density, both sensible and latent modes of heat storage are used. This paper focuses on the use of encapsulated lithium hydride shapes in a packed bed storage unit with lithium or NaK as the heat transport fluid. Analytical and experimental development work associated with the concept is described. Since the program is in its early stages, emphasis thus far has been on feasibility issues associated with encapsulating lithium hydride spheres. These issues include shell stress induced by phase-change during heating, hydrogen diffusion through the encapsulating shell, heat transfer limitations due to poor conductivity of the salt, void behavior, and material constraints. The impact of these issues on the design of encapsulated lithium hydride spheres has been evaluated, and design alternatives have been identified for circumventing key problem areas.

Foote, J.P.; Morris, D.G.; Olszewski, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Overview  

SciTech Connect

Utility battery energy storage allows a utility or customer to store electrical energy for dispatch at a time when its use is more economical, strategic, or efficient. The UBS program sponsors systems analyses, technology development of subsystems and systems integration, laboratory and field evaluation, and industry outreach. Achievements and planned activities in each area are discussed.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Comparison of natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermosyphon heat exchangers are used in indirect solar water heating systems to avoid using a pump to circulate water from the storage tank to the heat exchanger. In this study, the authors consider the effect of heat exchanger design on system performance. They also compare performance of a system with thermosyphon flow to the same system with a 40W pump in the water loop. In the first part of the study, the authors consider the impact of heat exchanger design on the thermal performance of both one- and two-collector solar water heaters. The comparison is based on Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) OG300 simulations. The thermosyphon heat exchangers considered are (1) a one-pass, double wall, 0.22 m{sup 2}, four tube-in-shell heat exchanger manufactured by AAA Service and Supply, Inc., (the Quad-Rod); (2) a two-pass, double wall, 0.2 m{sup 2}, tube-in-shell made by Heliodyne, Inc., but not intended for commercial development; (3) a one-pass, single wall, 0.28 m{sup 2}, 31 tube-in-shell heat exchanger from Young Radiator Company, and (4) a one-pass single-wall, 0.61 m{sup 2}, four coil-in-shell heat exchanger made by ThermoDynamics Ltd. The authors compare performance of the systems with thermosyphon heat exchangers to a system with a 40 W pump used with the Quad-Rod heat exchanger. In the second part of the study, the effects of reducing frictional losses through the heat exchanger and/or the pipes connecting the heat exchanger to the storage tank, and increasing heat transfer area are evaluated in terms of OG300 ratings.

Davidson, J.; Liu, W.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

Alan C. Cooper

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

Heat transport system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

Harkness, Samuel D. (McMurray, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

First university owned district heating system using biomass heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights · First university owned district heating system using biomass heat · Capacity: 15 MMBtu Main Campus District Heating Performance · Avoided: 3500 tonnes of CO2 · Particulate: less than 10 mg District Heating Goals To displace 85% of natural gas used for core campus heating. Fuel Bunker Sawmill

Northern British Columbia, University of

274

Uses for Distributed Photovoltaic and Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A range of factors are driving increases in the quantity of distributed photovoltaics connected to utility distribution systems. Going forward, it is anticipated that this growth will continue and that battery storage systems may also become common. These systems are expected to be both customer and utility owned. In either case, there is interest in understanding the full range of ways in which these systems might be used to maximize their value, to enable their integration in large numbers, and to opti...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

275

Development of a complex compound chill storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage system applicable to industrial refrigeration needs at temperatures as low as {minus}28{degree}C has been developed. The system is based on the chemical bonding between a gaseous refrigerant and a solid salt. The system has been tested successfully in the laboratory and a small unit capable of holding 4 ton-h has been constructed in a factory environment. Much of the development efforts have centered on designing the reactor/heat exchanger where the salt and the refrigerant are combined. Economic evaluations have been made and show an estimated simple rate of return between 30 and 50%. 6 refs., 30 figs.

Rockenfelleer, U.; Kirol, L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Magnetic Energy Storage System: Superconducting Magnet Energy Storage System with Direct Power Electronics Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GRIDS Project: ABB is developing an advanced energy storage system using superconducting magnets that could store significantly more energy than today’s best magnetic storage technologies at a fraction of the cost. This system could provide enough storage capacity to encourage more widespread use of renewable power like wind and solar. Superconducting magnetic energy storage systems have been in development for almost 3 decades; however, past devices were designed to supply power only for short durations—generally less than a few minutes. ABB’s system would deliver the stored energy at very low cost, making it ideal for eventual use in the electricity grid as a costeffective competitor to batteries and other energy storage technologies. The device could potentially cost even less, on a per kilowatt basis, than traditional lead-acid batteries.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Management Options Heat Management Options Industrial Process Heating Systems By Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi E-mail: athekdi@e3minc.com E3M, Inc. August 20, 2009 2 Source of Waste Heat in Industries * Steam Generation * Fluid Heating * Calcining * Drying * Heat Treating * Metal Heating * Metal and Non-metal Melting * Smelting, agglomeration etc. * Curing and Forming * Other Heating Waste heat is everywhere! Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc 3 Waste Heat Sources from Process Heating Equipment * Hot gases - combustion products - Temperature from 300 deg. F. to 3000 deg.F. * Radiation-Convection heat loss - From temperature source of 500 deg. F. to 2500 deg. F. * Sensible-latent heat in heated product - From temperature 400 deg. F. to 2200 deg. F. * Cooling water or other liquids - Temperature from 100 deg. F. to 180 deg. F.

278

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.a central solar thermal power plant. A variety of heliostatSTORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating solar air collector PV-panel fannon-return valve DHW tank mantle cold waterhot water roof Solar Energy Centre Denmark Danish Technological Institute SEC-R-29 #12;Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating Søren �stergaard Jensen

280

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems (e.g., PV or fuel cells with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. The interactions among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and CO2 emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that can pursue two strategies as its objective function. These two strategies are minimization of its annual energy costs or of its CO2 emissions. The problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, e.g., nursing homes, to obtain not only the optimal investment portfolio, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules for the selected technologies. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in micro-generation optimization on a building level, with example applications in New York State and California. It shows results from a two-year research projectperformed for the U.S. Department of Energy and ongoing work. Contrary to established expectations, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption compete rather than supplement each other considering the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply. The work shows that high electricity tariffs during on-peak hours are a significant driver for the adoption of electric storage technologies. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries have to be charged by grid power during off-peak hours instead of PV during on-peak hours. In contrast, we also show a CO2 minimization strategy where the common assumption that batteries can be charged by PV can be fulfilled at extraordinarily high energy costs for the site.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Heat pump water heater and storage tank assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water heater and storage tank assembly comprises a housing defining a chamber, an inlet for admitting cold water to the chamber, and an outlet for permitting flow of hot water from the chamber. A compressor is mounted on the housing and is removed from the chamber. A condenser comprises a tube adapted to receive refrigerant from the compressor, and winding around the chamber to impart heat to water in the chamber. An evaporator is mounted on the housing and removed from the chamber, the evaporator being adapted to receive refrigerant from the condenser and to discharge refrigerant to conduits in communication with the compressor. An electric resistance element extends into the chamber, and a thermostat is disposed in the chamber and is operative to sense water temperature and to actuate the resistance element upon the water temperature dropping to a selected level. The assembly includes a first connection at an external end of the inlet, a second connection at an external end of the outlet, and a third connection for connecting the resistance element, compressor and evaporator to an electrical power source.

Dieckmann, John T. (Belmont, MA); Nowicki, Brian J. (Watertown, MA); Teagan, W. Peter (Acton, MA); Zogg, Robert (Belmont, MA)

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

282

Macroencapsulation of Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of a latent heat storage system using phase change materials (PCMs) is an effective way of storing thermal energy. Latent heat storage enables… (more)

Pendyala, Swetha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a simple thermal energy storage system that already exists in almost every structure - concrete. Thermal storage calculations simulate sub-cooling of a building's structure during unoccupied times. During occupied times, the sub-cooled concrete reduces peak cooling demand, thereby lowering demand and saving money. In addition, significant savings are possible in the first cost of chilled water equipment, and the smaller chillers run at peak capacity and efficiency during a greater portion of their run time. The building, controlled by an Energy Management and Control System (EMCS), "learns" from past experience how to run the building efficiently. The result is an optimized balance between energy cost and comfort.

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Heating System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating System Basics Heating System Basics Heating System Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:32pm Addthis A variety of heating technologies are available today. You can learn more about what heating systems and heat pumps are commonly used today and how they work below. To learn how to use these technologies in your own home, see the Home Heating Systems section on Energy Saver. Furnaces and Boilers Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through a building using ducts. Boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating. Wood and Pellet Heating Provides a way to heat a building using biomass or waste sources. Electric Resistance Heating Can be supplied by centralized electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Active Solar Heating Uses the sun to heat either air or liquid and can serve as a supplemental

285

Heating System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating System Basics Heating System Basics Heating System Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:32pm Addthis A variety of heating technologies are available today. You can learn more about what heating systems and heat pumps are commonly used today and how they work below. To learn how to use these technologies in your own home, see the Home Heating Systems section on Energy Saver. Furnaces and Boilers Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through a building using ducts. Boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating. Wood and Pellet Heating Provides a way to heat a building using biomass or waste sources. Electric Resistance Heating Can be supplied by centralized electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Active Solar Heating Uses the sun to heat either air or liquid and can serve as a supplemental

286

Understanding Energy Storage Solutions and Capabilities on Utility Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widespread use of storage will require better grid integration tools to plan for the optimal size, use, and location of energy storage systems. Also important will be a coordinated effort between technology developers and utilities to ensure that storage systems are designed to adequately address utility needs. Utilities must understand the technical attributes and grid operational benefits of energy storage systems. Such operational benefits can also improve the definition of storage system functional r...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

287

DOE Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Transfer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Transfer Projects For Up to $67.6 Million DOE Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Transfer Projects For Up to $67.6 Million September 19, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced selections for negotiations of award under the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids and Novel Thermal Storage Concepts for Concentrating Solar Power Generation. These 15 new projects, for up to approximately $67.6 million, will facilitate the development of lower-cost energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) technology. These projects support President Bush's Solar America Initiative, which aims to make solar energy cost-competitive with conventional forms of electricity

288

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat may be limited if an energy source cannot be fully utilized in an otherwise available out of phase or unequal capacity end-use process. This paper summarizes the results of a technical and economic evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results showing estimated installed costs, net energy savings, economic benefits, and utility impact are presented at both single plant and industry levels for 14 of 24 applications having after tax ROR's in excess of 20 percent. Maximum energy and cost savings for 9 of these 14 systems are shown to be conditional on the use of TES.

