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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

2

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

3

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

4

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

5

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

6

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

7

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

8

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

9

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

10

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

11

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

12

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

13

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

14

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

15

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

16

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................... 1,870 1,276 322 138 133 43.0 29.4 7.4 3.2 3.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 243 151 34 40 18 78.7 48.9 11.1 13.0 5.7 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 202 139 31 29 Q 54.8 37.6 8.5 7.9 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 300 240 31 21 7 42.5 34.1 4.4 3.0 1.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 250 182 40 11 Q 41.5 30.2 6.6 1.9 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 236 169 41 8 19 35.4 25.2 6.2 1.2 2.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 241 165 54 7 16 36.3 24.8 8.1 1.0 2.4 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 199 130 42 11 16 35.0 22.8 7.5 1.9 2.8 Over 500,000 ............................. 198

17

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ............................. 2,037 1,378 338 159 163 42.0 28.4 7.0 3.3 3.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 156 35 41 18 78.6 49.1 11.0 12.9 5.6 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 218 147 32 31 7 54.8 37.1 8.1 7.9 1.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 343 265 34 25 18 43.8 33.9 4.4 3.2 2.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 270 196 41 13 Q 40.9 29.7 6.3 2.0 2.9 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 269 186 45 13 24 35.8 24.8 6.0 1.8 3.2 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 267 182 56 10 19 35.4 24.1 7.4 1.3 2.6 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 204 134 43 11 17 34.7 22.7 7.3 1.8 2.9 Over 500,000 .............................

18

Propane: A Mid-heating Season Assessment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2001 9, 2001 Propane - A Mid-Heating Season Assessment by David Hinton and Alice Lippert, Petroleum Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration In early October 2000, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecast that heating fuel markets would be expected to start the season with much higher prices and lower inventories than in recent years. While this assessment was true for both the heating oil and natural gas markets, propane markets actually began the season with adequate supplies but with high prices. Since EIA's forecast, propane inventories have plunged nearly 20 million barrels from their peak during the first half of the 2000-01 heating season while propane prices have continued to soar even higher than expected during this same period. This report will analyze some

19

German central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central solar heating plants contribute to the reduction of CO{sub 2}-emissions and global warming. The combination of central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage enables high solar fractions of 50% and more. Several pilot central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage (CSHPSS) built in Germany since 1996 have proven the appropriate operation of these systems and confirmed the high solar fractions. Four different types of seasonal thermal energy stores have been developed, tested and monitored under realistic operation conditions: Hot-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Friedrichshafen), gravel-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Steinfurt-Borghorst), borehole thermal energy store (in Neckarsulm) and aquifer thermal energy store (in Rostock). In this paper, measured heat balances of several German CSHPSS are presented. The different types of thermal energy stores and the affiliated central solar heating plants and district heating systems are described. Their operational characteristics are compared using measured data gained from an extensive monitoring program. Thus long-term operational experiences such as the influence of net return temperatures are shown. (author)

Bauer, D.; Marx, R.; Nussbicker-Lux, J.; Ochs, F.; Heidemann, W. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller-Steinhagen, H. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute of Technical Thermodynamics (ITT), German Aerospace Centre (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Radiant Barrier Performance during the Heating Season  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of winter experiments conducted in Central Texas are presented. The experiments were side-by-side tests using two identical 144 ft2 houses which responded similarly to weather variations prior to any retrofits. Two radiant barrier orientations were tested, horizontal barrier and barrier against the rafters, in vented and non-vented attics. The results compiled in this paper are for attics with R-19 fiberglass insulation. The data showed that radiant barriers were still effective during the winter season. During a typical day radiant barriers prevented approximately 9-17 percent of the indoor heat from escaping into the attic. No significant difference in moisture accumulation was detected in the attic with the radiant barrier.

Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Variability of Population-Weighted Seasonal Heating Degree Days  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional and national heating fuel demand is related to both weather and population density. This study analyzes the variability of population-weighted, seasonal heating degree days for the coterminous 48 states. A risk assessment of unusual ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Future Occurrence of Threshold-Crossing Seasonal Rainfall Totals: Methodology and Application to Sites in Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical simulation framework is developed to explore the future frequencies of threshold-crossing events, focusing here on low seasonal rainfall totals. Global change (GC) is represented by a trend on the seasonal mean rainfall total. ...

Asher B. Siebert; M. Neil Ward

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Seasonal Cycle of Atmospheric Heating and Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal cycle of the heating of the atmosphere is divided into a component due to direct solar absorption in the atmosphere and a component due to the flux of energy from the surface to the atmosphere via latent, sensible, and radiative heat ...

Aaron Donohoe; David S. Battisti

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Seasonal Heat Transport in a Primitive Equations Model of the Tropical Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work analyses seasonal heat transport in an ocean-only numerical simulation of the Indian Ocean forced by realistic seasonal winds and surface heat fluxes north of 15°S, assuming no Indonesian Throughflow. The seasonal changes in the model ...

S. Wacongne; R. Pacanowski

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

State of Maine residential heating oil survey 2001-02 season summary [SHOPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This, as the title implies, is a summary report of the price trends for heating oil, propane and kerosene heating fuels for the heating season.

Elder, Betsy

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

27

Preliminary Analysis of a Solar Heat Pump System with Seasonal Storage for Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For higher solar fraction and suitability for both heating and cooling, a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage was studied in this paper. The system scheme and control strategy of a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage for heating and cooling were set up, which is responsible for the space heating and cooling and domestic hot water for a residential block. Through hourly simulation, the performance and the economics of such systems were analyzed, for the different tank volumes, operating modes and weather conditions. The results show that 1) for most areas of China, the solar systems with seasonal storage can save energy; 2) for areas with cold winter and hot summer, it is suitable to store heat from summer to winter and store cold energy from winter to summer, but for chilly areas, it is suitable to only store heat from summer to winter; 3) when the ratio of volume of seasonal storage tank to collector areas is 2~3, the system performance is optimal and the payback period is shortest for most areas of north China; and 4) if cooling storage is needed, the seasonal storage coupled with short-term storage may raise the solar fraction largely.

Yu, G.; Chen, P.; Dalenback, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

State heating oil and propane program, 1994--1995 heating season. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Propane prices and No. 2 fuel prices during the 1994-1995 heating season are tabulated for the state of Ohio. Nineteen companies were included in the telephone survey of propane prices, and twenty two companies for the fuel oil prices. A bar graph is also presented for average residential prices of No. 2 heating oil.

NONE

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

29

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

30

Table WH1. Total Households Using Water Heating Equipment, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH1. Total Households Using Water Heating Equipment, 2005 Million U.S. Households Fuels Used (million U.S. households) Number of Water Heaters Used

31

Solar and seasonal dependence of ion frictional heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Ion frictional heating constitutes one of the principal mechanisms whereby energy, originating in the solar wind, is deposited into the Earth's ionosphere and ultimately the neutral atmosphere. Common programme observations by the EISCAT UHF radar system, spanning the years 1984 to 1995, provide the basis for a comprehensive statistical study of ion frictional heating, results of which are documented in this and a previous paper by the authors. In the present work, the authors demonstrate the solar and seasonal dependence of the universal time distribution of frictional heating, and explain these results with reference to corresponding dependences of the ion velocity. Although EISCAT observes a signi®cant increase in the occurrence of enhanced ion velocities associated with increased solar activity, the latter characterised according to the prevailing 10.7 cm solar ¯ux, this is not re¯ected to such an extent in the occurrence of frictional heating. It is suggested that this is a consequence of the decreased neutral atmosphere response times associated with active solar conditions, resulting from the higher ionospheric plasma densities present. Seasonal e€ects on the diurnal distribution of ion frictional heating are well explained by corresponding variations in ionospheric convection, the latter principally a result of geometrical factors. It is noted that, over the entire dataset, the variations in the unperturbed F-region ion temperature, required to implement the identi®cation criterion for ion heating, are highly correlated with model values of thermospheric temperature. Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density). 1

J. A. Davies; M. Lester; I. W. Mccrea

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Seasonal Heat Budget across the Extent of the California Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A seasonal heat budget is based on observations that span the broad California Current (CC) region. Budget terms are estimated from satellite data (oceanic heat advection), repeat ship transects (heat storage rate), and the Comprehensive Ocean–...

Kathleen A. Edwards; Kathryn A. Kelly

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Seasonal Differences in the Trend of Total Ozone and Contributions from Tropospheric and Stratospheric Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on an average of the total-ozone changes determined by means of linear regression at individual Dobson stations within climatic zones, trends of total ozone for each of the four seasons have been evaluated for five climatic zones, and the ...

J. K. Angell

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

State Heating Oil & Propane Program. Final report 1997/98 heating season  

SciTech Connect

The following is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1997/98 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program is funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. SHOPP was initiated in response to congressional inquires into supply difficulties and price spikes of heating oil and propane associated with the winter of 1989/90. This is important to New Hampshire because heating oil controls over 55% of the residential heating market statewide. Propane controls 10% of the heating market statewide and is widely used for water heating and cooking in areas of the state where natural gas is not available. Lower installation cost, convenience, lower operating costs compared to electricity, and its perception as a clean heating fuel have all worked to increase the popularity of propane in New Hampshire and should continue to do so in the future. Any disruption in supply of these heating fuels to New Hampshire could cause prices to skyrocket and leave many residents in the cold.

Hunton, G.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Propane: A Mid-heating Season Assessment - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Propane - A Mid-Heating Season Assessment by David Hinton and Alice Lippert, Petroleum Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration

37

Study of Applications of Solar Heating Systems with Seasonal Storage in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In most northern parts of China, it is cold in winter and needs space heating in winter. This paper studies applications of solar heating systems with seasonal storage in China. A typical residential district was selected, and a solar heating system with seasonal storage was designed and simulated based on various conditions. The results indicate that 1) for many places of China, solar systems with seasonal storage can save conventional energy and can be competitive with gas-fired boiler heating; 2) when the ratio of volume of seasonal storage tank to collector areas is 3~5, the system performance is optimal for many places in China; 3) the obtained solar heat is mainly dependent on the solar irradiance, length of heating period and ambient temperature. Solar heating with seasonal storage in chilly places may also get good performance.

Yu, G.; Zhao, X.; Chen, P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Annual and Seasonal Global Variation in Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Ozone » Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone Atmospheric Trace Gases » Ozone » Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone Annual and Seasonal Global Variation in Total Ozone and Layer-Mean Ozone, 1958-1987 (1991) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp023 data Data Investigators J. K. Angell, J. Korshover, and W. G. Planet Description For 1958 through 1987, this data base presents total ozone variations and layer mean ozone variations expressed as percent deviations from the 1958 to 1977 mean. The total ozone variations were derived from mean monthly ozone values published in Ozone Data for the World by the Atmospheric Environment Service in cooperation with the World Meteorological Organization. The layer mean ozone variations are derived from ozonesonde and Umkehr observations. The data records include year, seasonal and annual

39

Annual, Seasonal, and Interannual Variability of Air–Sea Heat Fluxes in the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the accuracy and physical representation of air–sea surface heat flux estimates for the Indian Ocean on annual, seasonal, and interannual time scales. Six heat flux products were analyzed, including the newly developed ...

Lisan Yu; Xiangze Jin; Robert A. Weller

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Michigan residential heating oil and propane price survey: 1995--1996 heating season. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a survey of residential No. 2 distillate fuel (home heating oil) and liquefied petroleum gas (propane) prices over the 1995--1996 heating season in Michigan. The Michigan`s Public Service Commission (MPSC) conducted the survey under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA). This survey was funded in part by a grant from the DOE. From October 1995 through March 1996, the MPSC surveyed participating distributors by telephone for current residential retail home heating oil and propane prices. The MPSC transmitted the data via a computer modem to the EIA using the Petroleum Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). Survey results were published in aggregate on the MPSC World Wide Web site at http://ermisweb.state.mi.us/shopp. The page was updated with both residential and wholesale prices immediately following the transmission of the data to the EIA. The EIA constructed the survey using a sample of Michigan home heating oil and propane retailers. The sample accounts for different sales volumes, geographic location, and sources of primary supply.

Moriarty, C.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Seasonal Cycle of the Mixed Layer Heat Budget in the Northeastern Tropical Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal cycle of the mixed layer heat budget in the northeastern tropical Atlantic (0°–25°N, 18°–28°W) is quantified using in situ and satellite measurements together with atmospheric reanalysis products. This region is characterized by ...

Gregory R. Foltz; Claudia Schmid; Rick Lumpkin

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

State heating oil and propane program: 1995-96 heating season. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1995/96 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. EIA provides ECS with a list of oil and propane retailers that serve customers in New Hampshire. In turn ECS conduct phone surveys twice per month from October through March to determine the average retail price for each fuel. Data collected by ECS is entered into the Petroleum Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) and transmitted via modem to EIA. The results of the state retail price surveys along with wholesale prices, supply, production and stock levels for oil, and propane are published by EIA in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report. Data is also published electronically via the internet or through the Electronic Publication System.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. [Geothermally heated]. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An engineering and economic study was made to determine a practical balance of selected agribusiness subsystems resulting in realistic estimated produce yields for a geothermally heated system known as the Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. The subsystem cycles for an average application at an unspecified hydrothermal resources site in the western United States utilize waste and by-products from their companion cycles insofar as practicable. Based on conservative estimates of current controlled environment yields, produce wholesale market prices, production costs, and capital investment required, it appears that the family-operation-sized TERSA module presents the potential for marginal recovery of all capital investment costs. In addition to family- or small-cooperative-farming groups, TERSA has potential users in food-oriented corporations and large-cooperative-agribusiness operations. The following topics are considered in detail: greenhouse tomatoes and cucumbers; fish farming; mushroom culture; biogas generation; integration methodology; hydrothermal fluids and heat exchanger selection; and the system. 133 references. (MHR)

Fogleman, S.F.; Fisher, L.A.; Black, A.R.; Singh, D.P.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

State heating oil and propane program: Final technical report, 1991-92 heating season, Minnesota Department of Public Service  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the survey approach and results of the Department of Public Service`s survey of retail fuel oil and propane prices during the 1991-92 heating season. The semi-monthly phone surveys were conducted in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Energy`s State Fuel Oil and Propane Program, which coordinated surveys of heating fuel, prices by 25 eastern and midwest states. This federal/state program serves as a method for fast collection, analysis, and dissemination of information on current residential prices. No other information source meets needs for timely retail, price information over the course of the heating season.

1992-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

State heating oil and propane program season begins - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

46

Table SH1. Total Households Using a Space Heating Fuel, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households Using a Space Heating Fuel, 2005 Million U.S. Households Using a Non-Major Fuel 5 ... Space Heating (millions) Energy Information Administration

47

Direct Estimation of Heat Flux in a Seasonal Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a direct measurement of the turbulent heat flux. The sampling was from a submarine that used a conventional airfoil probe to measure the vertical component of turbulent velocity and a thermistor probe to measure the ...

Hidekatsu Yamazaki; Thomas Osborn

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Variational Data Assimilation for Determining the Seasonal Net Surface Heat Flux Using a Tropical Pacific Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a study for determining the seasonal net surface heat flux over the tropical Pacific Ocean using an adjoint technique. A simple tropical ocean model with thermodynamics is chosen and the seasonal sea surface temperature (SST) ...

Lisan Yu; James J. O'Brien

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Table WH5. Total Expenditures for Water Heating by Major Fuels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Table WH5. Total Expenditures for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Billion Dollars Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil LPG U.S. Households

50

Get Ahead of the Heating Season with an Energy Assessment | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ahead of the Heating Season with an Energy Assessment Ahead of the Heating Season with an Energy Assessment Get Ahead of the Heating Season with an Energy Assessment September 7, 2010 - 4:48pm Addthis Andrea Spikes Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory As I walked outside this morning, I noticed something- a chill in the air! I live in Colorado, where the nights get cooler long before the days do. This is the time where it's common to see people walking around with shorts and sweaters in the morning (gotta be prepared). The sight of my breath was a reminder that soon I'll be running my heater again and will want to run it as little as possible while staying comfortable. If that sounds like your plan, consider scheduling a home energy assessment. Also known as an energy audit, an energy assessment

51

Optimal design of seasonal storage for 100% solar space heating in buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of seasonal solar systems that contain water as the sensible heat storage medium. A concise model is developed under the assumption of a fully mixed, uniform temperature, storage tank that permits efficient simulation of long-term (multi-day) system performance over the course of the year. The approach explicitly neglects the effects of short-term (sub-daily) fluctuations in insolation and load, effects that will be extremely small for seasonal solar systems. This approach is useful for examining the major design tradeoffs of concern here. The application considered is winter space heating. The thermal performance of seasonal solar systems that are designed to supply 100% of load without any backup is solved for, under ''reference year'' monthly normal ground temperature and insolation conditions. Unit break-even costs of seasonal storage are estimated by comparing the capital and fuel costs of conventional heating technologies against those of a seasonal solar system. A rough comparison between the alternatives for more severe winters was made by examining statistical variations in winter season conditions over the past several decades. (MHR)

Mueller, R.O.; Asbury, J.G.; Caruso, J.V.; Connor, D.W.; Giese, R.F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Seasonal Cycle of Meridional Heat Transport in a Numerical Model of the Pacific Equatorial Upwelling Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal heat transport mechanisms important in the Pacific equatorial upwelling zone are investigated using the primitive equation, reduced gravity model developed by Gent and Cane. Mechanisms of meridional heat transport are shown and ...

Esther C. Brady; Peter R. Gent

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Influence of Forests on Atmospheric Heating during the Snowmelt Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric heating during the snowmelt season has been studied by means of data analysis and numerical model experiments. As a result of the data analysis, it was shown that in some examples the daytime air temperature rose above 0°C, even if ...

Takeshi Yamazaki

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

Information Center

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Seasonal and Diurnal Fluxes of Radiation, Heat, Water Vapor, and Carbon Dioxide over a Suburban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on 1 yr of field measurements, the diurnal, seasonal, and annual fluxes of energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) at a residential area of Tokyo, Japan, are described. The major findings are as follows. 1) The storage heat flux G in the daytime ...

R. Moriwaki; M. Kanda

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

State of Maine residential heating oil survey: 1995--1996 season summary  

SciTech Connect

In Maine the cash price is surveyed, as opposed to lthe retail or charge price, as it has been identified as the price most often paid by Maine consumers. As one can see from the chart in this report, the 1995-1996 cash prices for No. 2 heating oil can be characterized as having an upward trend and much more fluctuation than last years` relatively flat line. The 1995-96 heating season started at the closing price of the previous season and for the first few weeks prices were lower than most of the 1994-95 trendline. When the weather became cooler, however, prices were on a steady incline until well into the winter. Prices leveled off for most of the rest of the season with a dramatic surge on the last week of the survey. The average statewide cash price for No. 2 heating oil this year was .861 1 cents, approximately ten cents higher than the average for 1994-1995 which was .7661 cents per gallon. It has been the observation of the SPO that during most of the 1995-1996 season, Maine`s prices showed a direct correspondence with New England rack or wholesale prices. It appeared that they never fluctuated more than 3-4 cents from each other.

