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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Heat Exchanger Design for Solar Gas-Turbine Power Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The aim of this project is to select appropriate heat exchangers out of available gas-gas heat exchangers for used in a proposed power plant.… (more)

Yakah, Noah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas -BACKGROUND: In December 2009, the Combined Heat and Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- BACKGROUND: In December 2009, the Combined Heat and Power Plant at Cornell Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas the power plant #12;

Keinan, Alon

3

Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants  

SciTech Connect

Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed.

McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Trigeneration scheme for energy efficiency enhancement in a natural gas processing plant through turbine exhaust gas waste heat utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of Natural Gas Processing Plants (NGPPs) can be enhanced with the integration of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) generation schemes. This paper analyzes the integration of a trigeneration scheme within a NGPP, that utilizes waste heat from gas turbine exhaust gases to generate process steam in a Waste Heat Recovery Steam Generator (WHRSG). Part of the steam generated is used to power double-effect water–lithium bromide (H2O–LiBr) absorption chillers that provide gas turbine compressor inlet air-cooling. Another portion of the steam is utilized to meet part furnace heating load, and supplement plant electrical power in a combined regenerative Rankine cycle. A detailed techno-economic analysis of scheme performance is presented based on thermodynamic predictions obtained using Engineering Equation Solver (EES). The results indicate that the trigeneration system could recover 79.7 MW of gas turbine waste heat, 37.1 MW of which could be utilized by three steam-fired H2O–LiBr absorption chillers to provide 45 MW of cooling at 5 °C. This could save approximately 9 MW of electric energy required by a typical compression chiller, while providing the same amount of cooling. In addition, the combined cycle generates 22.6 MW of additional electrical energy for the plant, while process heating reduces furnace oil consumption by 0.23 MSCM per annum. Overall, the trigeneration scheme would result in annual natural gas fuel savings of approximately 1879 MSCM, and annual operating cost savings of approximately US$ 20.9 million, with a payback period of 1 year. This study highlights the significant economical and environmental benefits that could be achieved through implementation of the proposed integrated cogeneration scheme in NGPPs, particularly in elevated ambient temperature and humidity conditions such as encountered in Middle East facilities.

Sahil Popli; Peter Rodgers; Valerie Eveloy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

Gas-dynamic characteristics of a noise and heat insulating jacket on a gas turbine in a gas pumping plant on emergency disconnection of the cooling fans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper discusses the operation of a gas turbine plant (GTP) when the fans in ... NHJ by a fan. The operation of gas-pumping plant involves working with brief (10 ... describing the motion of an ideal thermally...

P. V. Trusov; D. A. Charntsev; I. R. Kats…

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Sauget Plant Flare Gas Reduction Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical analysis of stack gas heating value allowed the Afton Chemical Corporation Sauget Plant to reduce natural gas flow to its process flares by about 50% while maintaining the EPA-required minimum heating value of the gas streams....

Ratkowski, D. P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load Southern Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

10

Determining the maximal capacity of a combined-cycle plant operating with afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect gained from afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler used as part of a PGU-450T combined-cycle plant is considered. The results obtained from ... electric and therma...

V. M. Borovkov; N. M. Osmanova

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Application of a low pressure economizer for waste heat recovery from the exhaust flue gas in a 600 MW power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of recovering the waste heat of the exhaust flue gas before entering a flue gas desulphurizer (FGD) in a 600 MW power plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing a low pressure economizer (LPE) to heat the condensed water which can save the steam extracted from the steam turbine for heating the condensed water and then extra work can be obtained. The energy and water savings and the reduction of CO2 emission resulted from the LPE installation are assessed for three cases in a 600 MW coal-fired power plant with wet stack. Serpentine pipes with quadrate finned extensions are selected for the LPE heat exchanger which has an overall coefficient of heat transfer of 37 W/m2·K and the static pressure loss of 781 Pa in the optimized case. Analysis results show that it is feasible to install \\{LPEs\\} in the exhaust flue gas system between the pressurizing fan and the FGD, which has little negative impacts on the unit. The benefits generated include saving of standard coal equivalent (SCE) at 2–4 g/(kW·h) and saving of water at 25–35 t/h under full load operation with corresponding reduction of CO2 emission.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Shaoyang Sun; Ying Wu; Na Yan; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Design and modeling of 1–10 MWe liquefied natural gas-fueled combined cooling, heating and power plants for building applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Decentralized, liquefied natural gas-fueled, trigeneration plants are considered as alternatives to centralized, electricity-only generating power plants to improve efficiency and minimize running costs. The proposed system is analyzed in terms of efficiency and cost. Electrical power is generated with a gas turbine, while waste heat is recovered and utilized effectively to cover heating and cooling needs for buildings located in the vicinity of the plant. The high quality of cooling energy carried in the LNG fluid is used to cool the air supply to the air compressor. Waste heat is recovered with heat exchangers to generate useful heating in the winter period, while in the summer period an integrated double-effect absorption chiller converts waste heat to useful cooling. For the base system (10 MWe), net electrical efficiency is up to 36.5%, while the primary energy ratio reaches 90%. The payback period for the base system is 4 years, for a lifecycle cost of 221.6 million euros and an investment cost of 13 million euros. The base system can satisfy the needs of more than 21,000 average households, while an equivalent conventional system can only satisfy the needs of 12,000 average households.

Alexandros Arsalis; Andreas Alexandrou

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen walls. Air Products tasked our team to design an insert to place in the tubes of the WHB to increase flow velocity, thereby reducing fouling of the WHB. Objectives Air Products wishes that our team

Demirel, Melik C.

14

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas. How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature? Links: The technology of Condensing Flue Gas Heat Recovery natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building

15

,"California Natural Gas Plant Processing"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Processing",3,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1031...

16

Intermountain Gas Company (IGC) - Gas Heating Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intermountain Gas Company (IGC) - Gas Heating Rebate Program Intermountain Gas Company (IGC) - Gas Heating Rebate Program Intermountain Gas Company (IGC) - Gas Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $200/unit Provider Customer Service The Intermountain Gas Company's (IGC) Gas Heating Rebate Program offers customers a $200 per unit rebate when they convert to a high efficiency natural gas furnace that replaces a heating system using another energy source. New furnaces must meet a minimum AFUE efficiency rating of 90%, and the home must have been built at least three years prior to the furnace conversion to qualify for the rebate. Visit IGC's program web site for more

17

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

18

Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Plants With plants in development. Click...

19

Computational and experimental test of self starting regimes for the in-house needs of the PGU-450 steam-gas unit at the Kaliningrad TÉTs-2 Heating and Power Plant during supply disruptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major stages of a computational test of the self starting regimes for the in-house needs of unit No. 1 of the 450 MW steam-gas unit at the Kaliningrad TÉTs-2 Heating and Electric Power Plant during supply ...

S. N. Sakharov; V. A. Kuz’michev

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The thermodynamic efficiency of the condensing process circuits of binary combined-cycle plants with gas-assisted heating of cycle air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal efficiencies of condensing-type circuits of binary combined-cycle plants containing one, two, and three ... gas turbine unit, and with preheating of cycle air are analyzed by way of comparison ... ini...

V. P. Kovalevskii

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

"NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.5 hours" "NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY" "FORM EIA-757" "Schedule A: Baseline Report " "This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public...

23

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?gas-energy-efficiency" target="_blank">read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

24

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant ... A natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with capacity of about 430 MW integrated to a chemical solvent absorber/stripping capture plant is investigated. ... The natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) is an advanced power generation technology that improves the fuel efficiency of natural gas. ...

Mehdi Karimi; Magne Hillestad; Hallvard F. Svendsen

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

,"Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","112014","1152013" ,"Release...

26

Experience with organic Rankine cycles in heat recovery power plants  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 30 years, organic Rankine cycles (ORC) have been increasingly employed to produce power from various heat sources when other alternatives were either technically not feasible or economical. These power plants have logged a total of over 100 million turbine hours of experience demonstrating the maturity and field proven technology of the ORC cycle. The cycle is well adapted to low to moderate temperature heat sources such as waste heat from industrial plants and is widely used to recover energy from geothermal resources. The above cycle technology is well established and applicable to heat recovery of medium size gas turbines and offers significant advantages over conventional steam bottoming cycles.

Bronicki, L.Y.; Elovic, A.; Rettger, P.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Heat Integrate Heat Engines in Process Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and refrigeration systems. In many instances these real heat engines may appear as a complex process consisting of flash vessels, heat exchangers, compressors, furnaces, etc. See Figure 18a, which shows a simplified diagram of a "steam Rankine cycle." How... and rejection profiles of the real machine. For example, the heat acceptance and re jection profiles for the steam Rankine cycle shown in Figure 18a have been drawn on T,H coordinates in Figure 18b. Thus providing we know the heat acceptance and rejection...

Hindmarsh, E.; Boland, D.; Townsend, D. W.

28

NEWTON: Greenhouse Gas and Heat Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas and Heat Transfer Greenhouse Gas and Heat Transfer Name: Robert Status: teacher Grade: 9-12 Location: AK Country: USA Date: Summer 2013 Question: It would appear from a superficial reading that heat flows out of a greenhouse gas more slowly than heat flows into the same gas. This has to be an incorrect interpretation. It seems more likely that molecules with high heat capacities resist heat transfer-both into and out of such a molecular system. At a molecular level how does heat move out of a hot greenhouse gas? I have seen plots of Cv vs Tempt which indicates that heat moves from translational modes of motion-into rotational modes and finally into modes of vibration. The energy spacing of vibrations is generally grater that rotation which are greater than translation. Could it be that it is this quantization of the energy levels and the difference in energy between such quantum states that is the source of the resistance to heat flow or transfer?

29

Gas Turbine Cogeneration Plant for the Dade County Government Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expansion plans, the system will efficiently produce additional electricity when chilled water demands are low. Houston, Texas The cogeneration plant consists of a Rolls-Royce gas turbine-generator set and a waste-heat recovery system which recovers... waste heat from the gas I tur bine exhaust. The waste-heat recovery syste~ con sists of a Zurn dual-pressure, heat recovery bpiler, a Thermo Electron dual-pressure, extraction /conden sing steam turbine generator set, and four Tra~e ab sorption...

Michalowski, R. W.; Malloy, M. K.

30

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plant Solar Power Ideal Gas Turbine Topping Braytonwill require higher parasitic power for gas circulation. Theefficiency of a solar power plant with gas-turbine topping

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Performance improvement of combined cycle power plant based on the optimization of the bottom cycle and heat recuperation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many F class gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plants are built in ... the efficiency improvement of GTCC plant. A combined cycle with three-pressure reheat heat recovery steam ... HRSG inlet gas temperatur...

Wenguo Xiang; Yingying Chen

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems This fact sheet describes ten effective ways to save...

33

Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner Lead Performer: Thermolift - Stony Brook, NY Partners: -- New York State Energy Research &...

34

Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Presents successful...

35

Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power Using Thermoelectric Engines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power Using Thermoelectric Engines Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power Using Thermoelectric Engines Discusses a novel TEG which utilizes a...

36

Waste-heat-driven refrigeration plants for freezer trawlers  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is made of the possibility of utilizing waste heat from a proposed gas-turbine fishing-vessel propulsion engine to power a refrigeration plant. On the basis of superior volume, maintenance and reliability, and cost and availability, the ammonia-water absorption system is chosen over the other waste-heat-driven option considered. It is found to be comparable in volume and in maintenance and reliability to the conventional vapor-compression system.

Kellen, A.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Gas and Electricity as Heating Agents1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... This is a misconception, which was very general also as regards the combustion of solid fuel in furnaces, until it was disproved by Stirling, by Neilson, and by the ... be largely employed, however, for heating purposes, it will have to come down in price; and considering that heating gas need not be highly putified, or possessed of high ...

1881-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

38

Heat Hyperbolic Diffusion in Planck Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the diffusion of the thermal pulse in Planck Gas. We show that the Fourier diffusion equation gives the speed of diffusion, v > c and breaks the causality of the thermal processes in Planck gas .For hyperbolic heat transport v

Miroslaw Kozlowski; Janina Marciak-Kozlowska

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

Heat conductivity of a pion gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the heat conductivity of a dilute pion gas employing the Uehling-Uehlenbeck equation and experimental phase-shifts parameterized by means of the SU(2) Inverse Amplitude Method. Our results are consistent with previous evaluations. For comparison we also give results for an (unphysical) hard sphere gas.

Antonio Dobado Gonzalez; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres Rincon

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Solar steam reforming of natural gas integrated with a gas turbine power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper shows a hybrid power plant wherein solar steam reforming of natural gas and a steam injected gas turbine power plant are integrated for solar syngas production and use. The gas turbine is fed by a mixture of natural gas and solar syngas (mainly composed of hydrogen and water steam) from mid-low temperature steam reforming reaction whose heat duty is supplied by a parabolic trough Concentrating Solar Power plant. A comparison is made between a traditional steam injected gas turbine and the proposed solution to underline the improvements introduced by the integration with solar steam reforming of the natural gas process. The paper also shows how solar syngas can be considered as an energy vector consequent to solar energy conversion effectiveness and the natural gas pipeline as a storage unit, thus accomplishing the idea of a smart energy grid.

Augusto Bianchini; Marco Pellegrini; Cesare Saccani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ecological and Economical efficient Heating and Cooling by innovative Gas Motor Heat Pump Systems and Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Ecological and Economical efficient Heating and Cooling by innovative Gas Motor Heat Pump use of buildings Gas Heat Pump Solution #12;Gas Heat Pump - deserves special attention due to its source in addition to the outside air ·A further essential component of Gas Heat Pump air conditioning

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

42

Methods for providing heat to electric operated LNG plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hammerfest LNG plant, located at Melkøya outside Hammerfest, is supplied with heat and power from an on-site combined heat and power (CHP-) plant. This natural… (more)

Tangås, Cecilie Magrethe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Chapter 4 - Natural Gas–fired Gas Turbines and Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas turbines can burn a range of liquid and gaseous fuels but most burn natural gas. Power plants based on gas turbines are one of the cheapest types of plant to build, but the cost of their electricity depends heavily on the cost of their fuel. Two types of gas turbine are used for power generation: aero-derivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines. The former are used to provide power to the grid at times of peak demand. The latter are most often found in combined cycle power stations. These are capable of more than 60% efficiency. There are a number of ways of modifying the gas turbine cycle to improve efficiency, including reheating and intercooling. Micro-turbines have been developed for very small-scale generation of both electricity and heat. The main atmospheric emissions from gas turbines are carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, Paul R. (Western Springs, IL); McLennan, George A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plant Solar Power Ideal Gas Turbine Topping Braytonefficiency of a solar power plant with gas-turbine toppingfor a solar power plant with Brayton-cycle gas turbine

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

,"Natural Gas Plant Liquids Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas Plant Liquids Proved Reserves",49,"Annual",2012,"6301979" ,"Release...

48

,"Natural Gas Plant Liquids Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas Plant Liquids Proved Reserves",49,"Annual",2013,"6301979" ,"Release...

49

Connecting the second exhaust-heat boiler to the operating first one under the conditions of flow circuits of combined-cycle plants with two gas-turbine units and one steam turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems arising with connecting the second exhaust-heat boiler to the first exhaust-heat boiler under load in the case of flow circuits of combined-cycle plants of type PGU-450 are considered. Similar problem...

Yu. A. Radin; I. A. Grishin; T. S. Kontorovich…

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Including radiative heat transfer and reaction quenching in modeling a Claus plant waste heat boiler  

SciTech Connect

Due to increasingly stringent sulfur emission regulations, improvements are necessary in the modified Claus process. A recently proposed model by Nasato et al. for the Claus plant waste heat boiler (WHB) is improved by including radiative heat transfer, which yields significant changes in the predicted heat flux and the temperature profile along the WHB tube, leading to a faster quenching of chemical reactions. For the WHB considered, radiation accounts for approximately 20% of the heat transferred by convection alone. More importantly, operating the WHB at a higher gas mass flux is shown to enhance reaction quenching, resulting in a doubling of the predicted hydrogen flow rate. This increase in hydrogen flow rate is sufficient to completely meet the hydrogen requirement of the H[sub 2]S recovery process considered, which would eliminate the need for a hydrogen plant.

Karan, K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Behie, L.A. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Heat-Transfer fluid Heat-Transfer Gas Helium Helium Gaswater vapor as a fluids, heat~transfer Problems associatedthermal energy by a heat-transfer fluid and used directly or

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to provide an assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants with special emphasis on heat recovery applications. Exhaust gases in the cement industry which are suitable for heat recovery range in temperature from about 400 to 1300 K, are generally dusty, may be highly abrasive, and are often heavily laden with alkalies, sulfates, and chlorides. Particulates in the exhaust streams range in size from molecular to about 100 ..mu..m in diameter and come from both the raw feed as well as the ash in the coal which is the primary fuel used in the cement industry. The major types of heat-transfer equipment used in the cement industry include preheaters, gas-to-air heat exchangers, waste heat boilers, and clinker coolers. The most important gas-side fouling mechanisms in the cement industry are those due to particulate, chemical reaction, and corrosion fouling. Particulate transport mechanisms which appear to be of greatest importance include laminar and turbulent mass transfer, thermophoresis, electrophoresis, and inertial impaction. Chemical reaction mechanisms of particular importance include the deposition of alkali sulfates, alkali chlorides, spurrite, calcium carbonate, and calcium sulfate. At sufficiently low temperatures, sulfuric acid and water can condense on heat exchanger surfaces which can cause corrosion and also attract particulates in the flow. The deleterious effects of gas-side fouling in cement plants are due to: (1) increased capital costs; (2) increased maintenance costs; (3) loss of production; and (4) energy losses. A conservative order-of-magnitude analysis shows that the cost of gas-side fouling in US cement plants is $0.24 billion annually.

Marner, W.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

California Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

55

Louisiana Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Louisiana (Million...

56

California State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

57

DEVELOPMENT OF THFEGENERAL ELECTRIC STIRLING ENGINE GAS HEAT PUMP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT OF THFEGENERAL ELECTRIC STIRLING ENGINE GAS HEAT PUMP R. C. Meier, Program Manager, Gas Heat Pump Program General Electric Company P. 0. Box 8555 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 FILE COPY DO NOT REMOVE SUMMARY The Stirling/Rankine Heat Activated Heat Pump is a high performance product for space

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

58

Gas plants, new fields spark production rise  

SciTech Connect

Gas plant construction is welcomed by operators in the Williston Basin, North Dakota. Petroleum and gas production has increased. The Montana portion of the Williston Basin shows new discoveries. Some secondary recovery efforts are in operation. Industrial officials share the same enthusiasm and optimism for rising production as they do for exploration potential in the basin. 5 tables.

Lenzini, D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Method and apparatus for fuel gas moisturization and heating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel gas is saturated with water heated with a heat recovery steam generator heat source. The heat source is preferably a water heating section downstream of the lower pressure evaporator to provide better temperature matching between the hot and cold heat exchange streams in that portion of the heat recovery steam generator. The increased gas mass flow due to the addition of moisture results in increased power output from the gas and steam turbines. Fuel gas saturation is followed by superheating the fuel, preferably with bottom cycle heat sources, resulting in a larger thermal efficiency gain compared to current fuel heating methods. There is a gain in power output compared to no fuel heating, even when heating the fuel to above the LP steam temperature.

Ranasinghe, Jatila (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Sensible- Heat Storage Solar Power Plant with Sulfurof the Solar Power Plant Storage-Vessel Design, . . . . .System for Chemical Storage of Solar Energy. UC Berkeley,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Laclede Gas Company - Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Program Laclede Gas Company - Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Heating System: 2 maximum Programmable Thermostats: 2 maximum Multi-Family Property Owners: 50 thermostat rebates, 50 furnace rebates over the life of the program Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gas Furnace: $150 - $200 Gas Boiler: $150 Programmable Setback Thermostat: $25 Gas Water Heater: $50 - $200 Provider Laclede Gas Company Laclede Gas Company offers various rebates to residential customers for investing in energy efficient equipment and appliances. Residential

62

Efficient gas stream cooling in Second-Generation PFBC plants  

SciTech Connect

The coal-fueled Advanced or Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor concept (APFBC) is an efficient combined cycle in which coal is carbonized (partially gasified) to fuel a gas turbine, gas turbine exhaust heats feedwater for the steam cycle, and carbonizer char is used to generate steam for a steam turbine while heating combustion air for the gas turbine. The system can be described as an energy cascade in which chemical energy in solid coal is converted to gaseous form and flows to the gas turbine followed by the steam turbine, where it is converted to electrical power. Likewise, chemical energy in the char flows to both turbines generating electrical power in parallel. The fuel gas and vitiated air (PFBC exhaust) streams must be cleaned of entrained particulates by high-temperature equipment representing significant extensions of current technology. The energy recovery in the APFBC cycle allows these streams to be cooled to lower temperatures without significantly reducing the efficiency of the plant. Cooling these streams would allow the use of lower-temperature gas cleanup equipment that more closely approaches commercially available equipment, reducing cost and technological risk, and providing an earlier path to commercialization. This paper describes the performance effects of cooling the two hottest APFBC process gas streams: carbonizer fuel gas and vitiated air. Each cooling variation is described in terms of energy utilization, cycle efficiency, and cost implications.

White, J.S.; Horazak, D.A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Configurations of the Mercury 50 Recuperated Gas-Turbine-Based Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Heat and Power (BIGCHP) Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, several original configurations of the cogeneration system based on different gasification technologies and Mercury 50 recuperated gas turbine are proposed and examined theoretically. ... (14) Another key problem of the successful commercialization of the technology is the commercial availability of reliable and efficient gas turbines (GTs) modified for syngas operation. ... In particular, the paper presents current development status and design challenges being addressed by Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. for large industrial engines (>200 MW) and by Solar Turbines for smaller engines (Turbine Systems (ATS) program. ...

Jacek Kalina

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

64

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive FILE COPY TAP By Irwin Stambler, Field Editor, is sized for a 10-ton heat pump system - will be scaled to power a commercial product line ranging from 7 of the cycle- as a heat pump drive for commercial installations. Company is testing prototype gas turbine

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

65

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 1,029,641 1,233,260 1,434,003 1,507,467 1,464,261 1,373,046 1967-2013 Total Liquids Extracted...

66

Gas treating alternatives for LNG plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper covers the various gas treating processes available for treating sour natural gas to specifications required for LNG production. The LNG product specification requires that the total sulfur level be less than 30--40 ppmv, the CO{sub 2} level be less than 50 ppmv and the water level be less than 100 ppmv to prevent freezing problems in the LNG cryogenic column. A wide variety of natural gas compositions are encountered in the various fields and the gas treating process selection is dependent on the type of impurities present in the gas, namely, levels of H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, mercaptans and other organic sulfur compounds. This paper discusses the implications various components in the feed to the LNG plant can have on process selection, and the various treating processes that are available to condition the gas. Process selection criteria, design and operating philosophies are discussed. An economic comparison for two treating schemes is provided.

Clarke, D.S.; Sibal, P.W. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Performance testing of natural gas plants  

SciTech Connect

Performance testing of natural-gas-extraction plants has become a valuable tool for improving recovery of plants operating below their optimum capabilities or maintaining the optimum recovery once it has been achieved. Many plants, whether turbo-expander, lean oil absorption, or straight refrigeration type, can drift from optimum recovery for one or several of many reasons. Sometimes this drift occurs without the plant operators being aware, or the reduction in recovery may be caused by operating problems of which the operator is aware but feels cannot be solved with the equipment available. A plant performance test may find the unknown problem or the test will show the problem can be solved and recoveries improved with existing equipment. Sometimes a computer simulation of the plant, using the test data, may be required to find or solve the problem.

Herrin, J.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

69

,"New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","102014","1152013" ,"Release...

70

Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power usingThermoelectric Engines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solutions Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power using Thermoelectric Engines John LaGrandeur October 5, 2011 Advanced Thermoelectric Solutions - 1 - Market motivation based on CO 2...

71

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of the installed cost of the project Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $400/kW - $500/kW up to 50% of the installed cost of the project Provider Southwest Gas Corporation Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers incentives to qualifying commercial and industrial facilities who install efficient Combined Heat and Power systems (CHP). CHP systems produce localized, on-site power and heat which can be used in a variety of ways. Incentives vary based upon the efficiency

72

Heat Transfer across the Interface between Nanoscale Solids and Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(4-7) Relative to heat transferred via solid–solid interfaces, heat dissipation from the active device region to the gas environment is usually negligible. ... Long VO2 NWs were cantilevered from a substrate and were locally heated using a focused laser, allowing the laser-heating induced phase transition and the resultant domain structures along the NW to be optically imaged. ... By imaging the laser-heating induced metal–insulator phase transition along single, free-standing VO2 NWs, we determined the heat transfer coefficient between the NW and the gas environment over a wide range of pressure and down to the submicrometer scale. ...