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Methods for producing the plasma initiation pulse in ohmic heating circuits in tokamak power reactors: resistive dissipation, transient inductive storage, and transient capacitive storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper compares the resistive dissipation method with transient storage methods: inductive and capacitive. While the capacitive method is relatively well known through its variant, the ''Inall circuit,'' the inductive transient storage method to produce the plasma initiation pulse is less well known. It consists of two closely coupled coils, one connected with a system of differentially compounded slow discharge homopolar machines. The magnetic energy is suddenly taken from the ohmic heating circuit and temporarily stored in the mutual inductance of the two coils--thus producing the pulse.

Driga, M.D.; Mayhall, D.J.; Weldon, W.F.; Rylander, H.G.; Woodson, H.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Balanced reconfiguration of storage banks in a hybrid electrical energy storage system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compared with the conventional homogeneous electrical energy storage (EES) systems, hybrid electrical energy storage (HEES) systems provide high output power and energy density as well as high power conversion efficiency and low self-discharge at a low ... Keywords: bank reconfiguration, hybrid electrical energy storage system

Younghyun Kim; Sangyoung Park; Yanzhi Wang; Qing Xie; Naehyuck Chang; Massimo Poncino; Massoud Pedram

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hybrid energy storage system integration for vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy consumption and the associated environmental impact are a pressing challenge faced by the transportation sector. Emerging electric-drive vehicles have shown promises for substantial reductions in petroleum use and vehicle emissions. Their success, ... Keywords: analysis, electric-drive vehicles, energy storage systems

Jia Wang; Kun Li; Qin Lv; Hai Zhou; Li Shang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Experimental evaluation of a simulation model for wrap-around heat exchanger, solar storage tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance of a commercially available 80 gallon, solar storage tank with an integral wrap-around heat exchanger is characterized experimentally an indoor test stand. The experimental results are used to evaluated the accuracy of a previously developed simulation model. Heat input on the collector side of the heat exchanger is held constant causing the heat transfer to reach a quasi-steady state. Temperatures in the heat exchanger and tank increase with time, however, the temperature differences across the heat exchanger remain nearly constant. Several combinations of heat input and collector loop flow are investigated. The development of the tank temperature profiles over time and the overall heat transfer performance predicted by the model are compared with experimental results. The influence of an electric auxiliary heater located in the top of the solar storage tank on the heat exchanger performance is investigated. Experimental normalization of the model is considered and modifications to the model and experiments are recommended.

Miller, J.A.; Hittle, D.C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat and waste heat recovery in the primary aluminum industry. Final report, September 1977-September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study entitled, Applications of Thermal Energy Storage to Process Heat and Waste Heat Recovery in the Primary Aluminum Industry are presented. In this preliminary study, a system has been identified by which the large amounts of low-grade waste energy in the primary pollution control system gas stream can be utilized for comfort heating in nearby communities. Energy is stored in the form of hot water, contained in conventional, insulated steel tanks, enabling a more efficient utilization of the constant energy source by the cyclical energy demand. Less expensive energy storage means (heated ponds, aquifers), when they become fully characterized, will allow even more cost-competitive systems. Extensive design tradeoff studies have been performed. These tradeoff studies indicate that a heating demand equivalent to 12,000 single-family residences can be supplied by the energy from the Intalco plant. Using a 30-year payback criterion (consistent with utility planning practice), the average cost of energy supplied over the system useful life is predicted at one-third the average cost of fossil fuel. The study clearly shows that the utilization of waste energy from aluminum plants is both technically and economically attractive. The program included a detailed survey of all aluminum plants within the United States, allowing the site specific analyses to be extrapolated to a national basis. Should waste heat recovery systems be implemented by 1985, a national yearly savings of 6.5 million barrels of oil can be realized.

Katter, L.B.; Hoskins, R.L.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

None

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

295

Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an evaluation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with simple gas turbine cogeneration systems. The TES system captures and stores thermal energy from the gas turbine exhaust for immediate or future generation of process heat. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers the following two significant advantages: (1) Electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced; (2) Although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The study evaluated the cost of power produced by cogeneration and cogeneration/TES systems designed to serve a fixed process steam load. The value of the process steam was set at the levelized cost estimated for the steam from a conventional stand-alone boiler. Power costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle power plants were also calculated for comparison. The results indicated that peak power production costs for the cogeneration/TES systems were between 25% and 40% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combustion turbine and between 15% and 35% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combined-cycle plant. The ranges reflect differences in the daily power production schedule and process steam pressure/temperature assumptions for the cases evaluated. Further cost reductions may result from optimization of current cogeneration/TES system designs and improvement in TES technology through future research and development.

Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Monitoring a petabyte scale storage system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fermilab operates a petabyte scale storage system, Enstore, which is the primary data store for experiments' large data sets. The Enstore system regularly transfers greater than 15 Terabytes of data each day. It is designed using a client-server architecture providing sufficient modularity to allow easy addition and replacement of hardware and software components. Monitoring of this system is essential to insure the integrity of the data that is stored in it and to maintain the high volume access that this system supports. The monitoring of this distributed system is accomplished using a variety of tools and techniques that present information for use by a variety of roles (operator, storage system administrator, storage software developer, user). Essential elements of the system are monitored: performance, hardware, firmware, software, network, data integrity. We will present details of the deployed monitoring tools with an emphasis on the different techniques that have proved useful to each role. Experience with the monitoring tools and techniques, what worked and what did not will be presented.

Bakken, Jon; Berman, Eileen; Huang, Chih-Hao; Moibenko, Alexander; Petravick, Don; Zalokar, Michael; /Fermilab

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Heat Pump System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pump System Basics Heat Pump System Basics Heat Pump System Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:02am Addthis Like a refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space into a warm space, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide up to four times the amount of energy they consume. Air-Source Heat Pump Transfers heat between the inside of a building and the outside air. Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump Ductless versions of air-source heat pumps. Absorption Heat Pump Uses heat as its energy source. Geothermal Heat Pumps Use the constant temperature of the earth as the exchange medium instead of the outside air temperature. Addthis Related Articles A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar.

298

Molten salt thermal energy storage systems. Project 8981, final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of storing thermal energy at temperatures of 450/sup 0/ to 535/sup 0/C (850/sup 0/ to 1000/sup 0/F) in the form of latent heat of fusion has been examined for over 30 inorganic salts and salt mixtures. Alkali carbonate mixtures are attractive as phase-change storage materials in this temperature range because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, moderate cost, low volumetric expansion upon melting, low corrosivity, and good chemical stability. An equimolar mixture of Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, which melts at 505/sup 0/C with a latent heat of 148 Btu/lb, was chosen for experimental study. The cyclic charge/discharge behavior of laboratory- and engineering-scale systems was determined and compared with predictions based on a mathematical heat-transfer model that was developed during this program. The thermal performance of one engineering-scale unit remained very stable during 1400 hours of cyclic operation. Several means of improving heat conduction through the solid salt were explored. Areas requiring further investigation have been identified.

Maru, H.C.; Dullea, J.F.; Kardas, A.; Paul, L.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature  

SciTech Connect

We conducted observations and modeling at a forest site to assess importance of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages for land-atmosphere interactions. We used the terrestrial ecosystem Fluxes And Pools Integrated Simulator (FAPIS). We first examined FAPIS performance by testing its predictions with and without biomass energy storages against measurements of surface energy and CO2 fluxes. We then evaluated the magnitudes and temporal patterns of the calculated biomass energy storages. Effects of energy storages on flux exchanges and variations of radiative temperature were investigated by contrasting FAPIS simulations with and without the storages. We found that with the storages, FAPIS predictions agreed with measurements well; without them, FAPIS performance deteriorated for all surface energy fluxes. The biomass heat storage and biochemical energy storage had clear diurnal patterns with typical ranges from -50 to 50 and -3 to 20 Wm-2, respectively; these typical ranges were exceeded substantially when there were sudden changes in atmospheric conditions. Without-storage simulations produced larger sensible and latent heat fluxes during the day but smaller fluxes (more negative values) at night as compared with with-storage simulations. Similarly, without-storage simulations had higher surface radiative temperature during the day but lower radiative temperature at night, indicating that the biomass energy storages act to dampen diurnal temperature range. Therefore, biomass heat and biochemical energy storages are an integral and substantial part of the surface energy budget and play a role in modulating land surface temperatures and must be considered in studies of land - atmosphere interactions and climate modeling.

Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL; Heuer, Mark [ATDD, NOAA; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Liu, Qing [ORNL; Riggs, Jeffery S [ORNL; Sluss, Daniel Wayne [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Power Electronics Presentations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Electronics Power Electronics Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Power Electronics Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to power electronics are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems International Energy Storage Programs Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - StatCom with Energy Storage to Smooth Intermittent Power Output of Wind Farms - Mesut Baran, NC State.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Cyber-Physical Systems Distributed Control - Mariesa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Heat pump having improved defrost system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger. 2 figs.

Chen, F.C.; Mei, V.C.; Murphy, R.W.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

302

Heat pump having improved defrost system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger.

Chen, Fang C. (Knoxville, TN); Mei, Viung C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Murphy, Richard W. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Peer Review 7 Peer Review Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. The agenda and ESS program overview presentation are below. Presentation categories Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems International Energy Storage Programs Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - Agenda.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Program Overview - John Boyes, SNL.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Agenda/Presentation List Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage

304

Heat storage material comprising calcium chloride-hexahydrate and a nucleating agent  

SciTech Connect

The utility of calcium chloride-hexahydrate as a heat storage material is improved when barium carbonate, strontium carbonate, barium fluoride, barium fluoride-hydrofluoride and/or strontium fluoride is used as a nucleating agent to prevent supercooling.

Gawron, K.; Schroder, J.

1980-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

305

Heat Storage in Urban Areas: Local-Scale Observations and Evaluation of a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flux density of sensible heat to or from storage in the physical mass of the city is determined for seven cities (Chicago, Illinois; Los Angeles, California; Mexico City, Distrito Federal; Miami, Florida; Sacramento, California; Tucson, ...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

EA-1211: Relocation and Storage of Isotopic Heat Sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for relocation and storage of the isotopic heat sources at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

307

Tree-Shaped Fluid Flow and Heat Storage in a Conducting Solid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper documents the time-dependent thermal interaction between a fluid stream configured as a plane tree of varying complexity embedded in a conducting solid with finite volume and insulated boundaries. The time scales of the convection-conduction phenomenon are identified. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional configurations are simulated numerically. The number of length scales of the tree architecture varies from one to four. The results show that the heat transfer density increases, and the time of approach to equilibrium decreases as the complexity of the tree designs increases. These results are then formulated in the classical notation of energy storage by sensible heating, which shows that the effective number of heat transfer units increases as the complexity of the tree design increases. The complexity of heat transfer designs in many applications is constrained by first cost and operating cost considerations. This work provides a fundamental basis for objective evaluation of cost and performance tradeoffs in thermal design of energy systems with complexity as an unconstrained parameter that can be actively varied over a broad range to determine the optimum system design.