Elder, B.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Seasonal efficiencies of residential heat pump air conditioners with inverter-driven compressors  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a study to experimentally determine the steady-state characteristics, cyclic effect, and frosting/defrosting effect of a inverter heat pump currently available on the Japanese market and compute its seasonal efficiency based on the local outdoor air temperature data. It has been found that the APF of this heat pump is higher by 15% than that of the conventional fixed-speed heat pump. If cyclic and frosting/defrosting losses are eliminated, the APF of the inverter heat pump will be further improved by 2% to 6%. For the evaluation of an inverter heat pump, APF alone is not sufficient, and an additional parameter such as an annual comfort factor (ACF) is needed.

Hori, M.; Akamine, I.; Sakai, T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Table A56. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1 20,"FOOD and KINDRED PRODUCTS" ,"Industry-Specific Technologies" ,"One or More Industry-Specific Technologies Present",2353,9 ," Infrared Heating",607,13 ," Microwave Drying",127,21 ," Closed-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Recover Heat",786,19

59

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" "...

60

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1991:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1994:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in...

62

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units Electricity (billion kWh) Natural Gas (billion cf) Fuel Oil

63

Table A12. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical...

64

Table SH2. Total Households by Space Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households by Space Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: ... Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG Other

65

Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (billion cf) Major Fuels Used 4 (physical units) Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units

66

Table WH2. Total Households by Water Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households by Water Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Table WH2.

67

Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) Investigation for Residential and Small Commercial Air-Source Heat Pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities frequently use the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) in air conditioning–based incentive programs to categorize energy efficiency and to quantify financial value. For residential and small commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps, SEER is determined by the procedures outlined in ANSI/AHRI Standard 210/240. Within Standard 210/240, SEER is calculated based on laboratory test results and equations that follow specific assumptions regarding indoor temperature, ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Table A54. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of General Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,," "," ",," "," ",," "," "," "," " ,,,,"Computer Control" ,," "," ","of Processes"," "," ",," "," ",," " ,," ","Computer Control","or Major",,,"One or More"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"of Building","Energy-Using","Waste Heat"," Adjustable-Speed","General Technologies","None","Row"

69

Seasonal Variation of Baroclinic Geostrophic Heat Transport: Is It Resolved by Existing Climatologies of the Atlantic Ocean?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal cycles of baroclinic geostrophic heat transport are systematically computed between 30°S and 40°N in the Atlantic from several hydrographic climatologies. The intercomparison of the cycles reveals very significant differences in both ...

S. Wacongne; L. Crosnier

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Seasonal and Low-Frequency Variability of the Meridional Heat Flux at 36°N in the North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical hydrographic sections are used to investigate the seasonal and interannual variability in the meridional heat flux at 36°N in the North Atlantic. The data consist of ten transatlantic sections and sections from four sectors, which ...

Olga T. Sato; T. Rossby

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"

72

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

73

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

74

Prediction of the Proton-to-Total Turbulent Heating in the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper employs a recent turbulent heating prescription to predict the ratio of proton-to-total heating due to the kinetic dissipation of Alfvenic turbulence as a function of heliocentric distance. Comparing to a recent empirical estimate for this turbulent heating ratio in the high-speed solar wind, the prediction shows good agreement with the empirical estimate for R >~ 0.8 AU, but predicts less ion heating than the empirical estimate at smaller heliocentric radii. At these smaller radii, the turbulent heating prescription, calculated in the gyrokinetic limit, fails because the turbulent cascade is predicted to reach the proton cyclotron frequency before Landau damping terminates the cascade. These findings suggest that the turbulent cascade can reach the proton cyclotron frequency at R ~ 0.8 AU, this turbulent heating prescription contains all of the necessary physical mechanisms needed to reproduce the empirically estimated proton-to-total heating ratio.

Howes, G G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

State of Maine residential heating oil survey: 1994--1995 Season summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1994--95 heating season approached with more attention to petroleum products than experienced in some time. This year, however, the focus was on transportation fuels with the introduction of reformulated gasolines scheduled for the first of 1995. Last year transportation fuels had been in the spotlight in the Northeast as well, for the ills experienced with a new winter mix for diesel fuel. Would RFG have the same dubious entrance as diesel`s winter mix? Would RFG implementation work and what effect would the change in stocks have on the refineries? With worries related to transportation fuels being recognized, would there be reason for concern with heating fuels? As the new year approached, the refineries seemed to have no problem with supplies and RFG stocks were eased in about the second week of December. In Maine, the southern half of the state was effected by the gasoline substitution but seven of Maine`s sixteen counties were directed to follow the recommended criteria. Since the major population concentration lies in the southern three counties, concern was real. Attention paid to emission testing had come to a head in the fall, and RFG complaints were likely. There have been years when snow and cold arrived by Thanksgiving Day. In northern Maine, snow easily covers the ground before the SHOPP survey begins. The fall slipped by with no great shocks in the weather. December was more of the same, as the weather continued to favor the public. Normally the third week in January is considered the coldest time in the year, but not this year. By the end of January, two days were recorded as being more typical of winter. By March and the end of the survey season, one could only recognize that there were perhaps a few cold days this winter. Fuel prices fluctuated little through the entire heating season. There were no major problems to report and demand never placed pressure on dealers.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

77

Table A55. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Cogeneration Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"Steam Turbines",,,,"Steam Turbines" ,," ","Supplied by Either","Conventional",,,"Supplied by","One or More",," " " "," ",,"Conventional","Combustion ","Combined-Cycle","Internal Combustion","Heat Recovered from","Cogeneration",,"RSE" "SIC"," ",,"or Fluidized","Turbines with","Combustion","Engines with","High-Temperature","Technologies","None","Row"

78

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal systems lose their heat by a site-specific combination of conduction (heat flow) and advection (surface discharge). The conductive loss at or near the surface (shallow heat flow) is a primary signature and indication of the strength of a geothermal system. Using a database of

79

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

80

Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.2,1.1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",12605,1209,3303,6386,1706,2.9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Table A15. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.3,1,1,0.9,1.2,1.2

82

Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.3,1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",10743,1150,2819,5309,1464,2.6,,,"/WIR{D}~"

83

PREDICTION OF THE PROTON-TO-TOTAL TURBULENT HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND  

SciTech Connect

This paper employs a recent turbulent heating prescription to predict the ratio of proton-to-total heating due to the kinetic dissipation of Alfvenic turbulence as a function of heliocentric distance. Comparing to a recent empirical estimate for this turbulent heating ratio in the high-speed solar wind, the prediction shows good agreement with the empirical estimate for R {approx}> 0.8 AU, but predicts less ion heating than the empirical estimate at smaller heliocentric radii. At these smaller radii, the turbulent heating prescription, calculated in the gyrokinetic limit, fails because the turbulent cascade is predicted to reach the proton cyclotron frequency before Landau damping terminates the cascade. These findings suggest that the turbulent cascade can reach the proton cyclotron frequency at R {approx}< 0.8 AU, leading to a higher level of proton heating than predicted by the turbulent heating prescription in the gyrokinetic limit. At larger heliocentric radii, R {approx}> 0.8 AU, this turbulent heating prescription contains all of the necessary physical mechanisms needed to reproduce the empirically estimated proton-to-total heating ratio.

Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

85

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

86

Table A32. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,," ","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ," "," "," ",,,,,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "

87

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

88

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

89

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

90

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

91

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

92

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

93

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

94

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

95

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

96

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

97

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

98

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

99

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

100

Table 5a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) District Heat Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 94 429 84 93 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 18 Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 11 Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 28 65 144 155 25,001 to 50,000 16 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 9 50 79 81 100,001 to 200,000 6 59 76 79 200,001 to 500,000 5 109 71 77 Over 500,000 1 65 62 80 Principal Building Activity Education 22 50 71 78 Food Sales and Service Q Q Q Q Health Care 3 57 100 142 Lodging 9 66 112 116 Mercantile and Service 9 Q Q Q Office 24 110 63 70 Public Assembly 10 23 64 66 Public Order and Safety Q Q Q Q Religious Worship Q Q Q Q Warehouse and Storage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Table 5b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) District Heat Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 11 16 16 16 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 27 78 76 76 5,001 to 10,000 38 60 51 51 10,001 to 25,000 18 43 36 35 25,001 to 50,000 24 68 51 51 50,001 to 100,000 18 40 30 30 100,001 to 200,000 27 33 35 36 200,001 to 500,000 22 31 26 27 Over 500,000 42 26 14 10 Principal Building Activity Education 17 29 22 23 Food Sales and Service 67 93 207 150 Health Care 35 26 25 14 Lodging 30 40 30 29 Mercantile and Service 40 74 59 58 Office 23 28 26 27 Public Assembly 25 33 25 26 Public Order and Safety

102

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

103

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

104

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

105

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

106

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

107

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

108

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

109

Table A52. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" 2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" " Categories and Presence of General Technologies and Cogeneration Technologies, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Employment Size(a)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" ,,,,,,,"1000 and","Row" "General/Cogeneration Technologies","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","Over","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2,2.1,1,0.7,0.7,0.9 "One or More General Technologies Present",14601,387,781,2054,2728,3189,5462,3.1 " Computer Control of Building Environment (b)",5079,64,116,510,802,1227,2361,5

110

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

111

Performance of active solar domestic hot water heating systems. Comparative report, 1979-1980 season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most recent composite results of analysis performed by Vitro Laboratories of solar hot water heating data for selected hot water sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) are presented. Results presented have been developed on the basis of analysis of instrumented sites monitored through 1979-1980. A total of 45 sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) were examined for this study. Eighteen of these were selected for in-depth treatment because of the availability of valid long term data. System descriptions, schematic diagrams and energy flow diagrams for these 18 sites are presented in Appendices A, B, and C, respectively. (WHK)

Cramer, M.A.; Kendall, P.W.; Rosenbusch, J.M.; Weinstein, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

113

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

114

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

115

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

116

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

117

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

118

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

119

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

120

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

122

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

123

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

124

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

125

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

126

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

127

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

128

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

129

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

130

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

131

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

132

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

133

Seasonal Variations in the Heat and Water Balances for Nonvegetated Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is presented for estimating the seasonal variations of evaporation, soil-water content, and soil temperature over nonvegetated land surfaces, especially in arid and semiarid regions. In the model, several types of soil are taken into ...

Junsei Kondo; Jianqing Xu

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Total U.S. Main Space Heating Fuel Used U.S. Using Any Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Heating Degree Days by Main Space Heating Fuel Used, ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: ... Any Fuel Natural Gas Fuel Oil Age of Main Heating ...

135

Effects of Surface Heat and Moisture Exchange on ARW-WRF Warm-Season Precipitation Forecasts over the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the daytime planetary boundary layer (PBL) and its association with warm-season precipitation is strongly impacted by land–atmosphere heat and moisture exchange (hereafter surface exchange). However, substantial uncertainty ...

S. B. Trier; M. A. LeMone; F. Chen; K. W. Manning

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Seasonal Variations of the Urban Heat Island at the Surface and the Near-Surface and Reductions due to Urban Vegetation in Mexico City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contrast of vegetation cover in urban and surrounding areas modulates the magnitude of the urban heat island (UHI). This paper examines the seasonal variations of the UHI using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), surface ...

Yu Yan Cui; Benjamin de Foy

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Class B monitoring program handbook for southeastern sites with data based on INIT2 software (applicable to heating season)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides reference information on eight residences located in the southern part of the US which are being monitored under the Class B Passive Solar Monitoring Program. This handbook provides reference information on the sites and basic test conditions for the 1982-1983 winter heating season using software which is identified as INIT2. The manual is intended for use in data analysis work but is limited to this period of time because of basic differences in the control software and the related instrumentation system. This document is separated into individual sections for each site. The following information is provided for each site: (a) Site summary providing information on the structure, the passive solar features, the auxiliary heating system, and other related data; (b) Floor layouts with the sensor locations, etc.; (c) The One Time Value Log which records the results of field tests and calculations to determine the thermal characteristics, air infiltration rate, and other reference data; (d) The Analog/Digital Channel Log which provides calibration data; (e) The Status Channel Log which defines various event sensors; and (f) Program listings as used during the specified time periods during the heating season. Appendix A provides a summary of photographs which have been provided separately as part of the site documentation.

Gustashaw, D. H.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

"Table B29. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,15996,32970,3818,4907 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,1779,2672,484,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,1686,3068,428,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,3366,5807,536,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,2264,4974,300,325

139

Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Atmospheric mercury in Changbai Mountain area, northeastern China I. The seasonal distribution pattern of total gaseous mercury and its potential sources  

SciTech Connect

An intensive field campaign for the measurement of total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations in ambient air was conducted in Changbai Mountain area from 5 August 2005 to 5 July 2006 using an automatic atmospheric mercury analyzer (Tekran 2537A), which was the first time TGM was monitored at a remote area in northeastern China. 99% of the hourly TGM concentrations fell between 1.28 and 9.49 ng m{sup -3} with an annual arithmetic mean of 3.58{+-}1.78 ng m{sup -3}, which was significantly elevated compared to values obtained in remote areas of Europe and North America. Seasonal mean TGM concentrations displayed a descending trend as follows: winter, spring, fall, and summer. Compared to spring/winter, TGM concentrations were lower in the summer/fall but the standard deviation (SD) of TGM levels was higher and indicated a correlation with anthropogenic emissions. TGM concentrations showed seasonal differences with respect to meteorological parameters: TGM levels in spring/winter were most correlated with wind speed, and correlated with solar radiation only in the winter, while TGM levels in summer/fall periods were most correlated with air temperature. There was a strong diurnal variation of seasonal TGM with significantly higher concentrations in daytime/nighttime compared to the early morning. The seasonal diel TGM pattern indicated regional biofuel and coal combustion were the primary mercury sources.

Wan Qi [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Feng Xinbin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China)], E-mail: fengxinbin@vip.skleg.cn; Lu, Julia [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada)], E-mail: Julialu@ryerson.ca; Zheng Wei [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Song Xinjie [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada); Han Shijie; Xu Hao [Open Research Station of Changbai Mountain Forest Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yanbian 133613 (China)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Simulated Seasonal and Interannual Variability of the Mixed Layer Heat Budget in the Northern Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global ocean general circulation model (OGCM) is used to investigate the mixed layer heat budget of the northern Indian Ocean (NIO). The model is validated against observations and shows fairly good agreement with mixed layer depth data in the ...

Clémentde Boyer Montégut; Jérôme Vialard; S. S. C. Shenoi; D. Shankar; Fabien Durand; Christian Ethé; Gurvan Madec

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Land Surface Heating and the North American Monsoon Anticyclone: Model Evaluation from Diurnal to Seasonal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Surface Heating and the North American Monsoon Anticyclone: Model Evaluation from Diurnal the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME), from observational sites as well as satellite retrievals simulations. 1. Introduction The North American monsoon (NAM) is a circulation pattern that brings summer

Miami, University of

144

Table SH5. Total Expenditures for Space Heating by Major Fuels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Space Heating Fuel 4 (millions) Fuel Oil U.S. Households ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Natural Gas

145

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:","NF",0.4,1.6,1.5,0.7,1,1.6,"NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",15027,2370,414,139,5506,105,1184,5309,3 "Boiler Fuel","--","W",296,40,2098,18,859,"--",3.6

146

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:"," NF",0.5,1.3,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2," NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",16515,2656,441,152,6141,99,1198,5828,2.7 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel"," --",28,313,42,2396,15,875," --",4

147

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

148

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

149

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 Short","Other","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors",

150

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

151

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1",,,,,,,"Coal" 1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Other","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

152

Comparing maintenance costs of geothermal heat pump systems with other HVAC systems: Preventive maintenance actions and total maintenance costs  

SciTech Connect

Total annual heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) maintenance costs were determined for 20 schools in the Lincoln, Nebraska, Public School District. Each school examined provides cooling to over 70% of its total floor area and relies on one of the following heating and cooling systems to provide the majority of space conditioning: vertical-bore, geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), air-cooled chiller with gas-fired hot water boiler (ACC/GHWB), or water-cooled chiller with gas-fired steam boiler (WCC/GSB). A precursor to this study examined annual costs associated with repair, service, and corrective maintenance activities tracked in a work order database. This follow-up study examines costs associated with preventive maintenance (PM) activities conducted by the district. Annual PM costs were 5.87 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (63.14 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 7.14 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (76.86 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 9.82 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (105.39 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/ GSB, and 12.65 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (136.30 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. The results of the two analyses are combined to produce an estimate of total annual maintenance costs, by system type, for the 20 schools. Total annual maintenance costs were 8.75 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (94.20 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 9.27 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (99.76 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 13.54 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (145.49 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GSB, and 18.71 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (201.61 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. It should be noted that these costs represent only the trends seen in the maintenance database of the Lincoln School District. Because of differences in the number of schools using each system type, varying equipment age, and the small total number of schools included in the study, the maintenance costs presented here may not be representative of the maintenance costs seen for similar equipment in other locations.

Martin, M.A.; Madgett, M.G.; Hughes, P.J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

An Inverse Model for Seasonal Circulation over the Southern Brazilian Shelf: Near-Surface Velocity from the Heat Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inverse model was developed of the seasonal upper-layer circulation in the region adjacent to the coast of southern Brazil between 30° and 35°S, 50° and 55°W near the boundary of the Brazil–Malvinas confluence. In this region there are no in ...

Peter O. Zavialov; Renato D. Ghisolfi; Carlos A. E. Garcia

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,043 ,043 49 141 128 26 393 7 112 20 46 122 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 115 6 13 5 3 28 2 40 2 3 11 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 86 5 11 5 2 28 1 17 2 3 11 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 142 8 16 15 4 54 1 17 3 6 19 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 116 5 18 16 3 41 (*) 11 2 5 14 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 153 8 22 23 4 59 1 10 2 6 17 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 172 7 24 27 3 68 (*) 9 4 10 20 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 112 3 16 16 2 50 (*) 3 2 6 13 Over 500,000 ............................. 147 7 20 20 3 64 1 5 3 7 16 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 109 4 22 24 3 33 (*) 5 1 9 6 Food Sales ................................ 61 2 4 2 Q 14 1 35 1 1 3 Food Service ............................. 63 3 8 7 3 12 4 20 (*) 1 4 Health Care ...............................

155

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,559 3,559 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 392 19 44 18 11 96 7 138 8 12 39 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 293 18 38 18 8 95 4 57 6 10 39 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 485 26 55 52 14 184 3 57 10 20 63 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 397 18 62 55 12 140 2 37 7 17 48 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 523 28 77 78 15 202 3 35 7 20 59 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 587 23 82 91 11 234 1 30 14 33 68 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 381 11 55 56 6 170 2 10 8 20 46 Over 500,000 ............................. 501 23 69 67 12 220 2 19 9 25 56 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 371 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 Food Sales ................................ 208 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 Food Service .............................

156

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,037 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 371 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 Food Sales ................................ 208 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 Food Service .............................