Chun Cheng; Wen Fan; Jinbo Cao; Sang-Gil Ryu; Jie Ji; Costas P. Grigoropoulos; Junqiao Wu

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Incentives Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Incentives < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate General: $600,000 Program Info Expiration Date 05/31/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $1.20/therm saved/yr Steamers: $300-$1200 Fryer: $400 Griddle: $50/ln. ft. Ovens: custom Storage Water Heaters: $150/unit Tankless Water Heater: $300/unit Gas Boiler/Furnace Replacement: $400 - $6,000

74

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

75

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

76

Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

77

California Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production Extracted in California (Million Cubic Feet) California Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in California (Million Cubic Feet) Decade...

78

Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

79

Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

80

California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Pinch Application- Heat Pump Study in a Food Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was to appropriatly place and size the heat pump system in a food plant. A change in the process configuration was recommended as a result of this study to increase the heat pump profitability and to improve the product quality....

Chao, Y. T.; Tripathi, P.

84

Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

85

Texas State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

86

Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump For Building Space Heating | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Space Heating Lead Performer: Stone Mountain Technologies - Erwin, TN Partners: -- A.O. Smith - Milwaukee, WI -- Gas Technology Institute - Des Plaines, IL DOE Funding: 903,000...

87

Mapping Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Plants | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

resources make up most of the current geothermal operating plants in the United States. Power generation comes from drawing heat from the fluid found naturally deep below the...

88

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON HEATING IN RF GAS DISCHARGES: I. QUASILINEAR THEORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON HEATING IN RF GAS DISCHARGES: I. QUASILINEAR THEORY Yu.M. Aliev1 , I an interest in mechanisms of electron heating and power deposition in the plasma main- tained by radio parameters. Due to the large value of the mean free path (MFP) the main mechanism of electron heating turns

Kaganovich, Igor

90

Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

Misage, Robert (Manchester, CT); Scheffler, Glenn W. (Tolland, CT); Setzer, Herbert J. (Ellington, CT); Margiott, Paul R. (Manchester, CT); Parenti, Jr., Edmund K. (Manchester, CT)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Energy Accounting for District Heating and Cooling Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY ACCOUNTING FOR DISTRICT HEATING AND COOLING PLANTS John A. Barrett, P.E. Manager, Central Plant Utilities University of Houston Houston, Texas Introduction Energy accounting combines engineering science with the insights of cost... Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 22-25, 1979 The Science of Plant Utilities Control While the Weiss papers are not as specific to district heating and cooling plants as the preceding papers, they do treat other problem areas of interest...

Barrett, J. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program (Arizona) Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program (Arizona) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Maximum Rebate 50% of system cost Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $15.00/therm Provider Southwest Gas Corporation '''''Note: Effective July 15, 2013, Southwest Gas is no longer accepting applications for the current program year. Systems installed during the current program year will not be eligible for a rebate in the next program

93

Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems Tips: Natural Gas and Oil Heating Systems May 30, 2012 - 5:41pm Addthis Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term. Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term. If you plan to buy a new heating system, ask your local utility or state energy office about the latest technologies on the market. For example, many newer models have designs for burners and heat exchangers that are more efficient during operation and cut heat loss when the equipment is off. Consider a sealed-combustion furnace -- they are safer and more efficient. Long-Term Savings Tip Install a new energy-efficient furnace to save money over the long term. Look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels to compare efficiency and

94

Dynamic Allocation of a Domestic Heating Task to Gas-Based and Heatpump-Based Heating Agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Allocation of a Domestic Heating Task to Gas-Based and Heatpump-Based Heating Agents Jan for a domestic heating task is introduced and analysed. The model includes two alternative heating agents (for gas-based heating and for heatpump-based heating), and a third allocation agent which determines

Treur, Jan

95

Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange. 4 figs.

Brown, W.R.; Cassano, A.A.; Dunbobbin, B.R.; Rao, P.; Erickson, D.C.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

PECO Energy (Gas) – Heating Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The PECO Smart Gas Efficiency Upgrade Program offers rebates and incentives to commercial or residential customers that install an ENERGY STAR qualified high-efficiency natural gas furnace or...

97

Corrosion Investigations at Masned Combined Heat and Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion Investigations at Masnedø Combined Heat and Power Plant Part VI Melanie Montgomery AT MASNED� COMBINED HEAT AND POWER PLANT PART VI CONTENTS 1. Introduction Department for Manufacturing Engineering Technical University of Denmark Asger Karlsson Energi E2 Power

98

Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

will build on system concepts and technical solutions developed for an 11-ton packaged natural gas heat pump. Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump More Documents &...

99

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing natural gas, heat, water, sewerage, and street railway services to the public. The legislation addresses rates and services, exemptions, investigations, and records. Article 4 (58-5-400 et seq.) of this

100

Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program (Idaho)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

102

,"U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",4,"Annual",2013,"6302003" ,"Release Date:","1128...

103

Dynamic Allocation of a Domestic Heating Task to Gas-Based and Heatpump-Based Heating Agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper a multi-agent model for a domestic heating task is introduced and analysed. The model includes two alternative heating agents (for gas-based heating and for heatpump-based heating), and a third allo...

Jan Treur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

105

System Modeling of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect

To improve the system performance of the GHP, modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated by using ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Software, which is used to predict steady-state heating and cooling performance of variable-speed vapor compression air-to-air heat pumps for a wide range of operational variables. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine, the SHR can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% in rated operating conditions.

Mahderekal, Isaac [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Report number ex. Ris-R-1234(EN) 1 Local CHP Plants between the Natural Gas and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distributed generation in Denmark. This paper deals with the CHP as intermediary between the natural gas of natural gas from the North Sea of which much is used for electricity and heat generation purposesReport number ex. Risø-R-1234(EN) 1 Local CHP Plants between the Natural Gas and Electricity

107

Application of mechanical and electrical equipment in a natural gas processing plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1984 the Northwest Pipeline Corporation purchased and installed equipment for their Ignacio, Colorado, gas processing plant to extract ethane and heavier hydrocarbons from the gas arriving at their pipeline system from various natural gas producing sources. In addition to the basic turbo-expander required to achieve the very low gas temperatures in the process, the equipment includes gas turbine driven compressors, heat recovery steam generators, and a steam turbine driven electric power generator. This paper reviews the process itself, the various mechanical and electrical equipment involved, and some of the control system utilized to tie it all together.

Lang, R.P.; Mc Cullough, B.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Residential: 30% of system cost or $3,000, whichever is less Small Commercial: 30% of system cost or $7,500, whichever is less Schools, Religious, Non-profit, Public Facilities and Civic and County Facilities: 50% of system cost or $30,000, whichever is less Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential and Small Business: $14.50 per therm Schools, Religious, Non-profit, Public Facilities and Civic and County

109

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the othernatural-gas-fired combined cycle plants. This assumptionplants were efficient combined cycle plants. The four

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

111

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

112

Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next Release Date: 10312014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent at Processing Plants Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...

113

Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

114

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

115

Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

116

,"Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2...

117

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

118

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

119

,"Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

120

,"Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

122

,"Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

123

,"Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

124

,"Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million...

125

,"California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2...

126

,"Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

127

,"Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2...

128

,"Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million...

129

,"California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

130

,"Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",...

131

,"Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million...

132

Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

133

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Available; W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1242014 Next Release Date: 12312015 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production...

134

Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

135

Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

136

Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

137

California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

138

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2014 Next Release Date: 10312014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent at Processing Plants California State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...

139

Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

140

Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids,...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

142

Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids,...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

143

Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

144

Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

145

Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Lower 48 Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

146

,"New York Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1998 ,"Release...

147

Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

Cole, Rossa W. (E. Rutherford, NJ); Zoll, August H. (Cedar Grove, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants in the United States as of 2009 and highlights characteristics of this segment of the industry. The purpose of the paper is to examine the role of natural gas processing plants in the natural gas supply chain and to provide an overview and summary of processing plant characteristics in the United States, such as locations, capacities, and operations. Key Findings There were 493 operational natural gas processing plants in the United States with a combined operating capacity of 77 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. Overall, operating capacity increased about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009, not including the processing capacity in Alaska1. At the same time, the number of all processing plants in the lower 48 States decreased

151

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices Sumit Mitra , Lige Sun , Ignacio E. Grossmann December 24, 2012 Abstract Combined heat and power companies. However, under-utilization can be a chance for tighter interaction with the power grid, which

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

152

Experimental performance of solid-gas chemical heat pump in solar chemical heat pump dryer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer has been designed, fabricated and tested. The performance of the system has been studied under the meteorological conditions of Malaysia. The system consists of four mean components: solar collector (evacuated ... Keywords: coefficient of performance, drying, energy density, evacuated tubes solar collector, reactor temperature, solid gas chemical heat pump

M. Ibrahim; K. Sopian; A. S. Hussein; W. R. W. Daud; A. Zaharim

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Indriect Measurement Of Nitrogen In A Mult-Component Natural Gas By Heating The Gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of indirectly measuring the nitrogen concentration in a natural gas by heating the gas. In two embodiments, the heating energy is correlated to the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. Regression analysis is used to calculate the constant values, which can then be substituted into the model equation. If the diluent concentrations other than nitrogen (typically carbon dioxide) are known, the model equation can be solved for the nitrogen concentration.

Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Behring, II, Kendricks A. (Torrance, CA)

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

Plant physiology Heat of combustion, degree of reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant physiology Heat of combustion, degree of reduction and carbon content: 3 interrelated methods of combustion and carbon content have been proposed as 3 ways of estimating the construction cost of plant the energy content of biomass and its reduction level. This relationship is not absolute and the regression

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

155

Chapter 10.2 - Heat-Resistant Coating Technology for Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operating temperature of gas turbines in the 1990s and later has been notably high in order to achieve high-efficiency power-generating plants by combining these gas turbines and steam turbines. Such high operating temperatures has been made possible with the development of heat-resistant superalloys forming turbine hot parts, as well as advances made in heat-resistant coating technology and cooling technology. For 1500 °C-class gas turbines, the adoption of single-crystal Ni-based superalloy blades and ceramic thermal barrier coatings is indispensable, and additionally, steam-cooled technology should be employed. In particular, thermal barrier coating (TBC) technology is recognized as important. Therefore, this paper reviews the trend of development of heat-resistant coating technology for gas turbines by paying attention to coating processes and evaluation. The paper also reviews the trend of development and standardization of heat-resistance evaluation test methods for coatings, because such evaluation test methods are indispensable for the development of heat-resistant coating technology.

Yoshiyasu Ito

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cogen/chilled-water plant heats, cools, electrifies campus  

SciTech Connect

This article describes replacement of the University of California at Los Angeles' aging boiler and refrigeration equipment with a central chiller/combined-cycle cogeneration plant. The topics of the article include the work scope, the chilled water plant including absorption and steam turbine driven centrifugal chillers, and the cogeneration plant including two packaged combustion turbines, two heat-recovery steam generators and one steam turbogenerator.

Johnson, D.N. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Bakker, V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Simplified method for determining heat of combustion of natural gas  

SciTech Connect

A simplified technique for determination of the heat of combustion of natural gas has been developed. It is a variation of the previously developed technique wherein the carrier air, in which the test sample was burnt, was oxygen enriched to adjust the mole fraction of oxygen in the combustion product gases up to that in the carrier air. The new technique eliminates the need for oxygen enrichment of the experimental mixtures and natural gas samples and has been found to predict their heats of combustion to an uncertainty of the order of 1 percent.

Singh, J.J.; Chegini, H.; Mall, G.H.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

On the isobaric specific heat capacity of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A colorimeter equipped with a gas booster in conjunction with a PVT cell was used to measure the heat capacity of natural gas with different amounts of impurities. Based on new experimental and literature data, a general investigation of the isobaric specific heat capacity was carried out using the Jarrahian–Heidaryan equation of state (J–H-EOS). A model was obtained that is valid in wide ranges of pressures (0.1–40 MPa) and temperatures (250–414 K). The arithmetic average of the model’s absolute error is acceptable in engineering calculations and has superiority over other methods in its class.

Azad Jarrahian; Hamid Reza Karami; Ehsan Heidaryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work The combustion (gas) turbines being installed in many of today's natural-gas-fueled power plants are complex machines, but they basically involve three main sections: The compressor, which draws air into the engine, pressurizes it, and feeds it to the combustion chamber at speeds of hundreds of miles per hour. The combustion system, typically made up of a ring of fuel injectors that inject a steady stream of fuel into combustion chambers where it mixes with the air. The mixture is burned at temperatures of more than 2000 degrees F. The combustion produces a high temperature, high pressure gas stream that enters and expands through the turbine section. The turbine is an intricate array of alternate stationary and

162

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

SciTech Connect

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the United States began a programme to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types—categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly—from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Michael Wang; May Wu; Hong Huo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Mathematical description of a boiler house operating jointly with a wind power plant and heat storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A heat supply system is considered that contains, along with a boiler house, a wind power plant and heat storage. Methodical approaches for determining ... modes of the heat storage jointly with the wind power plant

A. V. Bezhan; V. A. Minin

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing plant response Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plants Summary: gas plant technologies. The three technologies assessed are the gas turbine (GT) with heat recovery... 1 Using Auxiliary Gas Power for CCS Energy Needs in...

167

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

168

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 77 1980's 81 57 124 117 105 120 109 107 101 95 1990's 86 75 83 85 75 80 80 82 58 60 2000's 64 52 68 78 95 112 100 103 97 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec.

169

,"U.S. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)","U.S. Gasoline Blending Components Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants...

170

Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

operate a conventional electric heat pump system, fuel is first converted to energy at a power plant where the waste heat is typically discharged to the environment. Electrical...

171

A Heating Model for the Millennium Gas Run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The comparison between observations of galaxy clusters thermo-dynamical properties and theoretical predictions suggests that non-gravitational heating needs to be added into the models. We implement an internally self-consistent heating scheme into GADGET-2 for the third (and fourth) run of the Millennium gas project (Pearce et al. in preparation), a set of four hydrodynamical cosmological simulations with N=2(5x10^8) particles and with the same volume (L=500 h-1 Mpc) and structures as the the N-body Millennium Simulation (Springel et al. 2005). Our aim is to reproduce the observed thermo-dynamical properties of galaxy clusters.

L. Gazzola; F. R. Pearce

2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Turbine Drive Gas Generator for Zero Emission Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Vision 21 Program seeks technology development that can reduce energy costs, reduce or eliminate atmospheric pollutants from power plants, provide choices of alternative fuels, and increase the efficiency of generating systems. Clean Energy Systems is developing a gas generator to replace the traditional boiler in steam driven power systems. The gas generator offers the prospects of lower electrical costs, pollution free plant operations, choices of alternative fuels, and eventual net plant efficiencies in excess of 60% with sequestration of carbon dioxide. The technology underlying the gas generator has been developed in the aerospace industry over the past 30 years and is mature in aerospace applications, but it is as yet unused in the power industry. This project modifies and repackages aerospace gas generator technology for power generation applications. The purposes of this project are: (1) design a 10 MW gas generator and ancillary hardware, (2) fabricate the gas generator and supporting equipment, (3) test the gas generator using methane as fuel, (4) submit a final report describing the project and test results. The principal test objectives are: (1) define start-up, shut down and post shutdown control sequences for safe, efficient operation; (2) demonstrate the production of turbine drive gas comprising steam and carbon dioxide in the temperature range 1500 F to 3000 F, at a nominal pressure of 1500 psia; (3) measure and verify the constituents of the drive gas; and (4) examine the critical hardware components for indications of life limitations. The 21 month program is in its 13th month. Design work is completed and fabrication is in process. The gas generator igniter is a torch igniter with sparkplug, which is currently under-going hot fire testing. Fabrication of the injector and body of the gas generator is expected to be completed by year-end, and testing of the full gas generator will begin in early 2002. Several months of testing are anticipated. When demonstrated, this gas generator will be the prototype for use in demonstration power plants planned to be built in Antioch, California and in southern California during 2002. In these plants the gas generator will demonstrate durability and its operational RAM characteristics. In 2003, it is expected that the gas generator will be employed in new operating plants primarily in clean air non-attainment areas, and in possible locations to provide large quantities of high quality carbon dioxide for use in enhanced oil recovery or coal bed methane recovery. Coupled with an emission free coal gasification system, the CES gas generator would enable the operation of high efficiency, non-polluting coal-fueled power plants.

Doyle, Stephen E.; Anderson, Roger E.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

173

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

174

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

175

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

176

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

177

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

178

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

179

Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production,...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

180

California Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in California (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's NA -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

182

Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

183

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

184

Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

185

Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

186

Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

187

Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

188

California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

189

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's NA - No Data...

190

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect

This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

192

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

SciTech Connect

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Exergetic analysis of solar concentrator aided natural gas fired combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article deals with comparative energy and exergetic analysis for evaluation of natural gas fired combined cycle power plant and solar concentrator aided (feed water heating and low pressure steam generation options) natural gas fired combined cycle power plant. Heat Transfer analysis of Linear Fresnel reflecting solar concentrator (LFRSC) is used to predict the effect of focal distance and width of reflector upon the reflecting surface area. Performance analysis of LFRSC with energetic and exergetic methods and the effect, of concentration ratio and inlet temperature of the fluid is carried out to determine, overall heat loss coefficient of the circular evacuated tube absorber at different receiver temperatures. An instantaneous increase in power generation capacity of about 10% is observed by substituting solar thermal energy for feed water heater and low pressure steam generation. It is observed that the utilization of solar energy for feed water heating and low pressure steam generation is more effective based on exergetic analysis rather than energetic analysis. Furthermore, for a solar aided feed water heating and low pressure steam generation, it is found that the land area requirement is 7 ha/MW for large scale solar thermal storage system to run the plant for 24 h.

V. Siva Reddy; S.C. Kaushik; S.K. Tyagi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Study of the Heating Load of a Manufactured Space with a Gas-fired Radiant Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermal balance mathematics model of a manufactured space with a gas-fired radiant heating system is established to calculate the heating load. Computer programs are used to solve the model. Envelope internal surface temperatures under different...

Zheng, X.; Dong, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector- Fact Sheet, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet overview of a natural gas heat pump system for the residential sector that will incorporate an internal combustion engine that drives a vapor-compression heat pump

196

An Evaluation of Gas Turbines for APFBC Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EVALUATION OF GAS TURBINES FOR APFBC POWER PLANTS EVALUATION OF GAS TURBINES FOR APFBC POWER PLANTS Donald L. Bonk U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, West Virginia eMail: dbonk@netl.doe.gov phone: (304) 285-4889 Richard E. Weinstein, P.E. Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania eMail: richard.e.weinstein@parsons.com phone: (610) 855-2699 Abstract This paper describes a concept screening evaluation of gas turbines from several manufacturers that assessed the merits of their respective gas turbines for advanced circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle (APFBC) applications. The following gas turbines were evaluated for the modifications expected for APFBC service: 2 x Rolls-Royce Industrial Trent aeroderivative gas turbine configurations; a 3 x Pratt & Whitney Turbo Power FT8 Twin-

197

Performance of solid-gas chemical heat pump subsystem of solar dryer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the performance of solid-gas chemical heat pump subsystem of solar dryer has been investigated. A thermodynamic analysis is presented to upgrade solar energy with solid-gas chemical heat pump for agriculture drying purpose. A solar assisted ... Keywords: coefficient of performance (COPh), drying, evacuated tubes, overall COPs, solar, solid gas chemical heats pump

M. Ibrahim; W. R. W. Daud; Kamaruzaman Ibrahim; Azami Zaharim; Kamaruzaman Sopian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Life Cycle Assessment of district heat production in a straw fired CHP plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to concerns about the sustainability of the energy sector, conversion of biomass to energy is increasing its hold globally. Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is being adopted as an analytical tool to assess the environmental impacts in the entire cycle of biomass production and conversions to different products. This study deals with the LCIA of straw conversion to district heat in a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant and in a district heating boiler (producing heat only). Environmental impact categories are Global Warming Potential (GWP), Acidification Potential (AP), aquatic and terrestrial Eutrophication Potential (EP) and Non-Renewable Energy (NRE) use. In the case of CHP, the co-produced electricity is assumed to displace the marginal Danish electricity mix. The current study showed that straw fired in the CHP plant would lead to a GWP of ?187 g CO2-eq, AP 0.01 m2 UES (un-protected ecosystem), aquatic EP 0.16 g NO3-eq, terrestrial EP 0.008 m2 UES, and NRE use ?0.14 MJ-primary per 1 MJ heat production. Straw conversion to heat in the CHP plant showed better environmental performances compared to the district heating boiler. Furthermore, removing straw from the field is related to the consequence e.g. decline in soil carbon sequestration, limiting soil nutrient availability, and when compared with natural gas the conversion of straw to heat would lead to a higher aquatic and terrestrial EP and AP. The study also outlays spaces for the detail sustainability assessment of straw conversion in a biorefinery and compare with the current study.

Ranjan Parajuli; Søren Løkke; Poul Alberg Østergaard; Marie Trydeman Knudsen; Jannick H. Schmidt?; Tommy Dalgaard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Rubber linings as surface protection in flue gas desulfurization plants  

SciTech Connect

The manufacturers of the German rubber lining industry have executed the rubber lining of over 1 million m{sup 2} of steel surfaces in over 150 scrubbers of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) plants, thereby effectively protecting them against corrosion. The application of rubber linings as surface protection in FGD plants has proven effective.

Fenner, J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-Fired Absorption Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

202

Wyoming-Colorado Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2012 2013 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 69,827 75,855 2012-2013 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 5,481 5,903 2012-2013 NGPL Production, Gaseous...

203

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 853,470 769,783 737,187 795,069 777,099 746,010 1967-2013 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand...

204

Thermal analysis of an innovative heat pump operated desalination plant  

SciTech Connect

Sea and brackish water desalination can contribute to solve the problem of fresh water shortage in many and regions of the world. Nowadays most of the installed desalination plants employ distillation processes, like Multistage Flash (MSF), Multi effect Distillation (MED) and Vapor Compression (VC). VC process is called Mechanical Vapor Compression (MVC) when it employs a mechanical compressor, while it is called Thermal Compression when it employs a steam-ejector compressor. In this paper a new distillation plant for the treatment of sea water for drinking water purposes is presented. The most innovative feature of this system is the use of a heat pump as part of the desalting unit. The use of the heat pump in the proposed system enables desalting water evaporation and steam condensation at the same temperature, unlike conventional VC desalting systems where a steam compression stage is necessary. A thermal analysis of the heat pump-operated desalination (HPD) plant and a comparison between the HPD and a conventional MVC plant is presented, in order to determine the main advantages and disadvantages of the new system.

Site, V.D. [National Research Council of Italy, Rome (Italy)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Carbon dioxide absorber and regeneration assemblies useful for power plant flue gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are apparatus and method to treat large amounts of flue gas from a pulverized coal combustion power plant. The flue gas is contacted with solid sorbents to selectively absorb CO.sub.2, which is then released as a nearly pure CO.sub.2 gas stream upon regeneration at higher temperature. The method is capable of handling the necessary sorbent circulation rates of tens of millions of lbs/hr to separate CO.sub.2 from a power plant's flue gas stream. Because pressurizing large amounts of flue gas is cost prohibitive, the method of this invention minimizes the overall pressure drop in the absorption section to less than 25 inches of water column. The internal circulation of sorbent within the absorber assembly in the proposed method not only minimizes temperature increases in the absorber to less than 25.degree. F., but also increases the CO.sub.2 concentration in the sorbent to near saturation levels. Saturating the sorbent with CO.sub.2 in the absorber section minimizes the heat energy needed for sorbent regeneration. The commercial embodiments of the proposed method can be optimized for sorbents with slower or faster absorption kinetics, low or high heat release rates, low or high saturation capacities and slower or faster regeneration kinetics.

Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

206

CenterPoint Energy - Residential Gas Heating Rebates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CenterPoint Energy - Residential Gas Heating Rebates CenterPoint Energy - Residential Gas Heating Rebates CenterPoint Energy - Residential Gas Heating Rebates < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Storage Tank Water Heater: $75 Tankless Water Heater: $500 Forced-Air Furnace: $400 - $600 Forced-Air Furnace (Back-Up System): $125 - $175 Hydronic Heating System: $400 Provider CenterPoint Energy CenterPoint Energy offers gas heating and water heating equipment rebates to its residential customers. Eligible equipment includes furnaces, back-up furnace systems, hydronic heaters, storage water heaters and tankless water heaters. All equipment must meet program requirements for efficiency and

207

Plant physiology Stomatal movements and gas exchanges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

medium, Triticum df had a better water-use efficiency than T300 and rye. On the contrary, in the nutrient solution, T300 had a better water-use efficiency than its parental species. Under water stress, water loss exchange were lower than in control plants. stomata / water-use efficiency / osmotic stress / triticale

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

Uncooled two-stroke gas engine for heat pump drive  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and analysis of a family of natural gas fueled, uncooled, two-stroke, lean burn, thermal-ignition engines. The engines were designed specifically to meet the requirements dictated by the commercial heat pump application. The engines have a power output ranging from 15 to 100 kW; a thermal efficiency of 36 percent; a mean time between failure greater than 3 years; and a life expectancy of 45,000 hours. To meet these specifications a family of very simple, uncooled, two-stroke cycle engines were designed which have no belts, gears or pumps. The engines utilize crankcase scavenging, lubrication, stratified fuel introduction to prevent raw fuel from escaping with the exhaust gas, use of and ceramic rolling contact bearings. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) is used for ignition to enable the engines to operate with a lean mixture and eliminate spark plug erosion. 4 refs., 16 figs.

Badgley, P.; McNulty, D.; Woods, M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Superconductor fiber elongation with a heated injected gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and apparatus for producing flexible fibers of superconducting material includes a crucible for containing a charge of the superconducting material. The material is melted in the crucible and falls in a stream through a bottom hole in the crucible. The stream falls through a protecting collar which maintains the stream at high temperatures. The stream is then supplied through a downwardly directed nozzle where it is subjected to a high velocity of a heated gas which breaks the melted superconducting material into ligaments which solidify into the flexible fibers. The fibers are collected by directing them against a collection filter. 10 figs.

Zeigler, D.D.; Conrad, B.L.; Gleixner, R.A.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

210

Heating and cooling gas-gun targets: nuts and bolts  

SciTech Connect

The nuts and bolts of a system used to heat and cool gas-gun targets is described. We have now used the system for more than 35 experiments, all of which have used electromagnetic gauging. Features of the system include a cover which is removed (remotely) just prior to projectile impact and the widespread use of metal/polymer insulations. Both the cover and insulation were required to obtain uniform temperatures in samples with low thermal conductivity. The use of inexpensive video cameras to make remote observations of the cover removal was found to be very useful. A brief catalog of useful glue, adhesive tape, insulation, and seal materials is given.

Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gehr, Russell J [HONEYWEL FM& T; Bucholtz, Scott M [HINEYWELL FM& T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 74,056 76,732 74,938 79,040 82,376 81,196 1981-2013 PADD 1 1,525 1,439 2,394 2,918 2,821 2,687 1981-2013 East Coast 1993-2008 Appalachian No. 1 1,525 1,439 2,394 2,918 2,821 2,687 1993-2013 PADD 2 12,892 13,208 13,331 13,524 15,204 15,230 1981-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 1,975 1,690 2,171 1,877 2,630 2,746 1993-2013

212

Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Natural Gas Liquids  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period: Monthly Annual Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 5,419 6,722 6,801 5,826 6,210 6,249 1993-2013 PADD 1 122 121 115 189 246 248 1993-2013 East Coast 1993-2010 Appalachian No. 1 122 121 115 189 246 248 1993-2013 PADD 2 959 891 880 1,129 1,104 1,041 1993-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 311 300 298 308 262 260 1993-2013 Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. 56 64 58 60 51 64 1993-2013 Okla., Kans., Mo. 592 527 524 761 791 717 1993-2013 PADD 3 3,810 5,007 5,032 3,817 4,246 4,272 1993-2013

213

Technology Data for Electricity and Heat Generating Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................63 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

214

A Wood-Fired Gas Turbine Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-fired turbine, it probably seems that a wood gasification system must be involved. This is a proven and accepted method of producing gas to drive this type of power unit, but the fuel produced is a dirty fuel containing large amounts of me' ~ "'1 re, tars..., and other undesirable impurities that make it unsuitable for use as a fuel until a rather expensive cleanup process and residual waste disposal can take place. However, Aerospace Research felt that there must be a way to improve on the wood gasification...

Powell, S. H.; Hamrick, J. T.

215

The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. During low demand periods, the unit is gas-fired and produces 150 psi steam at high efficiency. In the fall, the heat exchanger is converted to accept flue gas from the large original water tube boilers. The flue gas heats water, which preheats make...

Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network. Phase 2. Final report, March 1, 1980-January 31, 1984. Volume IV  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the following: discussion of cost estimating methodology, detailed cost estimates of Hudson No. 2 retrofit, intermediate thermal plant (Kearny No. 12) and local heater plants; transmission and distribution cost estimate; landfill gas cost estimate; staged development scenarios; economic evaluation; fuel use impact; air quality impact; and alternatives to district heating.

Not Available

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Performance investigation of a cogeneration plant with the efficient and compact heat recovery system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the performance investigation of a cogeneration plant equipped with an efficient waste heat recovery system. The proposed cogeneration system produces four types of useful energy namely: (i) electricity (ii) steam (iii) cooling and (iv) dehumidification. The proposed plant comprises a Capstone C30 micro-turbine which generates 24 kW of electricity a compact and efficient waste heat recovery system and a host of waste heat activated devices namely (i) a steam generator (ii) an absorption chiller (iii) an adsorption chiller and (iv) a multi-bed desiccant dehumidifier. The numerical analysis for the host of waste heat recovery system and thermally activated devices using FORTRAN power station linked to powerful IMSL library is performed to investigate the performance of the overall system. A set of experiments both part load and full load of micro-turbine is conducted to examine the electricity generation and the exhaust gas temperature. It is observed that energy utilization factor (EUF) could achieve as high as 70% while Fuel Energy Saving Ratio (FESR) is found to be 28%.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Heat transfer research on gas turbine airfoils at NASA GRC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The turbine gas path is a very complex flow field due to a variety of flow and heat transfer phenomena encountered in turbine passages. This manuscript provides an overview of the current work in this field at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Based on the author's preference, however, more emphasis is on the computational work. There is much more experimental work in progress at GRC than that reported here. Specifically, the external flow and heat transfer characteristics are described over smooth and rough turbine blades for a range of parameter values. For smooth blades, the effect of film-cooling holes as well as internal cooling channels with ribs and bleed holes is considered. Studies on the blade tip region, susceptible to burnout and oxidation due to high thermal loading, are also described. Wherever possible, predictions of heat transfer coefficient on the real blade surface, obtained using in-house-developed codes, are compared with the available experimental data. Suggestions for further work are outlined.

Vijay K. Garg

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A newly designed economizer to improve waste heat recovery: A case study in a pasteurized milk plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An economizer is normally employed to perform heat recovery from hot exhaust gases to cold fluid. In this work, a newly designed economizer is devised to achieve high heat recovery in a pasteurized milk plant. In the economizer, the hot exhaust gas is divided into two channels flowing up on the left and right sides. After that, it is moving down passing over aligned banks of tubes, which water is flowing inside, in a triple passes fashion. Moreover, three dimensional (3D) models with heat transfer including fluid dynamic have been developed, validated by actual plant data and used to evaluate the performance of the economizer. Simulation results indicate that the newly designed economizer can recover the heat loss of 38% and can achieve the cost saving of 13%.

Sathit Niamsuwan; Paisan Kittisupakorn; Iqbal M. Mujtaba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Compact design improves efficiency and CAPEX -- combining plate heat exchangers and gas-liquid separators for gas processing savings  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the unique combination of two well proven technologies: a compact large scale welded plate heat exchanger with a gas-liquid separator within the same pressure vessel. Explained are the benefits for raw gas processing on production sites where cost, weight and efficiency are of particular importance. Application of this Combined Heat Exchanger-Separator is presented for various gas processing schemes: Turbo Expander, Mechanical Refrigeration and Joule-Thompson.

Waintraub, L.; Sourp, T. [Proser (France)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

222

Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into carbon gas-fired absorption heat pump water heaters. This project will employ innovative techniques to increase water heating energy efficiency over conventional gas storage water heaters by 40%. Project Description This project seeks to develop a natural gas-fired water heater using an absorption heat. The development effort is targeting lithium bromide aqueous solutions as a working fluid in order to avoid the negative implications of using more toxic ammonia. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a Cooperative Research and Development

223

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,270 1,530 1,924 1970's 2,251 2,419 2,847 2,725 1,649 1,760 3,043 3,210 2,134 2,889 1980's 1,320 1,580 3,278 3,543 5,236 4,575 4,715 5,799 4,983 4,767 1990's 6,031 3,502 3,381 4,145 3,252 3,069 3,299 2,275 1,706 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

224

Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,582 9,158 8,521 1970's 7,893 5,840 9,153 6,152 5,357 7,894 4,836 4,979 5,421 8,645 1980's 4,428 4,028 7,236 6,632 7,202 6,296 6,562 8,091 7,100 5,021 1990's 7,257 4,585 4,945 4,829 3,632 3,507 3,584 3,652 3,710 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

225

System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134  

SciTech Connect

The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

Annen, K.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Large eddy simulation for predicting turbulent heat transfer in gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...predicting turbulent heat transfer in gas turbines Danesh K. Tafti Long He K. Nagendra...of propulsion and power generation gas turbines. Accurate prediction of blade metal...compressed bypass air and allow higher turbine inlet temperature, increasing fuel efficiency...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation contains provisions for facilities and service related to electricity, natural gas, water, heating, refrigeration, and street railways. The chapter addresses the construction and...

228

UVM Central Heating & Cooling Plant Annual Maintenance Shutdown 2013 Affected Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UVM Central Heating & Cooling Plant Annual Maintenance Shutdown 2013 Affected Buildings Sunday 19 heating, hot water and critical air conditioning > NO CAGE WASHING > NO AUTOCLAVES > Given Boiler Plant will be in operation to provide heating, hot water and critical air conditioning > NO CAGE WASHING > NO AUTOCLAVES

Hayden, Nancy J.

229

Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,225 1,736 1,807 1,582 4,278 2,390 2,537 1990's 27,720 36,088 36,741 35,503 37,347 39,116 40,334 40,706 39,601 41,149 2000's 42,519 42,243 44,008 44,762 44,016 43,386 38,938 41,197 40,286 39,447 2010's 37,316 35,339 37,397 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

230

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 121,848 123,993 104,292 102,185 123,008 121,936 134,132 1990's 82,828 83,733 86,623 74,925 66,600 75,845 69,235 71,155 63,368 68,393 2000's 69,174 63,137 63,031 56,018 55,970 45,837 46,205 51,499 42,957 39,002 2010's 40,814 42,633 42,123 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

231

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 29,750 31,237 31,121 29,705 35,751 40,508 38,392 1990's 39,249 42,166 39,700 39,211 35,432 34,900 35,236 30,370 26,034 25,055 2000's 25,934 28,266 25,525 26,276 27,818 27,380 28,435 28,213 27,161 24,089 2010's 23,238 24,938 27,809 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

232

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,572 16,185 17,090 13,633 16,249 17,446 19,820 1990's 12,182 14,154 13,217 13,051 13,939 14,896 15,409 15,597 16,524 19,272 2000's 20,602 20,991 25,767 28,829 24,053 24,408 23,868 25,276 23,574 25,282 2010's 27,104 28,582 29,157 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

233

U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

234

System Modeling and Building Energy Simulations of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect

To improve the system performance of a gas engine driven heat pump (GHP) system, an analytical modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated with a detailed vapor compression heat pump system design model. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using the desiccant system the sensible heat ratio (SHR- sensible heat ratio) can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% at rated operating conditions. In addtion,using EnergyPlus, building energy simulations have been conducted to assess annual energy consumptions of GHP in sixteen US cities, and the performances are compared to a baseline unit, which has a electrically-driven air conditioner with the seasonal COP of 4.1 for space cooling and a gas funace with 90% fuel efficiency for space heating.

Mahderekal, Isaac [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Vineyard, Edward [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Analysis of a high-temperature heat exchanger for an externally-fired micro gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The externally-fired gas turbine (EFGT) can convert fuels such as coal, biomass, biomass gasification gas and solar energy into electricity and heat. The combination of this technology with biomass gasification gas represents an interesting option for gasification, for which it has been difficult to find a conversion technology. In this system, the heat exchanger deals with the contaminants of biomass derived gas instead of the turbine itself. However, these contaminants can build a deposit layer in the heat exchanger that can affect its performance. The heat exchanger is important in externally fired gas turbines since the turbine inlet temperature is directly dependent on its performance. Several studies on heat exchangers for externally fired gas turbines have been carried out. However, very few detailed studies were found comparing the performance of heat exchangers for externally fired gas turbines considering the effect of deposit materials on the surfaces. In this regard, this work compares the performance of a corrugated plate heat exchanger and a two-tube-passes shell and tube heat exchanger considering the effect of thickness of deposit material with different thermal conductivities on pressure drop and effectiveness. The results show that the effectiveness of the corrugated plate heat exchanger is more influenced at larger thicknesses of deposit materials than the two-tube-passes shell and tube heat exchanger. There is an exponential increase in the pressure drop of the plate heat exchanger while a monotonic increase of pressure drop is seen for the shell and tube heat exchanger. The increase in the thickness of the deposit material has two effects. On one hand, it increases the resistance to heat transfer and on the other hand, it reduces the through flow area increasing the velocity and hence the heat transfer coefficient. Additionally, the effectiveness of the heat exchangers had a stronger influence on the power output than the pressure drop.

Fabiola Baina; Anders Malmquist; Lucio Alejo; Björn Palm; Torsten H. Fransson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Analysis of Natural Gas Fuel Cell Plant Configurations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Natur Analysis of Natur al Gas Fuel Cell Plant Configur ations March 24, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1486 Analysis of Natur al Gas Fuel Cell Plant Configur ations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

237

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 121 116 93 1970's 79 55 70 71 75 68 61 45 64 49 1980's 41 29 40 55 61 145 234 318 272 254 1990's 300 395 604 513 513 582 603 734 732 879 2000's 586 691 566 647 634 700 794 859 1,008 1,295 2010's 4,578 8,931 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Processing

238

EA-1573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site, Golden, CO EA-1573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat...

239

Thermodynamic analysis of a closed-cycle, solar gas-turbine plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic analysis of a closed-cycle, Brayton gas-turbine plant with a heat exchanger powered by the sun has been studied. A Brayton cycle is simpler than a Rankine cycle and has an advantage in places where water is scarce and expensive. A simple expression is derived for calculating the efficiency of the cycle in terms of the compression pressure ratio, the pressure loss coefficient and the ratio of the lower to higher temperature in the cycle with the efficiency of various components. The maximum permissible pressure loss coefficient has also been calculated.

P. Gandhidasan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Coking Plants, Coal-to-gas Plants, Gas Production and Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This environmental brief covers various coal upgrading technologies, incl. coking and low-temperature carbonization as processes yielding the target products coke and gas plus tar products and diverse...

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement  

SciTech Connect

Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

Qu, Ming [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Yin, Hongxi [Southeast University, Nanjing, China

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power, Pennsylvania Presentation to the Natural Gas CCS Forum Washington, DC November 4, 2011 E.S. Rubin, Carnegie Mellon MotivationMotivation · Electric utilities again looking to natural gas combined cycle (NGCC

243

Techno-economic analysis of a coal-fired CHP based combined heating system with gas-fired boilers for peak load compensation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) plants dominate the heating market in China. With the ongoing energy structure reformation and increasing environmental concerns, we propose gas-fired boilers to be deployed in underperforming heating substations of heating networks for peak load compensation, in order to improve both energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. However, due to the relatively high price of gas, techno-economic analysis is required for evaluating different combined heating scenarios, characterized by basic heat load ratio (?). Therefore, we employ the dynamic economics and annual cost method to develop a techno-economic model for computing the net heating cost of the system, considering the current state of the art of cogeneration systems in China. The net heating cost is defined as the investment costs and operations costs of the system subtracted by revenues from power generation. We demonstrate the model in a real-life combined heating system of Daqing, China. The results show that the minimum net heating cost can be realized at ?=0.75 with a cost reduction of 16.8% compared to coal heating alone. Since fuel cost is the dominating factor, sensitivity analyses on coal and gas prices are discussed subsequently.

Hai-Chao Wang; Wen-Ling Jiao; Risto Lahdelma; Ping-Hua Zou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Heat Transfer on a Hypersonic Sphere with Gas Injection Vladimir V. Riabov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Transfer on a Hypersonic Sphere with Gas Injection Vladimir V. Riabov Department be considered as an effective way of the reduction of heat transfer to the surface in this area [1 the viscous layer is blown completely off the surface, and heat transfer is zero. The effect of injecting

Riabov, Vladimir V.

245

HEAT TRANSFER ON A HYPERSONIC SPHERE WITH DIFFUSE RAREFIED-GAS INJECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAT TRANSFER ON A HYPERSONIC SPHERE WITH DIFFUSE RAREFIED-GAS INJECTION Vladimir V. Riabov* Rivier numbers Re0,R.3-7 Mass injection can be considered as an effective way of the reduction of heat transfer in the case of small Reynolds numbers. Moss12 found that mass injection dramatically reduces heat transfer

Riabov, Vladimir V.

246

CenterPoint Energy - Business Gas Heating Rebates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CenterPoint Energy - Business Gas Heating Rebates CenterPoint Energy - Business Gas Heating Rebates CenterPoint Energy - Business Gas Heating Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Boiler System, Modulating Boiler Burner, and Vent Dampeners: 25% of equipment cost Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Solutions Program: Varies Direct Install Measures: No cost to customers 85% to 91.9% Efficiency Boiler: $1,400/MMBtuh Input 92%+ Efficiency Boiler: $2000/MMBtuh Input Modulating Boiler Burners: $1,000/MMBtuh Input Vent Dampers: $250/boiler Boiler Controls: $150/system Storage Water Heater: $75 Tankless Water Heater: $500

247

Flammability of selected heat resistant alloys in oxygen gas mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Within recent years, the use of oxygen has increased in applications where elevated temperatures and corrosion may be significant factors. In such situations, traditional alloys used in oxygen systems will not be adequate. Where alternative alloys must be utilized, based upon environmental requirements, it is essential that they may be characterized with respect to their ignition and combustion resistance in oxygen. Promoted ignition and promoted ignition-combustion are terms which have been used to describe a situation where a substance with low oxygen supports the combustion of a compatibility ignites and more ignition resistant material. In this paper, data will be presented on the promoted ignition-combustion behavior of selected heat resistant engineering alloys that may be considered for gaseous oxygen applications in severe environments. In this investigation, alloys have been evaluated via both flowing and static (fixed volume) approaches using a rod configuration. Oxygen-nitrogen gas mixtures with compositions ranging from approximately 40 to 99.7% oxygen at pressures of 3.55 to 34.6 MPa were used in the comparative studies.

Zawierucha, R.; McIlroy, K.; Million, J.F. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Auxiliary ECR heating system for the gas dynamic trap  

SciTech Connect

Physics aspects of a new system for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) at the magnetic mirror device Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT, Budker Institute, Novosibirsk) are discussed. This system based on two 400 kW/54.5 GHz gyrotrons is aimed at increasing the electron temperature up to the range 250-350 eV for improved energy confinement of hot ions. The key physical issue of the GDT magnetic field topology is that conventional ECRH geometries are not accessible. The proposed solution is based on a peculiar effect of radiation trapping in inhomogeneous magnetized plasma. Under specific conditions, oblique launch of gyrotron radiation results in generation of right-hand-polarized (R) electromagnetic waves propagating with high N{sub Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line} in the vicinity of the cyclotron resonance layer, which leads to effective single-pass absorption of the injected microwave power. In the present paper, we investigate numerically an optimized ECRH scenario based on the proposed mechanism of wave propagation and discuss the design of the ECRH system, which is currently under construction at the Budker Institute.

Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Smolyakova, O. B.; Malygin, V. I. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ulyanova St. 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Bagryansky, P. A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademika Lavrentieva Prospect 11, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Thumm, M. [Institut fuer Hochfrequenztechnik und Elektronik, Karlsruhe Institut fuer Technologie, Engesserstrasse 5, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Feedback under the microscope – II. Heating, gas uplift and mixing in the nearest cluster core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......volume-averaged way would overheat the surrounding gas and is...cool and hot gas phases are in thermal communication. The emission...volume-averaged heating mechanism would overheat the surrounding gas and can...keV. By helping to get hot thermal particles into contact with......

N. Werner; A. Simionescu; E. T. Million; S. W. Allen; P. E. J. Nulsen; A. von der Linden; S. M. Hansen; H. Böhringer; E. Churazov; A. C. Fabian; W. R. Forman; C. Jones; J. S. Sanders; G. B. Taylor

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Performance evaluation and economic analysis of a gas turbine power plant in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, performance evaluation and economic analysis (in terms of power outage cost due to system downtime) of a gas turbine power plant in Nigeria have been carried out for the period 2001–2010. The thermal power station consists of nine gas turbine units with total capacity of 301 MW (9 × 31.5 MW). The study reveals that 64.3% of the installed capacity was available in the period. The percentage of shortfall of energy generated in the period ranged from 4.18% to 14.53% as against the acceptable value of 5–10%. The load factor of the plant is between 20.8% and 78.2% as against international best practice of 80%. The average availability of the plant for the period was about 64% as against industry best practice of 95%, while the average use factor was about 92%. The capacity factor of the plant ranged from 20.8% to 78.23% while the utilization factor ranged from 85.47% to 95.82%. For the ten years under review, there was energy generation loss of about 35.7% of expected energy generation of 26.411 TW h with consequent plant performance of 64.3%. The study further reveals that the 35.7% of generation loss resulted in revenue loss of about M$251 (approximately b40). The simple performance indicator developed to evaluate the performance indices and outage cost for the station can also be applicable to other power stations in Nigeria and elsewhere. Measures to improve the performance indices of the plant have been suggested such as training of operation and maintenance (O & M) personnel regularly, improvement in O & M practices, proper spare parts inventory and improvement in general housekeeping of the plant. From technical point of view, performance of the plant can be improved by retrofitting with a gas turbine air inlet cooling system, heat recovery system or adding modifications (inter-cooling or regeneration) to the simple gas turbine units.

S.O. Oyedepo; R.O. Fagbenle; S.S. Adefila; S.A. Adavbiele

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Plant Oil Fuels Combined Heat and Power (CHP)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the simultaneous generation of both useable heat and power in a single process by a heat and power supply station or an engine. The mechanical energy is usuall...

Dr. Klaus Thuneke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Plant Oil Fuels Combined Heat and Power (CHP)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the simultaneous generation of both useable heat and power in a single process by a heat and power supply station or an engine. The mechanical energy is usuall...

Dr. Klaus Thuneke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generator (Waste Heat 1) - TEG 1 (preliminary assembly and testing) - TEG 2 (Bi-Te modules) - TEG 3 (Skutterudite and Bi-Te modules) * Develop Cost-Effective TEG (Waste Heat...

255

Combined Flue Gas Heat Recovery and Pollution Control Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the field of heat recovery now make it possible to recover a portion of the wasted heat and improve the working conditions of the air purification equipment. Proper design and selection of heat recovery and pollution control equipment as a combination...

Zbikowski, T.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hybrid heat exchange for the compression capture of CO2 from recirculated flue gas  

SciTech Connect

An approach proposed for removal of CO2 from flue gas cools and compresses a portion of a recirculated flue-gas stream, condensing its volatile materials for capture. Recirculating the flue gas concentrates SOx, H2O and CO2 while dramatically reducing N2 and NOx, enabling this approach, which uses readily available industrial components. A hybrid system of indirect and direct-contact heat exchange performs heat and mass transfer for pollutant removal and energy recovery. Computer modeling and experimentation combine to investigate the thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, chemistry and engineering design of this integrated pollutant removal (IPR) system.

Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Ochs, Thomas L.; Summers, Cathy A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Dynamic gas bearing turbine technology in hydrogen plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines - although applied for helium refrigerators and liquefiers for decades - experienced limitations for hydrogen applications due to restrictions in axial bearing capacity. With a new design concept for gas bearing turbines developed in 2004 axial bearing capacity was significantly improved enabling the transfer of this technology to hydrogen liquefiers. Prior to roll-out of the technology to industrial plants the turbine bearing technology passed numerous tests in R&D test benches and subsequently proved industrial scale demonstration at Linde Gas' hydrogen liquefier in Leuna Germany. Since its installation this turbine has gathered more than 16 000 successful operating hours and has outperformed its oil bearing brother in terms of performance maintainability as well as reliability. The present paper is based on Linde Kryotechnik AG's paper published in the proceedings of the CEC 2009 concerning the application of Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines in hydrogen applications. In contrast to the former paper this publication focuses on the steps towards final market launch and more specifically on the financial benefits of this turbine technology both in terms of capital investment as well as operating expenses.

Klaus Ohlig; Stefan Bischoff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition (SI) engine, from a prototyping of a practical supervi- sion and control system for a pilot Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

259

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Description of the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) will be located at the site of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the facility is to provide enriching services for the production of low assay enriched uranium for civilian nuclear power reactors. The construction and operation of the GCEP is administered by the US Department of Energy. The facility will be operated under contract from the US Government. Control of the GCEP rests solely with the US Government, which holds and controls access to the technology. Construction of GCEP is expected to be completed in the mid-1990's. Many facility design and operating procedures are subject to change. Nonetheless, the design described in this report does reflect current thinking. Descriptions of the general facility and major buildings such as the process buildings, feed and withdrawal building, cylinder storage and transfer, recycle/assembly building, and a summary of the centrifuge uranium enriching process are provided in this report.

Arthur, W.B. (comp.)

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it is important for students to know from where it comes. This module uses a series of activities to show how energy and mass are converted from one form to another. It focuses on the conversion of light energy into chemical energy via photosynthesis. It then goes on to show how the chemical energy in plant sugars can be fermented to produce ethanol. Finally, the reasons for using ethanol as a fuel are discussed.

262

Re-lining of scrubbers in flue gas desulfurization plants  

SciTech Connect

Rubber lining is used as corrosion protection material in scrubbers, tanks, pipe systems etc of European flue gas desulfurization plants. Although these rubber linings show in cases more than 15 years life, re-rubber lining is still necessary. Due to the expected higher availability of the power station units the time scale of such replacement must be kept to a minimum. As an efficient method for removal of the old lining the high pressure water systems has proven successful. Based on one such case of re-lining the working steps and time scale are demonstrated.

Fenner, J. [Keramchemie GmbH, Siershahn (Germany)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Relining of scrubbers in flue gas desulfurization plants  

SciTech Connect

Rubber lining is used as a corrosion protection material in European flue gas desulfurization plants, for scrubbers, tanks, pipe systems, etc. Although these rubber linings can last more than 15 years, relining still is necessary. The difficulty of shutting down power station units requires that the time scale of this replacement be kept to a minimum. High-pressure water systems have proven successful as an efficient method for removal of the old lining. The working steps and time scale are demonstrated for one such relining case.

Fenner, J. [Keramchemie GmbH (Germany)

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Two-tank working gas storage system for heat engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-tank working gas supply and pump-down system is coupled to a hot gas engine, such as a Stirling engine. The system has a power control valve for admitting the working gas to the engine when increased power is needed, and for releasing the working gas from the engine when engine power is to be decreased. A compressor pumps the working gas that is released from the engine. Two storage vessels or tanks are provided, one for storing the working gas at a modest pressure (i.e., half maximum pressure), and another for storing the working gas at a higher pressure (i.e., about full engine pressure). Solenoid valves are associated with the gas line to each of the storage vessels, and are selectively actuated to couple the vessels one at a time to the compressor during pumpdown to fill the high-pressure vessel with working gas at high pressure and then to fill the low-pressure vessel with the gas at low pressure. When more power is needed, the solenoid valves first supply the low-pressure gas from the low-pressure vessel to the engine and then supply the high-pressure gas from the high-pressure vessel. The solenoid valves each act as a check-valve when unactuated, and as an open valve when actuated.

Hindes, Clyde J. (Troy, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

ANALYSIS OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR POWERED HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS HYDROGEN PLANT  

SciTech Connect

An updated reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The reactor heat is used to produce heat and electric power to the HTE plant. A Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 44.4% was used to provide the electric power. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 1.1 million cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 42.8% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.85 kg/s (66 million SCFD) and an oxygen production rate of 14.6 kg/s (33 million SCFD). An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.03/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20% for a reactor cost of $2000/kWt and $2.41/kg of hydrogen for a reactor cost of $1400/kWt.

M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; A. M. Gandrik

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Using heat demand prediction to optimise Virtual Power Plant production capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Using heat demand prediction to optimise Virtual Power Plant production capacity Vincent Bakker is really produced by the fleet of micro- generators. When using micro Combined Heat and Power micro distributed electricity generation (micro-generation e.g. solar cells, micro Combined Heat and Power (micro

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

267

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005648  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edward Levy Edward Levy Principal Investigator Director, Lehigh University Energy Research Center RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas usinG condensinG Heat excHanGeRs PRomis/PRoject no.: de-nt0005648 Background As the United States' population grows and demand for electricity and water increases, power plants located in some parts of the country will find it increasingly difficult to obtain the large quantities of water needed to maintain operations. Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. Many coal-fired power plants operate with stack temperatures in the 300 °F range to minimize fouling and corrosion problems due to sulfuric acid condensation and to

268

Local heat and mass transfer for gas-solid two phase flow in CFB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental investigation on the flow characteristics and the local heat and mass transfer between coarse wet particles and hot gas in the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) has been performed. A two-thermocoupl...

Feng Lu; Ming-Heng Shi

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

270

Development and test of combustion chamber for Stirling engine heated by natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion chamber is an important component for the Stirling engine heated by natural gas. In the paper ... , we develop a combustion chamber for the Stirling engine which aims to generate 3?5 kWe...electric...

Tie Li; Xiange Song; Xiaohong Gui; Dawei Tang; Zhigang Li…

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

272

A Partial Load Model for a Local Combined Heat and Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Partial Load Model for a Local Combined Heat and Power Plant Camilla Schaumburg and power (CHP) plants constitute a not insignificant share of the power production in Denmark, particularly using data from a typical local CHP plant and the years 2003 through 2006 are simulated to assess

273

Novel integrated gas turbine solar cogeneration power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrating solar cogeneration power plants (CSCPP) may provide a key solution for the pressing freshwater deficits in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and could be used in the future for export electricity to Europe. From this standpoint the current study was undertaken to include proposed schemes of CSCPP, that would fully exploit the potential of hybrid reverse osmosis (RO)/multi effect distillation (MED) seawater desalination. Thereby, the primary objective of the present study was to identify and investigate the effectiveness and thermodynamic performance of CSCPP schemes. To satisfy this objective, detailed computational model for key components in the plant has been developed and implemented on simulation computer code. The thermal effectiveness in the computational model was characterized by the condition of attaining a maximum fuel saving in the electrical power grid (EPG). The study result shows the effectiveness of proposed CSCPP schemes. Especially the integrated gas turbine solar cogeneration power plant (IGSCP) scheme seems to be an alternative of the most effective technologies in terms of technical, economic and environmental sustainability. For the case study (IGSCP and the design number of effects 10 for low-temperature MED unit) the economical effect amount 172.3 ton fuel/year for each MW design thermal energy of parabolic solar collector array (PSCA). The corresponding decrease in exhaust gases emission (nitrogen oxides (NOx) 0.681 ton/year MW, carbon dioxides (CO2) 539.5 ton/year MW). Moreover, the increase in the output of PSCA and, subsequently, in solar power generation, will also be useful to offset the normal reduction in performance experienced by gas turbine unit during the summer season. Hence, the influence of the most important design parameters on the effectiveness of ISGPP has been discussed in this paper.

Hussain Alrobaei

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Compact Ceramic Heat Exchangers for Corrosive Waste Gas Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed for low temperature corrosive gas situations and have been applied to the pottery industry and are being developed for coal fired air heaters for the food industry....

Laws, W. R.; Reed, G. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Research on Heating Scope of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compilation Stipulation on heat-electricity cogeneration program (trial implementation) published recently says, “Under the condition of reasonable technical economy, heat resource shall be concentrated as far as...

Tai Lü; Zheng Wang; Hui Kang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Optimizing heat integration in a flexible coal–natural gas power station with CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Computational optimization is used to simultaneously determine the design and planned operating profile of a flexible coal–natural gas power station with CO2 capture, under a CO2 emission performance standard. The facility consists of a coal-fired power station undergoing retrofit with CO2 capture. The CO2 capture energy demand is provided by a specially designed combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT). The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) component of the CCGT is modeled and optimized in detail, with explicit treatment of the discrete aspects of the HRSG configuration, including the number and sequential arrangement of HRSG internal components. Variable facility operations are represented by discrete operating modes selected based on the electricity price–duration curve. Two objectives, the minimization of capital requirement and the maximization of net present value, are considered in a bi-objective mixed-integer nonlinear programming formulation. Pareto frontiers, which define the optimal tradeoffs between these two objectives, are generated for six scenarios constructed from recent historical data from West Texas, the United Kingdom, and India. For a 440 MW coal plant in a scenario based on 2011 West Texas data, the minimum effective net present cost required for the retrofit (which meets the CO2 emission performance standard) varies from $278 to 383 million, and the minimum total capital investment requirement ranges from $346 to 517 million. The variations in these optimized values correspond to the range of the Pareto frontier within the bounds of the problem. The net present cost of the retrofit is less than the present value of the existing coal plant, $476 million, indicating that a retrofit is preferred over decommissioning. In the case of very low energy prices, however, decommissioning is shown to be the preferred option. The UK and India scenarios demonstrate that optimal designs can vary greatly depending upon location-specific economic conditions.

Charles A. Kang; Adam R. Brandt; Louis J. Durlofsky

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Title: Net Energy Ratio and Greenhouse Gas Analysis of a Biogas Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Biogas Power Plant Author: W. Bauer Author Affiliation: Department and greenhouse gas analysis for a 1.45 MW (0.71 MW electrical) biogas power plant

Bauer, Wolfgang

280

Second law analysis of a natural gas-fired steam boiler and cogeneration plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A second law thermodynamic analysis of a natural gas-fired steam boiler and cogeneration plant at Rice University was conducted. The analysis included many components of… (more)

Conklin, Eric D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Multivariable robust control of a simulated hybrid solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work presents a systematic approach to the multivariable robust control of a hybrid fuel cell gas turbine plant. The hybrid configuration under investigation built… (more)

Tsai, Alex, 1973-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Economic feasibility of heat supply from nuclear power plants in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy is regarded as competitive for urban district heating applications. Hot water heat transport systems of up to 50 miles are feasible for heat loads over 1500 MWt, and heat load density of over 130 MWt/mi/sup 2/is most suitable for nuclear applications. An incremental approach and a nuclear plant design provision for future heat extraction are recommended. Nuclear district heating technology status is discussed, particularly turbine design. Results of a study for retrofitting a major existing nuclear power plant to cogeneration operation are presented. The study indicates that for transmission distances up to 20 miles it is economical to generate and transport between 600 and 1200 MWt of district heat.

Roe, K.K.; Oliker, I.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide solar power plant energy storage for a reasonablefor Chemical Storage of Solar Energy. UC Berkeley, M.S.for a solar power plant without energy storage for nighttime

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for concentrating solar-thermal energy use a large number ofBoth solar power plants absorb thermal energy in high-of a solar power plant that converts thermal energy into

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cecil. E. A. , Research on Dry-Type Cooling _T_o_w_e_r~s~f~oTower Type Wet-Cooled Power Plant Solar-Power Plant Dry-Cool

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

This DOE Industrial Program fact sheet describes ten effective ways to save energy and money in industrial process heating systems by making some changes in equipment, operations, and maintenance.

Not Available

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A Gas-Fired Heat Pipe Zone Heater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this table were obtained from the 1983 Qas Rel~earch Inrtitute Baseline Projection Data Book. 4verage Resldentlal Gas Prlces ($/Wtu) (1982 do1 lars) New England Middle Atlantlc South Atlantlc East North Central West North Central East South Central... West South Central kuntaln #I Mountaln I2 Paclflc #I Paclf lc 12 The conservation factor may be exprerred as lABLEm Gas Research lnstltute Fuel lnflatlon Estlmates natural Gas 1- ~2 1983-1990 1990-ZMO Nc* England 1.7 2.1 Mlddle Atlantlc 2.1 2...

Winn, C. B.; Burns, P.; Guire, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

"NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.5 hours" 1.5 hours" "NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY" "FORM EIA-757" "Schedule B: Emergency Status Report" "This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction."

289

Systems approach used in the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

A requirement exists for effective and efficient transfer of technical knowledge from the design engineering team to the production work force. Performance-Based Training (PBT) is a systematic approach to the design, development, and implementation of technical training. This approach has been successfully used by the US Armed Forces, industry, and other organizations. The advantages of the PBT approach are: cost-effectiveness (lowest life-cycle training cost), learning effectiveness, reduced implementation time, and ease of administration. The PBT process comprises five distinctive and rigorous phases: Analysis of Job Performance, Design of Instructional Strategy, Development of Training Materials and Instructional Media, Validation of Materials and Media, and Implementation of the Instructional Program. Examples from the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) are used to illustrate the application of PBT.

Rooks, W.A. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hot gas defrosting method for air-source transcritical CO2 heat pump systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract When the air-source heat pump systems operate at low ambient temperatures in winter, frost forms on the coil surface of the outdoor evaporators. The frost substantially affects the operating performance and energy efficiency of heat pump systems, and hence periodic defrosting is essential. In this study, several defrost methods are presented to look for a candidate for air-source transcritical CO2 heat pump systems. The hot gas method proves to be more suitable among other defrosting methods for transcritical CO2 heat pump systems. To validate its reliability and rationality, an air-source transcritical CO2 heat pump water heater was built in a climatic laboratory. Through the experiments, the dynamic process of temperature and pressure were obtained to demonstrate the hot gas defrosting characteristics and system cycle. The hot gas defrosting cycle in the p–h diagram was also validated by experiment results. Meanwhile, instant defrosting images were captured to record the dynamic defrosting process. The defrosting process lasted 10 min and defrosting efficiency was 34.8% for hot gas defrosting method. The effectiveness and applicability of hot gas defrosting method for CO2 heat pump water heater is validated by experiments.

Bin Hu; Dongfang Yang; Feng Cao; Ziwen Xing; Jiyou Fei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Multivariable Robust Control of a Simulated Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Plant  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a systematic approach to the multivariable robust control of a hybrid fuel cell gas turbine plant. The hybrid configuration under investigation built by the National Energy Technology Laboratory comprises a physical simulation of a 300kW fuel cell coupled to a 120kW auxiliary power unit single spool gas turbine. The public facility provides for the testing and simulation of different fuel cell models that in turn help identify the key difficulties encountered in the transient operation of such systems. An empirical model of the built facility comprising a simulated fuel cell cathode volume and balance of plant components is derived via frequency response data. Through the modulation of various airflow bypass valves within the hybrid configuration, Bode plots are used to derive key input/output interactions in transfer function format. A multivariate system is then built from individual transfer functions, creating a matrix that serves as the nominal plant in an H{sub {infinity}} robust control algorithm. The controller’s main objective is to track and maintain hybrid operational constraints in the fuel cell’s cathode airflow, and the turbo machinery states of temperature and speed, under transient disturbances. This algorithm is then tested on a Simulink/MatLab platform for various perturbations of load and fuel cell heat effluence. As a complementary tool to the aforementioned empirical plant, a nonlinear analytical model faithful to the existing process and instrumentation arrangement is evaluated and designed in the Simulink environment. This parallel task intends to serve as a building block to scalable hybrid configurations that might require a more detailed nonlinear representation for a wide variety of controller schemes and hardware implementations.

Tsai A, Banta L, Tucker D

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Collisionless electron heating by radio frequency bias in low gas pressure inductive discharge  

SciTech Connect

We show experimental observations of collisionless electron heating by the combinations of the capacitive radio frequency (RF) bias power and the inductive power in low argon gas pressure RF biased inductively coupled plasma (ICP). With small RF bias powers in the ICP, the electron energy distribution (EED) evolved from bi-Maxwellian distribution to Maxwellian distribution by enhanced plasma bulk heating and the collisionless sheath heating was weak. In the capacitive RF bias dominant regime, however, high energy electrons by the RF bias were heated on the EEDs in the presence of the ICP. The collisionless heating mechanism of the high energy electrons transited from collisionless inductive heating to capacitive coupled collisionless heating by the electron bounce resonance in the RF biased ICP.

Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

293

EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (DOE/EA-1573-S1) EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (DOE/EA-1573-S1) Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to make improvements to the Renewable Fuel Heat Plant including construction and operation of a wood chip storage silo and the associated material handling conveyances and utilization of regional wood sources. DOE/EA-1887 supplements a prior EA (DOE/EA-1573, July 2007) and is also referred to as DOE/EA-1573-S1. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download April 9, 2012 EA-1887: Finding of No Significant Impact

294

EA-1573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the 573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site, Golden, CO EA-1573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site, Golden, CO DOE's Golden Field Office has prepared a draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) for proposed improvements to the Renewable Fuel Heat Plant (RFHP) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain site. The SEA analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed improvements tot he RFHP consisting of construction and operation of an onsite woodchip fuel storage silo and an expansion of woodchip fuel sources to a regional scale.

295

Results of heat tests of the TGE-435 main boiler in the PGU-190/220 combined-cycle plant of the Tyumen' TETs-2 cogeneration plant  

SciTech Connect

Special features of operation of a boiler operating as a combined-cycle plant and having its own furnace and burner unit are descried. The flow of flue gases on the boiler is increased due to feeding of exhaust gases of the GTU into the furnace, which intensifies the convective heat exchange. In addition, it is not necessary to preheat air in the convective heating surfaces (the boiler has no air preheater). The convective heating surfaces of the boiler are used for heating the feed water, thus replacing the regeneration extractions of the steam turbine (HPP are absent in the circuit) and partially replacing the preheating of condensate (the LPP in the circuit of the unit are combined with preheaters of delivery water). Regeneration of the steam turbine is primarily used for the district cogeneration heating purposes. The furnace and burner unit of the exhaust-heat boiler (which is a new engineering solution for the given project) ensures utilization of not only the heat of the exhaust gases of the GTU but also of their excess volume, because the latter contains up to 15% oxygen that oxidizes the combustion process in the boiler. Thus, the gas temperature at the inlet to the boiler amounts to 580{sup o}C at an excess air factor a = 3.50; at the outlet these parameters are utilized to T{sub out} = 139{sup o}C and a{sub out} = 1.17. The proportions of the GTU/boiler loads that can actually be organized at the generating unit (and have been checked by testing) are presented and the proportions of loads recommended for the most efficient operation of the boiler are determined. The performance characteristics of the boiler are presented for various proportions of GTU/boiler loads. The operating conditions of the superheater and of the convective trailing heating surfaces are presented as well as the ecological parameters of the generating unit.

A.V. Kurochkin; A.L. Kovalenko; V.G. Kozlov; A.I. Krivobok [Engineering Center of the Ural Power Industry (Russian Federation)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Impact of heat transfer on the performance of micro gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The miniaturisation of gas turbine engines poses significant challenges to the performance in heat management due to the close proximity of the hot and cold components. This paper examines the scale and significance of heat transfer within micro gas turbines and aims to quantify the corresponding impacts on performance and efficiency. To study these effects, a reduced order lumped capacitance heat transfer network is developed. Two different micro turbine configurations are investigated and the effect of micro turbine size and material selection is explored. The investigation shows that the choice of configuration and materials influences the impact of heat transfer on the micro turbine performance and heat management is therefore key to achieving the full potential of micro turbines.

Dries Verstraete; Carlos Bowkett

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Optimization and heat integration of hollow fiber based thermal swing adsorption process for CO2 capture from flue gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work studies the optimization of a hollow fiber contactor operated in a rapid temperature swing adsorption (RTSA) mode for CO2 capture from flue gas. A hollow fiber contactor enables rapid heat and mass transfer and an efficient heat integration whereby parasitic loads on power plants can be reduced significantly compared to the traditional thermal swing adsorption processes. In this paper we employ a dynamic optimization strategy to predict the optimal operating conditions of a hollow fiber RTSA process for different process design objectives. The objective function considered was to maximize the feed throughput of the process with constraints for the required CO2 purity and recovery. Furthermore, the external heat and cold utilities must be minimized. The optimization requires a dynamic heat integration i.e. redistributing the hot and cold stream outlet between different parts of a cycle which is challenging and unconventional. This has been performed using a binary decision variable which switches the outlet water stream between hot and cold tanks. We also show that a multi- objective optimization approach can be employed to determine the optimal trade-off between heat duty and process throughput. Optimization was performed using a single discretization approach within gPROMS.

Subramanian Swernath; Fateme Rezaei; Jayashree Kalyanaraman; Ryan. P. Lively; Matthew J. Realff; Yoshiaki Kawajiri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Dual Heating and Cooling Sorption Heat Pump for a Food Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex compound sorption reactions are ideally suited for use in high temperature lift industrial heat pump cycles. Complex compound heat pumping and refrigeration provides a number of energy-saving advantages over present vapor compression systems...

Rockenfeller, U.; Dooley, B.

299

Flexibility and operability analysis of a HEN-integrated natural gas expander plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the heat-exchanger network (HEN) literature, synthesis, design, and flexibility analyses of \\{HENs\\} are done independently from processes to which \\{HENs\\} are integrated. Such analyses are made mostly based on nominal operating conditions at which the HEN's source- and target-stream properties are evaluated. However, terminal-stream properties of \\{HENs\\} depend upon temperatures, pressures, and compositions of the process connected to the HEN. In this work, flexibility and operability issues of a HEN are investigated with rigorous simulations using the process flowsheet simulator HYSYS for a HEN-integrated natural gas turbo-expander plant (TEP) operating under ethane-recovery mode. The contribution of this work is threefold. First, the HEN-plant interactions are exemplified via the process flowsheet simulator. Second, flexibility and operability issues are tackled using the optimization capability of the flowsheet simulator. Third, for highly energy-integrated complex plants like the TEP, the difficulties or impossibilities of automated HEN synthesis and flexibility analysis with process flowsheet simulators are demonstrated.

Alp Er S. Konukman; Ugur Akman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Investigation of coal fired combined-cycle cogeneration plants for power, heat, syngas, and hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methodology for determination of technical and economic efficiency of coal fired combined-cycle cogeneration plant (CCCP) with low-pressure ... steam-gas generator and continuous flow gasifier at combined pro...

V. E. Nakoryakov; G. V. Nozdrenko; A. G. Kuzmin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Parallel Condensing System As A Heat Sink For Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional heat sink technologies of use the condenser/cooling tower arrangement or an air cooled condenser for condensing exhaust steam from steam turbines. Each of these two systems have certain advantages as well as disadvantages. This paper...

Akhtar, S. Z.

302

Value analysis of advanced heat rejection systems for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer model is developed to evaluate the performance of the binary geothermal power plants (Organic Rankine Cycles) with various heat rejection systems and their impact on the levelized cost of electricity. The computer model developed in this work is capable of simulating the operation of a geothermal power plant which consists mainly of an Organic Rankine Cycle (binary plants) with different types of working fluids such as pure hydrocarbons and some binary mixtures of the most promising combinations of hydrocarbons.

Bliem, C. [CJB Consulting, Longmont, CO (United States); Zangrando, F.; Hassani, V. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

Optimum Heat Power Cycles for Process Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric power cogeneration is compared with direct mechanical drives emphasizing the technical aspects having the greatest impact on energy economics. Both steam and gas turbine applications are discussed and practical methods of developing...

Waterland, A. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Heat Integration and Heat Recovery at a Large Chemical Manufacturing Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the hydrogenation process. The hydrogenation process uses a catalyst to react the purified phenol with hydrogen, forming a mixture of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. The reaction is exothermic and is cooled with water to control the rate of reaction... Process Heat Recovery The process heat recovery opportunity was identified in the hydrogenation process. The hydrogenation process contains an exothermic reaction which is cooled with water to control the rate of reaction. The heated water...