Combelles, L.; Lorente, S.; Anderson, R.; Bejan, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The control of ice storage systems  

SciTech Connect

The tradeoffs between chiller and tank capacity for different load profiles and two storage strategies are evaluated in this article. Air-conditioning systems that employ ice storage incorporate equipment that produces ice during one period and melts it in another period to provide cooling for the building. In designing such systems, there are two basic strategies to consider: full-load and partial-load. In a full-load strategy, the entire daytime cooling energy is met using only cooling supplied by the ice storage tank. In a partial-load strategy, the chiller and the storage are used simultaneously to meet the load. With a full-load strategy, the tank capacity must be sufficient to meet the entire energy requirement, and the chiller capacity must be sufficient to recharge the tank during the night-time. In a partial-load strategy, a smaller chiller and tank than that for a full-load strategy are required, and there are many combinations of the two that will meet a given building load. The design and sizing of the components of an ice storage system depend not only on the desired strategy and total daily cooling energy but also on other factors. The maximum load dictates the amount of cooling required at any time. The cooling rate provided by an ice filled tank is not constant, but decreases as the ice inventory drops, and the time that the maximum load occurs is important. Thus, there is an interaction between the building load profile and tank size. In addition, the flow rate of the circulating fluid through the tank and the cooling coil may limit the supply air temperatures that may be reached. Thus, the circulating fluid flow rate must be sufficient to provide the desired rates of cooling to the building. The challenge to the design engineer is to size the components to meet the building load at all times at the lowest system cost. Effective designs must acknowledge the dynamic performance of the ice storage system.

Carey, C.W. [Amana Corp., IA (United States); Mitchell, J.W.; Beckman, W.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Study of Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump systems often combine a traditional geothermal system with either a cooling tower or fluid cooler for heat rejection and a boiler or solar heat collector for heat addition to the loop. These systems offer the same energy efficiency benefits as full geothermal systems to utilities and their customers but at a potentially lower first cost. Many hybrid systems have materialized to resolve heat buildup in full geothermal system loops where loop temperatures continue to rise as ...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

310

Pulse thermal energy transport/storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulse-thermal pump having a novel fluid flow wherein heat admitted to a closed system raises the pressure in a closed evaporator chamber while another interconnected evaporator chamber remains open. This creates a large pressure differential, and at a predetermined pressure the closed evaporator is opened and the opened evaporator is closed. This difference in pressure initiates fluid flow in the system.

Weislogel, Mark M. (23133 Switzer Rd., Brookpark, OH 44142)

1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

On-board hydrogen storage system using metal hydride  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen powered hybrid electric bus has been developed for demonstration in normal city bus service in the City of Augusta, Georgia, USA. The development team, called H2Fuel Bus Team, consists of representatives from government, industry and research institutions. The bus uses hydrogen to fuel an internal combustion engine which drives an electric generator. The generator charges a set of batteries which runs the electric bus. The hydrogen fuel and the hybrid concept combine to achieve the goal of near-zero emission and high fuel efficiency. The hydrogen fuel is stored in a solid form using an on-board metal hydride storage system. The system was designed for a hydrogen capacity of 25 kg. It uses the engine coolant for heat to generate a discharge pressure higher than 6 atm. The operation conditions are temperature from ambient to 70 degrees C, hydrogen discharge rate to 6 kg/hr, and refueling time 1.5 hours. Preliminary tests showed that the performance of the on-board storage system exceeded the design requirements. Long term tests have been planned to begin in 2 months. This paper discusses the design and performance of the on-board hydrogen storage system.

Heung, L.K.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARRA Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 2 (Day 2): ARRA Projects The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a peer...

313

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted...

314

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poster Session 2 (Day 2): SBIR Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 2 (Day 2): SBIR Projects The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program...

315

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

316

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Day 1, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a peer review and update...

317

Klystron "efficiency loop" for the ALS storage ring RF system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFICIENCY LOOP” FOR THE ALS STORAGE RING RF SYSTEM* S.at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to decrease thethe cavities. 1 INTRODUCTION ALS Storage Ring RF system is

Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Julian, Jim; Baptiste, Kenneth

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Innovations in ESS Presentations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations in ESS Innovations in ESS Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Innovations in ESS Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to innovations in energy storage systems are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems International Energy Storage Programs Power Electronics ESS 2007 Peer Review - Evaluation of Lead-Carbon Storage Devices for Utility Applications - Enders Dickinson, MeadWestvaco.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - High Voltage Electrochemical Capacitor - David

319

Model based design of an automotive-scale, metal hydride hydrogen storage system.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia and General Motors have successfully designed, fabricated, and experimentally operated a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system using the complex metal hydride sodium alanate. Over the 6 year project, the team tackled the primary barriers associated with storage and delivery of hydrogen including mass, volume, efficiency and cost. The result was the hydrogen storage demonstration system design. The key technologies developed for this hydrogen storage system include optimal heat exchange designs, thermal properties enhancement, a unique catalytic hydrogen burner and energy efficient control schemes. The prototype system designed, built, and operated to demonstrate these technologies consists of four identical hydrogen storage modules with a total hydrogen capacity of 3 kg. Each module consists of twelve stainless steel tubes that contain the enhanced sodium alanate. The tubes are arranged in a staggered, 4 x 3 array and enclosed by a steel shell to form a shell and tube heat exchanger. Temperature control during hydrogen absorption and desorption is accomplished by circulating a heat transfer fluid through each module shell. For desorption, heat is provided by the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen within a high efficiency, compact heat exchanger. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to the circulating heat transfer fluid. The demonstration system module design and the system control strategies were enabled by experiment-based, computational simulations that included heat and mass transfer coupled with chemical kinetics. Module heat exchange systems were optimized using multi-dimensional models of coupled fluid dynamics and heat transfer. Chemical kinetics models were coupled with both heat and mass transfer calculations to design the sodium alanate vessels. Fluid flow distribution was a key aspect of the design for the hydrogen storage modules and computational simulations were used to balance heat transfer with fluid pressure requirements. An overview of the hydrogen storage system will be given, and examples of these models and simulation results will be described and related to component design. In addition, comparisons of demonstration system experimental results to model predictions will be reported.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.; Jorgensen, Scott W. (General Motors R& D); Dedrick, Daniel E.; Evans, Gregory Herbert

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nZ The brick and gas heat capacities, cross-sectional areaConductivity! 10B9"K, W! mOK Heat Capacity! 1089°K, J/kg"KHelium has the highest heat capacity per unit mass and the

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on June, 1978 prices, AN OVERVIEW OF THE SOLAR POWER PLANTstorage for a solar power plant at a reasonable price usingsolar power plant energy storage for a reasonable price

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , The Central Reciever Power Plant: An Environmental,of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of Storage

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stores or releases thermal energy. This subsystem consistsGas - 436 MW Annual Thermal Energy Absorbed by the Heatof Storage Tanks, m Thermal Energy Stored per Cycle. MW -hr

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

788-1), December 1976. Electric Power Research Institute,CONCEPT FOR SOLAR ELECTRIC POWER: Interim Report, Report No.generate t 100 MW , gross electric power. e Storage has been

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural-Draft Dry-Cooling Tower • Power-Generation SubsystemSubsystem Costs Cost a, b, Dry-Cooling Tower Costs c, II.Steam Wet-Cooling Tower Costs Turbine~Generator STORAGE UNIT

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar space heating system with heat input and building loadBUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATINGBUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Heat Distribution Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distribution Systems Distribution Systems Heat Distribution Systems May 16, 2013 - 5:26pm Addthis Radiators are used in steam and hot water heating. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/Jot Radiators are used in steam and hot water heating. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/Jot Heat is distributed through your home in a variety of ways. Forced-air systems use ducts that can also be used for central air conditioning and heat pump systems. Radiant heating systems also have unique heat distribution systems. That leaves two heat distribution systems -- steam radiators and hot water radiators. Steam Radiators Steam heating is one of the oldest heating technologies, but the process of boiling and condensing water is inherently less efficient than more modern systems, plus it typically suffers from significant lag times between the

330

Solar heating system installed at Stamford, CT. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on the solar heating system installed at the Lutz-Sotire Partnership Executive East Office Building, Stamford, Connecticut. The information consists of description of system and components, operation and maintenance manual, as-built drawings and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50 percent of the heating requirements. The solar facility has 2,561 sq. ft. of liquid flat plate collectors and a 6000 gallon, stone lined, well-insulated storage tank. Freeze protection is provided by a 50 percent glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. From the storage tank, solar heated water is fed into the building's distributed heat pump loop via a modulating three-way valve. If the storage tank temperature drops below 80/sup 0/F, the building loop may be supplied from the existing electrical hot water boilers. The Executive East Office Building is of moderate size, 25,000 sq. ft. of heated space in 2 1/2 stories. The solar system makes available for other users up to 150 KVA of existing electrical generating capacity.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Solar-assisted heat pump system for cost-effective space heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of heat pumps for the utilization of solar energy is studied. Two requirements for a cost-effective system are identified: (1) a special heat pump whose coefficient of performance continues to rise with source temperature over the entire range appropriate for solar assist, and (2) a low-cost collection and storage subsystem able to supply solar energy to the heat pump efficiently at low temperatures. Programs leading to the development of these components are discussed. A solar assisted heat pump system using these components is simulated via a computer, and the results of the simulation are used as the basis for a cost comparison of the proposed system with other solar and conventional systems.