157

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

50.7 50.7 2.4 6.9 6.2 1.3 19.1 0.3 5.4 1.0 2.2 6.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 60.6 2.9 6.8 2.8 1.7 14.8 1.1 21.2 1.2 1.8 6.0 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 44.0 2.6 5.7 2.8 1.1 14.3 0.7 8.6 0.9 1.4 5.8 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 38.8 2.1 4.4 4.1 1.1 14.7 0.2 4.5 0.8 1.6 5.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 43.7 2.0 6.8 6.1 1.3 15.4 0.2 4.0 0.8 1.9 5.3 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 50.9 2.7 7.5 7.6 1.4 19.6 0.3 3.4 0.7 2.0 5.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 57.7 2.3 8.0 8.9 1.1 23.0 0.1 2.9 1.3 3.2 6.7 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 51.8 1.5 7.4 7.5 0.8 23.0 0.2 1.3 1.1 2.7 6.2 Over 500,000 ............................. 65.4 3.0 9.0 8.8 1.5 28.7 0.3 2.4 1.2 3.2 7.3 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 37.6 1.5

158

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

48.0 48.0 1.8 6.3 6.1 0.8 18.1 0.3 5.6 1.0 2.3 5.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 60.8 2.9 6.8 2.9 1.7 14.6 1.1 21.6 1.2 1.9 6.0 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 42.2 2.0 5.6 2.8 0.9 13.3 0.7 9.0 0.9 1.5 5.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 35.8 1.7 4.1 3.9 0.7 13.3 0.3 4.6 0.8 1.7 4.7 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 41.8 1.8 6.6 6.0 1.0 14.4 0.2 4.1 0.8 1.9 5.0 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 44.8 1.8 6.4 7.2 0.8 17.5 0.3 3.3 0.7 2.0 5.0 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 53.5 1.8 6.9 8.8 0.5 21.7 0.1 2.7 Q 3.5 6.2 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 51.2 1.2 7.2 7.6 0.7 23.0 0.2 1.2 1.1 2.7 6.1 Over 500,000 ............................. 64.9 1.4 7.9 9.5 0.5 30.6 0.3 2.1 1.4 3.9 7.3 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 37.6 1.5 7.5

159

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

89.8 89.8 34.0 6.7 5.9 6.9 17.6 2.6 5.5 1.0 2.3 7.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 98.9 30.5 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.7 7.1 20.2 1.2 1.7 8.1 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 78.3 30.0 5.4 2.6 6.1 12.5 5.2 8.4 0.8 1.4 5.9 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 67.3 28.1 4.1 3.9 3.7 13.1 2.1 4.6 0.8 1.6 5.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 77.6 30.2 6.6 5.8 6.3 13.9 1.6 3.9 0.8 1.9 6.7 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 83.8 32.4 6.5 7.2 6.0 17.4 1.2 3.3 0.7 2.0 7.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 103.0 41.3 7.1 8.8 7.9 21.5 0.9 2.7 Q 3.4 8.0 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 101.0 39.0 7.6 7.5 9.4 22.6 1.9 1.2 1.1 2.7 8.1 Over 500,000 ............................. 129.7 44.9 11.5 9.5 11.7 30.6 2.2 2.1 Q 3.9 11.9 Principal Building Activity Education ..................................

160

Snow Temperature Changes within a Seasonal Snowpack and their Relationship to Turbulent Fluxes of Sensible and Latent Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snowpack temperatures from a subalpine forest below Niwot Ridge, Colorado are examined with respect to atmospheric conditions and the 30-min above-canopy and subcanopy eddy covariance fluxes of sensible Qh and latent Qe heat. In the lower snowpack,...

Sean P. Burns; Noah P. Molotch; Mark W. Williams; John F. Knowles; Brian Seok; Russell K. Monson; Andrew A. Turnipseed; Peter D. Blanken

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The NCEP GODAS Ocean Analysis of the Tropical Pacific Mixed Layer Heat Budget on Seasonal to Interannual Time Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixed layer heat budget in the tropical Pacific is diagnosed using pentad (5 day) averaged outputs from the Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (GODAS), which is operational at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The ...

Boyin Huang; Yan Xue; Dongxiao Zhang; Arun Kumar; Michael J. McPhaden

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Skillful Seasonal Predictions of Boreal Winter Accumulated Heating Degree-Days and Relevance for the Weather Derivative Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that boreal winter accumulated heating degree-days, a weather derivative product that is frequently demanded by energy suppliers (among others), can be skillfully predicted with a lead time of 1 month, that is, at the beginning ...

S. Brands

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Approximation of Ocean Heat Storage by Ocean–Atmosphere Energy Exchange: Implications for Seasonal Cycle Mixed Layer Ocean Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The approximation of ocean heat storage by the net surface energy flux and the implications for zonal mean SST simulation using mixed layer ocean formulation are examined. The analysis considers both constant and variable depth mixed layers. ...

Robert G. Gallimore; David D. Houghton

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Role of Net Surface Heat Flux in Seasonal Variations of Sea Surface Temperature in the Tropical Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study used a new net surface heat flux (Qnet) product obtained from the Objective Analyzed Air–Sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) to examine two specific issues—one is to ...

Lisan Yu; Xiangze Jin; Robert A. Weller

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Seasonal and Interannual Variability of Atmospheric Heat Sources and Moisture Sinks as Determined from NCEP–NCAR Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the National Centers for Environmental Predictions (NCEP)–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) reanalysis, distributions of the heat source Q1 and moisture sink Q2 between 50°N and 50°S are determined for a 15-yr period from 1980 ...

Michio Yanai; Tomohiko Tomita

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Seasonal Contrasting Features of Heat and Moisture Budgets between the Eastern and Western Tibetan Plateau during the GAME IOP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) four-dimensional data assimilation (4DDA) upper-air data, the large-scale heat source (Q1) and moisture sink (Q2) over the western and eastern Tibetan ...

Hiroaki Ueda; Hirotaka Kamahori; Nobuo Yamazaki

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 1, Cooling season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer, Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

Miller, J.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

With the worst of the heating season (October-March) now behind us, we can be fairly confident that retail heating oil prices have seen their seasonal ...

169

Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Geothermal heat pumps use the constant temperature of the earth as an exchange medium for heat. Although many parts of the country experience seasonal temperature extremes—from scorching heat in...

170

The Seasonal Variation of the Propagating Diurnal Tide in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere. Part II: The Role of Tidal Heating and Zonal Mean Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear mechanistic tidal model is used to understand the mechanisms responsible for the seasonal variation of the propagating diurnal tide in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere simulated in the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM). The ...

Charles McLandress

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

28 28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 34 32 Q (*) Q 56.9 52.2 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 36 33 Q (*) Q 49.4 44.7 Q 0.1 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 28 25 1 (*) Q 26.7 23.8 1.4 0.1 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 17 16 Q (*) 1 19.1 17.8 Q (*) 0.6 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 29 26 1 Q 1 15.6 14.1 0.7 Q 0.5 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 37 35 Q Q 1 12.5 11.5 Q Q 0.5 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 36 25 Q Q 2 10.5 7.4 2.4 Q 0.5 Over 500,000 ............................. 10 Q Q Q 2 2.1 Q Q Q 0.4 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 47 45 2 Q Q 25.4 23.9 0.8 Q 0.3 Food Sales ................................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Food Service ............................. Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q

172

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

634 634 578 46 1 Q 116.4 106.3 8.4 0.2 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 165 154 10 Q Q 118.1 109.9 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 123 112 11 Q Q 121.2 110.2 10.5 Q Q Over 500,000 ............................. 169 146 16 Q Q 99.9 86.2 9.5 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 134 122 8 Q Q 116.6 106.6 6.9 Q Q Food Service ............................. N N N N N N N N N N Health Care ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Inpatient ..................................

173

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings.............................. Buildings.............................. 1,644 1,429 131 Q 72 0.10 0.09 0.01 Q (*) Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 228 Q (*) Q 0.41 0.38 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 237 Q 1 Q 0.36 0.32 Q (*) Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 201 179 11 (*) Q 0.19 0.17 0.01 (*) Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 124 115 Q (*) 4 0.14 0.13 Q (*) (*) 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 209 188 10 Q 7 0.11 0.10 0.01 Q (*) 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 270 250 Q Q 10 0.09 0.08 Q Q (*) 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 258 183 Q Q 11 0.08 0.05 0.02 Q (*) Over 500,000 ............................. 72 Q Q Q 15 0.02 Q Q Q (*) Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 342 322 11 Q Q 0.18 0.17 0.01 Q (*) Food Sales ................................

174

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

636 636 580 46 1 Q 114.0 103.9 8.3 0.2 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 165 154 10 Q Q 118.1 109.9 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 123 112 11 Q Q 121.2 110.2 10.5 Q Q Over 500,000 ............................. 171 147 16 Q Q 93.6 80.6 8.9 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 134 122 8 Q Q 116.6 106.6 6.9 Q Q Food Service ............................. N N N N N N N N N N Health Care ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Inpatient ..................................

175

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2002 Atlantic hurricane season is summarized. Although the season's total of 12 named storms was above normal, many of these were weak and short-lived. Eight of the named cyclones made landfall in the United States, including Lili, the first ...

Richard J. Pasch; Miles B. Lawrence; Lixion A. Avila; John L. Beven; James L. Franklin; Stacy R. Stewart

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Heating  

SciTech Connect

According to The Hydronics Institute, the surge in gas-fired boiler shipments brought about 3 years ago by high oil prices and the availability of natural gas after years of curtailment has almost competely subsided. Gas prices continue to escalate and the threat of decontrol by 1985 continues. Likewise, the Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association reports that shipments of gas-fired unit heaters, duct furnaces, and wall furnaces have also dropped as homeowners adopt a wait-and-see attitude toward conversion. However, the market for high- and ultra-high-efficiency furnaces appears to hold potential for expansion. Because of the rebounding home market, a steady replacement market, and increased sales for reasons of efficiency, GAMA expects the total (gas, oil, and electric) central furnace market to increase by 16% in 1983.

1983-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

177

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining charts deal with total distillate demand. Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products physically, and prior to the low sulfur requirements for on-road diesel fuel, were used interchangeably. But even today, low sulfur diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur requirements keep heating oil from being used in the on-road transportation sector. The seasonal increases and decreases in stocks stem from the seasonal demand in heating oil shown as the bottom red line. Heating oil demand increases by more than 50 percent from its low point to its high

178

Seasonal Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seasonal Tips Seasonal Tips Seasonal Tips January 23, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis Amanda McAlpin I've often wished I lived in one of those fabulous places where it's 72 degrees and sunny year-round. But unfortunately, most of us don't. And to stay comfortable, we need heat and hot coffee in the winter, and air-conditioning and lemonade in the summer. Luckily, part of the Energy Savers site is dedicated to helping us save energy during all four seasons. Bring up the dedicated Energy Savers seasonal website and learn great ways to reduce your energy bill. Tips range from small changes you can make immediately, such as closing your drapes, to information on modifications you can make to your home for even larger benefits. There is even information on assistance for energy-savings improvements to your home.

179

Spatiotemporal Variations in Growing Season Exchanges of CO2, H2O, and Sensible Heat in Agricultural Fields of the Southern Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate, vegetation cover, and management create finescale heterogeneity in unirrigated agricultural regions, with important but not well-quantified consequences for spatial and temporal variations in surface CO2, water, and heat fluxes. Eddy ...

Marc L. Fischer; David P. Billesbach; Joseph A. Berry; William J. Riley; Margaret S. Torn

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Weekly residential, wholesale, and spot prices; and production, demand, and stocks of heating fuels. (Weekly heating oil and propane prices are only collected during the heating season which extends from October through March. )

Information Center

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ohio Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wholesale Heating Oil : Residential ... Weekly heating oil and propane prices are only collected during the heating season which extends from ... 3/20/2013: Next ...

182

THERMOSIPHON WATER HEATERS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 ector connecting pipes header heat exchanger insulationLt total connecting pipe length, m (ft) total number of heat

Mertol, Atila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High heating oil prices discourage heating oil supply contracts ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA's Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook expects the U.S. home heating oil price will average $3.71 per gallon for the season, ...

184

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

Riaz, M.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A Climatology of Transition Season Colorado Cyclones: 1961–1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequency, track, and intensity characteristics of transition season Colorado cyclones are investigated for the period 1961–90. Monthly cyclone totals are examined for evidence of seasonal frequency variations during the study period. Cyclone ...

Gregory D. Bierly; John A. Harrington Jr.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1999 Atlantic basin hurricane season produced 4 tropical storms and 8 hurricanes for a total of 12 named tropical cyclones. Seven of these affected land. Hurricane Floyd—the deadliest U.S. hurricane since Agnes in 1972—caused a disastrous ...

Miles B. Lawrence; Lixion A. Avila; Jack L. Beven; James L. Franklin; John L. Guiney; Richard J. Pasch

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1995 Atlantic hurricane season is described. There were eight tropical storms and 11 hurricanes for a total of 19 named tropical cyclones in the Atlantic basin during 1995. This is the second-largest number of tropical storms and hurricanes ...

M. B. Lawrence; B. M. Mayfield; L. A. Avila; R. J. Pasch; E. N. Rappaport

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to collect data on State-level stocks and residential prices of No. 2 heating oil and propane during the heating season. The data are used to monitor the prices of propane and No....

189

Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 eastern North Pacific hurricane season had near normal activity, with a total of 17 named storms, of which seven became hurricanes and four became major hurricanes. One hurricane and one tropical storm made landfall in Mexico, directly ...

Todd B. Kimberlain; Michael J. Brennan

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Investigating the Effect of Seasonal Plant Growth and Development in Three-Dimensional Atmospheric Simulations. Part I: Simulation of Surface Fluxes over the Growing Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the effect of seasonal crop development and growth on the warm-season mesoscale heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes over the central Great Plains region of North America. The effect of crop growth and development on the ...

Elena A. Tsvetsinskaya; Linda O. Mearns; William E. Easterling

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Analysis of seasonality in energy prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identification of normal seasonal trends in energy prices is of considerable importance to budget planners and households. The purpose of this paper is to examine several key energy price series for the existence of these seasonal patterns, and to determine whether these patterns have changed over time. The prices examined are motor gasoline, heating oil, retail residual fuel oil, and residential electricity. The principal users of this analysis are energy analysts and budget planners in private industry and government.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

193

Heating Oil and Propane Update - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. ... Weekly heating oil and propane prices are only collected during the heating season, ...

194

The Southern Oscillation and Prediction of “Der” Season Rainfall in Somalia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Somalia survives in semiarid to arid conditions, with annual rainfall totals rarely exceeding 700 mm, which are divided between two seasons. Many areas are arid, with negligible precipitation. Seasonal totals are highly variable. Thus, any ...

P. Hutchinson

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and past heating season. As you can see, prices have started the heating season, about 40 to 50 cents per gallon higher than last year at this time. The data presented are from EIA's State Heating Oil and Propane Program. We normally collect and publish this data twice a month, but given the low stocks and high prices, we started tracking the prices weekly. These data will also be used to determine the price trigger mechanism for the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. The data are published at a State and regional level on our web site. The slide is to give you some perspective of what is happening in these markets, since you probably will get a number of calls from local residents about their heating fuels bills

196

What are the Seasons?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of dividing the year into four seasons is reexamined to appraise critically the relative merit of two commonly used definitions of the seasons: 1) the astronomical definition, and 2) the meteorological breakdown into four three-month ...

Kevin E. Trenberth

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Solar assisted heat pump system with volume solar collector. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The system uses the attic of the house with a large south facing window as the solar collector. An air-to-water heat pump uses the attic air as a heat source to heat a volume of storage water during the heating season. During the cooling season the attic is ventilated and the heat pump uses the attic air as a heat sink while cooling the storage water. The computer program was developed to include a heat exchanger in the attic which could by-pass the heat pump condenser cooling water, thus permitting direct heat exchange between the attic air and the storage water whenever a favorable temperature existed. The program also accounts for the effect of the incidence angle of insolation and the effect of the number of glass plates on the transmittance and absorptance of the collector and windows. Other refinements include: the use of a sophisticated nighttime setback thermostat, account of internal heat generation and infiltration loss. Among all of the parameter variations, the use of an attic heat exchanger resulted in the maximum savings in the heating/cooling energy consumption of the house. The use of double-glazed windows too, resulted in substantial energy savings. The total energy consumption was found to depend strongly on the infiltration rate. The program was also used to simulate the same system under weather conditions existing at several different geographic areas.

Sabnis, J.S.; Hickox, W.J.; Drucker, E.E.; Ucar, M.; LaGraff, J.E.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Definition: Heat pump | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pump pump Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Heat pump Heating and/or cooling equipment that, during the heating season, draws heat into a building from outside and, during the cooling season, ejects heat from the building to the outside[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A heat pump is a device that transfers heat energy from a heat source to a heat sink against a temperature gradient. Heat pumps are designed to move thermal energy opposite the direction of spontaneous heat flow. A heat pump uses some amount of external high-grade energy to accomplish the desired transfer of thermal energy from heat source to heat sink. While compressor-driven air conditioners and freezers are familiar examples of heat pumps, the term "heat pump" is more general and applies to

200

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Influences of the Kuroshio/Oyashio Extensions on Air–Sea Heat Exchanges and Storm-Track Activity as Revealed in Regional Atmospheric Model Simulations for the 2003/04 Cold Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influences of oceanic fronts in the Kuroshio and Oyashio Extension (KOE) region on the overlying atmosphere are investigated by comparing a pair of atmospheric regional model hindcast experiments for the 2003/04 cold season, one with the observed ...

Bunmei Taguchi; Hisashi Nakamura; Masami Nonaka; Shang-Ping Xie

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

U.S. Propane Total Stocks  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: U.S. inventories of propane benefited from a late pre-season build that pushed inventories to over 65 million barrels by early November 2000, the second highest peak pre-heating season level since 1986. Although propane inventories were expected to remain within the normal range for the duration of the 2000-01 heating season, cold weather in November and December, along with recently high natural gas prices that discouraged propane production from gas processing, resulted in stocks falling below the normal range by the end of December. However, if the weather remains seasonally normal, and the recent decline in natural gas prices holds, EIA expects the propane inventory drawdown to slow. This is reflected in the data for January 19, which showed a draw of only 2.1 million barrels, compared to more than twice that

203

Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

Metz, Philip D. (Rocky Point, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Propane Demand is Highly Seasonal, But Fresh Supply is Not  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Propane, like heating oil, has a highly seasonal demand pattern. Demand increases about 50% from its low point to its peak. Production and net imports, on the other hand,...

205

Seasonal tropical cyclone forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal forecasts of tropical cyclone activity in various regions have been developed since the first attempts in the early 1980s by Neville

Suzana J. Camargo; Anthony G. Barnston; Philip J. Klotzbach; Christopher W. Landsea

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Heat collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, M.A.