Togna, K .A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design. Propofied Solar Cooling Tower Type Wet-Cooled Powerdry-cooling tower was used in the proposed solar power plantTower • Power-Generation Subsystem Summary An Overall Summary of the Proposed Solar

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Off-Gas Cleaning in an FRG Reprocessing Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Development of Nuclear Gas Cleaning and Filtering Techniques / Radiation Biology and Environment

Jürgen Furrer; Walter Weinländer

307

Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Development and Demonstration of Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient CO2 Removal from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Demonstration of and Demonstration of Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient CO 2 Removal from Coal-Fired Flue Gas Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-

309

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 115,177 140,290 179,117 1970's 193,209 195,072 197,967 206,833 194,329 189,541 172,584 166,392 161,511 165,515 1980's 142,171 142,423 128,858 124,193 132,501 117,736 115,604 124,890 120,092 121,425 1990's 119,405 129,154 132,656 130,336 128,583 146,048 139,841 150,008 144,609 164,794 2000's 164,908 152,862 152,724 124,955 133,434 103,381 105,236 110,745 94,785 95,359 2010's 102,448 95,630 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

310

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,351 3,244 2,705 1970's 2,330 2,013 1,912 1,581 1,921 2,879 6,665 11,494 14,641 15,686 1980's 15,933 14,540 14,182 13,537 12,829 11,129 11,644 10,876 10,483 9,886 1990's 8,317 8,103 8,093 7,012 6,371 6,328 6,399 6,147 5,938 5,945 2000's 5,322 4,502 4,230 3,838 4,199 3,708 3,277 3,094 3,921 2,334 2010's 2,943 2,465 2,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013

311

California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 34,803 32,639 30,334 1970's 29,901 27,585 24,156 17,498 17,201 15,221 14,125 13,567 13,288 10,720 1980's 8,583 7,278 14,113 14,943 15,442 16,973 16,203 15,002 14,892 13,376 1990's 12,424 11,786 12,385 12,053 11,250 11,509 12,169 11,600 10,242 10,762 2000's 11,063 11,060 12,982 13,971 14,061 13,748 14,056 13,521 13,972 13,722 2010's 13,244 12,095 12,755 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

312

Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 11,500 8,573 8,579 1970's 6,574 6,133 6,063 5,441 5,557 5,454 5,231 4,764 6,192 3,923 1980's 6,845 5,638 6,854 6,213 6,516 6,334 4,466 2,003 2,142 1,444 1990's 1,899 2,181 2,342 2,252 2,024 2,303 2,385 2,404 2,263 2,287 2000's 1,416 1,558 1,836 1,463 2,413 1,716 2,252 1,957 2,401 3,270 2010's 4,576 4,684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

313

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,149 48,635 50,484 1970's 52,647 53,810 54,157 55,782 54,986 56,109 61,778 72,484 77,653 62,107 1980's 59,457 60,544 56,857 56,304 58,580 53,953 51,295 65,156 63,355 61,594 1990's 66,626 70,463 75,520 83,193 86,607 85,668 108,341 109,046 106,665 107,850 2000's 110,411 108,958 110,036 111,292 105,412 101,064 99,971 96,250 92,579 94,840 2010's 91,963 90,291 84,562 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

314

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,126 4,546 4,058 1970's 3,405 4,152 4,114 4,674 6,210 9,620 11,944 13,507 13,094 12,606 1980's 12,651 13,427 12,962 11,314 10,771 11,913 10,441 10,195 11,589 13,340 1990's 13,178 15,822 18,149 18,658 19,612 25,225 23,362 28,851 24,365 26,423 2000's 29,105 29,195 31,952 33,650 35,821 34,782 36,317 38,180 53,590 67,607 2010's 82,637 90,801 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

315

Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 236 1970's 225 281 243 199 501 694 661 933 1,967 4,845 1980's 4,371 4,484 4,727 4,709 5,123 5,236 4,836 4,887 4,774 5,022 1990's 4,939 4,997 5,490 5,589 5,647 5,273 5,361 4,637 4,263 18,079 2000's 24,086 13,754 14,826 11,293 15,133 13,759 21,065 19,831 17,222 17,232 2010's 19,059 17,271 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages:

316

North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,150 5,428 4,707 1970's 4,490 3,592 3,199 2,969 2,571 2,404 2,421 2,257 2,394 2,986 1980's 3,677 5,008 5,602 7,171 7,860 8,420 6,956 7,859 6,945 6,133 1990's 6,444 6,342 6,055 5,924 5,671 5,327 4,937 5,076 5,481 5,804 2000's 6,021 6,168 5,996 5,818 6,233 6,858 7,254 7,438 7,878 10,140 2010's 11,381 14,182 26,156 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014

317

New Measures to Safeguard Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

As Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants (GCEPs) increase in separative work unit (SWU) capacity, the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) model safeguards approach needs to be strengthened. New measures to increase the effectiveness of the safeguards approach are being investigated that will be mutually beneficial to the facility operators and the IAEA. One of the key concepts being studied for application at future GCEPs is embracing joint use equipment for process monitoring of load cells at feed and withdrawal (F/W) stations. A mock F/W system was built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to generate and collect F/W data from an analogous system. The ORNL system has been used to collect data representing several realistic normal process and off-normal (including diversion) scenarios. Emphasis is placed on the novelty of the analysis of data from the sensors as well as the ability to build information out of raw data, which facilitates a more effective and efficient verification process. This paper will provide a progress report on recent accomplishments and next steps.

Whitaker, Jr., James [ORNL; Garner, James R [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL; Lockwood, Dunbar [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA; Gilligan, Kimberly V [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Hooper, David A [ORNL; Henkel, James J [ORNL; Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 433,684 457,117 447,325 1970's 466,016 448,288 470,105 466,143 448,993 435,571 428,635 421,110 393,819 352,650 1980's 350,312 345,262 356,406 375,849 393,873 383,719 384,693 364,477 357,756 343,233 1990's 342,186 353,737 374,126 385,063 381,020 381,712 398,442 391,174 388,011 372,566 2000's 380,535 355,860 360,535 332,405 360,110 355,589 373,350 387,349 401,503 424,042 2010's 433,622 481,308 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

319

Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,127 971 1,334 1970's 1,270 1,217 1,058 878 679 567 520 367 485 1,146 1980's 553 830 831 633 618 458 463 437 811 380 1990's 445 511 416 395 425 377 340 300 495 5,462 2000's 11,377 15,454 16,477 11,430 13,697 14,308 14,662 13,097 10,846 18,354 2010's 18,405 11,221 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

320

Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,499 3,667 3,475 1970's 3,235 2,563 1,197 1,118 952 899 823 674 883 1,308 1980's 1,351 1,327 1,287 1,258 1,200 1,141 1,318 1,275 1,061 849 1990's 800 290 413 507 553 488 479 554 451 431 2000's 377 408 395 320 254 231 212 162 139 168 2010's 213 268 424 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes Jaschke, Helge Smedsrud, Sigurd Skogestad*, Henrik Manum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes J¨aschke, Helge@chemeng.ntnu.no off-line. This systematic approach is here applied to a waste incineration plant for district heating. In district heating networks, operators usually wish to ob- tain the lowest possible return temperature

Skogestad, Sigurd

322

THE EVALUATION OF THE HEAT LOADING FROM STEADY, TRANSIENT AND OFF-NORMAL CONDITIONS IN ARIES POWER PLANTS*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EVALUATION OF THE HEAT LOADING FROM STEADY, TRANSIENT AND OFF-NORMAL CONDITIONS IN ARIES POWER. The characterization of heat loads developed for ITER1 can be applied to power plants to better develop the operating, and heating type for the divertor and first wall (FW). A particular power plant design is used, referred

California at San Diego, University of

323

Simulation study on lignite-fired power system integrated with flue gas drying and waste heat recovery – Performances under variable power loads coupled with off-design parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignite is a kind of low rank coal with high moisture content and low net heating value, which is mainly used for electric power generation. However, the thermal efficiency of power plants firing lignite directly is very low. Pre-drying is a proactive option, dehydrating raw lignite to raise its heating value, to improve the power plant thermal efficiency. A pre-dried lignite-fired power system integrated with boiler flue gas drying and waste heat recovery was proposed in this paper. The plant thermal efficiency could be improved by 1.51% at benchmark condition due to pre-drying and waste heat recovery. The main system performances under variable power loads were simulated and analyzed. Simulation results show that the improvement of plant thermal efficiency reduced to 1.36% at 50% full load. Moreover, the influences of drying system off-design parameters were simulated coupled with power loads. The variation tendencies of main system parameters were obtained. The influence of pre-drying degree (including moisture content of pre-dried lignite and raw lignite) on the plant thermal efficiency diminishes gradually with the decreasing power load. The dryer thermal efficiency and dryer exhaust temperature are also main factors and the influences on system parameters have been quantitatively analyzed.

Xiaoqu Han; Ming Liu; Jinshi Wang; Junjie Yan; Jiping Liu; Feng Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Op%mal Scheduling of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Plants1 under Time-sensi%ve Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Op%mal Scheduling of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Plants1 under Time. Combined heat and power genera%on plants are also called co-genera%on plants. #12. #12;Facing the challenge of variability, the power grid is in transi

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

325

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners...

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The RealGas and RealGasH2O options of the TOUGH+ code for the simulation of coupled fluid and heat flow in tight/shale gas systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed two new EOS additions to the TOUGH+ family of codes, the RealGasH2O and RealGas. The RealGasH2O EOS option describes the non-isothermal two-phase flow of water and a real gas mixture in gas reservoirs, with a particular focus in ultra-tight ... Keywords: Coupled flow and heat flow, Fractured media, Multicomponent flow, Numerical simulation, Real gas mixture, Shale gas

George J. Moridis, Craig M. Freeman

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Medium-Term Risk Management for a Gas-Fired Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medium-Term Risk Management for a Gas-Fired Power Plant Medium-Term Risk Management for a Gas-Fired Power Plant Speaker(s): Afzal Siddiqui Date: October 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Chris Marnay Electricity sectors in many countries have been deregulated with the aim of introducing competition. However, as a result, electricity prices have become highly volatile. Stochastic programming provides an appropriate method to characterise the uncertainty and to derive decisions while taking risk management into account. We consider the medium-term risk management problem of a UK gas-fired power plant that faces stochastic electricity and gas prices. In particular, the power plant makes daily decisions about electricity sales to and gas purchases from spot markets over a monthly

328

How a Geothermal Power Plant Works (Simple) | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Works (Simple) Most power plants-whether fueled by coal, gas, nuclear power, or geothermal energy-have one feature in common: they convert heat to electricity. Heat from...

329

Thermodynamic analysis of a low-pressure economizer based waste heat recovery system for a coal-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An LPE (low-pressure economizer) based waste heat recovery system for a CFPP (coal-fired power plant) is investigated thermodynamically. With the installation of LPE in the flue before the FGD (flue gas desulfurizer), the heat contained in the exhaust flue gas can be recovered effectively and the water consumption can be reduced in the FGD resulted from the temperature dropped flue gas. The impacts on the related apparatuses after installing LPE in a CFPP are analyzed and the internal relationships among correlated parameters are presented. The efficiencies of LPE installed in a CFPP evaluated by the first law, the second law and the thermal equilibrium efficiencies are also compared and analyzed. A detailed case study based on a 350 MW CFPP unit is presented and the variations of the thermal performance after the installation of LPE are investigated. The results show that the second law and the thermal equilibrium efficiencies are increased which can be indicators to evaluate the performance of the LPE system while the first law efficiency is decreased after installing LPE. Results also show that the saving of SCE (standard coal equivalent) is 3.85 g/(kW·h) for this CFPP unit under full load after installing LPE.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei; Shinan Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Terrafore, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing an economically feasible thermal energy storage (TES) system based on phase change materials (PCMs), for CSP plants.

331

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 614 566 532 512 575 1990's 519 545 472 490 500 496 621 785 776 833 2000's 921 785 783 598 615 603 575 528 464 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec.

332

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 231 1980's 216 230 265 285 270 260 237 241 208 213 1990's 181 208 211 253 254 272 289 286 246 226 2000's 209 226 241 207 221 226 234 271 196 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec.

333

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 248 1980's 252 260 289 292 295 269 281 277 260 260 1990's 279 273 272 278 290 287 323 347 363 422 2000's 406 378 370 287 326 309 333 327 310 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec.

334

Design and Study of Gas Calorimeter for Absolute Measurements of the Combustion Heat of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel burning calorimeter design based on a heat pipe is presented. A circuit for automated control over operation of the proposed device is considered. The stability of the results is assessed. Several acce...

Yu. I. Aleksandrov; V. P. Varganov; S. Sarge

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Theoretical study of gas heated in a porous material subjected to a concentrated solar radiation (*)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W solar furnace of Solar Energy Laboratory in Odeillo (France). Revue Phys. Appl. 15 (1980) 423-426 MARS423 Theoretical study of gas heated in a porous material subjected to a concentrated solar exposed to the solar radiation. These quantities may be expressed in any set consistent units. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

336

Defining the needs for gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared UF{sub 6} containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. In verifying declared LEU production, the inspectors also take samples for off-site destructive assay (DA) which provide accurate data, with 0.1% to 0.5% measurement uncertainty, on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, taking samples of UF{sub 6} for off-site analysis is a much more labor and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of results and interruptions to the continuity of knowledge (CofK) of the samples during their storage and transit. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems such as process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements and provide more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also introduce examples advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlowe, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Air bottoming cycle: Use of gas turbine waste heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) as well as the results of a feasibility study for using the Air Bottoming Cycle for gas turbine waste heat recovery/power generation on oil/gas platforms in the North Sea. The basis for the feasibility study was to utilize the exhaust gas heat from an LM2500PE gas turbine. Installation of the ABC on both a new and an existing platform have been considered. A design reference case is presented, and the recommended ABC is a two-shaft engine with two compressor intercoolers. The compression pressure ratio was found optimal at 8:1. The combined gas turbine and ABC shaft efficiency wa/s calculated to 46.6 percent. The LM2500PE gas turbine contributes with 36.1 percent while the ABC adds 10.5 percent points to the gas turbine efficiency. The ABC shaft power output is 6.6 MW when utilizing the waste heat of an LM2500PE gas turbine. A preliminary thermal and hydraulic design of the ABC main components (compressor, turbine, intercoolers, and recuperator) was carried out. The recuperator is the largest and heaviest component (45 tons). A weight and cost breakdown of the ABC is presented. The total weight of the ABC package was calculated to 154 metric tons, and the ABC package cost to 9.4 million US$. An economical examination for three different cases was carried out. The results show that the ABC alternative (LM2500PE + ABC) is economical, with a rather good margin, compared to the other alternatives. The conclusion is that the Air Bottoming Cycle is an economical alternative for power generation on both new platforms and on existing platforms with demand for more power.

Bolland, O.; Foerde, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Thermal Energy and Hydropower; Haande, B. [Oil Engineering Consultants, Sandvika (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Integrated flue gas treatment for simulataneous emission control and heat rate improvement - demonstration project at Ravenswood  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented for electric-utility, residual-oil fired, field demonstration testing of advanced-design, heat-recovery type, flue gas sub-coolers that incorporate sulfite-alkali-based wet scrubbing for efficient removal of volatile and semi-volatile trace elements, sub-micron solid particulate matter, SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. By innovative adaptation of wet collector system operation with methanol injection into the rear boiler cavity to convert flue-gas NO to No{sub 2}, simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} is also achieved. The focus of this integrated flue gas treatment (IFGT) technology development and demonstration-scale, continuous performance testing is an upward-gas-flow, indirectly water-cooled, condensing heat exchanger fitted with acid-proof, teflon-covered tubes and tubesheets and that provides a unique condensing (non-evaporative) wet-scrubbing mode to address air toxics control objectives of new Clean Air Act, Title III. Advantageous trace-metal condensation/nucleation/agglomeration along with substantially enhanced boiler efficiency is accomplished in the IFGT system by use of boiler makeup water as a heat sink in indirectly cooling boiler flue gas to a near-ambient-temperature, low-absolute-humidity, water-saturated state. Moreover, unique, innocuous, stack systems design encountered with conventional high-humidity, wet-scrubber operations. The mechanical design of this advanced flue-gas cooling/scrubbing equipment is based on more than ten years of commercial application of such units is downward-gas-flow design/operation for energy recovery, e.g. in preheating of makeup water, in residual-oil and natural-gas fired boiler operations.

Heaphy, J.; Carbonara, J.; Cressner, A. [Consolidated Edison Company, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant design duty cycle. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document defines the Plant Design Duty Cycle (PCDC) for the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The duty cycle is a set of events and their design number of occurrences over the life of the plant for which the MHTGR plant shall be designed to ensure that the plant meets all the top-level requirements. The duty cycle is representative of the types of events to be expected in multiple reactor module-turbine plant configurations of the MHTGR. A synopsis of each PDDC event is presented to provide an overview of the plant response and consequence. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Chan, T.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Light-induced heat and mass transfer in a single-component gas in a capillary  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical analysis is presented of light-induced heat and mass transfer in a single-component gas in a capillary tube at arbitrary Knudsen numbers. Surface and collisional mechanisms of transfer are analyzed, due to differences in accommodation coefficient and collision cross section between excited-and ground-state particles, respectively. Analytical expressions for kinetic coefficients characterizing the gas drift and heat transfer in a capillary tube are obtained in the limits of low and high Knudsen numbers. Numerical computations are performed for intermediate Knudsen numbers. Both drift and heat fluxes are determined as functions of the light beam frequency. In the case of an inhomogeneously broadened absorption line, the light-induced fluxes are found to depend not only on the sign, but also on the amount, of light beam detuning from the absorption line center frequency.

Chermyaninov, I. V., E-mail: vladimir.chernyak@usu.ru; Chernyak, V. G.; Vilisova, E. A. [Ural State University (Russian Federation)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Economics of power plant district and process heating in Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The economic feasibility of utilizing hot water from nuclear reactors to provide district heating for private residences in Richland, Washington, and space and process heating for nearby offices, part of the Hanford Reservation, and the Lamb-Weston potato processing plant is assessed. Specifically, the practicality of using hot water from the Washington Public Power Supply System's WNP-1 reactor, which is currently under construction on the Hanford Reservation, just north of the City of Richland is established. World-wide experience with district heating systems and the advantages of using these systems are described. The GEOCITY computer model used to calculate district heating costs is described and the assumptions upon which the costs are based are presented. District heating costs for the city of Richland, process heating costs for the Lamb-Weston potato processing plant, district heating costs for the Horn Rapids triangle area, and process heating costs for the 300 and 3000 areas are discussed. An economic analysis is discussed and institutional restraints are summarized. (MCW)

Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant  

SciTech Connect

Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Appendix  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Appendix Appendix The preceding report is the most comprehensive report published by the EIA on natural gas processing plants in the United States. The data in the report for the year 2008 were collected on Form EIA-757, Natural Gas Processing Survey Schedule A, which was fielded to EIA respondents in the latter part of 2008 for the first time. This survey was used to collect information on the capacity, status, and operations of natural gas processing plants and to monitor constraints of natural gas processing plants during periods of supply disruption in areas affected by an emergency, such as a hurricane. EIA received authorization to collect information on processing plants from the Office of Management and Budget in early 2008. The form consists of two parts, Schedule A and Schedule B. Schedule A is

344

Membrane Process to Sequester CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MeMbrane Process to sequester co MeMbrane Process to sequester co 2 froM Power Plant flue Gas Background Carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants are believed to contribute significantly to global warming climate change. The direct approach to address this problem is to capture the carbon dioxide in flue gas and sequester it underground. However, the high cost of separating and capturing CO 2 with conventional technologies prevents the adoption of this approach. This project investigates the technical and economic feasibility of a new membrane process to capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. Description Direct CO 2 capture from power plant flue gas has been the subject of many studies. Currently, CO 2 capture with amine absorption seems to be the leading candidate technology-although membrane processes have been suggested. The principal

345

Testing of power-generating gas-turbine plants at Russian electric power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper cites results of thermal testing of various types and designs of power-generating gas-turbine plants (GTP), which have been placed in service at electric-power stations in Russia in recent years. Therm...

G. G. Ol’khovskii; A. V. Ageev; S. V. Malakhov…

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 - No Data Reported;...

347

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants July 13, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces a collaborative project with Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International to design, build, and test a warm gas cleanup system to remove multiple contaminants from coal-derived syngas. The 50-MWe system will include technologies to remove trace elements such as mercury and arsenic, capture the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2), and extract more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from the syngas. A novel process to convert the extracted sulfur to a pure elemental sulfur product will also be tested. This project supports DOE's vision of coal power plants with near-zero

348

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States The Gulf of Mexico area, which includes the States of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, has in the past accounted for the majority of natural gas production. Processing plants are especially important in this part of the country because of the amount of NGLs in the natural gas produced and existence of numerous petro-chemical plants seeking that feedstock in this area. Consequently, the States along the Gulf of Mexico are home to the largest number of plants and the most processing capacity in the United States. Natural gas produced in this area of the country is typically rich in NGLs and requires processing before it is pipeline-quality dry natural gas. Offshore natural gas production can contain more than 4 gallons of

349

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants July 13, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces a collaborative project with Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International to design, build, and test a warm gas cleanup system to remove multiple contaminants from coal-derived syngas. The 50-MWe system will include technologies to remove trace elements such as mercury and arsenic, capture the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2), and extract more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from the syngas. A novel process to convert the extracted sulfur to a pure elemental sulfur product will also be tested. This project supports DOE's vision of coal power plants with near-zero

350

Gas turbine power plant with supersonic shock compression ramps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine engine. The engine is based on the use of a gas turbine driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. The supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdynamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by use of a lean pre-mix system, a pre-swirl compressor, and a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor to the combustion gas outlet. Use of a stationary low NOx combustor provides excellent emissions results.

Lawlor, Shawn P. (Bellevue, WA); Novaresi, Mark A. (San Diego, CA); Cornelius, Charles C. (Kirkland, WA)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

352

COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON HEATING IN RF GAS DISCHARGES: II. THE ROLE OF COLLISIONS AND NON-LINEAR EFFECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The similar problem of cyclotron heating were extensively analyzed for magnetic traps (see for example review8COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON HEATING IN RF GAS DISCHARGES: II. THE ROLE OF COLLISIONS AND NON of electrons ( ) is large (comparable with discharge slab) and collisionless heating dominates Ohmic one. Being

Kaganovich, Igor

353

The relative contribution of waste heat from power plants to global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence on global climate change, being caused primarily by rising levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, is perceived as fairly conclusive. It is generally attributed to the enhanced greenhouse effect, resulting from higher levels of trapped heat radiation by increasing atmospheric concentrations of gases such as CO2 (carbon dioxide). Much of these gases originate from power plants and fossil fuel combustion. However, the fate of vast amounts of waste heat rejected into the environment has evaded serious scholarly research. While 1 kWh electricity generation in a typical condensing coal-fired power plant emits around 1 kg of CO2, it also puts about 2 kWh energy into the environment as low grade heat. For nuclear (fission) electricity the waste heat release per kWh is somewhat higher despite much lower CO2 releases. This paper evaluates the impact of waste heat rejection combined with CO2 emissions using Finland and California as case examples. The immediate effects of waste heat release from power production and radiative forcing by CO2 are shown to be similar. However, the long-term (hundred years) global warming by CO2-caused radiative forcing is about twenty-five times stronger than the immediate effects, being responsible for around 92% of the heat-up caused by electricity production.

R. Zevenhoven; A. Beyene

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

U.S. Total Imports Natural Gas Plant Processing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Processing Area: U.S. Alabama Alabama Onshore-Alabama Alabama Offshore-Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arkansas-Arkansas California California Onshore-California California...

355

Experiments and thermal modeling on hybrid energy supply system of gas engine heat pumps and organic Rankine cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a hybrid energy supply system, which is composed of two subsystems (gas engine-driven heat pump system (GEHP) and organic Rankine cycle system (ORC)) and three major thermodynamic cycles (the vapor compression refrigeration cycle, the internal combustion gas engine cycle and ORC). In order to convert the low-grade gas engine waste heat into high-grade electricity, the ORC system is built up using R245fa, \\{R152a\\} and R123 as working fluids, and the ORC thermal model is also developed. Meanwhile, experiments of \\{GHEPs\\} in cooling mode are conducted, and several factors which influence the cooling performance are also discussed. The results indicate that the cooling capacity, gas engine energy consumption, gas engine waste heat increase with increasing of gas engine speed and decrease with decreasing of evaporator water inlet temperature. The waste heat recovered from gas engine is more than 55% of gas engine energy consumption. F6urthermore, R123 in ORC system yields the highest thermal and exergy efficiency of 11.84% and 54.24%, respectively. Although, thermal and exergy efficiency of \\{R245fa\\} is 11.42% and 52.25% lower than that of R123, its environmental performance exhibits favorable utilization for ORC using gas engine waste heat as low-grade heat source.