Andrews, J W; Kush, E A; Metz, P D

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Heat Pump Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pump Systems Pump Systems Heat Pump Systems May 16, 2013 - 5:33pm Addthis A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar. A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar. What does this mean for me? Heat pumps can supply heat, cooling, and hot water. Your climate and site will determine the type of heat pump most appropriate for your home. For climates with moderate heating and cooling needs, heat pumps offer an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Like your refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space to a warm space, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. During the heating season, heat pumps move heat from the cool outdoors into

333

Energy Storage Technology and Application Cost and Performance Data Base-2012: Bulk Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates EPRI reports 1020071, Energy Storage Technology and Application Cost and Performance Data Base-2010, and 1021932, Energy Storage Technology and Application Cost and Performance Data Base-2011, which presents 2011 updated data on the cost, performance, and capabilities of energy storage systems only for bulk energy storage applications in a Excel workbook database. The distributed options detailed in the index can be found in the 2011 product, 1021932. The goal of this research was to ...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

334

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l U CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING* M.Wahlig,be capable of operating solar heating and cooling systemsand now transferred to ERDA, on solar heating and cooling of

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dry-Cooling Tower • Power-Generation Subsystem Summary AnGas-Circulation Subsystem The Power-Generation Subsystem Theinsulating plant piping. power-generation heat exchangers.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Solar heating system final design package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary Systems has taken its Series V Solar Heating System and developed it to a degree acceptable by local codes and regulatory agencies. The system is composed of the Series V warm air collector, the LCU-110 logic control unit and the USU-A universal switching and transport unit. The collector was originally conceived and designed as an integrated roof/wall system and provides a dual function in the structure. The collector serves both as a solar energy conversion system and as a structural weather resistant skin. The collector can be fabricated in any length from 12 to 24 feet. This provides maximum flexibility in design and installation. The LCU-110 control unit provides totally automatic control over the operation of the system. It receives input data from sensor probes in collectors, storage and living space. The logic is designed so as to make maximum use of solar energy and minimize use of conventional energy. The USU-A transport and switching unit is a high-efficiency air-handling system equipped with gear motor valves that respond to outputs from the control system. The fan unit is designed for maximum durability and efficiency in operation, and has permanently lubricated ball bearings and excellent air-handling efficiency.

Not Available

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Complete Fill of Northeast Home to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 26, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE), through its agent DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation seeking commercial storage contracts for the remaining 350,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate needed to complete the fill of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m., August 31, 2011. Earlier this year, DOE sold its entire inventory of heating oil stocks with plans to replace it with cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. New storage contracts were awarded in August 2011 for 650,000 barrels, and awards from this solicitation will complete the fill of the one million

339

Enhancement of heat transfer for ground source heat pump systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Uptake of geothermal heat pump (GSHP) systems has been slow in some parts of the world due to the unpredictable operational performance, large installation space… (more)

Mori, Hiromi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Charge allocation for hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid electrical energy storage (HEES) systems, composed of multiple banks of heterogeneous electrical energy storage (EES) elements with their unique strengths and weaknesses, have been introduced to efficiently store and retrieve electrical energy ... Keywords: charge allocation, charge management, hybrid electrical energy storage system

Qing Xie; Yanzhi Wang; Younghyun Kim; Naehyuck Chang; Massoud Pedram

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Basics: Heat Pump Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of air-source heat pumps. Absorption Heat Pump Uses heat as its energy source. Geothermal Heat Pumps Use the constant temperature of the earth as the exchange medium instead...

342

Annual collection and storage of solar energy for the heating of buildings, report No. 1. Progress report, May--November 1976. [Underground pool of water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new system for the annual collection and storage of solar heated water for heating of buildings is under development at the University of Virginia. The system is composed of an energy storage sub-system which stores hot water in an underground pool and of a solar collector sub-system which acts not only to collect solar energy throughout the year but also to limit the evaporative and convective heat losses from the storage system. During the summer of 1976, a storage sub-system was constructed using the initial design specifications. A structural failure of that storage pool occurred in August resulting from a leak in the pool liner which caused a failure of the pool structure. A revised design of the storage pool sub-system has been implemented and construction was completed in November, 1976. The collector sub-system has been designed and constructed. Collector operation began in February 1977. A vertical reflector on the north edge of the collector was added in March 1977. Future research will include initial total system operation, performance evaluation, and analytical modeling.

Beard, J. T.; Dickey, J. W.; Iachetta, F. A.; Lilleleht, L. U.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Heat extraction for the CSPonD thermal storage unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three coiled tube heat exchanger prototypes were designed to extract heat from containers holding 0.5 kg, 2.3 kg, and 10.5 kg of Sodium Nitrate-Potassium Nitrate salt. All of the prototypes were left with an open surface ...

Rojas, Folkers Eduardo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 2 (Day 2): University Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 2 (Day 2): University...

345

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility & Commercial Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to utility, commercial, and rail applications of advanced energy storage systems are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies International Energy Storage Programs Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - Application of Large-Scale ESS in AEP - Ali Nourai, AEP.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Iowa Stored Energy Park - Kent Holst, ISEP.pdf

346

Reference Designs of 50 MW / 250 MWh Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities are interested energy storage solutions for renewable integration and transmission and distribution (TD) grid support that require systems of 10's of MWs in scale and energy durations of longer than 4 hours. Compressed air energy storage and pumped hydro systems are currently the lowest capital cost (/ kW-h) bulk storage options for energy durations longer than 10 hour; however, these storage facilities have geological and siting restrictions and require long permitting and deployment ...

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

347

Passive space heating with a self-pumping vapor system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this system, which should be useful for space or water heating, a refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector and condensed within thermal storage located in the building below the collector. The vapor pressure generated in the collector periodically forces the condensed liquid upward to the location of the collector. This paper reports results of an operational test, in which this system provided passive space heating for an outdoor test cell during a winter season. The daily average energy yield and the elevation of collector temperature caused by self-pumping are reported, as well as observations on failure modes, system reliability, and suggestions for a practical configuration.

Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10. The Parallel Power Plant. III. NIGHTTIME OPERATION: A.~. W. , "Dry Cooling Tower Power Plant Design SpecificationsSUMMARY OF COSTS 1. Entire Power Plant--Storage System. · ·

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Interaction of a solar space heating system with the thermal behavior of a building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal behavior of a building in response to heat input from an active solar space heating system is analyzed to determine the effect of the variable storage tank temperature on the cycling rate, on-time, and off-time of a heating cycle and on the comfort characteristics of room air temperature swing and of offset of the average air temperature from the setpoint (droop). A simple model of a residential building, a fan coil heat-delivery system, and a bimetal thermostat are used to describe the system. A computer simulation of the system behavior has been developed and verified by comparisons with predictions from previous studies. The system model and simulation are then applied to determine the building response to a typical hydronic solar heating system for different solar storage temperatures, outdoor temperatures, and fan coil sizes. The simulations were run only for those cases where there was sufficient energy from storage to meet the building load requirements.

Vilmer, C.; Warren, M.L.; Auslander, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Heat pumps and under floor heating as a heating system for Finnish low-rise residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In bachelor’s thesis the study of under floor heating system with ground source heat pump for the heat transfers fluid heating is considered. The case… (more)

Chuduk, Svetlana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation of battery/microturbine hybrid energy storage technologies at the University of Maryland :a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study describes the technical and economic benefits derived from adding an energy storage component to an existing building cooling, heating, and power system that uses microturbine generation to augment utility-provided power. Three different types of battery energy storage were evaluated: flooded lead-acid, valve-regulated lead-acid, and zinc/bromine. Additionally, the economic advantages of hybrid generation/storage systems were evaluated for a representative range of utility tariffs. The analysis was done using the Distributed Energy Technology Simulator developed for the Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories by Energetics, Inc. The study was sponsored by the U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program through Sandia National Laboratories and was performed in coordination with the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Energy Engineering.

De Anda, Mindi Farber (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC); Fall, Ndeye K. (Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Breakeven costs of storage in optimized solar energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are described of an analysis of the breakeven cost, or value, of energy storage to solar energy systems. It is shown that the value of storage depends strongly both on solar fraction of the solar energy system in which the storage is employed, and on the cost of the collectors used in the system. Various strategies for dealing with this ambiguity are presented, and it is shown that for a broad class of technically and economically practical solar energy systems, storage costs need only be low enough to make a system employing very small amounts of storage practical. Reductions in cost of collectors will thereafter produce greater reductions in the total system costs or provide greater fuel displacement at constant total system cost than will reductions in the cost of storage, within limits discussed. The analysis makes use of a simple, accurate representation of solar energy system performance which may prove useful in other contexts.

Leigh, R. W.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal storage can be interfaced with a variety of high temperature heat generating systems, e.g. nuclear

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS. PART I: SCOPING MODELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed models for hydrogen storage systems provide essential design information about flow and temperature distributions, as well as, the utilization of a hydrogen storage media. However, before constructing a detailed model it is necessary to know the geometry and length scales of the system, along with its heat transfer requirements, which depend on the limiting reaction kinetics. More fundamentally, before committing significant time and resources to the development of a detailed model, it is necessary to know whether a conceptual storage system design is viable. For this reason, a hierarchical system of models progressing from scoping models to detailed analyses was developed. This paper, which discusses the scoping models, is the first in a two part series that presents a collection of hierarchical models for the design and evaluation of hydrogen storage systems.

Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

357

Lighting system with heat distribution face plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

358

Heat Transfer & Alternative Energy Systems Group Staff ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat Transfer and Alternative Energy Systems Group Staff. Staff Listing. Dr. William M. Healy, Leader, Supervisory Mechanical ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters June 14, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. What does this mean for me? Estimate the annual operating costs and compare several water heaters to determine whether it is worth investing in a more efficient

360

DOELEA-1211 Environmental Assessment Relocation and Storage of Isotopic Heat Sources, Hanford Site,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOELEA-1211 DOELEA-1211 - Environmental Assessment Relocation and Storage of Isotopic Heat Sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington June 1997 DOE/EA-1211 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RELOCATION AND STORAGE OF ISOTOPIC HEAT SOURCES HANFORD SITE RICHLAND, WASHINGTON JUNE 1997 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NCHLAND, WASHINGTON Portions of this document may be iiIegiile in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original dornmeut DOWEA- 1 2 1 1 U.S. Department of Energy Preface PREFACE This environmental assessment (EA) has been prep- to assess potentia environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action: Relocation and storage of the isotopic heat sources.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Development of encapsulated lithium hydride thermal energy storage for space power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inclusion of thermal energy storage in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. In this mode, waste heat generated during the brief high-power burst operation is placed in the thermal store; later, the heat in the store is dissipated to space via the radiator over the much longer nonoperational period of the orbit. Thus, the radiator required is of significantly smaller capacity. Scoping analysis indicates that use of lithium hydride as the thermal storage medium results in system mass reduction benefits for burst periods as long as 800 s. A candidate design for the thermal energy storage component utilizes lithium hydride encapsulated in either 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Key issues associated with the system design include phase-change induced stresses in the shell, lithium hydride and shell compatibility, lithium hydride dissociation and hydrogen loss from the system, void presence and movement associated with the melt-freeze process, and heat transfer limitations on obtaining the desired energy storage density. 58 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Power-reduction techniques for data-center storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As data-intensive, network-based applications proliferate, the power consumed by the data-center storage subsystem surges. This survey summarizes, organizes, and integrates a decade of research on power-aware enterprise storage systems. All of the existing ... Keywords: Cloud storage, data center, disk drive, energy efficiency, power reduction

Tom Bostoen, Sape Mullender, Yolande Berbers

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Megawatt-Class Lithium Ion Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project describes the most recent developments in the use of energy storage in frequency regulation and other ancillary service applications. This includes an analysis of limited storage in frequency regulation applications in the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection (PJM), as well as a case study of a lithium ion energy storage system installed in California.