1981-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

Heat collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Extremely Active 1995 Atlantic Hurricane Season: Environmental Conditions and Verification of Seasonal Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1995 Atlantic hurricane season was a year of near-record hurricane activity with a total of 19 named storms (average is 9.3 for the base period 1950–90) and 11 hurricanes (average is 5.8), which persisted for a total of 121 named storm days (...

Christopher W. Landsea; Gerald D. Bell; William M. Gray; Stanley B. Goldenberg

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Propagation and Diurnal Evolution of Warm Season Cloudiness in the Australian and Maritime Continent Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warm season cold cloud-top climatology in the Austral–Indonesian region is examined for evidence of propagating modes of precipitation that originate from elevated heat sources and the diurnal heating cycle. Using satellite-inferred cloudiness ...

T. D. Keenan; R. E. Carbone

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Heating Degree Day Data Applied to Residential Heating Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific total electric energy and heating oil consumption for individual residences show a very high correlation with National Weather Service airport temperature data when transformed to heating degree days. Correlations of regional total ...

Robert G. Quayle; Henry F. Diaz

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season October 18, 2011 - 6:42am Addthis Andrea Spikes Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory I'm sure you've noticed the change in seasons by now. Fall brings cooler weather, and with it my thoughts turn to warm things like putting blankets on the couch, enjoying my fireplace, and adjusting my thermostat (as little as possible, of course). One thing we did over the weekend is we insulated our water heater. Depending on how efficient your water heater tank is, adding insulation can reduce standby heat losses by 25%-45% and save you around 4%-9% in water heating costs. Since water heating contributes an average of 18% to the typical home utility bill, it's definitely worth it to add insulation!

212

Simulation of the Effects of Tropical Heat Sources on the Atmospheric Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For 35 seasons in the years 1974–84, the importance of seasonal anomalies in tropical diabatic heating was investigated for the circulation in the tropics and in the extratropics. The heating was estimated from anomalies in outgoing longwave ...

R. Mureau; J. D. Opsteegh; J. S. Winston

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general summary of the 1979 hurricane season is presented. Included are highlights of the season, comparisons of activity in recent years with long-term averages, and comment on large-scale atmospheric features which prevailed during the season ...

Paul J. Hebert

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Seasonal Predictability of Daily Rainfall Characteristics in Central Northern Chile for Dry-Land Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal predictability of daily winter rainfall characteristics relevant to dry-land management was investigated in the Coquimbo region of central northern Chile, with focus on the seasonal rainfall total, daily rainfall frequency, and mean ...

Koen Verbist; Andrew W. Robertson; Wim M. Cornelis; Donald Gabriels

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cool- and Warm-Season Precipitation Reconstructions over Western New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation over the southwestern United States exhibits distinctive seasonality, and contrasting ocean–atmospheric dynamics are involved in the interannual variability of cool- and warm-season totals. Tree-ring chronologies based on annual-...

D. W. Stahle; M. K. Cleaveland; H. D. Grissino-Mayer; R. D. Griffin; F. K. Fye; M. D. Therrell; D. J. Burnette; D. M. Meko; J. Villanueva Diaz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.

Keller, J.G.; Kunze, J.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis  

SciTech Connect

The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.

Keller, J.G.; Kunze, J.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

2008 Draft Season Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes investigations into predation by piscivorous colonial waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River basin during 2008. East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary again supported the largest known breeding colony of Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) in the world (approximately 10,700 breeding pairs) and the largest breeding colony of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in western North America (approximately 10,950 breeding pairs). The Caspian tern colony increased from 2007, but not significantly so, while the double-crested cormorant colony experienced a significant decline (20%) from 2007. Average cormorant nesting success in 2008, however, was down only slightly from 2007, suggesting that food supply during the 2008 nesting season was not the principal cause of the decline in cormorant colony size. Total consumption of juvenile salmonids by East Sand Island Caspian terns in 2008 was approximately 6.7 million smolts (95% c.i. = 5.8-7.5 million). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continued to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony, predation rates were highest on steelhead in 2008; minimum predation rates on steelhead smolts detected passing Bonneville Dam averaged 8.3% for wild smolts and 10.7% for hatchery-raised smolts. In 2007, total smolt consumption by East Sand Island double-crested cormorants was about 9.2 million juvenile salmonids (95% c.i. = 4.4-14.0 million), similar to or greater than that of East Sand Island Caspian terns during that year (5.5 million juvenile salmonids; 95% c.i. = 4.8-6.2 million). The numbers of smolt PIT tags recovered on the cormorant colony in 2008 were roughly proportional to the relative availability of PIT-tagged salmonids released in the Basin, suggesting that cormorant predation on salmonid smolts in the estuary was less selective than tern predation. Cormorant predation rates in excess of 30%, however, were observed for some groups of hatchery-reared fall Chinook salmon released downstream of Bonneville Dam. Implementation of the federal plan 'Caspian Tern Management to Reduce Predation of Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary' was initiated in 2008 with construction by the Corps of Engineers of two alternative colony sites for Caspian terns in interior Oregon: a 1-acre island on Crump Lake in the Warner Valley and a 1-acre island on Fern Ridge Reservoir near Eugene. We deployed Caspian tern social attraction (decoys and sound systems) on these two islands and monitored for Caspian tern nesting. Caspian terns quickly colonized the Crump Lake tern island; about 430 pairs nested there, including 5 terns that had been banded at the East Sand Island colony in the Columbia River estuary, over 500 km to the northwest. No Caspian terns nested at the Fern Ridge tern island in 2008, but up to 9 Caspian terns were recorded roosting on the island after the nesting season. There were two breeding colonies of Caspian terns on the mid-Columbia River in 2008: (1) about 388 pairs nested at the historical colony on Crescent Island in the McNary Pool and (2) about 100 pairs nested at a relatively new colony site on Rock Island in the John Day Pool. Nesting success at the Crescent Island tern colony was only 0.28 young fledged per breeding pair, the lowest nesting success recorded at that colony since monitoring began in 2000, while only three fledglings were raised at the Rock Island tern colony. The diet of Crescent Island Caspian terns consisted of 68% salmonid smolts; total smolt consumption was estimated at 330,000. Since 2004, total smolt consumption by Crescent Island terns has declined by 34%, due mostly to a decline in colony size, while steelhead consumption has increased 10% during this same period. In 2008, approximately 64,000 steelhead smolts were consumed by Caspian terns nesting at Crescent Island. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the Crescent Island Caspian tern colony, the average

Roby, Daniel D. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University; Collis, Ken [Real Time Research, Inc.; Lyons, Donald E. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

The energy performance of electrochromic windows in heating-dominated geographic locations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a study investigating the energy performance of electrochromic windows in heating-dominated geographic locations under a variety of state-switching control strategies. The authors used the DOE-2.1E energy simulation program to analyze the annual heating, cooling and lighting energy use and performance as a function of glazing type, size, and electrochromic control strategy. They simulated a prototypical commercial office building module located in Madison, Wisconsin. Control strategies analyzed were based on daylight illuminance, incident total solar radiation, and space cooling load. The results show that overall energy performance is best if the electrochromic is left in its clear or bleached state during the heating season, but controlled during the cooling season using daylight illuminance as a control strategy. Even in such heating dominated locations as madison, there is still a well-defined cooling season when electrochromic switching will be beneficial. However, having the electrochromic remain in its bleached state during the winter season may result in glare and visual comfort problems for occupants much in the same way as conventional glazings.

Sullivan, R.; Lee, E.S.; Rubin, M.; Selkowitz, S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Variability of Seasonality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasons are the complex nonlinear response of the physical climate system to regular annual solar forcing. There is no a priori reason why they should remain fixed/invariant from year to year, as is often assumed in climate studies when ...

S. Pezzulli; D. B. Stephenson; A. Hannachi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

"Season" "Monsoon" 199119942003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" " 1 "Mausim" "Season" "Monsoon" 1930 1934 19441948 1962) 199119942003 2:1-27 J194418:1-20 M1948, 15(4) M 1962,155169 M1991362pp Ding Yihui, Monsoon over China [M], Kluwer on the variabilities of the East Asian monsoon and their causes. Adv. Atmos. Sci.[J], 2003, 20,:5569 Ramage CS, Monsoon

Qian, Weihong

222

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2003 Atlantic hurricane season is described. The season was very active, with 16 tropical storms, 7 of which became hurricanes. There were 49 deaths directly attributed to this year’s tropical cyclones.

Miles B. Lawrence; Lixion A. Avila; John L. Beven; James L. Franklin; Richard J. Pasch; Stacy R. Stewart

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 Atlantic season was marked by below-average tropical cyclone activity with the formation of nine tropical storms, the fewest since the 1997 Atlantic hurricane season. Of these, three became hurricanes and two strengthened into major ...

Robert J. Berg; Lixion A. Avila

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1993 hurricane season is summarized. and individual tropical storms and hurricanes are described. Overall, the season was relatively inactive, but tropical storms and hurricanes were responsible for a large number of deaths in South America, ...

Richard J. Pasch; Edward N. Rappaport

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1992 hurricane season is summarized, including accounts of individual storms. Six tropical storms were tracked, of which four became hurricanes. In addition, one subtropical storm formed during the year. The season will be remembered most, ...

Max Mayfield; Lixion Avila; Edward N. Rappaport

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Four seasons of giving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kurt's Column Kurt's Column Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Four seasons of giving We value a culture of giving and appreciate our employees' on-going volunteerism throughout Northern New Mexico and even nationwide. January 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email We value a culture of giving and appreciate our employees' on-going volunteerism throughout Northern New Mexico and even nationwide. So, as the Lab, its employees, and retirees wrap up this year's season, I'm happy to say this is not our only time of giving. Programs such as our Science Education Community Service Time efforts mean that whenever school is in

228

Estimating Monthly and Seasonal Distributions of Temperature and Precipitation Using the New CPC Long-Range Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for transforming underlying climatological distributions for monthly and seasonal mean temperature and monthly and seasonal total precipitation, in a manner consistent with long-range forecasts by the U.S. Climate Prediction Center, is ...

William M. Briggs; Daniel S. Wilks

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Performance of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. Final report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operation of CSU Solar House I during the heating season of 1978-1979 and during the 1979 cooling season was based on the use of systems comprising an experimental evacuated tubular solar collector, a non-freezing aqueous collection medium, heat exchange to an insulated conventional vertical cylindrical storage tank and to a built-up rectangular insulated storage tank, heating of circulating air by solar heated water and by electric auxiliary in an off-peak heat storage unit, space cooling by lithium bromide absorption chiller, and service water heating by solar exchange and electric auxiliary. Automatic system control and automatic data acquisition and computation are provided. This system is compared with others evaluated in CSU Solar Houses I, II and III, and with computer predictions based on mathematical models. Of the 69,513 MJ total energy requirement for space heating and hot water during a record cold winter, solar provided 33,281 MJ equivalent to 48 percent. Thirty percent of the incident solar energy was collected and 29 percent was delivered and used for heating and hot water. Of 33,320 MJ required for cooling and hot water during the summer, 79 percent or 26,202 MJ were supplied by solar. Thirty-five percent of the incident solar energy was collected and 26 percent was used for hot water and cooling in the summer. Although not as efficient as the Corning evacuated tube collector previously used, the Philips experimental collector provides solar heating and cooling with minimum operational problems. Improved performance, particularly for cooling, resulted from the use of a very well-insulated heat storage tank. Day time (on-peak) electric auxiliary heating was completely avoided by use of off-peak electric heat storage. A well-designed and operated solar heating and cooling system provided 56 percent of the total energy requirements for heating, cooling, and hot water.

Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Heat Pump Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pump Systems Pump Systems Heat Pump Systems May 16, 2013 - 5:33pm Addthis A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar. A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar. What does this mean for me? Heat pumps can supply heat, cooling, and hot water. Your climate and site will determine the type of heat pump most appropriate for your home. For climates with moderate heating and cooling needs, heat pumps offer an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Like your refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space to a warm space, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. During the heating season, heat pumps move heat from the cool outdoors into

231

Winter Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Residential heating oil prices reflect a similar pattern to that shown in spot prices. However, like other retail petroleum prices, they tend to lag changes in wholesale prices in both directions, with the result that they don't rise as rapidly or as much, but they take longer to recede. This chart shows the residential heating oil prices collected under the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP), which only runs during the heating season, from October through March. The spike in New York Harbor spot prices last winter carried through to residential prices throughout New England and the Central Atlantic states. Though the spike actually lasted only a few weeks, residential prices ended the heating season well above where they had started.

232

TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

since during the heating season the solar radiation is atHeating and cooling demand compared with air temperature and solarHeating and cooling demand compared with air temperature and solar

Pelka, Walter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but solar thermal and absorption cooling are attractive, andthermal heat collection, and heat-activated cooling can befrom solar thermal Total heat load Heat for cooling Heat

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Heat pipe heat amplifier  

SciTech Connect

In a heat pipe combination consisting of a common condenser section with evaporator sections at either end, two working fluids of different vapor pressures are employed to effectively form two heat pipe sections within the same cavity to support an amplifier mode of operation.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Delayed Seasonal Cycle and African Monsoon in a Warmer Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing greenhouse gases will change many aspects of the Earth's climate, from its annual mean to the frequency of extremes such as heat waves and droughts. Here we report that the current generation of climate models predicts a delay in the seasonal cycle of global rainfall and ocean temperature in response to increasing greenhouse gases, with important implications for the regional monsoons. In particular, the rainy season of the semi-arid African Sahel is projected to start later and become shorter: an undesirable change for local rainfed agriculture and pastoralism. Previous work has highlighted the uncertainty in this region's response to anthropogenic global warming: summer rainfall is predicted either to decrease or increase by up to 30% depending which model is used. The robust agreement across models on the seasonal distribution of rainfall changes signifies that the onset date and length of the rainy season should be more predictable than annual mean anomalies.

Biasutti, Michela

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Experimental Study on Energy Efficiency of Heat-source Tower Heat Pump Units in Winter Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building energy consumption in China has been increasing rapidly. And a small increase in the operation efficiency of the air-conditioning system can substantially decrease it. In this paper a new type heat pump is developed to improve the performance ... Keywords: Heat-source tower, Heat pump, Seasonal energy efficiency ratio(SEER), Hermal properties

Li Nianping; Zhang Wenjie; Wang Lijie; Liu Qiuke; Hu Jinhua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Pool heating system on island brings year-round enjoyment  

SciTech Connect

The Bahamas is not generally thought of as a place in need of pool heating. However, the remote Bahamian island of Treasure Cay is actually situated north of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Pool temperatures drop during the winter, thus shortening the swimming season. The Beach Villas Homeowners Association of Treasure Cay investigated pool-heating options some time ago. Energy on Treasure Cay is expensive - about 25 cents/kWh - making cost a major concern for the association as they evaluated their choices. An electric heat pump was rule out as it would place too great a burden on the electricity load of the remote island. Heating the pool with propane gas was deemed far too costly. After evaluating each of these heating methods on the basis of economics, energy efficiency, and comfort, the association concluded that solar would be the best method. They selected a solar pool heating system manufactured by FAFCO, Inc. and installed by SUNWORKS in Ft. Lauderdale. The system requires virtually no daily maintenance, and there have been no problems with the system since its installation. In addition to being trouble-free, the FAFCO solar pool heater has saved Treasure Cay a great deal of money. The equipment cost about $9,500; lumber, PVC, and labor brought the total cost to $13,000. By comparison, a propane-gas system would have cost $4,000 but would have generated a yearly gas bill of $12,000. Therefore, payback on the system began immediately upon installation.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter. 40 years of monthly mean surface data and 25 years of monthly mean 700mb and 500mb data is averaged over the seasons. The spatial correlation of four northern hemisphere midlatitude test sites, two ocean sites and two land sites, at the surface, at 700mb and at 500mb is examined for the winter, spring, summer and fall. The correlations between the different vertical levels and the variance of each level is also presented and examined.

Tobin, Bridget Frances

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

OpenEI - Water Heating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm560 en Residential Energy Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode59

Provides total and average...

240

Simulation of the Tropical Thermal Domes in the Atlantic: A Seasonal Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general ocean circulation model is used to analyze seasonal variations in the Guinea Dome and Angola Dome regions. The cold Guinea Dome develops from June through September due to active divergence of heat transport. The cooling is related to ...

Toshio Yamagata; Satoshi Iizuka

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Oceanic Influences on the Seasonal Cycle in Evaporation over the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual mean and seasonal cycle in latent heating over the Indian Ocean are investigated using a simple, analytical ocean model and a 3D, numerical, ocean model coupled to a prescribed atmosphere, which permits interaction through sea surface ...

Roxana C. Wajsowicz; Paul S. Schopf

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Intraseasonal and Seasonal-to-Interannual Indian Ocean Convection and Hemispheric Teleconnections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep tropical convection over the Indian Ocean leads to intense diabatic heating, a main driver of the climate system. The Northern Hemisphere circulation and precipitation associated with intraseasonal and seasonal-to-interannual components of ...

Andrew Hoell; Mathew Barlow; Roop Saini

243

Design of solar water-heater installations for seasonal users of thermal energy  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model has been developed for a solar water-heating unit intended to be employed by seasonal users of thermal energy. The expected characteristics of such units are calculated for an ''average'' operating season.

Valyuzhinich, A.A.; Myshko, Yu.L.; Smirnov, S.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Radiant Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Radiant heating systems involve supplying heat directly to the floor or to panels in the walls or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer: the delivery of heat...

245

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990 hurricane season is summarized, including accounts of individual storms. Fourteen tropical stormswere tracked of which eight became hurricanes. Only one storm, Marco, hit the United States.

Max Mayfield; Miles B. Lawrence

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Seasonal Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Savers seasonal website and learn great ways to reduce your energy bill. Tips range from small changes you can make immediately, such as closing your drapes, to...

247

Seasonal Contrasts in the Surface Energy Balance of the Sahel  

SciTech Connect

Over most of the world ocean, heating of the surface by sunlight is balanced predominately by evaporative cooling. Even over land, moisture for evaporation is available from vegetation or the soil reservoir. However, at the ARM Mobile Facility in Niamey, Niger, soil moisture is so depleted that evaporation makes a significant contribution to the surface energy balance only at the height of the rainy season, when precipitation has replenished the soil reservoir. Using observations at the Mobile Facility from late 2005 to early 2007, we describe how the surface balances radiative forcing. How the surface compensates time-averaged solar heating varies with seasonal changes in atmospheric water vapor, which modulates the greenhouse effect and the ability of the surface to radiate thermal energy directly to space. During the dry season, sunlight is balanced mainly by longwave radiation and the turbulent flux of sensible heat. The ability of longwave radiation to cool the surface drops after the onset of the West African summer monsoon, when moist, oceanic air flows onshore, increasing local column moisture and atmospheric opacity at these wavelengths. After the monsoon onset, but prior to significant rainfall, solar heating is compensated mainly by the sensible heat flux. During the rainy season, the magnitude of evaporation is initially controlled by the supply of moisture from precipitation. However, by the height of the rainy season, sufficient precipitation has accumulated at the surface that evaporation is related to the flux demanded by solar radiation, and radiative forcing of the surface is balanced comparably by the latent, sensible, and longwave fluxes. Radiative forcing of the surface also varies on a subseasonal time scale due to fluctuations in water vapor, clouds, and aerosol concentration. Except at the height of the rainy season, subseasonal forcing is balanced mainly by sensible heating and longwave anomalies. The efficacy of the sensible heat flux depends upon a positive feedback, where forcing changes mixing within the boundary layer and amplifies the sensible heating anomaly. How the surface responds to radiative forcing is fundamental to the climate response to dust and carbonaceous aerosols.