Huanwei Liu; Qiushu Zhou; Haibo Zhao; Peifeng Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Combined gas turbine-Rankine turbine power plant  

SciTech Connect

A combined gas turbine-Rankine cycle powerplant with improved part load efficiency is disclosed. The powerplant has a gas turbine with an organic fluid Rankine bottoming cycle which features an inter-cycle regenerator acting between the superheated vapor leaving the Rankine turbine and the compressor inlet air. The regenerator is used selectively as engine power level is reduced below maximum rated power.

Earnest, E.R.

1981-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production Zhenyu (PWT) in offshore oil & gas production processes. Different from most existing facility- or material offshore and the oil industry expects this share to grow continuously in the future. In last decade, oil

Yang, Zhenyu

358

Adding Environmental Gas Physics to the Semi-Analytic Method for Galaxy Formation: Gravitational Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of an attempt to include more detailed gas physics motivated from hydrodynamical simulations within semi-analytic models (SAM) of galaxy formation, focusing on the role that environmental effects play. The main difference to previous SAMs is that we include 'gravitational' heating of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) by the net surplus of gravitational potential energy released from gas that has been stripped from infalling satellites. Gravitational heating appears to be an efficient heating source able to prevent cooling in environments corresponding to dark matter halos more massive than $\\sim 10^{13} $M$_{\\odot}$. The energy release by gravitational heating can match that by AGN-feedback in massive galaxies and can exceed it in the most massive ones. However, there is a fundamental difference in the way the two processes operate. Gravitational heating becomes important at late times, when the peak activity of AGNs is already over, and it is very mass dependent. This mass dependency and time behaviour gives the right trend to recover down-sizing in the star-formation rate of massive galaxies. Abridged...

S. Khochfar; J. P. Ostriker

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

359

EIS-0071: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuels Gas Demonstration Plant, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a 3,155-ton-per-day capacity facility, which will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the Memphis Division of Light, Gas and Water coal gasification plant at Memphis, Tennessee.

360

Slovak Centre of Biomass Use for Energy Wood Fired Heating Plant in Slovakia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slovak Centre of Biomass Use for Energy Slovakia 1 Wood Fired Heating Plant in Slovakia Energy energy User behaviour ESCOs Biomass Education Architects and engineers Wind Other Financial institutions countries it is already implemented for several years. #12;Slovak Centre of Biomass Use for Energy Slovakia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Initiation of long, free-standing Z-discharges by CO2 laser gas heating  

SciTech Connect

High current discharge channels can neutralize both current and space charge of very intense ion beams. Therefore they are considered as an interesting alternative for the final focus and beam transport in a heavy ion beam fusion reactor. At the GSI accelerator facility, 50 cm long, stable, free-standing discharge channels with currents in excess of 40 kA in 2 to 25 mbar ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas are investigated for heavy ion beam transport studies. The discharges are initiated by a CO{sub 2} laser pulse along the channel axis before the discharge is triggered. Resonant absorption of the laser, tuned to the {nu}{sub 2} vibration of the ammonia molecule, causes strong gas heating. Subsequent expansion and rarefaction of the gas prepare the conditions for a stable discharge to fulfill the requirements for ion beam transport. This paper describes the laser-gas interaction and the discharge initiation mechanism. We report on the channel stability and evolution, measured by fast shutter and streak imaging techniques. The rarefaction of the laser heated gas is studied by means of a hydrocode simulation.

Nieman, C.; Tauschwitz, A.; Penache, D.; Neff, S.; Knobloch, R.; Birkner, R.; Presura, R.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Yu, S.S.; Sharp, W.M.

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Selection of an acid-gas removal process for an LNG plant  

SciTech Connect

Acid gas contaminants, such as, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and mercaptans, must be removed to a very low level from a feed natural gas before it is liquefied. CO{sub 2} is typically removed to a level of about 100 ppm to prevent freezing during LNG processing. Sulfur compounds are removed to levels required by the eventual consumer of the gas. Acid-gas removal processes can be broadly classified as: solvent-based, adsorption, cryogenic or physical separation. The advantages and disadvantages of these processes will be discussed along with design and operating considerations. This paper will also discuss the important considerations affecting the choice of the best acid-gas removal process for LNG plants. Some of these considerations are: the remoteness of the LNG plant from the resource; the cost of the feed gas and the economics of minimizing capital expenditures; the ultimate disposition of the acid gas; potential for energy integration; and the composition, including LPG and conditions of the feed gas. The example of the selection of the acid-gas removal process for an LNG plant.

Stone, J.B.; Jones, G.N. [Exxon Production Research, Houston, TX (United States); Denton, R.D. [Exxon Production Malaysia, Inc., Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Membrane Process to Capture CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane Process to Capture CO Membrane Process to Capture CO 2 from Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

364

Renewable Energy Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Subject Bioenergy Summary With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it is important for students to know where it comes from. This module uses a series...

365

Effects of landfill gas on subtropical woody plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An account is given of the influence of landfill gas on tree growth in the field at...Acacia confusa, Albizzia lebbek, Aporusa chinensis, Bombax malabaricum, Castanopsis fissa, Liquidambar formosana, Litsea gluti...

G. Y. S. Chan; M. H. Wong; B. A. Whitton

366

Louisiana Offshore-Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2012 2013 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 151,301 99,910 2012-2013 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 3,378 2,694 2012-2013 NGPL Production,...

367

Alabama Offshore-Alabama Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2012 2013 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 53,348 53,771 2012-2013 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 2,695 2,767 2012-2013 NGPL Production, Gaseous...

368

Exergetic analysis and evaluation of coal-fired supercritical thermal power plant and natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work has been undertaken for energetic and exergetic analysis of coal-fired supercritical thermal power plant and natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant. Comparative analysis has been conducted ...

V. Siva Reddy; S. C. Kaushik; S. K. Tyagi

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

Sullivan, John

370

Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

371

Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture  

SciTech Connect

The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a “gasification with CO{sub 2} capture” process simulator with a “combined cycle” power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTAR’s IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

None

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of...

374

Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

375

Thermodynamic evaluation of solar integration into a natural gas combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The term integrated solar combined-cycle (ISCC) has been used to define the combination of solar thermal energy into a natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC) power plant. Based on a detailed thermodynamic cycle model for a reference ISCC plant, the impact of solar addition is thoroughly evaluated for a wide range of input parameters such as solar thermal input and ambient temperature. It is shown that solar hybridization into an NGCC plant may give rise to a substantial benefit from a thermodynamic point of view. The work here also indicates that a significant solar contribution may be achieved in an ISCC plant, thus implying substantial fuel savings and environmental benefits.

Guangdong Zhu; Ty Neises; Craig Turchi; Robin Bedilion

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Flue-gas sulfur-recovery plant for a multifuel boiler  

SciTech Connect

In October 1991, a Finnish fluting mill brought on stream a flue-gas desulfurization plant with an SO{sub 2} reduction capacity of 99%. The desulfurization plant enabled the mill to discontinue the use of its sulfur burner for SO{sub 2} production. The required makeup sulfur is now obtained in the form of sulfuric acid used by the acetic acid plant, which operates in conjunction with the evaporating plant. The mill`s sulfur consumption has decreased by about 6,000 tons/year (13.2 million lb/year) because of sulfur recycling.

Miettunen, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland); Aitlahti, S. [Savon Sellu Oy, Kuopio (Finland)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Operational Performance Results of an Innovative Solar Thermal Cooling and Heating Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar thermal cooling and heating plants with single-effect sorption chillers/heat pumps promise primary energy savings compared to electric vapor compression chiller systems. Yet, the need of auxiliary electric a nd fossil energy for the operation and backup of the thermal cooling system possibly worsen the primary energy balance. An auspicious approach to overcome this problem is the application of a more efficient multi -stage sorption chiller with flexible operational modes. A pilot installation of that innovative solar thermal heating and cooling plant comprising a two stage absorption chiller/heat pump is presented. Beginning with the motivation and the system concept, a detailed analysis of the 2011/2012 cooling and heating periods is shown. The influence of the different system components – especially the absorption chiller – on the overall system performance is analyzed and a comparison to data from a detailed dynamic model is carried out. Recommendations for the improvement with respect to efficiency and economic aspects are given based on the installation process and the operational experience gained in the last 1 ½ years.

Manuel Riepl; Felix Loistl; Richard Gurtner; Martin Helm; Christian Schweigler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Electric Power Generation Using Low Bandgap TPV Cells in a Gas?fired Heating Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low bandgap TPV cells are preferred for electric power generation in TPV cogeneration systems. Recently significant progress has been made in fabrication of low bandgap semiconductor TPV devices such as InGaAsSb and InGaAs cells. However it appears that only limited data are available in the literature with respect to the performance of these TPV cells in combustion?driven TPV systems. In the research presented in this paper power generation using recently?developed InGaAsSb TPV cells has been investigated in a gas?fired space heating appliance. The combustion performance of the gas burner associated with a broadband radiator was evaluated experimentally. The radiant power density and radiant efficiency of the gas?heated radiator were determined at different degrees of exhaust heat recuperation. Heat recuperation is shown to have a certain effect on the combustion operation and radiant power output. The electric output characteristics of the InGaAsSb TPV devices were investigated under various combustion conditions. It was found that the cell short circuit density was greater than 1 A/cm2 at a radiator temperature of 930°C when an optical filter was used. An electric power density of 0.54 W/cm2 was produced at a radiator temperature of 1190°C. Furthermore modeling calculations were carried out to reveal the influence of TPV cell bandgap and radiator temperature on power output and conversion efficiency. Finally the design aspects of combustion?driven TPV systems were analyzed showing that development of a special combustion device with high conversion level of fuel chemical energy to useful radiant energy is required to improve further the system efficiency.

K. Qiu; A. C. S. Hayden

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the burnout dynamics of Kansk-Achinsk coals in the pu...

E. A. Boiko; S. V. Pachkovskii

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Heat-pipe gas-combustion system endurance test for Stirling engine. Final report, May 1990-September 1990  

SciTech Connect

Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., (STM) has been developing a general purpose Heat Pipe Gas Combustion System (HPGC) suitable for use with the STM4-120 Stirling engine. The HPGC consists of a parallel plate recuperative preheater, a finned heat pipe evaporator and a film cooled gas combustor. A principal component of the HPGC is the heat pipe evaporator which collects and distributes the liquid sodium over the heat transfer surfaces. The liquid sodium evaporates and flows to the condensers where it delivers its latent heat. The report presents test results of endurance tests run on a Gas-Fired Stirling Engine (GFSE). Tests on a dynamometer test stand yielded 67 hours of engine operation at power levels over 10 kW (13.5 hp) with 26 hours at power levels above 15 kW (20 hp). Total testing of the engine, including both motoring tests and engine operation, yielded 245 hours of engine run time.

Mahrle, P.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Rankine/Rankine cycle gas-fired heat pump. Final report Mar 79-Mar 82  

SciTech Connect

A Rankine/Rankine cycle gas-fired heat pump was developed for residential application. The system consists of two rotating elements: a high-speed turbomachine core and a low-speed assembly, which includes a rotating vapor generator and heat exchangers. Inherent in the rotation of these components is the elimination of separate pumps, fans, reversing valves, and expansion valves. One Rankine cycle, the power cycle, drives the turbine and gives up its excess heat to the service air. The second Rankine cycle, the refrigerant cycle, is pressurized by a turbine-powered centrifugal compressor. The dual-cycle system uses two organic heat transfer fluids. The power cycle uses a developmental, moderate-temperature fluid (designated Fluid B), and the refrigeration cycle uses Freon R-113. These two fluids are compatible and missible in each other. Therefore, positive seals are not required. A laboratory prototype model was developed to the point of initiating proof-of-concept demonstration. A conceptual design study of an end-product model was conducted, and a product specification for a family of heat pump systems with various performance enhancement options was generated. The maximum realizable performance end-product heat pump system has a projected overall coefficient of performance (OCOP) of 0.79 at 37,500 Btu/hr cooling and an OCOP of 1.49 at 60,000 Btu/hr heating load. This end-product model has an estimated manufacturing cost of $1460 (in 1982 dollars) and could be available as a commercial product in the early 1990s.

Enbar, E.; Moriarty, R.

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

A (S)TEM Gas Cell Holder with Localized Laser Heating for In Situ Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The advent of aberration correction for transmission electron microscopy has transformed atomic resolution imaging into a nearly routine technique for structural analysis. Now an emerging frontier in electron microscopy is the development of in situ capabilities to observe reactions at atomic resolution in real time and within realistic environments. Here we present a new in situ gas cell holder that is designed for compatibility with a wide variety of sample type (i.e., dimpled 3-mm discs, standard mesh grids, various types of focused ion beam lamellae attached to half grids). Its capabilities include localized heating and precise control of the gas pressure and composition while simultaneously allowing atomic resolution imaging at ambient pressure. The results show that 0.25-nm lattice fringes are directly visible for nanoparticles imaged at ambient pressure with gas path lengths up to 20 ?m. Additionally, we quantitatively demonstrate that while the attainable contrast and resolution decrease with increasing pressure and gas path length, resolutions better than 0.2 nm should be accessible at ambient pressure with gas path lengths less than the 15 ?m utilized for these experiments.

Mehraeen, S.; McKeown, J.; Deshmukh, Pushkarraj V.; Evans, James E.; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Xu, Pinghong; Reed, Bryan W.; Taheri, Mitra L.; Fischione, Paul E.; Browning, Nigel D.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network. Phase 2. Final report, 1 March 1980-31 January 1984  

SciTech Connect

The potential for district heating was examined in terms of a total (regional) system and two subsystems of overlapping scales. The basis of the economic analysis of district heating was that the utility's electric and gas customers would not be economically burdened by the implementation of district heating, and that any incremental costs due to district heating (e.g. district heating capital and operating costs, replacement electric power, abandonment of unamortized gas mains) would be charged to district heating customers.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Capacity Processing plants are typically clustered close to major producing areas, with a high number of plants close to the Federal Gulf of Mexico offshore and the Rocky Mountain production areas (Figure 1). In terms of both the number of plants and processing capacity, about half of these plants are concentrated in the States along the Gulf of Mexico. Gulf States have been some of the most prolific natural gas producing areas. U.S. natural gas processing capacity showed a net increase of about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009 (not including the State of Alaska), with the largest increase occurring in Texas, where processing capacity rose by more than 4 Bcf per day. In fact, increases in Texas' processing capacity accounted for 57 percent of the total lower 48 States' capacity increase

386

Performance and Costs of CO2 Capture at Gas Fired Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarises the results from a study that assesses the performance and costs of natural gas fired combined cycle power plants with CCS. Information is provided on the designs of each of the plants, their power output, efficiency, greenhouse gas intensity, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, levelised costs of electricity and costs of CO2 avoidance. Discussion and commentary on the key findings and recommendations is also included. The paper includes information on base load plant performance and costs, but part load performance and costs of operation at low annual capacity factors are also presented because operation at lower load factors may be necessary, particularly in future electricity systems that include high amounts of other low-CO2 generation plants.

Neil Smith; Geoff Miller; Indran Aandi; Richard Gadsden; John Davison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Case Study from Norway on Gas-Fired Power Plants, Carbon Sequestration, and Politics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Study from Norway on Case Study from Norway on Gas-Fired Power Plants, Carbon Sequestration, and Politics Guillaume Quiviger and Howard Herzog (hjherzog@mit.edu; +1-617-253-0688) Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Room E40-471 1 Amherst Street Cambridge, MA 02139 INTRODUCTION On Thursday March 9, 2000, Norwegian Prime Minister Kjell Magne Bondevik's minority government resigned over a disagreement with the opposition about a controversial proposal to build two gas-fired power plants. The government had been rejecting the building of the proposed plants for months. Bondevik and his coalition government wanted to hold off construction until new technology, such as carbon sequestration, allowed building more environmentally friendly plants. They argued that their position was supported by European

388

Sensitivity studies for gas release from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

Sensitivity studies have been conducted for the gas release from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) using the TOUGH2 computer code with performance measures of peak repository pressure and gas migration distance at 1000 years. The effect of formation permeabilities including impermeable halite, two-phase characteristic curves including different models and residual saturations, and other variations was studied to determine their impact on the performance of the WIPP repository. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Webb, S.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Technical and cost analyses of two different heat storage systems for residential micro-CHP plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The heat storage system represents a key component for micro-cogeneration plants since it permits to store the unused thermal energy during electricity production for a later use. Nevertheless, it also represents a consistent additional cost that has to be taken into account in order to evaluate the profitability of the micro-CHP system with respect to the separate generation. In this paper the results of a technical and of a cost analysis of two different types of thermal energy storage systems for residential micro-CHP plants are presented. Indeed, in the present work hot water thermal energy storage systems and latent heat thermal energy storage systems have been dimensioned for different micro-CHP systems producing electrical and thermal energy for two different buildings situated in Italy. For each analysed micro-CHP system an adequate thermal energy storage capacity is estimated on the basis of the operational logic and of the electric and thermal loads, and the sizing of the cylindrical tank and of the coil heat exchanger relative to both types of thermal energy storage systems is performed. Comparisons in terms of components cost between hot water thermal energy storage systems and latent heat thermal energy storage systems are performed as well.

L. Mongibello; M. Capezzuto; G. Graditi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Advanced combustion technologies for gas turbine power plants  

SciTech Connect

Objectives are to develop actuators for enhancing the mixing between gas streams, increase combustion stability, and develop hgih-temperature materials for actuators and sensors in combustors. Turbulent kinetic energy maps of an excited jet with co-flow in a cavity with a partially closed exhaust end are given with and without a longitudinal or a transverse acoustic field. Dielectric constants and piezoelectric coefficients were determined for Sr{sub 2}(Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 1-x}){sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics.

Vandsburger, U. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Roe, L.A. [Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Desu, S.B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

An economic analysis of solar hybrid steam injected gas turbine (STIG) plant for Indian conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Steam injection for power augmentation is one of the significant modifications of gas turbines that has been commercialized for natural gas-fired applications. The primary objective of this work is to demonstrate that the installation of a solar hybrid steam injected gas turbine plant (STIG) for power generation could have a lower installed cost and lower solar levelized tariff compared to the solar-only thermal power plant while producing a comparable energy output. An economic evaluation is presented for the locations Indore and Jaipur in India under constant, variable power and mixed power scenarios. The levelized tariff (LT) of solar hybrid STIG plant ranges 0.24–0.26 $/kWh, and the levelized tariff (solar only) or solar levelized tariff (SLT) of solar STIG plant ranges from 0.29 to 0.4 $/kWh in constant power (CP) and variable power (VP) scenarios. In case of mixed power (MP) scenario, the range of LT varies from 0.16 to 0.21 $/kWh for CP and VP modes basis. In this analysis, size of the solar STIG plant varies from 48 MW to 212 MW based on the steam to air ratio. The IRR and payback period varies between 12%–17% and 6.3–8 years for both CP and VP scenarios at Jaipur and Indore. Sensitivity analysis reports that the performance of the power plants depends, to a large degree, on boundary conditions such as fuel and equipment costs.

A. Immanuel Selwynraj; S. Iniyan; Guy Polonsky; L. Suganthi; Abraham Kribus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Lox breathing system with gas permeable-liquid impermeable heat exchange and delivery hose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Life support apparatus composed of: a garment (2): for completely enclosing a wearer and constructed for preventing passage of gas from the environment surrounding the garment (2); a portable receptacle (6) holding a quantity of an oxygen-containing fluid in liquid state, the fluid being in a breathable gaseous; state when at standard temperature and pressure; a fluid flow member (16) secured within the garment (2) and coupled to the receptacle (6) for conducting the fluid in liquid state from the receptacle (6) to the interior of the garment (2); and a fluid flow control device (14) connected for causing fluid to flow from the receptacle (6) to the fluid flow member (16) at a rate determined by the breathable air requirement of the wearer, wherein fluid in liquid state is conducted into the interior of the garment (2) at a rate to be vaporized and heated to a breathable temperature by body heat produced by the wearer.

Hall, Mark N. (Richland, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

LOx breathing system with gas permeable-liquid impermeable heat exchange and delivery hose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Life support apparatus is composed of: a garment for completely enclosing a wearer and constructed for preventing passage of gas from the environment surrounding the garment; a portable receptacle holding a quantity of an oxygen-containing fluid in liquid state, the fluid being in a breathable gaseous state when at standard temperature and pressure; a fluid flow member secured within the garment and coupled to the receptacle for conducting the fluid in liquid state from the receptacle to the interior of the garment; and a fluid flow control device connected for causing fluid to flow from the receptacle to the fluid flow member at a rate determined by the breathable air requirement of the wearer, wherein fluid in liquid state is conducted into the interior of the garment at a rate to be vaporized and heated to a breathable temperature by body heat produced by the wearer. 6 figs.

Hall, M.N.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEQUESTER CO2 FROM POWER PLANT FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of using a membrane process to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. During this program, MTR developed a novel membrane (Polaris™) with a CO2 permeance tenfold higher than commercial CO2-selective membranes used in natural gas treatment. The Polaris™ membrane, combined with a process design that uses a portion of combustion air as a sweep stream to generate driving force for CO2 permeation, meets DOE post-combustion CO2 capture targets. Initial studies indicate a CO2 separation and liquefaction cost of $20 - $30/ton CO2 using about 15% of the plant energy at 90% CO2 capture from a coal-fired power plant. Production of the Polaris™ CO2 capture membrane was scaled up with MTR’s commercial casting and coating equipment. Parametric tests of cross-flow and countercurrent/sweep modules prepared from this membrane confirm their near-ideal performance under expected flue gas operating conditions. Commercial-scale, 8-inch diameter modules also show stable performance in field tests treating raw natural gas. These findings suggest that membranes are a viable option for flue gas CO2 capture. The next step will be to conduct a field demonstration treating a realworld power plant flue gas stream. The first such MTR field test will capture 1 ton CO2/day at Arizona Public Service’s Cholla coal-fired power plant, as part of a new DOE NETL funded program.

Tim Merkel; Karl Amo; Richard Baker; Ramin Daniels; Bilgen Friat; Zhenjie He; Haiqing Lin; Adrian Serbanescu

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

,"Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sin_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sin_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

397

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

398

Combustion and performance of a diesel engine with preheated Jatropha curcas oil using waste heat from exhaust gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The viscosity and density of CJO (crude Jatropha oil) were reduced by heating it using the heat from exhaust gas of a diesel engine with an appropriately designed helical coil heat exchanger. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combustion characteristics of a DI (direct injection) diesel engine using PJO (preheated Jatropha oil). It exhibited a marginally higher cylinder gas pressure, rate of pressure rise and heat release rate as compared to HSD (high speed diesel) during the initial stages of combustion for all engine loadings. Ignition delay was shorter for PJO as compared to HSD. The results also indicated that BSFC (brake specific fuel consumption) and EGT (exhaust gas temperature) increased while BTE (brake thermal efficiency) decreased with PJO as compared to HSD for all engine loadings. The reductions in CO2 (carbon dioxide), HC (hydrocarbon) and \\{NOx\\} (nitrous oxide) emissions were observed for PJO along with increased CO (carbon monoxide) emission as compared to those of HSD.

Priyabrata Pradhan; Hifjur Raheman; Debasish Padhee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Numerical simulation of heat transfer performance of an air-cooled steam condenser in a thermal power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of the thermal-flow characteristics and heat transfer performance is made of an air-cooled steam condenser (ACSC) in a thermal power plant by considering the effects of ambient wind speed and...

Xiufeng Gao; Chengwei Zhang; Jinjia Wei; Bo Yu

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the main project is to identify the current developmental status of MCFC systems and address those technical issues that need to be resolved to move the technology from its current status to the demonstration stage in the shortest possible time. The specific objectives are separated into five major tasks as follows: Stack research; Power plant development; Test facilities development; Manufacturing facilities development; and Commercialization. This Final Report discusses the M-C power Corporation effort which is part of a general program for the development of commercial MCFC systems. This final report covers the entire subject of the Unocal 250-cell stack. Certain project activities have been funded by organizations other than DOE and are included in this report to provide a comprehensive overview of the work accomplished.