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

Instrumentation & control architecture applied for a hydrogen isotopes storage system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of hydrogen storage used materials refers to their ability to high "connect" hydrogen, to have a large storage capacity, to be easily achievable and, if necessary, to allow its easy recovery. The metals and intermetallic compounds are ... Keywords: architecture, control system, hydrogen, isotopes, storage

Eusebiu Ilarian Ionete; Bogdan Monea

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ursa: Scalable Load and Power Management in Cloud Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprise and cloud data centers are comprised of tens of thousands of servers providing petabytes of storage to a large number of users and applications. At such a scale, these storage systems face two key challenges: (1) hot-spots due to the dynamic ... Keywords: Load management, linear programming, optimization, power management, storage

Gae-Won You; Seung-Won Hwang; Navendu Jain

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

New York's Energy Storage System Gets Recharged | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

York's Energy Storage System Gets Recharged York's Energy Storage System Gets Recharged New York's Energy Storage System Gets Recharged August 2, 2010 - 1:18pm Addthis Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Chu, explain why grid frequency regulation matters Jonathan Silver Jonathan Silver Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office What does this mean for me? AES Storage in New York got a $17.1M conditional loan guarantee to provide a more stable transmission grid. When thinking of clean technologies, energy storage might not be the first thing to come to mind, but with a $17.1 million conditional commitment for a loan guarantee from the Department of Energy AES Energy Storage will develop a battery-based energy storage system to provide a more stable and efficient electrical grid for New York State's high-voltage transmission

367

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at the Washington DC Marriott Hotel on Nov. 2 - 4, 2010, with more than 500 attendees. The 2010 agenda reflected increased national interest in energy storage issues. The 3-day conference included 11 sessions plus a poster session on the final day. Presentations from the first session of Day 2, chaired by DOE's Imre Gyuk, are below. ESS 2010 Update Conference - UltraBattery Grid Storage - John Wood, Ecoult.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - PV Plus Storage for Simultaneous Voltage Smoothing and Peak Shifting - Steve Willard, PNM.pdf

368

Solar heating and hot water system installed at Listerhill, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar system was installed into a new buildng and was designed to provide 79% of the estimated annual space heating load and 59% of the estimated annual potable hot water requirement. The collectors are flat plate, liquid manufactured by Reynolds Metals Company and cover a total area of 2344 square feet. The storage medium is water inhibited with NALCO 2755 and the container is an underground, unpressurized steel tank with a capacity of 5000 gallons. This final report describes in considerable detail the solar heating facility and contains detailed drawings of the completed system.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, February 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report describes the thermodynamic testing and modeling of a thermosyphon heat exchanger used in solar water heating systems. Testing of a four tube-in-shell thermosyphon heat exchanger was performed in two parts. The first portion of the test increased the collector fluid while the storage tank remained isothermal. After the collector fluid temperature was raised to 95 C, the second part of the test allowed the storage tank to gain heat. The test was performed for two collector flow rates. Measured values included collector side forced flow rate, temperature differences across the heat exchanger, vertical temperature distribution in the storage tank, vertical water temperature profile in the heat exchanger, and pressure drop on the thermosyphon side of the heat exchanger. The overall heat transfer coefficient-area product (UA) values obtained confirmed that models which assume UA depends solely on thermosyphon flow rate do not adequately characterize thermosyphon heat exchangers. This is because heat transfer in thermosyphon exchangers occurs in the mixed convection, rather than forced flow, regime. A linear regression equation was developed to better predict UA using the Prandtl, Reynolds, and Grashof numbers and dimensionless parameters based on fluid properties calculated for the average hot and cold leg temperatures. 9 figs.

Davidson, J.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Distributed Energy Storage Systems Testing and Evaluation 2010 Interim Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed Energy Storage Systems (DESS) are fully integrated AC storage devices which can be located within the distribution system, at substation locations, off distribution feeders, near end-of-line pad mounted transformers, or on customer side of the meter locations. Many new and emerging storage systems are being developed for grid support, outage mitigation, power quality and peak load energy management. However there is limited operational data on performance, grid comparability, durability, reli...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

Distributed Energy Storage Systems for Padmounted or Pole Mount Transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to define the specifications for distributed energy storage systems in a neighborhood or a community setting also known as a distributed energy storage (DES) system, where they can be co-located with pad-mounted transformers. In 2009, the program collaborated with a utility stakeholder interest group to further enhance functional specifications developed by AEP for such energy storage systems. Initial technology mapping, screening and cost and value analysis have also been con...

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

Energy storage systems program report for FY1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Energy Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective energy storage systems as a resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of energy storage systems for stationary applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1996.

Butler, P.C.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Energy Storage Systems Program Report for FY99  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Energy Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Power Technologies. The goal of this program is to develop cost-effective electric energy storage systems for many high-value stationary applications in collaboration with academia and industry. Sandia National Laboratories is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of energy storage components and systems. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1999.

BOYES,JOHN D.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

HVAC and water heating system field test experiences at the Tennessee Energy Conservation in Housing (TECH) complex  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TECH complex has been utilized since 1976 as a field test site for several novel and conventional space conditioning and water heating systems. Systems tested include the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), solar space heating systems (hydronic and air), parallel and series solar assisted heat pumps, air-type solar heating with off-peak storage, passive solar heating, two conventional air-to-air heat pumps, an air-to-air heat pump with desuperheater water heater, and horizontal coil and multiple shallow vertical coil ground-coupled heat pumps. System descriptions and test results are presented as well as performance observations.

Baxter, V.D.; McGraw, B.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Heat engine generator control system  

SciTech Connect

An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power.

Rajashekara, Kaushik (Carmel, IN); Gorti, Bhanuprasad Venkata (Towson, MD); McMullen, Steven Robert (Anderson, IN); Raibert, Robert Joseph (Fishers, IN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Heat engine generator control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

379

A Case for Optimistic Coordination in HPC Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-performance computing (HPC) storage systems rely on access coordination to ensure that concurrent updates do not produce incoherent results. HPC storage systems typically employ pessimistic distributed locking to provide this functionality in cases where applications cannot perform their own coordination. This approach, however, introduces significant performance overhead and complicates fault handling. In this work we evaluate the viability of optimistic conditional storage operations as an alternative to distributed locking in HPC storage systems. We investigate design strategies and compare the two approaches in a prototype object storage system using a parallel read/modify/write benchmark. Our prototype illustrates that conditional operations can be easily integrated into distributed object storage systems and can outperform standard coordination primitives for simple update workloads. Our experiments show that conditional updates can achieve over two orders of magnitude higher performance than pessimistic locking for some parallel read/modify/write workloads.

Carns, Philip [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Harms, Kevin [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kimpe, Dries [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wozniak, Justin [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ross, Robert [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ward, Lee [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Curry, Matthew [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Klundt, Ruth [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Danielson, Geoff [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Karakoyunlu, Cengiz [University of Connecticut; Chandy, John [University of Connecticut; Gropp, William D [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Test report : Raytheon / KTech RK30 energy storage system.  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Raytheon/KTech has developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Raytheon/KTech Zinc-Bromide Energy Storage System.

Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure – Optimizing Transitionseconomies and lower infrastructure costs. REFERENCES 1. NRC,a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Self-contained passive solar heating system  

SciTech Connect

A self-contained passive solar heating system includes first and second heat pipes, each having a refrigerant medium therein, a condenser portion and an evaporator portion, with the condenser portion of the first heat pipe being coupled to the evaporator portion of the second heat pipe for transferring heat thereto when the pressure within the first heat pipe is greater than the pressure within the second heat pipe. The evaporator portion of the first heat pipe is adapted to be exposed to a source of heat and the condenser portion of the second heat pipe contacts a medium to be heated. A temperature control mechanism may be installed as the coupling between the first and second heat pipes for uncoupling the same when the temperature within the first heat pipe falls below a predetermined temperature. Also, a third heat pipe may be provided having a thermostatic portion operatively connected to the condenser portion of the second heat pipe by a piston means so that changes in pressure within the thermostatic portion occasioned by changes in temperature of the medium to be heated will cause movement of the pistons to vary the size of the condensing portion of the second heat pipe to increase or decrease the rate of heat transfer to the medium.

Maldonado, E.A.; Woods, J.E.

1983-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities conducted by Solaron Corporation from November 1977 through September 1978 are summarized and the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is covered. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Williamson, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports, November 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development of ammoniated salts. Thermochemical energy storage systems: Phase IB. Final report, February--September 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal energy is usually stored in energy storage systems as sensible heat at temperatures well above the ambient temperature. Most energy storage systems of this type suffer from two drawbacks: (1) the thermal losses to the surroundings are large, and (2) the energy is only available for recovery at the bulk temperature of the storage material; therefore, the stored energy can only be partially recovered. If the energy could be stored at near ambient temperature and recovered at the desired use temperature, thermal losses can be minimized and a high degree of efficiency can be maintained. The purpose of the program is to develop an energy storage system that accepts thermal energy at high temperatures, stores that energy at ambient temperature, and recovers the energy at the original high temperature. The energy is stored as chemical energy. The concept consists of storage and subsequent extraction of the heat of reaction from a pair of ammoniated salts near equilibrium conditions. By shifting the equilibrium in the forward or reverse direction, the heat of reaction can be stored or recovered. The system can be used for many different applications (i.e., different temperature levels) by selecting the appropriate salt pair for the high and low temperature reactions. In this phase of the program, the technical feasibility of the concept was demonstrated using several ammoniated salt pairs.