Miller, Ron; Slingo, A.; Barnard, James C.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.

2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geothermal Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pump Basics Heat Pump Basics Geothermal Heat Pump Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:12am Addthis Text Version Geothermal heat pumps use the constant temperature of the earth as an exchange medium for heat. Although many parts of the country experience seasonal temperature extremes-from scorching heat in the summer to sub-zero cold in the winter-the ground a few feet below the earth's surface remains at a relatively constant temperature. Depending on the latitude, ground temperatures range from 45°F (7°C) to 75°F (21°C). So, like a cave's, the ground's temperature is warmer than the air above it during winter and cooler than the air above it in summer. Geothermal heat pumps take advantage of this by exchanging heat with the earth through a ground heat exchanger. Geothermal heat pumps are able to heat, cool, and, if so equipped, supply

249

Compare All CBECS Activities: District Heat Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District Heat Use District Heat Use Compare Activities by ... District Heat Use Total District Heat Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 433 trillion Btu of district heat (district steam or district hot water) in 1999. There were only five building types with statistically significant district heat consumption; education buildings used the most total district heat. Figure showing total district heat consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. District Heat Consumption per Building by Building Type Health care buildings used the most district heat per building. Figure showing district heat consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

250

Heat rejection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

Smith, Gregory C. (Richland, WA); Tokarz, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Parry, Jr., Harvey L. (Richland, WA); Braun, Daniel J. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1998 hurricane season in the Atlantic basin is summarized, and the individual tropical storms and hurricanes are described. It was an active season with a large number of landfalls. There was a near-record number of tropical cyclone–related ...

Richard J. Pasch; Lixion A. Avila; John L. Guiney

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

National micro-data based model of residential electricity demand: new evidence on seasonal variation  

SciTech Connect

Building on earlier estimates of electricity demand, the author estimates elasticities by month to determine differences between heating and cooling seasons. He develops a three equation model of residential electricity demand that includes all the main components of economic theory. The model generates seasonal elasticity estimates that generally support economic theory. Based on the model using a national current household data set (monthly division), the evidence indicates there is a seasonal pattern for price elasticity of demand. While less pronounced, there also appears to be seasonal patterns for cross-price elasticity of alternative fuels, for the elasticity of appliance stock index, and for an intensity of use variable.

Garbacz, C.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Surveillance Guide - MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEASONAL PREPARATION SEASONAL PREPARATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is implementing appropriate measures to protect equipment and systems from damage due to the effects of cold weather. The Facility Representative evaluates systems necessary for the protection of the public and workers to determine if they have been adequately prepared for cold weather. The Facility Representative also examines other preparations for cold weather to ensure that materials are properly stored, permanent and auxiliary heating systems are functional, and other appropriate preparations have been completed. During the surveillance, the Facility Representative ensures that applicable DOE requirements have been implemented.

254

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

255

Seasonal Prediction of Air Temperature Associated with the Growing-Season Start of Warm-Season Crops across Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal prediction of growing-season start of warm-season crops (GSSWC) is an important task for the agriculture sector to identify risks and opportunities in advance. On the basis of observational daily surface air temperature at 210 stations ...

Zhiwei Wu; Hai Lin; Ted O’Brien

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas-Only Heating Load Annual Total Energy Demand (Natural Gas-Only Heating Load Annual Total Energy Demand (Natural Gas-Only Heating Load Annual Total Energy Demand (

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Heating Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are used in many varied applications--from small household appliances to large industrial process heating systems and furnaces. In appliances or industrial process heating, the heating elements are usually either open

258

Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: With the worst of the heating season (October-March) now behind us, we can be fairly confident that retail heating oil prices have seen their seasonal peak. Relatively mild weather and a softening of crude oil prices have helped ease heating oil prices. Spot heating oil prices recently reached their lowest levels in over six months. Because of relatively balmy weather in the Northeast in January and February, heating oil stock levels have stabilized. Furthermore, heating oil production has been unusually robust, running several hundred thousand barrels per day over last year's pace. Currently, EIA expects winter prices to average around $1.41, which is quite high in historical terms. The national average price in December 2000 was 44 cents per gallon above the December 1999 price. For February

259

Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A variety of heating technologies are available today. In addition to heat pumps, which are discussed separately, many homes and buildings use the following approaches:

260

Optimization of Heat Exchanger Cleaning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of heat integration systems is quantified in terms of the amount of heat that is recovered. This decreases with time due to increased fouling of the heat exchange surface. Using the "Total Fouling Related Expenses (TFRE)" approach, economic incentives for heat exchanger cleaning are evaluated using linear, exponential, and exponential finite decrease models of the heat recovery decay. A mathematical comparison of mechanical and chemical cleaning of heat exchangers has identified the most significant parameters which affect the choice between the two methods.

Siegell, J. H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2006 Atlantic hurricane season is summarized and the year’s tropical cyclones are described. A verification of National Hurricane Center official forecasts during 2006 is also presented. Ten cyclones attained tropical storm intensity in 2006. ...

James L. Franklin; Daniel P. Brown

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active of record. Twenty-eight storms occurred, including 27 tropical storms and one subtropical storm. Fifteen of the storms became hurricanes, and seven of these became major hurricanes. ...

John L. Beven II; Lixion A. Avila; Eric S. Blake; Daniel P. Brown; James L. Franklin; Richard D. Knabb; Richard J. Pasch; Jamie R. Rhome; Stacy R. Stewart

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2004 Atlantic hurricane season is summarized, and the year’s tropical and subtropical cyclones are described. Fifteen named storms, including six “major” hurricanes, developed in 2004. Overall activity was nearly two and a half times the long-...

James L. Franklin; Richard J. Pasch; Lixion A. Avila; John L. Beven II; Miles B. Lawrence; Stacy R. Stewart; Eric S. Blake

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1997 Atlantic hurricane season is summarized and the year’s tropical storms, hurricanes, and one subtropical storm are described. The tropical cyclones were relatively few in number, short lived, and weak compared to long-term climatology. ...

Edward N. Rappaport

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the 1980 hurricane season is presented. Eleven named tropical cyclones were tracked, of which nine reached hurricane force. Allen, an intense storm, affected a number of Caribbean countries before making landfall on the Texas coast.

Miles B. Lawrence; Joseph M. Pelissier

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general overview of the 1989 hurricane season is presented. Eleven named tropical cyclones were tracked, seven of which reached hurricane strength. Three hurricanes and a tropical storm struck the U.S. mainland. The large Cape Verde-type ...

Bob Case; Max Mayfield

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the 1985 hurricane season is presented, including detailed accounts of individual hurricanes. There were eleven named tropical cyclones, seven of which reached hurricane force. A record-typing six hurricanes crossed the U.S. ...

Robert A. Case

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2007 Atlantic hurricane season had 15 named storms, including 14 tropical storms and 1 subtropical storm. Of these, six became hurricanes, including two major hurricanes, Dean and Felix, which reached category 5 intensity (on the Saffir–...

Michael J. Brennan; Richard D. Knabb; Michelle Mainelli; Todd B. Kimberlain

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season is summarized and the year’s tropical cyclones are described. Sixteen named storms formed in 2008. Of these, eight became hurricanes with five of them strengthening into major hurricanes (category 3 or higher on ...

Daniel P. Brown; John L. Beven; James L. Franklin; Eric S. Blake

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general overview of the 1987 hurricane season in the North Atlantic is presented together with detailed accounts of all named storms. In addition, an unnamed tropical storm and a tropical depression that required watches and/or warnings on ...

Robert A. Case; Harold P. Gerrish

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1988 hurricane season is summarized, including accounts of individual storms. Twelve tropical storms were tracked, of which five became hurricanes Gilbert and Joan were devastating hurricanes in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, and ...

Miles B. Lawrence; James M. Gross

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the 1984 Atlantic hurricane season is given. Twelve tropical cyclones and one subtropical cyclone were tracked in the North Atlantic–Caribbean–Gulf of Mexico region. Diana was a landfalling hurricane on the North Carolina coast and ...

Miles B. Lawrence; Gilbert B. Clark

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sampling Errors in Seasonal Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limited numbers of start dates and ensemble sizes in seasonal forecasts lead to sampling errors in predictions. Defining the magnitude of these sampling errors would be useful for end users as well as informing decisions on resource ...

Stephen Cusack; Alberto Arribas

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2000 Atlantic hurricane season is summarized and the year's tropical and subtropical cyclones are described. While overall activity was very high compared to climatology, with 15 cyclones attaining tropical (or subtropical) storm intensity, ...

James L. Franklin; Lixion A. Avila; Jack L. Beven; Miles B. Lawrence; Richard J. Pasch; Stacy R. Stewart

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1994 Atlantic hurricane season had only three hurricanes forming from just seven tropical storms. Several of these tropical cyclones, however, caused loss of life and great damage. Gordon, as a tropical storm, produced floods that killed more ...

Lixion A. Avila; Edward N. Rappaport

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Seasonality and Its Effects on Crop Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding crop seasonality can improve a producer's marketing skills and options. The causes of seasonality and its effects on price changes are discussed.

Tierney Jr., William I.; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

277

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

278

State heating oil and propane program  

SciTech Connect

The following is a report of New Hampshire's participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPS) for the 1990--91 heating season. The program is a joint effort between participating states and the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EYE) to collect retail price data for heating oil and propane through phone surveys of 25 oil and 20 propane retailers in New Hampshire. SHOPS is funded through matching grants from DOE and the participating state. (VC)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Active Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating Active Solar Heating Active Solar Heating June 24, 2012 - 5:58pm Addthis This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system supplies both domestic hot water and a secondary radiant floor heating system. | Photo courtesy of Jim Schmid Photography, NREL This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system supplies both domestic hot water and a secondary radiant floor heating system. | Photo courtesy of Jim Schmid Photography, NREL What does this mean for me? If you live in a cold climate and have unobstructed access to the sun during the heating season, an active solar heating system might make sense for you. You can buy a manufactured active solar system or build your own.

280

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) Provides total and average annual residential energy consumption for water heating in U.S. households in 2005, measured in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Regional Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of this winter's market pressures is in home heating oil prices. This chart shows prices through February 28, the most recent EIA data available. The general level of heating oil prices each year is largely a function of crude oil prices, and the price range over the course of the heating season is typically about 10 cents per gallon. Exceptions occur in unusual circumstances, such as very cold weather, large changes in crude oil prices, or supply problems. Heating oil prices for East Coast consumers started this winter at just over $1 per gallon, but rising crude oil prices drove them up nearly 21 cents through mid-January. With the continuing upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil

282

Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Analysis > Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Released: June 4, 2010 Download Full Report (PDF) This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly. Research finds that a significant portion of data collected on EIAÂ’s primary monthly natural gas consumption survey reflects billing data that does not strictly coincide with the actual calendar month, which creates an aggregate-level discrepancy with EIAÂ’s other natural gas supply and disposition data series. This discrepancy is especially observable during the fall and spring as one transitions into and out of the winter heating season. The report also outlines improved data collection and estimation procedures that will be implemented later this year to more closely align reported and actual calendar month consumption. This discussion will be helpful to users of EIAÂ’s volumetric natural gas data. Questions about this report should be directed to Andy Hoegh at andrew.hoegh@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-9502.

283

Integrating preconcentrator heat controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for controlling the electric resistance heating of a metallic chemical preconcentrator screen, for example, used in portable trace explosives detectors. The length of the heating time-period is automatically adjusted to compensate for any changes in the voltage driving the heating current across the screen, for example, due to gradual discharge or aging of a battery. The total deposited energy in the screen is proportional to the integral over time of the square of the voltage drop across the screen. Since the net temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, of the screen, from beginning to end of the heating pulse, is proportional to the total amount of heat energy deposited in the screen during the heating pulse, then this integral can be calculated in real-time and used to terminate the heating current when a pre-set target value has been reached; thereby providing a consistent and reliable screen temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, from pulse-to-pulse.

Bouchier, Francis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Arakaki, Lester H. (Edgewood, NM); Varley, Eric S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Ground source heat storage and thermo-physical response of soft clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground source heat storage can condition buildings with reduced consumption of fossil fuels, an important issue in modem building design. However, seasonal heat storage can cause soil temperature fluctuations and possibly ...

Saxe, Shoshanna Dawn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Prediction of East African Seasonal Rainfall Using Simplex Canonical Correlation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear statistical model, canonical correlation analysis (CCA), was driven by the Nelder–Mead simplex optimization algorithm (called CCA-NMS) to predict the standardized seasonal rainfall totals of East Africa at 3-month lead time using SLP and ...

Henry K. Ntale; Thian Yew Gan; Davison Mwale

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Effect of Spatial Aggregation on the Skill of Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skillful forecasts of 3-month total precipitation would be useful for decision making in hydrology, agriculture, public health, and other sectors of society. However, with some exceptions, the skill of seasonal precipitation outlooks is modest, ...

Xiaofeng Gong; Anthony G. Barnston; M. Neil Ward

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Extracting Subseasonal Scenarios: An Alternative Method to Analyze Seasonal Predictability of Regional-Scale Tropical Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current seasonal prediction of rainfall typically focuses on 3-month rainfall totals at regional scale. This temporal summation reduces the noise related to smaller-scale weather variability but also implicitly emphasizes the peak of the ...

Vincent Moron; Pierre Camberlin; Andrew W. Robertson

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Variance and Predictability of Precipitation at Seasonal-to-Interannual Timescales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of atmospheric general circulation model simulations, spanning a total of several thousand years, is used to assess the impact of land surface and ocean boundary conditions on the seasonal-to-interannual variability and predictability of ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez; Mark Heiser

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

No. 2 heating oil/propane program  

SciTech Connect

During the 1990/91 heating season, the Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources (DOER) participated in a joint data collection program between several state energy offices and the federal Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA). The purpose of the program was to collect and monitor retail and wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories from October 1990 through March 1991. This final report begins with an overview of the unique events which had an impact on the reporting period. Next, the report summarizes the results from the residential heating oil and propane price surveys conducted by DOER over the 1990/91 heating season. The report also incorporates the wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories collected by the EIA and distributed to the states.

McBrien, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hoosac tunnel geothermal heat source. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hoosac Rail Tunnel has been analyzed as a central element in a district heating system for the City of North Adams. The tunnel has been viewed as a collector of the earth's geothermal heat and a seasonal heat storage facility with heat piped to the tunnel in summer from existing facilities at a distance. Heated fluid would be transported in winter from the tunnel to users who would boost the temperature with individual heat pumps. It was concluded the tunnel is a poor source of geothermal heat. The maximum extractable energy is only 2200 million BTU (20000 gallons of oil) at 58/sup 0/F. The tunnel is a poor heat storage facility. The rock conductivity is so high that 75% of the heat injected would escape into the mountain before it could be recaptured for use. A low temperature system, with individual heat pumps for temperature boost could be economically attractive if a low cost fuel (byproduct, solid waste, cogeneration) or a cost effective seasonal heat storage were available.

Not Available

1982-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

291

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quad. The estimates for total energy usage are within 12% ofthe total heating and cooling energy usages represented bythe total heating and cooling energy usages represented by

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Heat Conduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Differential equations for heat conduction in solids...conduction in solids General form with variable thermal properties General form with constant thermal properties General form, constant properties, without heat

293

EIA Outlook for U.S. Heating Fuels  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation at the 2006 State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference in North Falmouth, Massachusetts, outlined EIA's current forecast for U.S. crude oil, distillate, propane and gasoline supply, demand, and markets over the coming winter season.

Information Center

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Heat and Freshwater Transport through the Central Labrador Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal and interannual variations in the export of Labrador Sea Water (LSW), and in the heat and freshwater transport through the central Labrador Sea, are examined for two different periods: from 1964 to 1974, using Ocean Weather Station ...

F. Straneo

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Spatial Variation in Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution underway shipboard atmospheric and oceanic observations collected in Drake Passage from 2000 to 2009 are used to examine the spatial scales of turbulent heat fluxes and flux-related state variables. The magnitude of the seasonal ...

ChuanLi Jiang; Sarah T. Gille; Janet Sprintall; Kei Yoshimura; Masao Kanamitsu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Summary of seasonal thermal energy storage field test projects in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storage of available heat or chill for distribution at a later time to meet thermal loads. STES can reduce energy consumption, peak energy demand, and emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere over conventional systems. It is estimated that full-scale application of STES would provide 2% to 4% of total energy needs in the United States. One STES technology, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), has been determined to be the most cost-effective option in the United States when site conditions enable its use. ATES has been analyzed in the laboratory and investigated in the field in the United States since the program was established at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1979. Two field test facilities (FTFs), one for heating ATES at the University of Minnesota and the other for cooling ATES at the University of Alabama, have been primary testing grounds for US ATES research. Computer models have been developed to analyze the complex thermal and fluid dynamics. Extensive monitoring of FTFs has provided verification of and refinements to the computer models. The areas of geochemistry and microbiology have been explored as they apply to the aquifer environment. In general, the two FTFs have been successful in demonstrating the steps needed to make an ATES system operational.

Johnson, B.K.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

Daman, Ernest L. (Westfield, NJ); McCallister, Robert A. (Mountain Lakes, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the rest of the winter, and into the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that affects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

299

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

300

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The specific heat of pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of data for heat capacity samples. T S is the growthSummary of HWCVD a-Si:H heat capacity results. The data forv Total measured heat capacity c T of a 50 nm thick device

Queen, Daniel Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the 1996 Atlantic hurricane season is given, and the individual tropical storms and hurricanes are described. This was the second active year in a row with a large number of intense hurricanes. Hurricane Fran, which hit the coast of ...

Richard J. Pasch; Lixion A. Avila

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2011 Atlantic season was marked by above-average tropical cyclone activity with the formation of 19 tropical storms. Seven of the storms became hurricanes and four became major hurricanes (category 3 or higher on the Saffir–Simpson hurricane ...