NONE

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

terrestrial animals and plants exchange O2 and CO2 with the atmosphere and thereby incur costs in the currency Hemphill Brown, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, and approved March 30, 2010 (received for review), the steepness of the gradients for gas and vapor, and the transport mode (convective or diffusive). Model

402

Wireless channel characterization and modeling in oil and gas refinery plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wireless channel characterization and modeling in oil and gas refinery plants Stefano Savazzi1 modeling approach is validated by experimental measurements in two oil refinery sites using industry standard ISA SP100.11a compliant commercial devices operating at 2.4GHz. I. INTRODUCTION The adoption

Savazzi, Stefano

403

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARp?) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution Benjamin Brant Sabine Brueske Donald Erickson Riyaz Papar Planetec Planetec Energy Concepts Company Energy... in Denver, Colorado. The Waste Heat Ammo nia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP?) is based on a patented process and cycle design developed by Energy Concepts Co. (ECC) to cost effectively re cover 73,000 barrels a year of salable LPGs and gasoline...

Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

405

Adaptation of a commercially available 200 kW natural gas fuel cell power plant for operation on a hydrogen rich gas stream  

SciTech Connect

International Fuel Cells (IFC) has designed a hydrogen fueled fuel cell power plant based on a modification of its standard natural gas fueled PC25{trademark} C fuel cell power plant. The natural gas fueled PC25 C is a 200 kW, fuel cell power plant that is commercially available. The program to accomplish the fuel change involved deleting the natural gas processing elements, designing a new fuel pretreatment subsystem, modifying the water and thermal management subsystem, developing a hydrogen burner to combust unconsumed hydrogen, and modifying the control system. Additionally, the required modifications to the manufacturing and assembly procedures necessary to allow the hydrogen fueled power plant to be manufactured in conjunction with the on-going production of the standard PC25 C power plants were identified. This work establishes the design and manufacturing plan for the 200 kW hydrogen fueled PC25 power plant.

Maston, V.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Arkansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,267 4,027 6,268 1970's 9,184 6,433 4,740 3,000 4,246 4,200 4,049 4,032 3,760 7,661 1980's 1,949 2,549 5,096 5,384 5,922 12,439 9,062 11,990 12,115 11,586 1990's 7,101 1,406 5,838 6,405 4,750 5,551 5,575 6,857 8,385 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

407

Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,956 1,503 2,113 1970's 633 2,115 1,978 2,435 4,193 7,240 9,150 7,585 8,325 14,123 1980's 7,594 511 5,965 4,538 8,375 9,001 13,289 17,671 16,889 16,211 1990's 19,719 13,738 12,611 12,526 13,273 27,012 27,119 24,619 27,466 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

408

West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,052 2,276 0 1970's 2,551 3,043 3,808 2,160 1,909 1,791 1,490 1,527 1,233 1,218 1980's 2,482 2,515 6,426 5,826 7,232 7,190 6,658 8,835 8,343 7,882 1990's 9,631 7,744 8,097 7,065 8,087 8,045 6,554 7,210 6,893 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

409

Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,828 1,992 2,277 1970's 2,317 2,212 1,509 1,238 1,206 1,218 1,040 1,107 1,160 1,214 1980's 989 1,040 9,772 8,361 9,038 9,095 6,335 3,254 2,942 2,345 1990's 3,149 2,432 2,812 3,262 2,773 2,647 2,426 2,457 2,325 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

410

Michigan Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,798 2,012 2,074 1970's 3,440 2,145 2,143 2,551 3,194 8,420 7,647 8,022 11,076 14,695 1980's 6,494 3,461 9,699 8,130 8,710 8,195 7,609 9,616 8,250 8,003 1990's 9,094 9,595 7,274 8,171 9,766 9,535 8,489 12,060 9,233 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

411

Montana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,904 5,188 6,183 1970's 5,091 6,148 5,924 4,281 3,683 2,315 2,754 2,972 2,792 4,796 1980's 3,425 1,832 2,012 1,970 2,069 2,138 1,808 2,088 1,994 1,766 1990's 2,262 1,680 1,871 2,379 2,243 2,238 2,401 2,277 2,000 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

412

Ohio Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,656 3,505 2,879 1970's 3,140 4,302 3,397 3,548 2,957 2,925 2,742 2,814 3,477 22,094 1980's 1,941 1,776 3,671 4,377 5,741 5,442 5,243 5,802 4,869 3,876 1990's 5,129 1,476 1,450 1,366 1,332 1,283 1,230 1,201 1,125 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

413

Renewable LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landfill Gas to LNG Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LNG LNG Update on the world's largest landfill gas to LNG plant Mike McGowan Head of Government Affairs Linde NA, Inc. June 12, 2012 $18.3 billion global sales A leading gases and engineering company Linde North America Profile $2.3 billion in gases sales revenue in North America in 2011 5,000 employees throughout the U.S., Canada and the Caribbean Supplier of compressed and cryogenic gases and technology Atmospheric gases - oxygen, nitrogen, argon Helium LNG and LPG Hydrogen Rare gases Plant engineering and supply LNG Petrochemicals Natural gas processing Atmospheric gases 3 Linde's alternative fuels portfolio Green hydrogen production - Magog, Quebec Renewable liquefied natural gas production - Altamont, CA Biogas fueling, LNG import terminal - Sweden

414

The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage for Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Historically, natural gas has been used to provide peak-load power at a relatively high cost per kilowatt-hour during the daytime intervals when electricity demands peak and cannot be supplied wholly by baseload generators. ... (1) This share is projected to grow to 47% by 2035, with natural gas accounting for 60% of new generating capacity additions between 2010 and 2035 in the Department of Energy’s reference case scenario. ... To answer this question we use the LCOE results above to generate a probabilistic difference in cost, recognizing that some parameters should have the same value for plants with and without CCS, such as the power block capital cost, natural gas price, and the plant labor rate. ...

Edward S. Rubin; Haibo Zhai

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas Liquids 74,056 76,732 74,938 79,040 82,376 81,196 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 9,772 10,464 10,689 11,270 11,542 11,167 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 64,284 66,268 64,249 67,770 70,834 70,029 1981-2013 Ethane 27,647 28,274 26,311 27,829 30,063 30,015 1981-2013 Propane 23,332 24,191 24,157 25,425 25,974 25,545 1981-2013 Normal Butane 5,876 6,383 6,543 6,399 6,508 6,893 1981-2013 Isobutane 7,429 7,420 7,238 8,117 8,289 7,576 1981-2013 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

416

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Natural Gas Liquids 650,794 652,822 697,124 757,019 808,865 881,306 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 95,899 96,530 98,904 101,155 106,284 116,002 1981-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 554,895 556,292 598,220 655,864 702,581 765,304 1981-2012 Ethane 258,682 256,713 280,590 317,180 337,972 356,592 1981-2012 Propane 185,099 187,340 199,398 213,782 230,227 260,704 1981-2012 Normal Butane 46,833 48,976 49,528 56,655 57,399 65,555 1981-2012 Isobutane 64,281 63,263 68,704 68,247 76,983 82,453 1981-2012 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

417

Influence of the heat storage size on the plant performance in a Smart User case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increasing diffusion of renewable energy sources are posing new challenges to the power grid due to their intrinsic unpredictability causing poor power quality, line congestion and unreliable and unsecure grid operations. In the future, power grid operators may require to the customers/producers a prescribed exchange profile, leading to a diffusion of storage systems or prime movers (especially small combined heat and power for distributed resources) able to balance renewable sources fluctuations. In this latter case, one of the major issue is the efficient use of the heat co-generated: the adoption of thermal storages appears to be necessary. In this paper, the energy performance of a Smart User, i.e. a dwelling with renewable energy sources, a combined cooling, heat, and power system, and heat and cooling back-up generators, is estimated by means of a purposely developed TRNSYS unsteady model. A virtual stand-alone operating condition is imposed for the analysed building as an arbitrary profile of power exchange with the grid. The balancing of renewable sources fluctuations imposes a non-negligible part of the heat from the prime mover to be wasted and a sensible consumption for auxiliary devices (i.e. the auxiliary boiler and the compression chiller). By applying a thermal storage, and increasing its capacity, the fraction of heat wasted and the supply from other devices is remarkably changed, showing different plant performance and efficiencies. The Smart User primary energy consumptions of the different configurations are compared to several options, showing appreciable differences in the performance.

Andrea Chesi; Giovanni Ferrara; Lorenzo Ferrari; Sandro Magnani; Fabio Tarani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

"1. Moss Landing Power Plant","Gas","Dynegy -Moss Landing LLC",2529  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California" California" "1. Moss Landing Power Plant","Gas","Dynegy -Moss Landing LLC",2529 "2. Diablo Canyon","Nuclear","Pacific Gas & Electric Co",2240 "3. San Onofre","Nuclear","Southern California Edison Co",2150 "4. AES Alamitos LLC","Gas","AES Alamitos LLC",1997 "5. Castaic","Pumped Storage","Los Angeles City of",1620 "6. Haynes","Gas","Los Angeles City of",1524 "7. Ormond Beach","Gas","RRI Energy Ormond Bch LLC",1516 "8. Pittsburg Power","Gas","Mirant Delta LLC",1311 "9. AES Redondo Beach LLC","Gas","AES Redondo Beach LLC",1310

419

EFFECTS ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY OF H2 PRODUCTION THROUGH PARTIAL OXYDATION OF NATURAL GAS OVER TWO GROUP VIII METAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY OF H2 PRODUCTION THROUGH PARTIAL OXYDATION OF NATURAL GAS OVER TWO with natural gas in spark ignition engines can increase for electric efficiency. In-situ H23 production for spark ignition engines fuelled by natural gas has therefore been investigated recently, and4 reformed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

420

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Btu Content The natural gas received and transported by the major intrastate and interstate mainline transmission systems must be within a specific energy (Btu) content range. Generally, the acceptable Btu content is 1,035 Btu per cubic foot, with an acceptable deviation of +/-50 Btu. However, when natural gas is extracted, its Btu content can be very different from acceptable pipeline specifications. The Btu content of natural gas extracted varies depending on the presence of water, NGLs, as well as CO2, nitrogen, helium, and others. Significant amounts of NGLs in natural gas is generally associated with higher Btu values. Consistent with this, Btu values reported by plants in Texas and other Gulf of Mexico States are comparatively high (Table 3). On

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Demonstration of an on-site PAFC cogeneration system with waste heat utilization by a new gas absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect

Analysis and cost reduction of fuel cells is being promoted to achieve commercial on-site phosphoric acid fuel cells (on-site FC). However, for such cells to be effectively utilized, a cogeneration system designed to use the heat generated must be developed at low cost. Room heating and hot-water supply are the most simple and efficient uses of the waste heat of fuel cells. However, due to the short room-heating period of about 4 months in most areas in Japan, the sites having demand for waste heat of fuel cells throughout the year will be limited to hotels and hospitals Tokyo Gas has therefore been developing an on-site FC and the technology to utilize tile waste heat of fuel cells for room cooling by means of an absorption refrigerator. The paper describes the results of fuel cell cogeneration tests conducted on a double effect gas absorption chiller heater with auxiliary waste heat recovery (WGAR) that Tokyo Gas developed in its Energy Technology Research Laboratory.

Urata, Tatsuo [Tokyo Gas Company, LTD, Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

limits potential use of waste heat for space conditioning.the attractive uses for waste heat in many circumstancesprovide electricity and use the waste heat for cleaning, the

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Evaluation of the Heat Loading from Steady, Transient, and Off-Normal Conditions in ARIES Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The heat loading on plasma facing components (PFCs) provides a critical limitation for design and operation of the first wall, divertor, and other special components. Power plants will have high power entering the scrape-off layer and transporting to the first wall and divertor. Although the design for steady heat loads is understood, the approach for transient and offnormal loading is not. The characterization of heat loads developed for ITER1 can be applied to power plants to better develop the operating space of viable solutions and point to research focus areas.

C.E. Kessel, M.S. Tillack and J. Blanchard

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Coordinated optimization of the parameters of the cooled gas-turbine flow path and the parameters of gas-turbine cycles and combined-cycle power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the coordinated solution to the optimization problem for the parameters of cycles in gas turbine and combined cycle power plants and to the optimization prob...

A. M. Kler; Yu. B. Zakharov; Yu. M. Potanina

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Optimization of waste heat recovery boiler of a combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the details of a procedure developed for optimization of a waste heat recovery boiler (WHRB) of a combined cycle power plant (CCPP) using the program for performance prediction of a typical CCPP, details of which have been presented elsewhere (Seyedan et al., 1994). In order to illustrate the procedure, the optimum design of a WHRB for a typical CCPP (employing dual-pressure bottoming cycle) built by a prominent Indian company, has been carried out. The present design of a WHRB is taken as the base design and the newer designs generated by this procedure are compared with it to assess the extent of cost reduction possible.

Seyedan, B.; Dhar, P.L.; Gaur, R.R. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bindra, G.S. [Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd., New Delhi (India)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Development of Molten-Salt Heat Trasfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"This PowerPoint presentation was originally given by Dylan Grogan, principal investigator at Abengoa Solar, during a SunShot Initiative Concentrating Solar Power program review on April 24, 2013. The project, Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants, seeks to determine whether the inorganic fluids (molten salts) offer a sufficient reduction in levelized energy costs to pursue further development, and to develop the components required for their use. The presentation focuses on presenting conclusions from Phase 1 of the program and looks ahead to review Phase 2 activities."

428

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 383,077 389,525 367,572 348,731 408,115 398,180 429,269 1990's 428,657 456,954 460,571 448,822 423,878 427,853 450,033 426,873 401,314 399,509 2000's 404,059 371,141 382,503 363,903 366,341 355,193 358,985 365,323 355,590 362,009 2010's 368,830 384,248 408,316 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

429

Alaska Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,659 2,240 6,864 1970's 4,748 8,459 16,056 15,217 14,402 17,842 15,972 17,336 15,895 12,153 1980's 30,250 15,249 94,232 97,828 111,069 64,148 72,686 116,682 153,670 192,239 1990's 193,875 223,194 234,716 237,702 238,156 292,811 295,834 271,284 281,872 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

430

New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,793 46,331 45,309 1970's 47,998 46,114 48,803 52,553 43,452 38,604 49,160 43,751 37,880 50,798 1980's 36,859 22,685 55,722 47,630 50,662 46,709 35,615 48,138 41,706 42,224 1990's 65,889 44,766 53,697 49,658 54,786 52,589 81,751 64,458 59,654 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

431

Colorado Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,668 2,361 2,604 1970's 2,726 3,231 4,676 7,202 5,822 7,673 7,739 9,124 10,619 21,610 1980's 7,041 7,093 13,673 10,000 10,560 10,829 9,397 12,095 11,622 12,221 1990's 17,343 23,883 21,169 24,832 24,347 25,130 27,492 29,585 31,074 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

432

North Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 17,133 16,163 14,691 1970's 14,067 13,990 12,773 12,462 11,483 12,008 15,998 13,697 12,218 3,950 1980's 1,017 13,759 3,514 4,100 4,563 4,710 3,974 5,194 4,014 3,388 1990's 6,939 11,583 8,462 8,256 11,306 11,342 11,603 8,572 8,309 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

433

Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 7,842 15,867 17,587 1970's 20,841 27,972 28,183 32,663 35,350 27,212 31,044 29,142 30,491 48,663 1980's 24,521 19,665 41,392 37,901 40,105 42,457 38,885 44,505 45,928 43,630 1990's 40,914 44,614 43,736 56,657 44,611 47,282 49,196 46,846 33,989 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

434

Oklahoma Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 65,167 84,259 103,361 1970's 98,417 101,126 98,784 80,233 80,780 79,728 84,025 77,631 82,046 128,475 1980's 59,934 56,785 91,465 79,230 91,707 88,185 84,200 104,415 100,926 90,225 1990's 111,567 88,366 92,978 99,869 91,039 80,846 73,039 81,412 61,543 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

435

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Alaska Alaska The State of Alaska had the third-largest processing capacity, trailing only Texas and Louisiana. While much of the natural gas processed in Alaska does not enter any transmission system and is instead re-injected into reservoirs, its processing capability is nonetheless significant. At 9.5 Bcf per day of processing capacity, the State of Alaska accounted for about 12 percent of total U.S. capacity. As of 2009, there were a total of 4 plants in the State, with the largest one reporting a capacity of 8.5 Bcf per day. Average plant size of 2.4 Bcf per day far exceeded any other State, with Illinois noting the next largest average plant size of 1.1 Bcf per day. In addition to the significant processing total capacity, plants in

436

A modeling and control approach to advanced nuclear power plants with gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Advanced nuclear power plants are currently being proposed with a number of various designs. However, there is a lack of modeling and control strategies to deal with load following operations. This research investigates a possible modeling approach and load following control strategy for gas turbine nuclear power plants in order to provide an assessment way to the concept designs. A load frequency control strategy and average temperature control mechanism are studied to get load following nuclear power plants. The suitability of the control strategies and concept designs are assessed through linear stability analysis methods. Numerical results are presented on an advanced molten salt reactor concept as an example nuclear power plant system to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed modeling and load following control strategies.

Günyaz Ablay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Processing Plant Capacity by State 1. Natural Gas Processing Plant Capacity by State Natural Gas Processing Capacity (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Number of Natural Gas Plants Average Plant Capacity (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Change Between 2004 and 2009 State 2009 Percent of U.S. Total 2009 Percent of U.S. Total 2004 2009 Capacity (Percent) Number of Plants Texas 19,740 25.5 163 33.1 95 121 24.7 -3 Louisiana 18,535 23.9 60 12.2 271 309 12.3 -1 Wyoming 7,273 9.4 37 7.5 154 197 5.1 -8 Colorado 3,791 4.9 44 8.9 49 86 81.1 1 Oklahoma 3,740 4.8 58 11.8 58 64 8.8 -1 New Mexico 3,022 3.9 24 4.9 137 126 -11.8 -1 Mississippi 2,273 2.9 4 0.8 262 568 44.6 -2 Illinois 2,102 2.7 2 0.4 1101 1,051 -4.6 0 Kansas 1,250 1.6 6 1.2 353 208 -64.6 -4 Alabama 1,248 1.6 12 2.4 87 104 -4.7 -3 Utah 1,185 1.5 12 2.4 61 99 22.2 -4 Michigan 977 1.3 10 2.0 30 98 102.2 -6 California 876 1.1 20 4.1 43 44 -15.5 -4 Arkansas 710 0.9 4 0.8 10 178

438

Quantifying Combined Heat and Power (CHP) activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In CHP plants without heat rejection facilities power, output is complementary to the recovery of heat, and all activity is cogeneration. CHP plants with heat rejection facilities can operate a mix of cogeneration and condensing activities. Quantifying the energy flows of both activities properly requires knowledge of the design power-to-heat ratios of the CHP processes (steam and gas turbines, combustion engines). The ratios may be multiple, non-linear or extend into the virtual domain of the production possibility sets of the plants. Quantifying cogeneration in CCGT plants reveals a definition conflict but consistent solutions are available.

Aviel Verbruggen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Surry Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Containment Technology Test Facility (CTTF) and the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories are used to perform scaled experiments that simulate High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) phenomena on the containment load. High-temperature, chemically reactive melt (thermite) is ejected by high-pressure steam into a scale model of a reactor cavity. Debris is entrained by the steam blowdown into a containment model where specific phenomena, such as the effect of subcompartment structures, prototypic air/steam/hydrogen atmospheres, and hydrogen generation and combustion, can be studied. Four Integral Effects Tests (IETs) have been performed with scale models of the Surry NPP to investigate DCH phenomena. The 1/61{sup th} scale Integral Effects Tests (IET-9, IET-10, and IET-11) were conducted in CTRF, which is a 1/6{sup th} scale model of the Surry reactor containment building (RCB). The 1/10{sup th} scale IET test (IET-12) was performed in the Surtsey vessel, which had been configured as a 1/10{sup th} scale Surry RCB. Scale models were constructed in each of the facilities of the Surry structures, including the reactor pressure vessel, reactor support skirt, control rod drive missile shield, biological shield wall, cavity, instrument tunnel, residual heat removal platform and heat exchangers, seal table room and seal table, operating deck, and crane wall. This report describes these experiments and gives the results.

Blanchat, T.K.; Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Evaluation of Gas, Oil and Wood Pellet Fueled Residential Heating System Emissions Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the emissions from a wide range of heating equipment burning different fuels including several liquid fuel options, utility supplied natural gas and wood pellet resources. The major effort was placed on generating a database for the mass emission rate of fine particulates (PM 2.5) for the various fuel types studied. The fine particulates or PM 2.5 (less than 2.5 microns in size) were measured using a dilution tunnel technique following the method described in US EPA CTM-039. The PM 2.5 emission results are expressed in several units for the benefit of scientists, engineers and administrators. The measurements of gaseous emissions of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} were made using a combustion analyzer based on electrochemical cells These measurements are presented for each of the residential heating systems tested. This analyzer also provides a steady state efficiency based on stack gas and temperature measurements and these values are included in the report. The gaseous results are within the ranges expected from prior emission studies with the enhancement of expanding these measurements to fuels not available to earlier researchers. Based on measured excess air levels and ultimate analysis of the fuel's chemical composition the gaseous emission results are as expected and fall within the range provided for emission factors contained in the US-EPA AP 42, Emission Factors Volume I, Fifth Edition. Since there were no unexpected findings in these gaseous measurements, the bulk of the report is centered on the emissions of fine particulates, or PM 2.5. The fine particulate (PM 2.5) results for the liquid fuel fired heating systems indicate a very strong linear relationship between the fine particulate emissions and the sulfur content of the liquid fuels being studied. This is illustrated by the plot contained in the first figure on the next page which clearly illustrates the linear relationship between the measured mass of fine particulate per unit of energy, expressed as milligrams per Mega-Joule (mg/MJ) versus the different sulfur contents of four different heating fuels. These were tested in a conventional cast iron boiler equipped with a flame retention head burner. The fuels included a typical ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with sulfur below 0.5 percent (1520 average ppm S), an ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with very high sulfur content (5780 ppm S), low sulfur heating oil (322 ppm S) and an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (11 ppm S). Three additional oil-fired heating system types were also tested with normal heating fuel, low sulfur and ultralow sulfur fuel. They included an oil-fired warm air furnace of conventional design, a high efficiency condensing warm air furnace, a condensing hydronic boiler and the conventional hydronic boiler as discussed above. The linearity in the results was observed with all of the different oil-fired equipment types (as shown in the second figure on the next page). A linear regression of the data resulted in an Rsquared value of 0.99 indicating that a very good linear relationship exits. This means that as sulfur decreases the PM 2.5 emissions are reduced in a linear manner within the sulfur content range tested. At the ultra low sulfur level (15 ppm S) the amount of PM 2.5 had been reduced dramatically to an average of 0.043 mg/MJ. Three different gas-fired heating systems were tested. These included a conventional in-shot induced draft warm air furnace, an atmospheric fired hydronic boiler and a high efficiency hydronic boiler. The particulate (PM 2.5) measured ranged from 0.011 to 0.036 mg/MJ. depending on the raw material source used in their manufacture. All three stoves tested were fueled with premium (low ash) wood pellets obtained in a single batch to provide for uniformity in the test fuel. Unlike the oil and gas fired systems, the wood pellet stoves had measurable amounts of particulates sized above the 2.5-micron size that defines fine particulates (less than 2.5 microns). The fine particulate emissions rates ranged from 22 to 30 mg/ MJ with an average value

McDonald, R.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Environmentally Acceptable Endpoints for PAHs at a Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Samples from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site in Santa Barbara, CA, were tested to evaluate the environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE) process for setting risk-based cleanup criteria. ... Several availability assays have been proposed, including chemical analyses, toxicity tests, desorption studies, and biological uptake, but there is no clear consensus on the relationship between different assays and the risks posed to human or ecological receptors (10?13). ...

Hans F. Stroo; Ron Jensen; Raymond C. Loehr; David V. Nakles; Anne Fairbrother; Cris B. Liban

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Heat loss reduction and hydrocarbon combustion in ultra-micro combustors for ultra-micro gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the development of ultra-micro combustors for Ultra-Micro Gas Turbines (UMGT), heat loss reduction and hydrocarbon fuel use are the key issues. An approach for reducing the effect of heat loss in ultra-micro combustors was proposed. The heat loss ratio (HLR), which was defined as the ratio of heat loss rate from a combustor to heat release rate in the combustor, was related to the space heating rate (SHR), and experiments using some flat-flame ultra-micro combustors with hydrogen/air premixture exhibited the relation of HLR ? SHR?0.92/? (?, characteristic length of combustor). From the viewpoint of heat loss reduction, burning at high SHR in compact ultra-micro combustors is essential for a practical UMGT combustor. As for hydrocarbon combustion, the flat-flame burning method with and without catalyst was applied to propane fuel. The flat-flame combustor, having an inner diameter of 18.5 mm, a height of 3.5 mm, and a volume of 0.806 cm3, could form a propane flame successfully in the chamber without a catalyst and achieved an extremely high SHR of 3370 MW/(MPa m3). Flame stable region was wide enough, and the combustion efficiency achieved was more than 99.4% between the equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 0.7 at m ? a = 0.06 g / s . The flat-flame combustor using a Pt-impregnated porous plate showed catalytic combustion, but did not improve the combustion characteristic. On the other hand, the flat-flame combustor using a nozzle whose surface was covered with Pt showed a combination of catalytic and gas-phase combustion with improved combustion efficiency for a wider range of equivalence ratios, due to CO oxidation in the burned gas after gas-phase combustion in the chamber.