Jaeger, F. A.; Howerton, M. T.; Podlaseck, S. E.; Myers, J. E.; Beshore, D. G.; Haas, W. R.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hydrogen--halogen energy storage system. Annual report, January--December 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory on the electrochemically regenerative hydrogen--chlorine energy storage system has included electrochemical investigations, materials studies, and technoeconomic assessment. Electrochemical studies have confirmed the reversibility of the cell reactions and the possibility of using the same cell in the electrolysis and fuel cell mode. The hydrogen--chlorine cell differs from most batteries in that the open circuit potential varies appreciably with temperature and depth of discharge. The temperature variation of the open circuit potential reflects the large negative entropy of formation of HCl. A detailed heat and mass balance analysis has been carried out for the H/sub 2//Cl/sub 2/ system for one method of reactant storage and two schemes of heat exchange between the hydrochloric acid storage subsystem and the reactant storage subsystems. Characterization of Nafion membranes in H/sub 2//Cl/sub 2/ cells is reported. From a cost comparison on a 20 MW/200 MWh electrochemically regenerative hydrogen--halogen system it was concluded that the use of either clorine or bromine or alternative methods of chlorine storage had an insignificant effect on the overall cost of the system. The most cost effective method of hydrogen storage is very dependent on the cost of activated metal hydrides.

McBreen, J.; Srinivasan, S.; Salzano, F.J.; Beaufrere, A.H.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Successful Application of Heat Pumps to a DHC System in the Tokyo Bay Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Harumi-Island District Heating & Cooling (DHC), which is located in the Tokyo Bay area, introduced the heat pump and thermal storage system with the aim of achieving minimum energy consumption, minimum environmental load, and maximum economical efficiency. It started operating in 2001, achieving high efficiency and a large amount of reduction of greenhouse gas emission, as well as low heat-charge. The system performance was verified by the continued commissioning of the system.

Yanagihara, R.; Okagaki, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Molten salt thermal energy storage systems: system design. [LiKCO/sub 3/ mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A five-task research program aimed at the development of molten salt thermal energy storage systems commenced in June 1976. The first topical report, covering Task 1, the selection of suitable salt systems for storage at 850 to 1000/sup 0/F, was issued in August 1976. It was concluded that a 35 Wt percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-65 Wt percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (LiKCO/sub 3/) mixture was most suitable for the purpose. Interrelationships between various design parameters were examined using the available solutions, and an engineering-scale storage unit was designed. This unit has an annular configuration with a 1-ft OD, 1.5-ft high, 2-in. dia heat transfer well. Preliminary experiments on a pilot size (3-in. OD) unit showed that temperature profiles and progress of the solid-liquid interface agreed with those predicted theoretically. Also, no supercooling was observed during cooldown, and the presence of significant convective mixing was indicated by negligible temperature gradients. Use of a lithium aluminate volume-change suppressor was investigated, but it appears to be nonessential because of the low volume-change in the LiKCO/sub 3/ system. Consideration of the relative heat-transfer resistances under practical conditions suggested that the use of a conductivity promoter will enhance the heat-transfer rates, thereby requiring smaller heat-transfer areas. Different configurations and materials were considered for this application; an aluminum wool appears to be most suitable. The corrosion resistance of various construction materials was investigated. Stainless steels and aluminum appear to be suitable construction materials for carbonates in the 850 to 1000/sup 0/F range. Testing of the engineering-scale system (Task 3) and verification of the conclusions derived under Task 2 are in progress.

Maru, H.C.; Kardas, A.; Huang, V.M.; Dullea, J.F.; Paul, L.; Marianowski, L.G.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH forms are analyzed and the calculation formulas and characteristic are also given. The results indicate that the efficiency of the parallel-flow form is greater than that of the reverse-flow, so the TDTH system must choose the parallel-flow form. The distance-load ratio (DLR) is defined and the minimum DLR is obtained by the technical and economic feasibility analysis. The paper will provide references for heat-transfer calculation and schematic determination of urban sewage cool or heat source applied delivery heat transfer methods.

Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by SNL's Stan Atcitty, are below. ESS 2010 Update Conference - Demonstration of Microgrids with Storage & Senior Design Class - Satish Ranade, NMSU.pdf ESS 2010 Update...

392

Integratedenergy storage system for optimal energy production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This project served to analyze the effects that energy storage can have on energy production.  The study was aimed at Johannes CHP bio fuel.… (more)

Stevens, Kristoffer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Ground-coupled heat pump systems: a pumping analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) systems use the ground as a heat source or sink that absorbs heat from or rejects heat to the soil, respectively;… (more)

Mays, Cristin Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Thermal storage HVAC system retrofit provides economical air conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes an EMS-controlled HVAC system that meets the ventilation and cooling needs of an 18,000-seat indoor ice hockey arena. The Buffalo Memorial Auditorium (affectionately referred to as the Aud) was built in 1937 under the Works Project Administration of the federal government. Its original configuration included a 12,000-seat arena with an ice skating rink. By the late 1980s, the city was unsuccessfully attempting to attract events and tenants to the auditorium, which lacked air conditioning and other modern amenities. Thus, it was decided to renovate the facility to make it marketable. The first phase of the renovation included installing an air-conditioning system in the arena and repairing the existing building systems that were inoperable because of deferred maintenance. After considering the existing conditions (such as size of the space, intermittent usage, construction restrictions, operating budgets and the limited operations staff), the engineering team designed an innovative HVAC system. The system's features include: a carbon dioxide monitoring device that controls the intake of outside air; an ice storage system that provides chilled water and shifts electrical demand to off-peak hours; and a design that uses the building mass as a heat sink. A new energy management system (EMS) determines building cooling needs based on the type of event, ambient conditions and projected audience size. Then, it selects the most economical method to obtain the desired arena temperature.

Smith, S.F. (Wendel Engineers, P.C., Buffalo, NY (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NREL: Energy Analysis: Electric System Flexibility and Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric System Flexibility and Storage Electric System Flexibility and Storage Options for Increasing Electric System Flexibility to Accommodate Higher Levels of Variable Renewable Electricity Increased electric system flexibility, needed to enable electricity supply-demand balance with high levels of renewable generation, can come from a portfolio of supply- and demand-side options, including flexible conventional generation, grid storage, curtailment of some renewable generation, new transmission, and more responsive loads. NREL's electric system flexibility studies investigate the role of various electric system flexibility options on large-scale deployment of renewable energy. NREL's electric system flexibility analyses show that: Key factors in improving grid flexibility include (1) increasing the

396

Carbon footprints of heating oil and LPG heating systems  

SciTech Connect

For European homes without access to the natural gas grid, the main fuels-of-choice for heating are heating oil and LPG. How do the carbon footprints of these compare? Existing literature does not clearly answer this, so the current study was undertaken to fill this gap. Footprints were estimated in seven countries that are representative of the EU and constitute two-thirds of the EU-27 population: Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Poland and the UK. Novelties of the assessment were: systems were defined using the EcoBoiler model; well-to-tank data were updated according to most-recent research; and combustion emission factors were used that were derived from a survey conducted for this study. The key finding is that new residential heating systems fuelled by LPG are 20% lower carbon and 15% lower overall-environmental-impact than those fuelled by heating oil. An unexpected finding was that an LPG system's environmental impact is about the same as that of a bio heating oil system fuelled by 100% rapeseed methyl ester, Europe's predominant biofuel. Moreover, a 20/80 blend (by energy content) with conventional heating oil, a bio-heating-oil system generates a footprint about 15% higher than an LPG system's. The final finding is that fuel switching can pay off in carbon terms. If a new LPG heating system replaces an ageing oil-fired one for the final five years of its service life, the carbon footprint of the system's final five years is reduced by more than 50%.

Johnson, Eric P., E-mail: ejohnson@ecosite.co.uk

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Heat pump assisted geothermal heating system for Felix Spa, Romania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a pre-feasibility type study of a proposed heat pump assisted geothermal heating system for an average hotel in Felix Spa, Romania. After a brief presentation of the geothermal reservoir, the paper gives the methodology and the results of the technical and economical calculations. The technical and economical viability of the proposed system is discussed in detail in the final part of the paper.

Rosca, Marcel; Maghiar, Teodor

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

398

Demonstration Development Project: Solar Thermocline Storage Systems: Preliminary Design Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar thermal energy storage (TES) has the potential to significantly increase the operating flexibility of solar power. TES allows solar power plant operators to adjust electricity production to match consumer demand, enabling the sale of electricity during peak demand periods and boosting plant revenues. To date, TES systems have been prohibitively expensive except in certain markets. Two of the most significant capital costs in a TES system are the storage medium (typically molten salt) and the storag...

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

399

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Storage Systems Analysis Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Storage Systems Analysis Working Group The Storage Systems Analysis Working Group, launched in March 2005, provides a forum to facilitate research and communication of hydrogen storage-related analysis activities among researchers actively engaged in hydrogen storage systems analyses. The working group includes members from DOE, the national laboratories, industry, and academia. Description Technical Targets Meetings Contacts Description Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell power technologies in transportation, stationary, and portable power applications. One of the most challenging technical barriers known is how to efficiently store hydrogen on-board a vehicle to meet customer expectations of a driving range greater than 300 miles-as well as performance, safety, and cost-without impacting passenger or cargo space. The Department of Energy's hydrogen storage activity is coordinated through the "National Hydrogen Storage Project," with multiple university, industry, and federal laboratory partners focused on research and development of on-board vehicular hydrogen storage technologies. This research also has components applicable to off-board storage of hydrogen for refueling infrastructure and the off-board regeneration of chemical hydrogen carriers applicable to hydrogen delivery.

400

Sensitivity analysis of a community solar system using annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to assess the sensitivity of design parameters for a community solar heating system having annual thermal energy storage to factors including climate, building type, community size, and collector type and inclination. The system under consideration uses a large, water-filled, concrete-constructed tank for providing space heating, and domestic hot water (DHW). Collector field area and storage volume have been sized for 440 community designs in 10 geographic locations. Analysis of the data has allowed identification of those parameters that have first order effects on component sizing. Two linear relationships were derived which allow system sizing. The average ambient temperature is used to determine average yearly collector efficiency. This parameter combined with estimates of space/DHW loads, storage/distribution losses, and total yearly insolation per square meter allows estimation of collector area. Storage size can be estimated from the winter net load which is based on space and DHW loads, storage/distribution losses, and collector solar heat for the winter months. (MHR)

Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comparison of energy storage systems in the United States chilled water versus two types of ice storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current US production non-storage heat pumps are compared to heat pumps using stored hot water and stored chilled water and to heat pumps using ice-on-coils as a means of using latent heat of fusion of water as a heat source. This equipment is also used as a means of stored cooling for air conditioning during hot weather. An ice-making heat pump which harvests ice as sheets of ice 3 to 4 times per hour and stores the ice in a large inexpensive bin is discussed. The advantages of such an ice-making heat pump to heat in cold weather and cool in hot weather is discussed as it relates to Electric Utility load management in different parts of the United States.