Lixion A. Avila; Stacy R. Stewart

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Water Heating | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Heating Water Heating Dataset Summary Description Provides total and average household expenditures on energy for water heating in the United States in 2005. Source EIA Date Released September 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated January 01st, 2009 (6 years ago) Keywords Energy Expenditures Residential Water Heating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Total.Expenditures.for_.Water_.Heating_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 70.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Avg.Expenditures.for_.Water_.Heating_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 69.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

305

Regional Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Slide 2 of 11 Notes: One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of this winterÂ’s market pressures is in home heating oil prices. This chart shows prices through February 7, the most recent EIA data available. The general level of heating oil prices each year is largely a function of crude oil prices, and the price range over the course of the heating season is typically about 10 cents per gallon. Exceptions occur in unusual circumstances, such as very cold weather, large changes in crude oil prices, or supply problems. Heating oil prices for East Coast consumers started this winter at just over $1 per gallon, but rising crude oil prices drove them up nearly 21 cents per gallon through mid-January. With the continuing upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of

306

national average for heating oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Propane Missouri North Dakota X South Dakota TOTAL List of States included on Winter Heating Fuels Survey (SHOPP) Release date: January 2012 22.00 24.00. Author: MRO

307

Design and Development of an Intelligent Energy Controller for Home Energy Saving in Heating/Cooling System .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy is consumed every day at home as we perform simple tasks, such as watching television, washing dishes and heating/cooling home spaces during season of… (more)

Abaalkhail, Rana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

309

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

310

Heating Oil Imports Strong in 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Notes: Although total distillate imports have been unusually strong this winter, heating oil (high-sulfur distillate) imports have grown by a proportionately greater amount. As...

311

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

312

Table C37. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

HVAC Maintenance ..... 60 5,154 86 612 6,987 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ..... 18 2,782 158 320 3,636 Equipment Usage Reduced When ...

313

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

Analysis of community solar systems for combined space and domestic hot water heating using annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified design procedure is examined for estimating the storage capacity and collector area for annual-cycle-storage, community solar heating systems in which 100% of the annual space heating energy demand is provided from the solar source for the typical meteorological year. Hourly computer simulations of the performance of these systems were carried out for 10 cities in the United States for 3 different building types and 4 community sizes. These permitted the use of design values for evaluation of a more simplified system sizing method. Results of this study show a strong correlation between annual collector efficiency and two major, location-specific, annual weather parameters: the mean air temperature during daylignt hours and the total global insolation on the collector surface. Storage capacity correlates well with the net winter load, which is a measure of the seasonal variation in the total load, a correlation which appears to be independent of collector type.

Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.; Cook, J.D.; Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie Title Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Fischer, Marc L., Margaret S. Torn, David P. Billesbach, Geoffrey Doyle, Brian Northup, and Sebastien C. Biraud Journal Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Volume 166-167 Pagination 169-174 Keywords Carbon exchange, eddy covariance, Fire, Grassland, Prairie, Water stress Abstract Drought and fire are common disturbances to grassland ecosystems. We report two years of eddy covariance ecosystem-atmosphere fluxes and biometric variables measured in nearby burned and unburned pastures in the US Southern Great Plains. Over the course of the experiment, annual precipitation (∼600 mm yr-1) was lower than the long term mean (∼860 mm yr-1). Soil moisture decreased from productive conditions in March 2005 dry, unproductive conditions during the growing season starting in March 2006. Just prior to the burn in early March 2005, burned and unburned pastures contained 520 ± 60 and 360 ± 40 g C m-2 of total above ground biomass (AGB) and litter, respectively. The fire removed approximately 200 g C m-2 of litter and biomass. In the 2005 growing season following the burn, maximum green AGB was 450 ± 60 and 270 ± 40 g C m-2, with corresponding cumulative annual net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) of -330 and -150 g C m-2 for the burned and unburned pastures, respectively. In contrast to NEE, cumulative mean sensible heat and water fluxes were approximately equal in both pastures during the growing season, suggesting either an increase in water use efficiency or a decrease in evaporation in the burned relative to the unburned pasture. In the 2006 growing season, dry conditions decreased carbon uptake and latent heat, and increased sensible heat fluxes. Peak AGB was reduced to 210 ± 30 g C m-2 and 140 ± 30 g C m-2 in the burned and unburned pastures, respectively, while NEE was near zero. These results suggest that the lack of precipitation was responsible for most of the interannual variation in carbon exchange for these un-irrigated prairie pastures.

316

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

317

Total Building Air Management: When Dehumidification Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry trends toward stringent indoor air quality codes, spearheaded by ASHRAE 62-89: Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, present four challenges to the building industry in hot and humid climates: 1. Infusion of large quantities of make-up air to code based on zone requirements 2. Maintenance of tight wet bulb and dry bulb temperature tolerances within zones based on use 3. Energy management and cost containment 4. Control of mold and mildew and the damage they cause Historically, total air management of sensible and latent heat, filtration and zone pressure was brought about through the implementation of non-integrated, composite systems. Composite systems typically are built up of multi-vendor equipment each of which perform specific, independent functions in the total control of the indoor air environment. Composite systems have a high up-front cost, are difficult to maintain and are costly to operate. Today, emerging technologies allow the implementation of fully integrated system for total building air management. These systems provide a single-vendor solution that is cost effective to purchase, maintain and operate. Operating saving of 23% and ROIs of 2.3 years have been shown. Equipment specification is no longer based primarily on total building load. Maximum benefits of these dynamic systems are realized when systems are designed with a total operating strategy in mind. This strategy takes into consideration every factor of building air management including: 1. Control of sensible heat 2. Balance management of heat rejection 3. Latent heat management 4. Control of process hot water 5. Indoor air quality management 6. Containment of energy consumption 7. Load shedding

Chilton, R. L.; White, C. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Specification of United States Summer Season Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The specification of summer season precipitation in the contiguous United States from summer season fields of 700 mb height, sea level pressure (SLP) and Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) was carried out using stepwise multiple linear ...

John R. Lanzante; Robert P. Harnack

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hurricane season of 2008 in the eastern North Pacific basin is summarized, and the individual tropical cyclones are described. Official track and intensity forecasts of these cyclones are also evaluated. The 2008 eastern North Pacific season ...

Eric S. Blake; Richard J. Pasch

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1999 hurricane season in the eastern North Pacific is summarized, and individual tropical storms and hurricanes are described. Producing only nine named storms, the season tied 1996 as the second least active on record. Hurricane Dora was the ...

John L. Beven II; James L. Franklin

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NCEP Dynamical Seasonal Forecast System 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) numerical seasonal forecast system is described in detail. The new system is aimed at a next-generation numerical seasonal prediction in which focus is placed on land processes, initial ...

Masao Kanamitsu; Arun Kumar; Hann-Ming Henry Juang; Jae-Kyung Schemm; Wanqui Wang; Fanglin Yang; Song-You Hong; Peitao Peng; Wilber Chen; Shrinivas Moorthi; Ming Ji

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

ANNUAL SUMMARY: Atlantic Hurricane Season of 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity during the 2001 hurricane season was similar to that of the 2000 season. Fifteen tropical storms developed, with nine becoming hurricanes and four major hurricanes. Two tropical depressions failed to become tropical storms. Similarities ...

John L. Beven II; Stacy R. Stewart; Miles B. Lawrence; Lixion A. Avila; James L. Franklin; Richard J. Pasch

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 eastern North Pacific hurricane season was one of the least active seasons on record. Only seven named storms developed, which is the lowest number observed at least since routine satellite coverage of that basin began in 1966. ...

Stacy R. Stewart; John P. Cangialosi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Trends in Total Precipitation and Frequency of Daily Precipitation Extremes over China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on a newly developed daily precipitation dataset of 740 stations in China and more robust trend detection techniques, trends in annual and seasonal total precipitation and in extreme daily precipitation, defined as those larger than its ...

Panmao Zhai; Xuebin Zhang; Hui Wan; Xiaohua Pan

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

326

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

327

Natural gas storage withdrawal season review - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The natural gas industry considers two seasons in storage operation–the withdrawal season, from November 1 through March 31; and the injection season, from April 1 ...

328

Foundation Heat Exchanger Model and Design Tool Development and Validation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Feasibility of foundation heat exchangers in ground source heat pump systems in the United States. ASHRAE systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order Heat Exchangers for Residential Ground Source Heat Pump Systems - Numerical Modeling and Experimental

329

Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Title Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres Volume 117 Issue D11 Keywords atmospheric transport, emission inventory, greenhouse gas, inverse model, methane Abstract We estimate seasonal variations in methane (CH4) emissions from central California from December 2007 through November 2008 by comparing CH4 mixing ratios measured at a tall tower with transport model predictions based on a global 1° a priori CH4emissions map (EDGAR32) and a 10 km seasonally varying California-specific map, calibrated to statewide by CH4emission totals. Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport models. Uncertainties due to wind velocity and boundary layer mixing depth are evaluated using measurements from radar wind profilers. CH4signals calculated using the EDGAR32 emission model are larger than those based on the California-specific model and in better agreement with measurements. However, Bayesian inverse analyses using the California-specific and EDGAR32 maps yield comparable annually averaged posterior CH4emissions totaling 1.55 ± 0.24 times and 1.84 ± 0.27 times larger than the California-specific prior emissions, respectively, for a region of central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. If these results are applicable across California, state total CH4 emissions would account for approximately 9% of state total greenhouse gas emissions. Spatial resolution of emissions within the region near the tower reveal seasonality expected from several biogenic sources, but correlations in the posterior errors on emissions from both prior models indicate that the tower footprints do not resolve spatial structure of emissions. This suggests that including additional towers in a measurement network will improve the regional specificity of the posterior estimates.

330

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Title Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Edward J. Dlugokencky, Colm Sweeney, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 39 Issue 16 Keywords atmospheric transport, inverse modeling, nitrous oxide Abstract We estimate nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from Central California for the period of December 2007 through November 2009 by comparing N2O mixing ratios measured at a tall tower (Walnut Grove, WGC) with transport model predictions based on two global a priori N2O emission models (EDGAR32 and EDGAR42). Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) models. Regression analyses show that the slopes of predicted on measured N2O from both emission models are low, suggesting that actual N2O emissions are significantly higher than the EDGAR inventories for all seasons. Bayesian inverse analyses of regional N2O emissions show that posterior annual N2O emissions are larger than both EDGAR inventories by factors of 2.0 ± 0.4 (EDGAR32) and 2.1 ± 0.4 (EDGAR42) with seasonal variation ranging from 1.6 ± 0.3 to 2.5 ± 0.4 for an influence region of Central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. These results suggest that if the spatial distribution of N2O emissions in California follows the EDGAR emission models, then actual emissions are 2.7 ± 0.5 times greater than the current California emission inventory, and total N2O emissions account for 8.1 ± 1.4% of total greenhouse gas emissions from California.

331

Geothermal Energy: Residential Space Heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study, which was carried out under the auspices of the DGRST, was to determine the best way to use geothermal hot water for residential space heating. It quickly became apparent that the type of heating apparatus used in the housing units was most important and that heat pumps could be a valuable asset, making it possible to extract even more geothermal heat and thus substantially improve the cost benefit of the systems. Many factors play a significant role in this problem. Therefore, after a first stage devoted to analyzing the problem through a manual method which proved quite useful, the systematic consideration of all important aspects led us to use a computer to optimize solutions and process a large number of cases. The software used for this general study can also be used to work out particular cases: it is now available to any interested party through DGRST. This program makes it possible to: (1) take climatic conditions into account in a very detailed manner, including temperatures as well as insolation. 864 cases corresponding to 36 typical days divided into 24 hours each were chosen to represent the heating season. They make it possible to define the heating needs of any type of housing unit. (2) simulate and analyze the behavior in practice of a geothermal heating system when heat is extracted from the well by a simple heat exchanger. This simulation makes it possible to evaluate the respective qualities of various types of heating apparatus which can be used in homes. It also makes it possible to define the best control systems for the central system and substations and to assess quite accurately the presence of terminal controls, such as radiators with thermostatically controlled valves. (3) determine to what extent the addition of a heat pump makes it possible to improve the cost benefit of geothermal heating. When its average characteristics and heating use conditions (price, coefficient of performance, length of utilization, electrical rates, etc.) are taken into account, the heat pump should not be scaled for maximum heating power. Consequently, the program considers several possible sizes, with different installation schemes, and selects for each case the value which corresponds to the lowest cost of heating.

None

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan...

333

Interannual Variability of Indian Ocean Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work in this paper builds upon the relatively well-studied seasonal cycle of the Indian Ocean heat transport by investigating its interannual variability over a 41-yr period (1958–98). An intermediate, two-and-a-half-layer thermodynamically ...

Galina Chirokova; Peter J. Webster

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Temporal March of the Chicago Heat Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twenty years of records from Midway Airport, located within the City of Chicago, and Argonne National Laboratory, a rural site 23 km southwest of the airport, have been used to study the diurnal and seasonal variation in the Chicago urban heat ...

Bernice Ackerman

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Commissioning : The Total Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, most new buildings have been equipped with increasingly sophisticated heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, energy conservation equipment, lighting systems, security systems, and environmental control devices that rely on electronic control. Very frequently these systems and design features have not performed as expected. This can result in energy-efficiency losses. occupant complaints about comfort, indoor air quality problems. high operating costs, and increased liability for building owners, operators, employers, and design professionals. Building commissioning was developed in response to these concerns. Commissioning involves the examining and testing of building systems to verify aspects of the building design, ensure that the building is constructed in accordance with the contract documents, and verify that the building and its systems function according to the design intent documents. The process helps to integrate and organize the design, construction, operations, and maintenance of a building's systems to produce a healthy, comfortable, and efficient facility.

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Heat Stroke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stress, from exertion or hot environments, places stress, from exertion or hot environments, places workers at risk for illnesses such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Heat Stroke A condition that occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, and can cause death or permanent disability. Symptoms â–  High body temperature â–  Confusion â–  Loss of coordination â–  Hot, dry skin or profuse sweating â–  Throbbing headache â–  Seizures, coma First Aid â–  Request immediate medical assistance. â–  Move the worker to a cool, shaded area. â–  Remove excess clothing and apply cool water to their body. Heat Exhaustion The body's response to an excessive loss of water and salt, usually through sweating. Symptoms â–  Rapid heart beat â–  Heavy sweating â–  Extreme weakness or fatigue â– 

337

Heat reclaimer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A device for reclaiming heat from stove pipes and the like. A semi-circular shaped hollow enclosed housing with a highly thermal-conductive concave surface is mounted contactingly to surround approximately one-half of the circumference of the stove pipe. The concave surface is formed to contact the pipe at a maximum number of points along that surface. The hollow interior of the housing contains thin multi-surfaced projections which are integral with the concave surface and conductively transfer heat from the stove pipe and concave surface to heat the air in the housing. A fan blower is attached via an air conduit to an entrance opening in the housing. When turned on, the blower pushes the heated interior air out a plurality of air exit openings in the ends of the housing and brings in lower temperature outside air for heating.

Parham, F.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

338

Heat transfer. [heat transfer roller employing a heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A heat transfer roller embodying a heat pipe is disclosed. The heat pipe is mounted on a shaft, and the shaft is adapted for rotation on its axis.

Sarcia, D.S.

1978-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

Heat Pump Markets UK in Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000 units Total: 200,000 units 48% 19% 26% 0% 7% boilers heat pumps solar thermal micro chp & FC district% boilers heat pumps solar thermals micro chp & FC district heating 2010 2020Sales to new build 15% 51% 18 to Renewables Boiler non- con. Boilers con. Boiler Boiler + ST ST Boiler condensing Boiler non-condensing Boiler

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

340

Control of Dry Season Evapotranspiration over the Amazonian Forest as Inferred from Observations at a Southern Amazon Forest Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extent to which soil water storage can support an average dry season evapotranspiration (ET) is investigated using observations from the Rebio Jarú site for the period of 2000 to 2002. During the dry season, when total rainfall is less than ...

Robinson I. Negrón Juárez; Martin G. Hodnett; Rong Fu; Michael L. Goulden; Celso von Randow

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Design method to determine the optimal distribution and amount of insulation for in-ground heat storage tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The seasonal sensible heat storage model developed by F.C. Hooper and C.R. Attwater is modified to describe the thermal behaviour of the soil regime surrounding cylindrical, in-ground, heat storage tanks with optimally distributed insulation. The model assumes steady-state heat transfer, and the surrounding soil is considered to be homogeneous and isotropic. Changes in soil thermal properties due to moisture migration, whether driven by thermal or hydrostatic gradients, are assumed negligible. The optimal distribution is determined using the method of Lagrange multipliers. It is shown that the marginal cost per unit of energy lost and per unit of tank surface area must be the same at all points on the surface of the tank as the condition for minimum total heat loss with a given total investment in insulation. This condition appears to apply for all axi-symmetric in-ground tank geometries. For a given volume of insulation, the incremental increase in storage efficiency with an optimal redistribution of the insulation is a function of tank geometry. The problem of determining the optimal total investment in insulation for a given marginal cost of fuel is described and a method of solution is outlined.

Williams, G.T.; Attwater, C.R.; Hooper, F.C.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

A parameterized model of heat storage by lake sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of seasonal heat storage by lake sediments is proposed oriented at applications in climate modeling and at lake parameterization in numerical weather prediction. The computational efficiency is achieved by reformulating of the heat transfer problem ... Keywords: Bulk model, Climate modeling, Lake temperature, Sediment processes, Temperature wave, Water-sediment exchange

Sergey Golosov; Georgiy Kirillin

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

www.heatpumpcentre.org IEA HEAT PUMP PROGRAMME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of residential HP and AC annual/ seasonal performance (Operating Agent: SE) Establish common calculation and test ­ Refrigeration Covers applications in ­ Residential and commercial buildings ­ Industry HEAT PUMPING TECHNOLOGY boilers and gas boilers Annex 38 - Systems using solar thermal energy in combination with heat pumps

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

344

Diabatic Heating in the UCLA General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diabatic heating rates calculated in the UCLA general circulation model are analyzed. The heating rates are for the December–January–February season for the mean of four climatological runs and the mean of four runs with observed 1982/83 sea ...

Bryan C. Weare

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Description and operation of Haakon School geothermal-heating system  

SciTech Connect

To encourage the development of hydrothermal energy, twenty-three demonstration projects were funded. The Haakon School project is one of twelve such projects. The geothermal direct-use heating system at the Haakon School complex in Philip, South Dakota is described and information gained during approximately three heating seasons of operation is presented.

Childs, F.W.; Kirol, L.D.; Sanders, R.D.; McLatchy, M.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

347

Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

Minor, J.E.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy Basics: Heat Pump Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating Heat...

349

A Model Study of the Seasonal Circulation in the Gulf of Maine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Princeton Ocean Model is used to study the circulation in the Gulf of Maine and its seasonal transition in response to wind, surface heat flux, river discharge, and the M2 tide. The model has an orthogonal-curvature linear grid in the ...