Takashi Sakurai; Saburo Yuasa; Taku Honda; Shoko Shimotori

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Wax formation assessment of condensate in South Pars gas processing plant sea pipeline (a case study)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wax deposition from the gas condensate in South Pars gas processing plant causes a number of severe problems. These problems include: (1) deposits form on the reboiler tubes of stabilizer column and tend to reduce its duty (2) forcing periodic shut-down and removal of deposits (3) interrupting normal processing operations. An understanding of deposition, nature and propensity is necessary to mitigate the mentioned problems. In this work, the multi solid phase model is used to predict the wax precipitation from gas condensate fluid. For five different reservoir fluids, several methods were investigated to split the heavy hydrocarbon fraction into pseudo fractions. The results show that the Al-Meshari method is the most accurate one. Also, a set of consistent correlations were used to calculate the critical points, fusion properties and the acentric factor of the single carbon number groups in the extended composition. Finally the best methods for predicting the wax formation are selected and used to predict the wax formation in the sea line of South Pars gas processing plant. The modeling shows that wax precipitation starts at 293 K and 86 bar. At this pressure and temperature the pipeline is 94 km away from the wellhead.

M.R. Rahimpour; M. Davoudi; S.M. Jokar; I. Khoramdel; A. Shariati; M.R. Dehnavi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Texas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 645,058 711,720 741,902 1970's 769,500 784,773 802,112 828,139 817,194 763,107 729,946 732,428 757,853 717,462 1980's 536,766 505,322 347,846 307,717 326,662 307,759 302,266 355,765 318,922 291,977 1990's 394,605 297,233 293,845 296,423 298,253 333,548 330,547 301,800 330,228 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption

445

Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants like SO2 NOx HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan the USA Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

Andrzej G. Chmielewski; Bogdan Tyminski; Zbigniew Zimek; Andrzej Pawelec; Janusz Licki

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Louisiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 195,990 212,134 273,213 1970's 287,222 292,589 312,145 336,832 347,098 301,816 556,772 591,292 558,877 305,181 1980's 196,033 180,687 337,398 275,698 303,284 258,069 243,283 301,279 272,455 256,123 1990's 258,267 195,526 220,711 222,813 207,171 209,670 213,721 227,542 194,963 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption

447

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Processing Plant Utilization Data collected for 2009 show that the States with the highest total processing capacity are among the States with the highest average utilization rates. This is to be expected as most of the plants are located in production areas that have been prolific for many years. In fact, the five States situated along the Gulf of Mexico accounted for nearly 49 percent of total processing volume in 2009. The total utilization rate in the United States averaged 66 percent of total capacity in 2009 (Table 2). Plants in Alaska ran at 86 percent of total capacity during the year, the highest capacity utilization rate in the country. Texas had significant utilization capacity at 71 percent, for an average of 14 Bcf per day of natural gas in 2009. However, a number of

448

Helium circulator design considerations for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant  

SciTech Connect

Efforts are in progress to develop a standard modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant that is amenable to design certification and serial production. The MHTGR reference design, based on a steam cycle power conversion system, utilizes a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Flexibility in power rating is afforded by utilizing a multiplicity of the standard module. The circulator, which is an electric motor-driven helium compressor, is a key component in the primary system of the nuclear plant, since it facilitates thermal energy transfer from the reactor core to the steam generator; and, hence, to the external turbo-generator set. This paper highlights the helium circulator design considerations for the reference MHTGR plant and includes a discussion on the major features of the turbomachine concept, operational characteristics, and the technology base that exists in the U.S.

McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Helium circulator design considerations for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant  

SciTech Connect

Efforts are in progress to develop a standard modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant that is amenable to design certification and serial production. The MHTGR reference design, based on a steam cycle power conversion system, utilizes a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Flexibility in power rating is afforded by utilizing a multiplicity of the standard module. The circulator, which is an electric motor-driven helium compressor, is a key component in the primary system of the nuclear plant, since it facilitates thermal energy transfer from the reactor core to the steam generator; and, hence, to the external turbo-generator set. This paper highlights the helium circulator design considerations for the reference MHTGR plant and includes a discussion on the major features of the turbomachine concept, operational characteristics, and the technology base that exists in the US.

McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to provide a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project tool in which to collect and identify key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions are extracted from a number of sources, including NGNP Project documents such as licensing related white papers [References 1-11] and previously issued requirement documents [References 13-15]. Also included is information agreed upon by the NGNP Regulatory Affairs group's Licensing Working Group and Configuration Council. The NGNP Project approach to licensing an HTGR plant via a combined license (COL) is defined within the referenced white papers and reference [12], and is not duplicated here.

Phillip Mills

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Experimental study of heat transfer in an electric arc gas heater with vortex stabilization of the discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of an experimental investigation into heat transfer in the discharge chamber of an electric-arc gas heater are presented. For the anode...an=f(I, d), St=f(l/d, Re, N/GH0). The energy losses in the bas...

V. L. Sergeev

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Design study of a coal-fired thermionic (THX) topped power plant. Volume IV. Thermionic heat exchanger design and costing  

SciTech Connect

This volume deals with the details of how thermionic conversion works, and how it is used in a coal-fired furnace to achieve power plant efficiencies of 45%, and overall costs of 36.3 mills/kWh. A review of the fundamental technical aspects of thermionic conversion is given. The overall Thermionic Heat Exchanger (THX) design, the heat pipe design, and the interaction of the heat pipes with the furnace are presented. Also, the operational characteristics of thermionic converters are described. Details on the computer program used to perform the parametric study are given. The overall program flow is reviewed along with the specifics of how the THX subroutine designed the converter to match the conditions imposed. Also, input costs and variables effecting the THX's performance are detailed. The efficiencies of the various power plants studied are given as a function of the air preheat temperature, size of the power plant, and thermionic level of performance.

Dick, R.S.; Britt, E.J.

1980-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Award Number: DE-FE0007395 DOE Project Manager: José D. Figueroa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Heat Integrated Post- a Heat Integrated Post- combustion CO 2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant University of Kentucky Research Foundation Partnered with U.S. Department of Energy NETL Louisville Gas & Electric and Kentucky Utilities Electric Power Research Institute (with WorleyParsons) Hitachi Power Systems America Smith Management Group July 9, 2013 Goals and Objectives * Objectives 1) To demonstrate a heat-integrated post-combustion CO 2 capture system with an advanced solvent; 2) To collect information/data on material corrosion and identify appropriate materials of construction for a 550 MWe commercial-scale carbon capture plant.  To gather data on solvent degradation kinetics, water management, system dynamic control as well as other information during the long-term

454

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification - Power Plant Performance  

SciTech Connect

A technical feasibility assessment was performed for retrofitting oxy-fuel technology to an existing power plant burning low sulfur PRB fuel and high sulfur bituminous fuel. The focus of this study was on the boiler/power generation island of a subcritical steam cycle power plant. The power plant performance in air and oxy-firing modes was estimated and modifications required for oxy-firing capabilities were identified. A 460 MWe (gross) reference subcritical PC power plant was modeled. The reference air-fired plant has a boiler efficiency (PRB/Bituminous) of 86.7%/89.3% and a plant net efficiency of 35.8/36.7%. Net efficiency for oxy-fuel firing including ASU/CPU duty is 25.6%/26.6% (PRB/Bituminous). The oxy-fuel flue gas recirculation flow to the boiler is 68%/72% (PRB/bituminous) of the flue gas (average O{sub 2} in feed gas is 27.4%/26.4%v (PRB/bituminous)). Maximum increase in tube wall temperature is less than 10ºF for oxy-fuel firing. For oxy-fuel firing, ammonia injected to the SCR was shut-off and the FGD is applied to remove SOx from the recycled primary gas stream and a portion of the SOx from the secondary stream for the high sulfur bituminous coal. Based on CFD simulations it was determined that at the furnace outlet compared to air-firing, SO{sub 3}/SO{sub 2} mole ratio is about the same, NOx ppmv level is about the same for PRB-firing and 2.5 times for bituminous-firing due to shutting off the OFA, and CO mole fraction is approximately double. A conceptual level cost estimate was performed for the incremental equipment and installation cost of the oxyfuel retrofit in the boiler island and steam system. The cost of the retrofit is estimated to be approximately 81 M$ for PRB low sulfur fuel and 84 M$ for bituminous high sulfur fuel.

Andrew Seltzer; Zhen Fan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Utilization of a fuel cell power plant for the capture and conversion of gob well gas. Final report, June--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary study has been made to determine if a 200 kW fuel cell power plant operating on variable quality coalbed methane can be placed and successfully operated at the Jim Walter Resources No. 4 mine located in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The purpose of the demonstration is to investigate the effects of variable quality (50 to 98% methane) gob gas on the output and efficiency of the power plant. To date, very little detail has been provided concerning the operation of fuel cells in this environment. The fuel cell power plant will be located adjacent to the No. 4 mine thermal drying facility rated at 152 M British thermal units per hour. The dryer burns fuel at a rate of 75,000 cubic feet per day of methane and 132 tons per day of powdered coal. The fuel cell power plant will provide 700,000 British thermal units per hour of waste heat that can be utilized directly in the dryer, offsetting coal utilization by approximately 0.66 tons per day and providing an avoided cost of approximately $20 per day. The 200 kilowatt electrical power output of the unit will provide a utility cost reduction of approximately $3,296 each month. The demonstration will be completely instrumented and monitored in terms of gas input and quality, electrical power output, and British thermal unit output. Additionally, real-time power pricing schedules will be applied to optimize cost savings. 28 refs., 35 figs., 13 tabs.

Przybylic, A.R.; Haynes, C.D.; Haskew, T.A.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

HEAT TRANSFER DURING THE SHOCK-INDUCED IGNITION OF AN EXPOLSIVE GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 Stagnation Point Heat Transfer Measurements in Air atR.M. , and Kemp, N.H. , Heat Transfer from High TemperatureProceedings of the 1963 Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

Heperkan, H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Rheology and Convective Heat Transfer of Colloidal Gas Aphrons in Horizontal Minichannels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-phase convective heat transfer in microchannels: aand Newell, M. E. , 1967. Heat transfer in fully developed3 /s at 130 W. Water CGA Heat Transfer Coefficient, h (W/m 2

Tseng, H.; Pilon, L.; Warrier, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Studies Estimating the Dermal Bioavailability of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Manufactured Gas Plant Tar-Contaminated Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In vitro percutaneous absorption studies were performed with contaminated soils or organic extracts of contaminated soils collected at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. The MGP tar contaminated soils were found to contain a group of targeted polynuclear ...

Timothy A. Roy; Andrew J. Krueger; Barbara B. Taylor; David M. Mauro; Lawrence S. Goldstein

1998-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

459

Life cycle considerations of the flue gas desulphurization system at a lignite-fired power plant in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulphurization (FGD) system has been installed at the biggest lignite-fired power generation plant in Thailand to reduce the large...2...emission. In order to understand the costs and benefits, bot...

Sate Sampattagul; Seizo Kato…

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

File:BOEMRE oil.gas.plant.platform.sta.brbra.map.4.2010.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil.gas.plant.platform.sta.brbra.map.4.2010.pdf oil.gas.plant.platform.sta.brbra.map.4.2010.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Federal Leases in Pacific Ocean, near Santa Barbara Channel Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 234 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Federal Leases in Pacific Ocean, near Santa Barbara Channel Sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-04 Extent Santa Barbara Channel Countries United States UN Region Northern America States California Locations of oil and separation and treatment plants, oil separation, gas processing, and treatment plants, oil spill response vessels, platforms,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 2: Comparison of Wet and Dry Rankine Cycle Heat Rejection, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., regarding a system analysis comparing solar parabolic trough plants with wet and dry rankine cycle heat rejection.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Comparison of heat pump system and boiler plant for one-family house : Heat sources in one-family house.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this work is to look through, compare and choose the cheapest heat source for typical new Finnish one-family house. We will speak… (more)

Kaydalova, Natalia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Micro gas turbine cogeneration system with latent heat storage at the University: Part III: Temperature control schedule  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The latent heat storage system is a novel heat storage system. At the University under service conditions, it was demonstrated with a micro gas turbine (MGT) cogeneration system (CGS). Expanding the latent heat storage system into new applications is expected to save energy economically with high density energy storage and reduce exhaust emissions and reduce operational costs. This is the first demonstration of using a latent heat storage system with CGS under service condition and its characteristics are very important. In Part I, a fixed operating schedule of the system was planned and demonstrated at the University. The charge/discharge cycles of the latent heat storage system were repeated for 407 times. The energy flow test of the system shows the importance of the heat release source and total system design. In Part II, an irregular charge case of the latent heat storage system was discussed when the prime mover of the system was operated at a part load and thermal priority mode. A highly sophisticated system design that solves these problems was necessary for extending the applications of the latent heat storage system. In Part III, a temperature control schedule of the system was demonstrated during winter mornings using a new programmable logic controller (PLC). Using a fixed schedule, the MGT-CGS with latent heat storage reduced the CO2 emission when the energy utilization factor was above 50%. The temperature control schedule was considered to be better than the fixed schedule, both in terms of the operational efficiency of the overall system and CO2 reduction. The temperature control schedule was executed using an empirical formula for the temperature rise in a classroom. The restriction on the operation time by the contract with the gas supplier and the low heating capacity of the CGS affected the heating time and temperature rise. The temperature rise in the classroom was almost proportional to the integrated temperature difference across the hot water header of the heating system. On cold days, the rate of temperature rise produced by the CGS was very slow, therefore, additional heat supplied by the original boiler was used to increase the temperature rise. If larger latent heat storage systems will be developed in future, it will be expected that the temperature of the classrooms are kept more comfortable with less energy consumptions and lower CO2 emission.

Osamu Kurata; Norihiko Iki; Takayuki Matsunuma; Tetsuhiko Maeda; Satoshi Hirano; Katsuhiko Kadoguchi; Hiromi Takeuchi; Hiro Yoshida

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG preferable to grid power only when the waste heat can bethe grid electricity it displaces when the waste heat from

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Evaluation on Energy Performance of Heating Plant System Installed Energy Saving Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cooling Water in Production Area: 3.5MW (11942KBtu/h), 1unit Heat Discharge: 2.6MW (8872KBtu/h), 1unit Additional Operation with Screw Refrigeration Machine: 2.3MW (7847KBtu/h), 1unit Turbo Refrigerating Machine (1.41MW): 152m3/h (5398mf3/h), 2units... Production Area (North) Production Area (South) Water Treatment Plant 21Cells Unit (14.1MW) Turbo Refrigerating Machines (1.4MW, 2units/ 4.2MW,6units) Screw Refrigerating Machines (0.8MW, 2units) Iced-thermal Storage Tank (28.5GJ, 2units) HEX for Additional...

Song, Y.; Akashi, Y.; Kuwahara, Y.; Baba, Y.; Iribe, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Integration of biomass fast pyrolysis and precedent feedstock steam drying with a municipal combined heat and power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass fast pyrolysis (BFP) is a promising pre-treatment technology for converting biomass to transport fuel and in the future also for high-grade chemicals. BFP can be integrated with a municipal combined heat and power (CHP) plant. This paper shows the influence of BFP integration on a CHP plant's main parameters and its effect on the energetic and environmental performance of the connected district heating network. The work comprises full- and part-load operation of a CHP plant integrated with BFP and steam drying. It also evaluates different usage alternatives for the BFP products (char and oil). The results show that the integration is possible and strongly beneficial regarding energetic and environmental performance. Offering the possibility to provide lower district heating loads, the operation hours of the plant can be increased by up to 57%. The BFP products should be sold rather than applied for internal use as this increases the district heating network's primary energy efficiency the most. With this integration strategy future CHP plants can provide valuable products at high efficiency and also can help to mitigate global CO2 emissions.

Thomas Kohl; Timo P. Laukkanen; Mika P. Järvinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Modeling and co-simulation of a parabolic trough solar plant for industrial process heat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper a tri-dimensional non-linear dynamic thermohydraulic model of a parabolic trough collector was developed in the high-level acausal object-oriented language Modelica and coupled to a solar industrial process heat plant modeled in TRNSYS. The integration is performed in an innovative co-simulation environment based on the TLK interconnect software connector middleware. A discrete Monte Carlo ray-tracing model was developed in SolTrace to compute the solar radiation heterogeneous local concentration ratio in the parabolic trough collector absorber outer surface. The obtained results show that the efficiency predicted by the model agrees well with experimental data with a root mean square error of 1.2%. The dynamic performance was validated with experimental data from the Acurex solar field, located at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria, South-East Spain, and presents a good agreement. An optimization of the IST collector mass flow rate was performed based on the minimization of an energy loss cost function showing an optimal mass flow rate of 0.22 kg/s m2. A parametric analysis showed the influence on collector efficiency of several design properties, such as the absorber emittance and absorptance. Different parabolic trough solar field model structures were compared showing that, from a thermal point of view, the one-dimensional model performs close to the bi-dimensional. Co-simulations conducted on a reference industrial process heat scenario on a South European climate show an annual solar fraction of 67% for a solar plant consisting on a solar field of 1000 m2, with thermal energy storage, coupled to a continuous industrial thermal demand of 100 kW.

R. Silva; M. Pérez; A. Fernández-Garcia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Modeling reaction quench times in the waste heat boiler of a Claus plant  

SciTech Connect

At the high temperatures found in the modified Claus reaction furnace, the thermal decomposition and oxidation of H[sub 2]S yields large quantities of desirable products, gaseous hydrogen (H[sub 2]) and sulfur (S[sub 2]). However, as the temperature of the gas stream is lowered in the waste heat boiler (WHB) located downstream of the furnace, the reverse reaction occurs leading to reassociation of H[sub 2] and S[sub 2] molecules. To examine the reaction quenching capabilities of the WHB, a rigorous computer model was developed incorporating recently published intrinsic kinetic data. A sensitivity study performed with the model demonstrated that WHBs have a wide range of operation with gas mass flux in the tubes from 4 to 24 kg/(m[sup 2] [center dot] s). Most important, the model showed that is was possible to operate WHBs such that quench times could be decreased to 40 ms, which is a reduction by 60% compared to a base case scenario. Furthermore, hydrogen production could be increased by over 20% simply by reconfiguring the WHB tubes.

Nasato, L.V.; Karan, K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Behie, L.A. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Influence of solids hydrodynamics on local heat transfer from tube banks immersed in a gas fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) has generated considerable interest as an efficient low-cost and non-polluting means of burning a variety of fuels. Despite the research and developmental efforts focused on FBC for more than three decades, the current state-of-the-art remains at a distance from the point where the combustor/boiler performance can be predicted with confidence. The high heat transfer rates and small internal temperature gradients as perceived from efficient mixing have yet to be fully realized. This is due largely to the multiplicity of variables involved in a fluidized bed combustor and the complexity of its hydrodynamics. Many empirical correlations for predicting heat transfer between a gas fluidized bed and the immersed internals have been proposed. They are based mainly on gross experimental observations with minimal attention to the mechanism of heat transfer due, at least in part, to the lack of systematic data on solids motion. Much useful insight can be obtained from a simultaneous determination of the local heat transfer rates from immersed internal structures and the associated hydrodynamics of the solid particles. Accordingly, in this study, the local mean heat transfer coefficients of horizontal internals simulating tube banks were measured for several locations in the bed along with measurements of the mean solids velocity and density distributions for a range of superficial gas velocities. The experiments were conducted in a 184 mm (7.25 in.) ID air fluidized bed with a horizontal in-line internal rod bundle of 16 mm (0.625 in.) OD with pitch-to-diameter ratio of 4 over a wide range of gas velocities. The results showed that the local heat transfer rates depend strongly on the flow pattern of solids induced by the bubble motion. The data confirmed the expectation that particle convection plays a major role in the mechanisms of heat transfer from immersed internals. 15 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Moslemian, D.; Chen, M.M.; Chao, B.T.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Study of integrated metal hydrides heat pump and cascade utilization of liquefied natural gas cold energy recovery system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The traditional cold energy utilization of the liquefied natural gas system needs a higher temperature heat source to improve exergy efficiency, which barricades the application of the common low quality thermal energy. The adoption of a metal hydride heat pump system powered by low quality energy could provide the necessary high temperature heat and reduce the overall energy consumption. Thus, an LNG cold energy recovery system integrating metal hydride heat pump was proposed, and the exergy analysis method was applied to study the case. The performance of the proposed integration system was evaluated. Moreover, some key factors were also theoretically investigated about their influences on the system performance. According to the results of the analysis, some optimization directions of the integrated system were also pointed out.

Xiangyu Meng; Feifei Bai; Fusheng Yang; Zewei Bao; Zaoxiao Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Modeling and Performance Prediction of a Solar Powered Rankin Cycle/Gas Turbine Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study is dealing with the development and implementation of an integrated solar combined cycle power plant in which heat ... its energy from the waste heat of a gas turbine unit in additional to solar

Mohammed A. Elhaj; Kassim K. Matrawy…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Two-stage plasma gun based on a gas discharge with a self-heating hollow emitter  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the results of tests of a new compact two-stage bulk gas plasma gun. The plasma gun is based on a nonself-sustained gas discharge with an electron emitter based on a discharge with a self-heating hollow cathode. The operating characteristics of the plasma gun are investigated. The discharge system makes it possible to produce uniform and stable gas plasma in the dc mode with a plasma density up to 3x10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} at an operating gas pressure in the vacuum chamber of less than 2x10{sup -2} Pa. The device features high power efficiency, design simplicity, and compactness.

Vizir, A. V.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Shandrikov, M. V.; Oks, E. M. [Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

New and Existing Buildings Heating and Cooling Opportunities: Dedicated Heat Recovery Chiller  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Langfitt Langfitt U S Department of State Overseas Buildings Operations Mechanical Engineering Division *Engineers are working Harder AND Smarter *New Energy Economy *Heating Is Where The Opportunity Is  39% of total US energy goes into non-residential buildings.  Gas for heating is about 60% of energy used in a building  Gas for heating is at least 25% of total energy used in the US. Heat Generation System Heat Disposal System What's Wrong With This Picture? Keep the heat IN the system Don't run main plant equipment until necessary ! Less rejected heat Less gas consumption High Temp >160F with conventional boilers Hydronic heating... condensing style modular boilers. The entire heating system... designed for low temperature water, recommend maximum temperature of 135ºF.

475

Approach to IAEA material-balance verification at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a potential approach by which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) might verify the nuclear-material balance at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP). The strategy makes use of the attributes and variables measurement verification approach, whereby the IAEA would perform independent measurements on a randomly selected subset of the items comprising the U-235 flows and inventories at the plant. In addition, the MUF-D statistic is used as the test statistic for the detection of diversion. The paper includes descriptions of the potential verification activities, as well as calculations of: (1) attributes and variables sample sizes for the various strata, (2) standard deviations of the relevant test statistics, and (3) the detection sensitivity which the IAEA might achieve by this verification strategy at GCEP.

Gordon, D.M.; Sanborn, J.B.; Younkin, J.M.; DeVito, V.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

477

,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

478

,"Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

479

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

480

,"California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heating plant gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

482

,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

483

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sms_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sms_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:50 PM"

484

,"Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_soh_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_soh_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

485

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

486

,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sut_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sut_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

487

,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:48 PM"

488

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:54 PM"

489

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

490

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sky_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sky_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

491

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

492

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

493

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:46 PM"

494

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

495

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

496

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:51 PM"

497

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

498

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

499

,"California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

500

Renewable Energy Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol (4 Activities)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it is important for students to know where it comes from. This module uses a series of four activities to show how energy and mass are converted from one form to another. It focuses on the conversion of light energy into chemical energy via photosynthesis, then goes on to show how the chemical energy in plant sugars can be fermented to produce ethanol. Finally, the reasons for using ethanol as a fuel are discussed.