Fischer, H.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump System Performance Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extensive independent evaluation recently was completed of the Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump (MSHHP) system, a proprietary heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system developed by Meckler Systems Group. The MSHHP tests were conducted on a unique test bed designed and constructed by National Technical Systems (NTS) through a research and development grant program funded by Southern California Edison Company. This paper outlines testing methods and results, including evaluations of peak power and energy savings allowed by the innovative system. The main difference between the MSHHP and a conventional HVAC system is use of a chilled water "diversity" cooling loop interconnecting air to water coils (located at each water source heat pump unit) with a central chilled water storage tank. The MSHHP system uses significantly less energy than a conventional HVAC system, and lowers peak demand by shifting required electrical energy consumption to lower-cost, off-peak and mid-peak rates. Lower heat pump capacities are a main feature of the MSHHP. This is accomplished by pre-cooling return air from the zone space, a process that also allows the heat pump to operate at a higher Coefficient of Performance (COP), thereby contributing to further energy savings.

Meckler, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Heat recovery anti-icing system  

SciTech Connect

A heat recovery anti-icing system is disclosed. The heat recovery system includes a blower which removes air from the air flow path of a combustion turbine power generating system and circulates the air through a heat exchanger located in the exhaust stack of the combustion turbine. The heated air circulating through the heat exchanger is returned to an inlet filter compartment in the air flow path so as to maintain the temperature of the air in the inlet filter compartment at an elevated level.

Cummins, J.R.

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

404

FY 1977 Progress report, Compressed air energy storage advanced systems analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Advanced Systems Analysis task is to accelerate the development of new technologies that will reduce the consumption of natural gas and oil. The immediate overall objectives of this program are to: (1) provide a screening cost assessment for thermal energy storage (TES) systems that are suitable for CAES applications; (2) establish the potential fuel savings of hybrid CAES cycles that incorporate TES for recovery of the heat of compression and estimate the economic incentive for using TES in CAES systems; and (3) investigate modified CAES cycles that eliminate the use of gas and oil by the use of alternative fuels.

Kreid, D.K.; McKinnon, M.A.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Advanced Liquid Natural Gas Onboard Storage System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins Westport Incorporated (CWI) has designed and developed a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel system that includes a reciprocating pump with the cold end submerged in LNG contained in a vacuum-jacketed tank. This system was tested and analyzed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced LNG Onboard Storage System (ALOSS) program. The pumped LNG fuel system developed by CWI and tested under the ALOSS program is a high-pressure system designed for application on Class 8 trucks powered by CWI's ISX G engine, which employs high-pressure direct injection (HPDI) technology. A general ALOSS program objective was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of a pumped LNG fuel system relative to on-vehicle fuel systems that require the LNG to be ''conditioned'' to saturation pressures that exceeds the engine fuel pressure requirements. These advantages include the capability to store more fuel mass in given-size vehicle and station tanks, and simpler lower-cost LNG refueling stations that do not require conditioning equipment. Pumped LNG vehicle fuel systems are an alternative to conditioned LNG systems for spark-ignition natural gas and port-injection dual-fuel engines (which typically require about 100 psi), and they are required for HPDI engines (which require over 3,000 psi). The ALOSS program demonstrated the feasibility of a pumped LNG vehicle fuel system and the advantages of this design relative to systems that require conditioning the LNG to a saturation pressure exceeding the engine fuel pressure requirement. LNG tanks mounted on test carts and the CWI engineering truck were repeatedly filled with LNG saturated at 20 to 30 psig. More fuel mass was stored in the vehicle tanks as well as the station tank, and no conditioning equipment was required at the fueling station. The ALOSS program also demonstrated the general viability and specific performance of the CWI pumped LNG fuel system design. The system tested as part of this program is designed to be used on Class 8 trucks with CWI ISX G HPDI engines. Extensive test cart and engineering truck tests of the pump demonstrated good durability and the high-pressure performance needed for HPDI application. The LNG tanks manufactured by Taylor-Wharton passed SAE J2343 Recommended Practice drop tests and accelerated road-load vibration tests. NER and hold-time tests produced highly consistent results. Additional tests confirmed the design adequacy of the liquid level sensor, vaporizer, ullage volume, and other fuel system components. While the testing work performed under this program focused on a high-pressure pumped LNG fuel system design, the results also validate the feasibility of a low-pressure pumped fuel system. A low-pressure pumped fuel system could incorporate various design refinements including a simpler and lighter-weight pump, which would decrease costs somewhat relative to a high-pressure system.

Greg Harper; Charles Powars

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

more efficient system. When considering a water heater model for your home, estimate its energy efficiency and annual operating cost. Then, compare costs with other more andor...

407

Reference Designs of 50 MW / 250 MWh Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage solutions for Renewable Integration and Transmission and Distribution (T&D) Grid Support often require systems of 10's of MWs in scale, and energy durations of longer than 4 hours. The goals of this study were to develop cost, performance and conceptual design information for several current and emerging alternative bulk storage systems in the scale of 50 MW / 250 MWh.

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

Reagent Storage and Handling for SCR and SNCR Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As utilities move to post-combustion nitrogen oxides (NOx) control technologies, the need to understand reagent storage and handling requirements for these systems increases. This report reviews various approaches to the storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia, aqueous ammonia, and urea. Systems that convert urea to ammonia also are included.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Optimal Control of Harvesting Ice Thermal Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage is becoming a standard consideration in HVAC and process cooling systems. As the technology is refined, more attention is being given to minimize the energy consumption and power demand requirements. This paper addresses a method for optimal control of a harvesting ice storage system. A simplified procedure is used to develop 24 hour load data. Example installations will be shown.

Knebel, D. E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the present invention to provide superconducting magnetic energy storage for a plurality of asynchronous electrical systems. It is a further object of the present invention to provide load leveling and stability improvement in a plurality of independent ac systems using a single superconducting magnetic energy storage coil.

Boenig, H.J.

1984-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program report for FY93  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. In this capacity, Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contract development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility-energy-storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1993.

Butler, P.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Modeling a Leadership-scale Storage System , Christopher Carothers1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an end-to-end storage system model of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility's (ALCF) comput- ing collected from the ALCF's storage system for a variety of synthetic I/O workloads and scales. we present in the ALCF. As an early study of the CODES project, our simulators can quickly and accurately simulate

413

Storage-Space Capacitated Inventory System with (r, Q) Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We deal with an inventory system with limited storage space for a single item or multiple items. For the single-item system, customers' demand is stochastic. The inventory is controlled by a continuous-review (r, Q) policy. Goods are replenished ... Keywords: (r, Q) policy, algorithm, inventory/production, programming, stochastic demand, storage-space constraint

Xiaobo Zhao; Fan Fan; Xiaoliang Liu; Jinxing Xie

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Umbrella file system: Storage management across heterogeneous devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of and recent developments in Flash storage, device characteristic diversity is becoming both more prevalent and more distinct. In this article, we describe the Umbrella File System (UmbrellaFS), a stackable file system designed to provide ... Keywords: Device characteristics, flash drives, namespaces, policy-driven storage

John A. Garrison; A. L. Narasimha Reddy

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, March--May 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of heat loss tests for the Integral Collector Storage unit are shown. Work on unique solar system components is summarized briefly.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Southern company energy storage study : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the business case for additional bulk electric energy storage in the Southern Company service territory for the year 2020. The model was used to examine how system operations are likely to change as additional storage is added. The storage resources were allowed to provide energy time shift, regulation reserve, and spinning reserve services. Several storage facilities, including pumped hydroelectric systems, flywheels, and bulk-scale batteries, were considered. These scenarios were tested against a range of sensitivities: three different natural gas price assumptions, a 15% decrease in coal-fired generation capacity, and a high renewable penetration (10% of total generation from wind energy). Only in the elevated natural gas price sensitivities did some of the additional bulk-scale storage projects appear justifiable on the basis of projected production cost savings. Enabling existing peak shaving hydroelectric plants to provide regulation and spinning reserve, however, is likely to provide savings that justify the project cost even at anticipated natural gas price levels. Transmission and distribution applications of storage were not examined in this study. Allowing new storage facilities to serve both bulk grid and transmission/distribution-level needs may provide for increased benefit streams, and thus make a stronger business case for additional storage.

Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Black, Clifton [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL; Jenkins, Kip [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS Mashuri L.CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS * • Mashuri L.consists of a hydronic solar space heating system with heat

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Peer Review 6 Peer Review Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review The 2006 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program was held in Washington DC on November 2-3, 2006. Current and completed program projects were presented and reviewed by a group of industry professionals. The agenda and ESS program overview are available below. Day 1 morning session presentations Day 1 afternoon session presentations Day 2 morning session presentations Day 2 afternoon session presentations ESS 2006 Peer Review - Agenda.pdf ESS 2006 Peer Review - ESS Program Overview - John Boyes, SNL.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Innovations in ESS Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications

419

Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting: Summary Report, March 29, 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting 955 L'Enfant Plaza North, SW, Suite 6000 Washington, DC 20024-2168 March 29, 2005 SUMMARY REPORT Compiled by Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory June 20, 2005 SUMMARY REPORT Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting March 29, 2005 955 L'Enfant Plaza, North, SW, Suite 6000 Washington, DC 20024-2168 Meeting Objectives The objective of this meeting was to familiarize the DOE research community involved in hydrogen storage materials and process development with the systems analysis work being carried out within the DOE program. In particular, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been tasked to develop models of on-board and off-board hydrogen storage systems based on the various materials and technologies being developed at the DOE Centers of Excellence and

420

Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne DC Offices L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC December 4, 2007 SUMMARY REPORT Compiled by Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory and Kristin Deason Sentech, Inc. January 16, 2008 SUMMARY REPORT Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting December 4, 2007 Argonne DC Offices, L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC Meeting Objectives This meeting was one of a continuing series of biannual meetings of the Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group (SSAWG). The objective of these meetings is to bring together the DOE research community involved in systems analysis of hydrogen storage materials and processes for information exchange and to update the researchers on related developments within the DOE program. A major thrust of these meetings is to leverage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Computational Study on Thermal Properties of HVAC System with Building Structure Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building structure thermal storage (BSTS) HVAC systems can store heat during nighttime thermal storage operation (nighttime operation hours) by using off-peak electricity and release it in the daytime air-conditioning operation (daytime operation hours) by utilizing a large amount of the thermal capacity of building structures such as beams, columns and floors composed of concrete. These BSTS systems have recently been considered as one method for leveling hourly electricity demands for HVAC on a day-to-day basis. Through a simulation using a model developed with experimental data, this paper describes how various factors for the design and operation of a BSTS quantitatively affect the charge/discharge performances of a HVAC system. As a result, the following was revealed: the thermal performance of the system is strongly influenced by the daily heat storage operation hours, supply air volume and supply air temperature during the nighttime operation hours, stored heat caused the total daytime cooling extraction to decrease by 11% to 58% and the daily total cooling extraction through nighttime to daytime to increase by 4% to 17% compared with the values of non- thermal storage HVAC system.