Huijie Xue; Fei Chai; Neal R. Pettigrew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Heating and cooling your home uses more energy and costs more money than any other system in your home -- typically making up about 54% of your

351

Evaluation of a residential solar air heating system. Interim progress report, August 1976--May 1977. [Comparison of air-type and liquid-type collectors  

SciTech Connect

The comparative performance of Solar House II collectors (air heater) and Solar House I collectors (liquid heater) is presented. In the 1976 comparison year, there is no conclusive evidence that either system provides a greater fraction of the seasonal load. Both systems were designed to provide approximately 75 percent of the annual space and water heating load, and the design targets are reasonably achieved. In February, 1976, the air system provided 65 percent of the total requirement while the liquid system provided 76 percent. In March, based on a few days of data, the performance was substantially the same. In April the air system provided a greater fraction of solar heat to the total need, but the use of the heat was different, more being used for domestic water heating in Solar House I than in Solar House II. The data for 1977 have not yet been fully analyzed for both solar houses and therefore, a complete comparison cannot be made. At this stage in the evaluations, it can be stated that either system can be designed to achieve the target fraction of the total annual heat requirements. (WHK)

Karaki, S.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Heat reclaimer  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for reclaiming heat from the discharge gas from a combustion fuel heating unit, which has: inlet and outlet sections; an expansion section whose circumference gradually increases in the direction of flow, thereby providing an increased area for heat transfer; flow splitter plates which lie within and act in conjunction with the expansion section wall to form flow compartments, which flow splitter plates and expansion section wall have a slope, with respect to the centroidal axis of the flow compartment not exceeding 0.1228, which geometry prevents a separation of the flow from the enclosing walls, thereby increasing heat transfer and maintaining the drafting function; and a reduction section which converges the flow to the outlet section.

Horkey, E.J.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

Process Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update uses real world examples to discuss applications of electrotechnology in industrial process heating and to highlight some of the emerging technologies in this field. These emerging technologies, when implemented in a plant, will provide significant energy savings as well as increase productivity. The report presents three case studies of successful implementation of two different electric process-heating technologies in three different industries. The case studies show that in some ...

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

354

HEAT EXCHANGER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

355

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

356

Characteristic Differences of Rainfall and Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Activity over South Korea during the Summer Monsoon Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the characteristic variations of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning and total precipitation during the Korean summer monsoon (June–August) season have been extensively analyzed for different climate regimes. The data used in this study ...

S. K. Kar; Kyung-Ja Ha

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions.      ...

358

Corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation October 3, 2008 - 11:09am Addthis John Lippert If you pay your own energy bills, you don't need to be reminded that energy prices are escalating. Energy price projections for this coming winter are not encouraging. According to the Energy Information Administration, residential natural gas prices during the upcoming heating season (October though March) are projected to average $14.93 per Mcf, an increase of about 17% compared to last year's heating season. Residential heating oil prices are projected to average $4.13 per gallon this winter, an increase of about 25%. What if you live in an all-electric house? Many utilities are continuing to pursue retail electricity rate increases in response to power generation

360

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation Reduce Your Heating Bills with Better Insulation October 3, 2008 - 11:09am Addthis John Lippert If you pay your own energy bills, you don't need to be reminded that energy prices are escalating. Energy price projections for this coming winter are not encouraging. According to the Energy Information Administration, residential natural gas prices during the upcoming heating season (October though March) are projected to average $14.93 per Mcf, an increase of about 17% compared to last year's heating season. Residential heating oil prices are projected to average $4.13 per gallon this winter, an increase of about 25%. What if you live in an all-electric house? Many utilities are continuing to pursue retail electricity rate increases in response to power generation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ground Source Heat Pump Sub-Slab Heat Exchange Loop Performance in a Cold Climate  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a cold-climate project that examines an alternative approach to ground source heat pump (GSHP) ground loop design. The innovative ground loop design is an attempt to reduce the installed cost of the ground loop heat exchange portion of the system by containing the entire ground loop within the excavated location beneath the basement slab. Prior to the installation and operation of the sub-slab heat exchanger, energy modeling using TRNSYS software and concurrent design efforts were performed to determine the size and orientation of the system. One key parameter in the design is the installation of the GSHP in a low-load home, which considerably reduces the needed capacity of the ground loop heat exchanger. This report analyzes data from two cooling seasons and one heating season. Upon completion of the monitoring phase, measurements revealed that the initial TRNSYS simulated horizontal sub-slab ground loop heat exchanger fluid temperatures and heat transfer rates differed from the measured values. To determine the cause of this discrepancy, an updated model was developed utilizing a new TRNSYS subroutine for simulating sub-slab heat exchangers. Measurements of fluid temperature, soil temperature, and heat transfer were used to validate the updated model.

Mittereder, N.; Poerschke, A.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SHOPP Financial Forms - for State Energy Officials SHOPP Financial Forms - for State Energy Officials The Federal forms below are required for State Energy Officials participating in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) to execute their cooperative agreements with the U. S. Energy Information Administration. The Application for Federal Assistance, Form SF-424, is required to be submitted annually no later than May 15th in order for the applicant to receive funds for the upcoming season. This form consists of three parts: SF-424 - general funding information SF-424A - annual budget SF-424B - assurance pages The Federal Financial Report, Form SF-425, collects basic data on federal and recipient expenditures related to the SHOPP grant. This form should be submitted by August 1st of each year after the end of the season.

363

Analysis of Selection of Single or Double U-bend Pipes in a Ground Source Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ground source heat pump (GSHP) system is widely used because of its energy-saving and environmental-friendly characteristics. The buried pipes heat exchangers play an important role in the whole GSHP system design. However, in most cases, single U-bend pipes are adopted only for their simplicity in design and construction instead of high efficiency and less operation cost of the whole system. In this paper, we make a comparison between single and double U-bend pipe heat exchangers in their heat exchange rate per depth, the number of boreholes needed for the same amount of cooling load, total lengths of pipes for the two different types of heat exchangers, and seasonal overall energy efficiency of the two GSHP systems. An economic analysis method is also presented. Finally, conclusions are made for the selection of single or double U-bend pipe heat exchangers in a GSHP system after a case study using TRNSYS simulation software is carried out.

Shu, H.; Duanmu, L.; Hua, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Comparison of Factors Affecting Water Transfer in a Cultivated Paleotropical Grass (Brachiaria decumbens Stapf) Field and a Neotropical Savanna during the Dry Season of the Orinoco Lowlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partitioning of available energy into sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat exchange was simultaneously measured in a closed Brachiaria field and an open neotropical savanna during the dry season of the Orinoco lowlands. These communities, differing ...

J. J. San José; N. Nikonova; R. Bracho

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

New and Existing Buildings Heating and Cooling Opportunities: Dedicated Heat Recovery Chiller  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Langfitt Langfitt U S Department of State Overseas Buildings Operations Mechanical Engineering Division *Engineers are working Harder AND Smarter *New Energy Economy *Heating Is Where The Opportunity Is  39% of total US energy goes into non-residential buildings.  Gas for heating is about 60% of energy used in a building  Gas for heating is at least 25% of total energy used in the US. Heat Generation System Heat Disposal System What's Wrong With This Picture? Keep the heat IN the system Don't run main plant equipment until necessary ! Less rejected heat Less gas consumption High Temp >160F with conventional boilers Hydronic heating... condensing style modular boilers. The entire heating system... designed for low temperature water, recommend maximum temperature of 135ºF.

366

The Seasonal Cycle of Interannual Variability and the Dynamical Imprint of the Seasonally Varying Mean State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various aspects of the seasonal cycle of interannual variability of the observed 300-hPa streamfunction are documented and related to dynamical influences of the seasonality of the mean circulation. The stochastically excited nondivergent ...

Grant Branstator; Jorgen Frederiksen

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Table HC3-1a. Space Heating by Climate Zone, Million U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table HC3-1a. Space Heating by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone1 RSE

368

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exchanger 1 . 3. The Condensers . Reboiler . . . . BoilerNet Power Waste Heat Trimmer Dist. Condenser Turbine SteamLeaks LP Turbine Condenser Misc. Heat Losses Total Waste

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Table CE2-5.1u. Space-Heating Energy Consumption and Expenditures ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Space-Heating Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Household Member and Demographics, 2001 Household ... Total Households Using a Major Space-Heating

370

HEAT GENERATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

373

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

374

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

375

Original article Seasonal fluctuations of cosmopolitan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Seasonal fluctuations of cosmopolitan inversion frequencies in a natural 1989) Summary - Seasonal changes in the frequencies of cosmopolitan inversions and In(3R)C have been as being responsible for the geographic cline of the cosmopolitan inversions. Without ignoring

Recanati, Catherine

376

Seasonally Stratified Analysis of Simulated ENSO Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using outputs from the SINTEX-F1 coupled GCM, the thermodynamics of ENSO events and its relation with the seasonal cycle are investigated. Simulated El Niño events are first classified into four groups depending on during which season the Niño-...

Tomoki Tozuka; Jing-Jia Luo; Sebastien Masson; Toshio Yamagata

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2004 eastern North Pacific hurricane season is reviewed. It was a below-average season in terms of number of systems and landfalls. There were 12 named tropical cyclones, of which 8 became hurricanes. None of the tropical storms or hurricanes ...

Lixion A. Avila; Richard J. Pasch; John L. Beven II; James L. Franklin; Miles B. Lawrence; Stacy R. Stewart

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

Wolowodiuk, Walter (New Providence, NJ)

1976-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

Heat reclaimer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heat reclaimer for the exhaust flue of a heating unit comprises a housing having an air input space, an air output space, and an exhaust space, with a plurality of tubes connected between and communicating the air input space with the air output space and extending through the exhaust space. The exhaust flue of the heating unit is connected into the exhaust space of the housing and an exhaust output is connected to the housing extending from the exhaust space for venting exhaust coming from the heater into the exhaust space to a chimney, for example. A float or level switch is connected to the housing near the bottom of the exhaust space for switching, for example, an alarm if water accumulates in the exhaust space from condensed water vapor in the exhaust. At least one hole is also provided in the housing above the level of the float switch to permit condensed water to leave the exhaust space. The hole is provided in case the float switch clogs with soot. A wiping device may also be provided in the exhaust space for wiping the exterior surfaces of the tubes and removing films of water and soot which might accumulate thereon and reduce their heat transfer capacity.

Bellaff, L.

1981-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

Performance of a solar energy-assisted heat pump heating system: analysis and correlation of field-collected data  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of building energy usage and thermal load for the Solar Building during the winter heating seasons of 1974-75 and 1975-76 is reported. The one-story office building is located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Its mechanical heating and cooling equipment is categorized as a solar-assisted heat pump system consisting of solar collectors, water thermal storage, a water-to-water heat pump and five smaller water-to-air heat pump packaged units. Building energy usage was examined with emphasis on the time of day energy was consumed and the source from which the energy was obtained; i.e., from the electricity for lighting, office equipment and mechanical equipment, and from the heat output of the thermal storage and heat pumps. The rate of electrical energy consumption was found to be very dependent on building use. High rates of electrical energy usage during occupied periods required cooling during parts of even the coldest days. Mechanical equipment heating was found to vary as a function of building usage as well as a function of the indoor-outdoor temperature differential. Energies supplied to and withdrawn from the building were examined and are presented for hourly, daily, and seasonal periods. A comparison of the two heating seasons was made. Energy losses and gains from the building to the surroundings were examined for both steady-state and transient load profiles. Envelope conductive heat losses and losses due to infiltration and ventilation were calculated using actual weather data through the use of the Building Environmental Analysis Program (BEAP). The effect of building thermal storage on heating and cooling loads was examined and a set of building balance-point temperatures was established. Comparisons between the building energy consumption and a calculated load were made for hourly, daily, and seasonal periods.

Williams, R.C.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy Basics: Absorption Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating...

382

Energy Basics: Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating...

383

Heating Oil and Propane Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Release Schedule Holiday Release Schedule The Heating Oil and Propane Update is produced during the winter heating season, which extends from October through March of each year. The standard release time and day of the week will be at 1:00 p. m. (Eastern time) on Wednesdays with the following exceptions. All times are Eastern. Data for: Alternate Release Date Release Day Release Time Holiday October 14, 2013 October 17, 2013 Thursday Cancelled Columbus/EIA Closed November 11, 2013 November 14, 2013 Thursday 1:00 p.m. Veterans December 23, 2013 December 27, 2013 Friday 1:00 p.m. Christmas December 30, 2013 January 3, 2014 Friday 1:00 p.m. New Year's January 20, 2014 January 23, 2014 Thursday 1:00 p.m. Martin Luther King Jr. February 17, 2014 February 20, 2014 Thursday 1:00 p.m. President's

384

Number 2 heating oil/propane program. Final report, 1991/92  

SciTech Connect

During the 1991--92 heating season, the Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources (DOER) participated in a joint data collection program between several state energy offices and the federal Department of Energy`s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA). The purpose of the program was to collect and monitor retail and wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories from October, 1991 through March, 1992. This final report begins with an overview of the unique events which had an impact on the reporting period. Next, the report summarizes the results from the residential heating oil and propane price surveys conducted by DOER over the 1991--1992 heating season. The report also incorporates the wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories collected by the EIA and distributed to the states. Finally, the report outlines DOER`s use of the data and responses to the events which unfolded during the 1991--1992 heating season.

McBrien, J.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Geothermal heating retrofit at the Utah State Prison Minimum Security Facility. Final report, March 1979-January 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of progress and results of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project. Initiated in 1978 by the Utah State Energy Office and developed with assistance from DOE's Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies PON program, final construction was completed in 1984. The completed system provides space and water heating for the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. It consists of an artesian flowing geothermal well, plate heat exchangers, and underground distribution pipeline that connects to the existing hydronic heating system in the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. Geothermal water disposal consists of a gravity drain line carrying spent geothermal water to a cooling pond which discharges into the Jordan River, approximately one mile from the well site. The system has been in operation for two years with mixed results. Continuing operation and maintenance problems have reduced the expected seasonal operation from 9 months per year to 3 months. Problems with the Minimum Security heating system have reduced the expected energy contribution by approximately 60%. To date the system has saved the prison approximately $18,060. The total expenditure including resource assessment and development, design, construction, performance verification, and reporting is approximately $827,558.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Prefeasibility analysis and study of the seasonal storage systems for the Pennsylvania Avenue Redevelopment Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Annual Cycle Energy Storage (ACES) concept as applied on a community scale to Market Square Complex on Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C. is discussed. Four alternatives of seasonal energy storage are examined. Each alternative was examined on the energy saving aspect and its operational and economic feasibility. Of the alternatives considered the most efficient system from the point of view of energy and economic feasibility was found to be system No. 3 dealing with heat pump generated ice for seasonal storage and it was thus selected and recommended for further study. The system utilizes the heat pump for heating the buildings in winter and for meeting the domestic hot water requirements. The heat pump obtains its heat by extracting the heat of fusion of water and thereby converting it to ice. The method suggested is to use the ice maker evaporator with water sprayed over the evaporator coil and being converted to ice. The ice would be used to cool the buildings during the summer by circulating chilled water through the ice bin. This system is expected to supply about 70% of the summer cooling requirements and provide a 100% cut in electric peak demand. The heat pumpsystem using the slab as storage of the heat rejected for reusing in winter time was found inefficient from the energy point of view. Only about 4% of the heat required during winter could be stored in the slab. The solar energy annual storage was found efficient energywise but prohibitive from the economical point of view. The winter cold air potential to make ice for storage was found efficient from the energy point of view but prohibitive from the economical point of view and because of unpredictability of system performance. It is therefore, recommended that the heat pump system with ice storage be taken up for a further feasibility study.

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Combinatorial aspects of total positivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study combinatorial aspects of an emerging field known as total positivity. The classical theory of total positivity concerns matrices in which all minors are nonnegative. While this theory was pioneered ...

Williams, Lauren Kiyomi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 16   Ceramic heat exchanger systems...Soaking pit 870â??1230 1600â??2250 Fe, Si, alkalis Solar Turbines â?¦ 4â??8 OD Ã? 180 long (440 tubes) Aluminum melt furnaces 1010 1850 Alkali salts Plate fin GTE 0.6, 1.6 25â??46 Multiple 870â??1370 1600â??2250 Clean (good), alkalis (poor) Coors 0.25, 1.0 30 Ã? 30 Ã? 46 Multiple Clean (good), alkalis (poor) Radiant...

389

ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP IN THE DISTRICT HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP IN THE DISTRICT HEATING PLANT Dr.sc.ing. Agnese Lickrastina M.Sc. Normunds European Heat Pump Summit 2013, Nuremberg, 15-16.10.2013 · Riga District Heating company · Operation #12;JSC RGAS SILTUMS · the biggest District Heating company in Latvia and in the Baltic states

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

390

Electrically heated liquid tank employing heat pipe heat transfer means  

SciTech Connect

The heating apparatus for applying heat to the interior of a chamber includes a modular, removable, electrical, heat-producing unit and a heat pipe mountable in a wall of the chamber with one end of the pipe arranged to receive heat from the electrical heat producing unit exterior of the housing and with another end of the pipe constructed and arranged to apply heat to the medium within the chamber. The heat pipe has high conductivity with a low temperature differential between the ends thereof and the heat producing unit includes an electric coil positioned about and removably secured to the one end of the heat pipe. The electric coil is embedded in a high thermal conducitivity, low electrical conductivity filler material which is surrounded by a low thermal conductivity insulating jacket and which is received around a metal core member which is removably secured to the one end of the heat pipe.

Shutt, J.R.

1978-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

391

Influence of the vertical structure of the atmosphere on the seasonal variation of precipitable water and greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

By using satellite observations and European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses, we study the seasonal variations of the precipitable water and the greenhouse effect, defined as the normalized difference between the longwave flux emitted at the surface and that emergent at the top of the atmosphere. Results show a strong systematic influence of the vertical structure of the atmosphere on geographical and seasonal variations of both precipitable water and greenhouse effect. Over ocean, in middle and high latitudes, the seasonal variation of the mean temperature lapse rate in the troposphere leads to large seasonal phase lags between greenhouse effect and precipitable water. By contrast, the seasonal variation of the clear-sky greenhouse effect over tropical oceans is mainly driven by the total atmospheric transmittance and thus by precipitable water variations. Over land, the seasonal variations of the tropospheric lapse rate acts to amplify the radiative impact of water vapor changes, giving a strong seasonal variation of the greenhouse effect. Over tropical land regions, monsoon activity generates a seasonal phase lag between surface temperature and relative humidity variations that gives a seasonal lag of about 2 months between the surface temperature and the clear-sky greenhouse effect. Generally, the cloudiness amplifies clear-sky tendencies. Finally, as an illustration, obtained results are used to evaluate the general circulation model of the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique.

Bony, S.; Duvel, J.P. [Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris (France)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Genesis of Indian Ocean Mixed Layer Temperature Anomalies: A Heat Budget Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The genesis of mixed layer temperature anomalies across the Indian Ocean are analyzed in terms of the underlying heat budget components. Observational data, for which a seasonal budget can be computed, and a climate model output, which provides ...

Agus Santoso; Alexander Sen Gupta; Matthew H. England

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Reduction of Residential Heating and Cooling Requirements Possible Through Atmospheric Seeding with Ice-Forming Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rough analysis shows that it may be economically feasible to reduce space heating costs during the cold season in the northern United States by modifying naturally-occurring cloud cover, or by artificially forming clouds in otherwise clear ...