Sato, Y.; Sagara, N.; Ryu, Y.; Maehara, K.; Nagai, T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Heat transport system, method and material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

Musinski, Donald L. (Saline, MI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Heat recovery in a laundry system  

SciTech Connect

In a laundry system including a washer, a dryer, and a water heater, improvement is disclosed of using a heat pipe to recover waste heat, whether it be from the hot air exhaust of the dryer or from the conductive losses from the dryer and to transfer that heat to the feed water of the water heater.

George, O.F.

1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

Waste Heat Recapture from Supermarket Refrigeration Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the potential energy savings associated with improved utilization of waste heat from supermarket refrigeration systems. Existing and advanced strategies for waste heat recovery in supermarkets were analyzed, including options from advanced sources such as combined heat and power (CHP), micro-turbines and fuel cells.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Heat conductivity in linear mixing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present analytical and numerical results on the heat conduction in a linear mixing system. In particular we consider a quasi one dimensional channel with triangular scatterers with internal angles irrational multiples of pi and we show that the system obeys Fourier law of heat conduction. Therefore deterministic diffusion and normal heat transport which are usually associated to full hyperbolicity, actually take place in systems without exponential instability.

Baowen Li; Giulio Casati; Jiao Wang

2002-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

426

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

427

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

428

Battery energy storage systems life cycle costs case studies  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a comparison of life cycle costs between battery energy storage systems and alternative mature technologies that could serve the same utility-scale applications. Two of the battery energy storage systems presented in this report are located on the supply side, providing spinning reserve and system stability benefits. These systems are compared with the alternative technologies of oil-fired combustion turbines and diesel generators. The other two battery energy storage systems are located on the demand side for use in power quality applications. These are compared with available uninterruptible power supply technologies.

Swaminathan, S.; Miller, N.F.; Sen, R.K. [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at the Washington DC Marriott Hotel on Nov. 2 - 4, 2010, with more than 500 attendees. The 2010 agenda reflected increased national interest in energy storage issues. The 3-day conference included 11 sessions plus a poster session on the final day. Presentations from the fourth session of Day 2, chaired by NETL's Kim Nuhfer, are below. ESS 2010 Update Conference - Low Cost Energy Storage - Ted Wiley, Aquion.pdf Ess 2010 Update Conference - Solid State Li Metal Batteries for Grid-Scale Storage - Mohit Singh, Seeo.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - Utility Scale Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration - Edward Chiao, Amber Kinetics.pdf

430

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at the Washington DC Marriott Hotel on Nov. 2 - 4, 2010, with more than 500 attendees. The 2010 agenda reflected increased national interest in energy storage issues. The 3-day conference included 11 sessions plus a poster session on the final day. Presentations from the first session of Day 2, chaired by DOE's Imre Gyuk, are below. ESS 2010 Update Conference - UltraBattery Grid Storage - John Wood, Ecoult.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - PV Plus Storage for Simultaneous Voltage Smoothing and Peak Shifting - Steve Willard, PNM.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage - Loic Gaillac,

431

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at the Washington DC Marriott Hotel on Nov. 2 - 4, 2010, with more than 500 attendees. The 2010 agenda reflected increased national interest in energy storage issues. The 3-day conference included 11 sessions plus a poster session on the final day. Presentations from the first session of Day 3, chaired by SNL's Ross Guttromson, are below. ESS 2010 Update Conference - NYSERDA-DOE Joint Energy Storage Initiative - Georgianne Huff, SNL.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - Testing and Evaluation of Energy Storage Devices - Tom Hund, SNL.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) - Dan

432

Municipal District Heating and Cooling Co-generation System Feasibility Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In summer absorption refrigerating machines provide cold water using excess heat from municipal thermoelectric power plant through district heating pipelines, which reduces peak electric load from electricity networks in summer. The paper simulates annual dynamic load of a real project to calculate the first investments, annual operation cost and LCC (life cycle cost) of the four schemes, which are electric chillers, electric chillers with ice-storage system, absorption refrigerating machines using excess heat from power plant and absorption refrigerating machines using excess heat from power plant along with ice-storage system. On the basis of the results, the paper analyzes the prospect of the absorption refrigeration using municipal excess heat, as well as the reasonable heat price, which provides a theoretical basis for municipal heating and cooling co-generation development.

Zhang, W.; Guan, W.; Pan, Y.; Ding, G.; Song, X.; Zhang, Y.; Li, Y.; Wei, H.; He, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating...

434

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage is essential if solar power plants are ever tostorage system into a solar power plant. Complete materialdaytime-only steam-cycle solar power plant, then about two-

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hydrogen storage of energy for small power supply systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power supply systems for cell phone base stations using hydrogen energy storage, fuel cells or hydrogen-burning generators, and a backup generator could offer an improvement over current power supply systems. Two categories ...

Monaghan, Rory F. D. (Rory Francis Desmond)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Solar assisted heat pump system with volume solar collector. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The system uses the attic of the house with a large south facing window as the solar collector. An air-to-water heat pump uses the attic air as a heat source to heat a volume of storage water during the heating season. During the cooling season the attic is ventilated and the heat pump uses the attic air as a heat sink while cooling the storage water. The computer program was developed to include a heat exchanger in the attic which could by-pass the heat pump condenser cooling water, thus permitting direct heat exchange between the attic air and the storage water whenever a favorable temperature existed. The program also accounts for the effect of the incidence angle of insolation and the effect of the number of glass plates on the transmittance and absorptance of the collector and windows. Other refinements include: the use of a sophisticated nighttime setback thermostat, account of internal heat generation and infiltration loss. Among all of the parameter variations, the use of an attic heat exchanger resulted in the maximum savings in the heating/cooling energy consumption of the house. The use of double-glazed windows too, resulted in substantial energy savings. The total energy consumption was found to depend strongly on the infiltration rate. The program was also used to simulate the same system under weather conditions existing at several different geographic areas.

Sabnis, J.S.; Hickox, W.J.; Drucker, E.E.; Ucar, M.; LaGraff, J.E.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds. Thermal energy storage provides a workable solution to...

438

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems, inTwin City district cogeneration system, in Proceedings,proposed system, based on cogeneration of power and heat by

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Systems Analysis Storage Systems Analysis Project Summary Full Title: System Level Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Options Project ID: 202 Principal Investigator: Rajesh K. Ahluwalia Keywords: Hydrogen storage; compressed hydrogen tanks Purpose ANL is developing models to understand the characteristics of storage systems based on approaches with unique characteristics (thermal energy and temperature of charge and discharge, kinetics of the physical and chemical process steps involved) and to evaluate their potential to meet DOE targets for on-board applications. Performer Principal Investigator: Rajesh K. Ahluwalia Organization: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Address: 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439 Telephone: 630-252-5979 Email: walia@anl.gov Additional Performers: T.Q. Hua, Argonne National Laboratory; Romesh Kumar, Argonne National Laboratory; J-C Peng, Argonne National Laboratory

440

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a peer review and update meeting in Washington, DC on Sept. 26 - 28, 2012. The 3-day conference included 9 sessions plus two poster sessions. ARPA-E project presentations from the first poster session on Day 1, chaired by DOE's Mark Johnson, are below. ESS 2012 Peer Review - Dispatchable Wind--Wind Power on Demand - Ian Lawson, General Compression ESS 2012 Peer Review - Novel Regenerative Fuel Cells based on Anion Exchange Membranes - Katherine Ayers, Proton Onsite ESS 2012 Peer Review - Low Cost, High-Energy Density Flywheel Storage Grid

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating storage systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Analyses of Compressed Hydrogen On-Board Storage Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Compressed Hydrogen On-Board Storage Systems © 2010 TIAX LLC Compressed and Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop February 14, 2011 Jeff Rosenfeld Karen Law Jayanti Sinha TIAX LLC 35 Hartwell Ave Lexington, MA 02421-3102 Tel. 781-879-1708 Fax 781-879-1201 www.TIAXLLC.com Reference: D0268 Overview Project Objectives Project Objectives Description Overall Help guide DOE and developers toward promising R&D and commercialization pathways by evaluating the status of the various on-board hydrogen storage technologies on a consistent basis On-Board Storage System Assessment Evaluate or develop system-level designs for the on-board storage system to project bottom-up factory costs Off-Board Fuel Cycle Assessment Evaluate or develop designs and cost inputs for the fuel cycle to

442

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial 7 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to utility, commercial, and rail applications of advanced energy storage systems are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies International Energy Storage Programs Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - Application of Large-Scale ESS in AEP - Ali Nourai, AEP.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Iowa Stored Energy Park - Kent Holst, ISEP.pdf

443

Design of Heat Exchanger for Heat Recovery in CHP Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to review issues related to the design of heat recovery unit in Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems. To meet specific needs of CHP systems, configurations can be altered to affect different factors of the design. Before the design process can begin, product specifications, such as steam or water pressures and temperatures, and equipment, such as absorption chillers and heat exchangers, need to be identified and defined. The Energy Engineering Laboratory of the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and the Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center has been donated an 800kW diesel turbine and a 100 ton absorption chiller from industries. This equipment needs to be integrated with a heat exchanger to work as a Combined Heat and Power system for the University which will supplement the chilled water supply and electricity. The design constraints of the heat recovery unit are the specifications of the turbine and the chiller which cannot be altered.

Kozman, T. A.; Kaur, B.; Lee, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Metallic phase-change materials for solar dynamic energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar (thermal) dynamic power systems for satellites require a heat storage system that is capable of operating the engine during eclipse. The conventional approach to this thermal storage problem is to use the latent heat of fluoride salts, which would melt during insolation and freeze during eclipse. Although candidate fluorides have large heats of fusion per unit mass, their poor thermal conductivity limits the rate at which energy can be transferred to and from the storage device. System performance is further limited by the high parasitic mass of the superalloy canisters needed to contain the salt. This report describes a new thermal storage system in which the phase-change material (PCM) is a metal (typically germanium) contained in modular graphite canisters. These modules exhibit good thermal conductivity and low parasitic mass, and they are physically and chemically stable. Prototype modules have survived over 600 melt/freeze cycles without degradation. Advanced concepts to further improve performance are described. These concepts include the selection of ternary eutectic alloys to provide a wider range of useful melting temperatures and the use of infiltration to control the location of liquid alloy and to compensate for differences in thermal expansion. 13 refs., 18 figs.

Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.