Andrew Detwiler; Haesook Cho

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Impact of Polar Stratospheric Clouds on the Heating Rates of the Winter Polar Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have computed the perturbation to the infrared radiative heating rates of the lower stratosphere due to the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during the winter season in the Antarctic and Arctic regions. The calculations were ...

James B. Pollack; Christopher P. McKay

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Transient heat transfer through walls and thermal bridges. numerical modelling: methodology and validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current advanced numerical codes for the energy audits carry out 0-dimensional simulation (i.e., one computational node representing the thermal zone), underestimating the effects of thermal bridges on the seasonal heating demand of buildings. The ...

Fabrizio Ascione; Filippo de' Rossi; Nicola Bianco; Giuseppe Peter Vanoli

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Intraseasonal Variability of the Saharan Heat Low and Its Link with Midlatitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Saharan heat low (SHL) is thought to be a key feature of the West African monsoon, and its variations during the summer season have not yet been systematically assessed. To characterize the intraseasonal variations of the SHL, real and ...

Fabrice Chauvin; Romain Roehrig; Jean-Philippe Lafore

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Annual Heat Gain of the Tropical Atlantic Computed from Subsurface Ocean Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Charts are presented which show the seasonal and annual rates of heat gain of the tropical North Atlantic Ocean. These rates have been computed using subsurface oceanographic data and wind-stress data. In these computations the interseasonal ...

David W. Behringer; Henry Stommel

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Computation of Ground Surface Conduction Heat Flux by Fourier Analysis of Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for computing the ground surface heat flux density is tested at two places in West Africa during the rainy season and during the dry season. This method is based upon the Fourier analysis of the experimental ground surface temperature. ...

Guy Cautenet; Michel Legrand; Yaya Coulibaly; Christian Boutin

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Total correlations and mutual information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum information theory it is generally accepted that quantum mutual information is an information-theoretic measure of total correlations of a bipartite quantum state. We argue that there exist quantum states for which quantum mutual information cannot be considered as a measure of total correlations. Moreover, for these states we propose a different way of quantifying total correlations.

Zbigniew Walczak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Solar heat collector  

SciTech Connect

A solar heat collector comprises an evacuated transparent pipe; a solar heat collection plate disposed in the transparent pipe; a heat pipe, disposed in the transparent pipe so as to contact with the solar heat collection plate, and containing an evaporable working liquid therein; a heat medium pipe containing a heat medium to be heated; a heat releasing member extending along the axis of the heat medium pipe and having thin fin portions extending from the axis to the inner surface of the heat medium pipe; and a cylindrical casing surrounding coaxially the heat medium pipe to provide an annular space which communicates with the heat pipe. The evaporable working liquid evaporates, receiving solar heat collected by the heat collection plate. The resultant vapor heats the heat medium through the heat medium pipe and the heat releasing member.

Yamamoto, T.; Imani, K.; Sumida, I.; Tsukamoto, M.; Watahiki, N.

1984-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geothermal district heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ten district heating demonstration projects and their present status are described. The projects are Klamath County YMCA, Susanville District Heating, Klamath Falls District Heating, Reno Salem Plaza Condominium, El Centro Community Center Heating/Cooling, Haakon School and Business District Heating, St. Mary's Hospital, Diamond Ring Ranch, Pagosa Springs District Heating, and Boise District Heating.

Budney, G.S.; Childs, F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Microsoft Word - S08364_SeasonalVariation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Groundwater Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site February 2012 LMS/RVT/S08364 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Evaluation of Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation, Riverton, Wyoming February 2012 Doc. No. S08364 Page 1 Evaluation of Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site Executive Summary Historical groundwater monitoring at the Riverton site included collecting samples for a variety of analyses, including general water quality, inorganics, metals, and radionuclides. Evaluations of these constituents were conducted and presented in past documents, which resulted in four constituents of concern (COCs). This paper presents a reevaluation of 47 constituents using

403

Analysis of Energy-Rescued Potential of a Hot Water Heating Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture energy consumption occupies a big ratio of overrall energy consumption, while heating energy consumption is a main part of it. Therefore, analyzing the generation of heat waste is important. In this paper, based on a test of a heating and electricity factory in Jinan, we analyze the energy waste caused by hydraulic power maladjustment and improper control of heating temperature in heating season. We conclude that proper adjustment of the heating network and controlling the heating supply to change according to outdoor temperature can save much energy.

Han, J.; Wang, D.; Tian, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchangers and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Energy Basics: Radiant Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

very low heat capacity and have the quickest response time of any heating technology. More Information Visit the Energy Saver website for more information about radiant heating...

407

Energy Basics: Radiant Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

low heat capacity and have the quickest response time of any heating technology. More Information Visit the Energy Saver website for more information about radiant heating in homes...

408

U.S. Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: One of the first places where consumers are feeling the impact of this winterÂ’s market pressures is in home heating oil prices. This chart shows prices for the last four winters, with this yearÂ’s prices shown through January 24, the most recent EIA data available. The general level of heating oil prices each year is largely a function of crude oil prices, and the price range over the course of the heating season is typically about 10 cents per gallon. Exceptions occur in unusual circumstances, such as very cold weather, large changes in crude oil prices, or supply problems. Although heating oil prices for consumers started this winter at similar levels to those in 1997, they already rose nearly 20 cents per gallon through mid-January. With the continuing upward pressure from crude

409

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

410

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

411

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

412

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

413

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

414

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

415

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

416

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

417

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

418

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

419

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

420

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

422

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

423

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

424

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

425

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

426

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

427

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q 0.5 Q Q Monitor is Turned Off... 0.5 N Q Q Q Q N Q Use of Internet Have Access to Internet Yes... 66.9...

428

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

m... 3.2 0.2 Q 0.1 Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 14.9 11.1 3.9 Cordless...

429

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

m... 3.2 0.9 0.7 Q Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 19.3 13.2 6.1 Cordless...

430

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Four Most Populated States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four...

431

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

432

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

433

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,000 to 79,999 80,000 or More Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

434

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators U.S. Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Energy Information...

435

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.7...

436

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC4.7...

437

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC8.7...

438

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East North Central West North Central Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

439

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

440

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

442

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

443

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

444

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.1 0.5 Q 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

445

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.3 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.7 0.5 Q Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

446

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.8 0.3 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

447

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.1 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.4 Q 0.2 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

448

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.4 0.4 0.4 0.7 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

449

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer......

450

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 25.8 2.8 5.8 5.5 3.8 7.9 1.4 5.1 Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan Used All Summer... 18.7 4.2 4.9 4.1 2.1 3.4 2.4 6.3...

451

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

452

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 34.3 1.2 0.9 2.2 2.9 5.4 7.0 8.2 6.6 Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated... 29.5 1.5 0.9 2.3 2.7 4.1...

453

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

454

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

455

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

456

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

457

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

458

Wood-Burning Heating System Deduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute allows individual taxpayers a deduction for the purchase and installation of a wood-burning heating system. The deduction is equal to the total cost of purchase and installation for...

459

The Role of Sublimational Cooling in a Late-Season Midwestern Snow Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis is provided of a surprise late-season snow event over eastern Missouri and western Illinois. While snow totals failed to exceed 15 cm (6 in.) at any single location, the system was noteworthy because of the poor performance of public, ...

Patrick S. Market; Ronald W. Przybylinski; Scott M. Rochette

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner October 20, 2010 - 10:31am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability As temperatures start to drop Americans around the country are pulling out their flannel sheets, putting the storm windows back on, and switching their air conditioning units with heaters. These transformations have an impact on the way our nation uses our energy resources, particularly heating fuels. Since 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) have held an annual Winter Fuels Outlook Conference to provide the energy community with information on global and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation 3/21/95 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Seasonal Preparation 3/21/95 3 Seasonal Preparation 3/21/95 MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation 3/21/95 The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is implementing appropriate measures to protect equipment and systems from damage due to the effects of cold weather. The Facility Representative evaluates systems necessary for the protection of the public and workers to determine if they have been adequately prepared for cold weather. The Facility Representative also examines other preparations for cold weather to ensure that materials are properly stored, permanent and auxiliary heating systems are functional, and other appropriate preparations have been completed. During the surveillance, the Facility Representative ensures that applicable DOE requirements have been implemented.

462

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner October 20, 2010 - 10:31am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability As temperatures start to drop Americans around the country are pulling out their flannel sheets, putting the storm windows back on, and switching their air conditioning units with heaters. These transformations have an impact on the way our nation uses our energy resources, particularly heating fuels. Since 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) have held an annual Winter Fuels Outlook Conference to provide the energy community with information on global and

463

Reproducibility of Seasonal Land Surface Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the sensitivity of the continental seasonal climate to initial conditions is estimated from an ensemble of decadal simulations of an atmospheric general circulation model with the same specifications of radiative forcings and ...

Thomas J. Phillips

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Model Fidelity versus Skill in Seasonal Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relation between skill and fidelity of seasonal mean hindcasts of surface temperature by seven coupled atmosphere–ocean models is investigated. By definition, fidelity measures the agreement between model and observational climatological ...

Timothy DelSole; Jagadish Shukla

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Potential Economic Value of Seasonal Hurricane Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the potential utility of seasonal Atlantic hurricane forecasts to a hypothetical property insurance firm whose insured properties are broadly distributed along the U.S. Gulf and East Coasts. Using a recently developed hurricane ...

Kerry Emanuel; Fabian Fondriest; James Kossin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Baroclinic Eddy Equilibration under Specified Seasonal Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic eddy equilibration under a Northern Hemisphere–like seasonal forcing is studied using a modified multilayer quasigeostrophic channel model to investigate the widely used “quick baroclinic eddy equilibration” assumption and to ...

Yang Zhang; Peter H. Stone

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Lagged Ensembles, Forecast Configuration, and Seasonal Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of lagged ensemble seasonal forecasts from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) is presented. The focus of the analysis is on the construction of lagged ensemble forecasts ...

Mingyue Chen; Wanqiu Wang; Arun Kumar

468

Causes of Robust Seasonal Land Precipitation Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) archive are used to calculate the zonal mean change in seasonal land precipitation for the second half of the twentieth century in response to a range of ...

Debbie Polson; Gabriele C. Hegerl; Xuebin Zhang; Timothy J. Osborn

469

Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Hurricane Center (a component of the Tropical Prediction Center) tracked nine tropical storms, five of which became hurricanes, during the 1996 eastern North Pacific hurricane season. Five tropical storms or hurricanes made landfall ...

Max Mayfield; Edward N. Rappaport

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Hurricane Center tracked 14 tropical storms, 10 of which became hurricanes, during the 1993 eastern North Pacific hurricane season. Four named tropical cyclones and one tropical depression made landfall in Mexico. A general overview ...

Lixion A. Avila; Max Mayfield

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hurricane season of the eastern North Pacific basin is summarized and individual tropical cyclones are described. The number of tropical cyclones was near normal. Hurricane Pauline’s rainfall flooding killed more than 200 people in the ...

Miles B. Lawrence

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Lagged Ensembles, Forecast Configuration, and Seasonal Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of lagged ensemble seasonal forecasts from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System, version 2 (CFSv2), is presented. The focus of the analysis is on the construction of lagged ensemble forecasts ...

Mingyue Chen; Wanqiu Wang; Arun Kumar

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

On the Seasonality of the Hadley Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual march of the climatological mean meridional circulations (MMCs) in the NCEP–NCAR reanalyses is dominated by two components of roughly comparable mean-squared amplitude: 1) a seasonally invariant pair of “Hadley cells” with rising ...

Ioana M. Dima; John M. Wallace

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A Consensus Model for Seasonal Hurricane Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors apply a procedure called Bayesian model averaging (BMA) for examining the utility of a set of covariates for predicting the distribution of U.S. hurricane counts and demonstrating a consensus model for seasonal prediction. Hurricane ...

Thomas H. Jagger; James B. Elsner

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Predictability of Seasonal Precipitation Using Joint Probabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper tests whether seasonal mean precipitation is predictable using a new method that estimates and analyzes joint probabilities. The new estimation method is to partition the globe into boxes, pool all data within the box to estimate a ...

M. Tugrul Yilmaz; Timothy DelSole

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Richardson Number Statistics in the Seasonal Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistics of Richardson number in the seasonal thermocline are determined for a simple model and from experiments over the continental shelf. The model consists of normally distributed and uncorrelated density gradient and shear (such as may be ...

Laurie Padman; Ian S. F. Jones

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Characteristics of the Northern Australian Rainy Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A trend of increasing rainfall over much of north and northwest Australia over recent decades has contrasted with decreases over much of the rest of the continent. The increases have occurred during the summer months when the rainy season is ...

I. N. Smith; L. Wilson; R. Suppiah

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overall activity during the 2011 eastern North Pacific hurricane season was near average. Of the 11 tropical storms that formed, 10 became hurricanes and 6 reached major hurricane strength (category 3 or stronger on the Saffir–Simpson hurricane ...

Eric S. Blake; Todd B. Kimberlain

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hurricane season of 2006 in the eastern North Pacific basin is summarized, and the individual tropical cyclones are described. Also, the official track and intensity forecasts of these cyclones are verified and evaluated. The 2006 eastern ...

Richard J. Pasch; Eric S. Blake; Lixion A. Avila; John L. Beven; Daniel P. Brown; James L. Franklin; Richard D. Knabb; Michelle M. Mainelli; Jamie R. Rhome; Stacy R. Stewart

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Estimation of Errors in Seasonal Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formula is first given for the error in a 2-harmonic seasonal curve of best fit through a set of N oceanographic data points, assuming the departures from the true mean are independent random numbers.

J. S. Godfrey; K. R. Ridgway

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating season total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More...

482

Heat transfer and heat exchangers reference handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with an understanding of the basic concepts of heat transfer and the operation of heat exchangers.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

484

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, Phillip J. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategies impact on energy consumption in residentialBEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTION Nicola Combe 1 ,2 ,nearly 60% of domestic energy consumption and 27% of total

Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Phase Change Materials for Enhancing Heat Transfer in Thermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main issues with using phase change materials is that solidification often reduces total heat transfer, reducing the efficiency of the storage system.

487

Table A3. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table A3. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption and Biofuels Production, 1949-2011 (Million Btu per Barrel) Year: Total Petroleum 1 ...

488

Atmospheric Heat Engines on Earth and Mars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The character of the Earth's atmospheric heat engine depends, inter alia, on the relatively tight linkage between surface fluxes of energy and of H20. On Mars, on the other hand, H2O-based latent heat fluxes are only a trivial fraction of total ...

J. R. Philip

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Heat Exchange Between Ocean and Atmosphere in the Eastern North Pacific for 1961-71  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Exchange Between Ocean and Atmosphere in the Eastern North Pacific for 1961-71 N. E. CLARK, L of total heat exchange and departuresfroma long-term mean; 2)long-term monthly mean valuesof the total heat exchange, incom- ing solar radiation, effectiveback radiation, and evaporative and sensible heat transfer

490

Radiofrequency plasma heating: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The conference proceedings include sessions on Alfven Wave Heating, ICRF Heating and Current Drive, Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive, and ECRF Heating. Questions of confinement, diagnostics, instabilities and technology are considered. Individual papers are cataloged separately. (WRF)

Swenson, D.G. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

492

Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Of course, petroleum product prices don't move in lockstep to crude oil prices, for a number of reasons. We find it useful to look at variations in the spread between product and crude oil prices, in this case comparing spot market prices for each. The difference between heating oil and crude oil spot prices tends to vary seasonally; that is, it's generally higher in the winter, when demand for distillate fuels is higher due to heating requirements, and lower in the summer. (Gasoline, as we'll see later, generally does the opposite.) However, other factors affecting supply and demand, including the relative severity of winter weather, can greatly distort these "typical" seasonal trends. As seen on this chart, the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97 featured

493

China Total Cloud Amount Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Total Cloud Amount Over China DOI: 10.3334CDIACcli.008 data Data image Graphics Investigator Dale P. Kaiser Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental...

494

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and could the heat transfer processes be modeled to estimateindicating that the heat transfer processes were modeled w i

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Heat pipe methanator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

Ranken, William A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

496

Buildings","All Heated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Heating Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" 3. Heating Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,8923,14449,17349,5534,19522,25743,4073 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,679,2271,1183,"Q",463,1779,250 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,745,2848,1350,"Q",1040,2301,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,1288,3047,3021,307,2047,3994,401

497

Performance comparison between air and liquid residential solar heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons of system performance for the flat plate liquid-heating system in CSU Solar House I, the evacuated-tube collector system in Solar House I, and the flat plate air-heating system in CSU Solar House II are described for selected months of the 1976 and 1977 heating seasons. Only space and domestic water heating data are compared. The flat plate air- and liquid-heating collectors operating with complete heating systems have nearly equal efficiencies when based upon solar flux while the collector fluids are flowing, but approximately 40% more energy is collected during a heating season with the air-heating system because the air system operates over a longer period of the day. On the basis of short-term data, the evacuated tube collector array on Solar House I is about 27% more efficient than the flat plate air-heating collector array on Solar House II based on gross roof area occupied by the collectors and manifolds.

Karaki, S.; Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Performance improvement of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak electric auxiliary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and construction of a heat pump system suitable for incorporating in a space solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility are described. The performance of the system is evaluated. The refrigerating capacity, heating capacity and compressor horsepower for a heat pump system using a piston type compressor are first determined. The heat pump design is also matched with the existing University of Toledo solar house heating system. The refrigerant is Freon-12 working between a condensing temperature of up to 172/sup 0/F and evaporator temperature between 0/sup 0/F and 75/sup 0/F. The heat pump is then installed. Performance indices for the heat pump and the heating system in general are defined and generated by the on-line computer monitoring system for the 1979/80 heating season operation. Monthly and seasonal indices such as heat pump coefficient of performance, collector efficiency, percent of heating load supplied by solar energy and individual components efficiencies in general are recorded. The data collected is then analyzed and compared with previously collected data. The improvement in the performance resulting from the addition of a piston type compressor with an external motor belt drive is then evaluated. Data collected points to the potentially improved operating performance of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility. Data shows that the seasonal percent of space heating load supplied by solar is 60% and the seasonal percent cost of space heating load supplied by solar is 82% with a solar collection coefficient of performance of 4.6. Data also indicates that such a system would pay for itself in 14 years when used in Northwest Ohio.

Eltimsahy, A.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Heat reclaimer for a heat pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heat reclaiming device for a heat pump. The heat reclaimer is able to absorb heat from the compressor by circulating cooling fluid through a circuit which is mounted in good heat transfer relationship with the condenser, then around the shell of the motor-compressor and lastly around the hollow tube which connects the condenser to the compressor. The reclaiming circuit is connected into a fluid circulating loop which is used to supply heat to the evaporator coil of the heat pump.

Beacham, W.H.

1981-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

500

Covariability of Components of Poleward Atmospheric Energy Transports on Seasonal and Interannual Timescales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically integrated atmospheric energy and heat budgets are presented with a focus on the zonal mean transports and divergences of dry static energy, latent energy, their sum (the moist static energy), and the total (which includes kinetic ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; David P. Stepaniak

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z