National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for heating cooling appliances

  1. Presenting a New (and Cool) Appliance Efficiency Standard | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Presenting a New (and Cool) Appliance Efficiency Standard Presenting a New (and Cool) Appliance Efficiency Standard September 29, 2010 - 5:24pm Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? The proposed appliance standard could save consumers as much as $18.6 billion over thirty years Proposed standards could save nearly 4.5 quadrillion BTUs over 30 years Secretary Chu recently

  2. Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition August 23, 2012 - 2:44pm Addthis The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of University of Maryland students -- designed and built a prototype for a wall unit air conditioner that showed more than 30 percent energy savings when tested in a lab. | Photo courtesy of Yunho Hwang, University of Maryland. The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of

  3. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Tony Bouza, U.S. Department of Energy View the Presentation PDF icon HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications HVAC, Water Heater and Appliance R&D - 2014 BTO Peer Review Research & Development Roadmap: Emerging HVAC Technologies This thermoelastic system provides a

  4. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies » HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances About the Portfolio The HVAC/Water Heating/Appliance subprogram develops cost effective, energy efficient technologies with national labs and industry partners. Technical analysis has shown that heat pumps have the technical potential to save up to 50% of the energy used by conventional HVAC technologies in residential buildings. Our focus is on the introduction of new heat pumping technologies, heat

  5. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Tony Bouza, U.S. Department of Energy View the Presentation PDF icon HVAC, Water Heating, and ...

  6. Maryland Heats Up Student Appliance Design Competition | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Maryland Heats Up Student Appliance Design Competition Maryland Heats Up Student Appliance Design Competition September 10, 2013 - 11:43am Addthis Students from the University of Maryland won the Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition for their heat pump clothes dryer prototype, which achieved a 59 percent energy savings compared to standard U.S. electric dryers. | Photo courtesy of the University of Maryland. Students from the University of Maryland won the Max Tech and Beyond Design

  7. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Publications | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Publications HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Publications October 15, 2015 Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient-Temperature Environments: R-22 and R-410A Alternatives for Mini-Split Air Conditioners This publication is a final report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High-Ambient-Temperature Evaluation Program for Low Global Warming Potential (Low-GWP) Refrigerants project. October 9, 2015 Pump and Fan Technology Characterization and R&D

  8. Stirling heat pump external heat systems: An appliance perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilakis, A.D.; Thomas, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    A major issue facing the Stirling Engine Heat Pump is system cost, and, in particular, the cost of the External Heat System (EHS). The need for high temperature at the heater head (600{degree}C to 700{degree}C) results in low combustion system efficiencies unless efficient heat recovery is employed. The balance between energy efficiency and use of costly high temperature materials is critical to design and cost optimization. Blower power consumption and NO{sub x} emissions are also important. A new approach to the design and cost optimization of the EHS system was taken by viewing the system from a natural gas-fired appliance perspective. To develop a design acceptable to gas industry requirements, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) code considerations were incorporated into the design process and material selections. A parametric engineering design and cost model was developed to perform the analysis, including the impact of design on NO{sub x} emissions. Analysis results and recommended EHS design and material choices are given.

  9. Stirling heat pump external heat systems: An appliance perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilakis, A.D. ); Thomas, J.F. )

    1992-01-01

    A major issue facing the Stirling Engine Heat Pump is system cost, and, in particular, the cost of the External Heat System (EHS). The need for high temperature at the heater head (600{degree}C to 700{degree}C) results in low combustion system efficiencies unless efficient heat recovery is employed. The balance between energy efficiency and use of costly high temperature materials is critical to design and cost optimization. Blower power consumption and NO{sub x} emissions are also important. A new approach to the design and cost optimization of the EHS system was taken by viewing the system from a natural gas-fired appliance perspective. To develop a design acceptable to gas industry requirements, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) code considerations were incorporated into the design process and material selections. A parametric engineering design and cost model was developed to perform the analysis, including the impact of design on NO{sub x} emissions. Analysis results and recommended EHS design and material choices are given.

  10. HVAC, Water Heating and Appliances Sub-Program Logic Model

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    market entry & acceptance of technologies & products Competitive & shared R&D funding focused on tech. performance by researchers in lab / field facilities Technology pathway & research reports Improve performance & cost of heat pump & water heating technologies Researchers equipped with validated solutions to develop or improve components & optimize tech. systems at reduced cost High-efficiency HVAC, water heating & appliance technologies & products are

  11. Cab Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damman, Dennis

    2005-10-31

    Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

  12. Geothermal Heat Pumps- Cooling Mode

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In summer, the fluid removes heat from the building and transfers it to the relatively cooler ground in order to cool the building.

  13. Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility 6801 Industrial Road Springfield, VA Date: October 9, 2014 Time: 10:00 am - 12:30 pm EDT Purpose: To convene representatives from stakeholder organizations in order to enhance their understanding of the characteristics of condensing natural gas heating and water heating equipment that contribute to the unique installation requirements and challenges of this equipment compared to

  14. GenSys Blue: Fuel Cell Heating Appliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GenSys Blue: Fuel Cell Heating Appliance GenSys Blue: Fuel Cell Heating Appliance Presented at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meetng, Nov. 16, 2009. PDF icon htmwg_nov09_gynsblue.pdf More Documents & Publications Minutes of the Fall 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report 2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report

  15. Appliance Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HVAC, Water Heating, Appliances R&D Appliance Projects Appliance Projects Energy Efficient Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic Precipitator Lead Performer: GE Global ...

  16. Heating & Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science & Innovation » Energy Efficiency » Homes » Heating & Cooling Heating & Cooling Heating and cooling account for about 48% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most homes. <a href="/energysaver/principles-heating-and-cooling">Learn more about the principles of heating and cooling</a>. Heating and cooling account for about 48% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for

  17. Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, John H. (Salem Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

  18. Guide to Home Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    Get the most out of your heating and cooling systems, including types, how to choose, and performing maintenance.

  19. Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, nearly half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2011, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, nearly half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy

  20. Heat and Cool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Saver » Heat and Cool Heat and Cool Programmable thermostats and apps make it easy to control the temperature of your home and save energy and money. Programmable thermostats and apps make it easy to control the temperature of your home and save energy and money. Space heating and cooling account for almost half of a home's energy use, while water heating accounts for 18%, making these some of the largest energy expenses in any home. Space Heating and Cooling A variety of technologies

  1. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pendergrass, Joseph C. (Gainesville, GA)

    1997-01-01

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

  2. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pendergrass, J.C.

    1997-05-13

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

  3. Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling July 27, 2014 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat...

  4. Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows,

  5. Heat and Cool | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    apps make it easy to control the temperature of your home and save energy and money. Space heating and cooling account for almost half of a home's energy use, while water...

  6. Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed Cooling/Heating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient HVAC System for Distributed CoolingHeating with Thermoelectric Devices Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed CoolingHeating with Thermoelectric Devices 2012 DOE...

  7. Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems - Fact Sheet, 2015 Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power ...

  8. Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomlinson, John J; Christian, Jeff; Gehl, Anthony C

    2012-09-01

    Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the dump valve on these two appliances would have eliminated uncertainty in knowing when waste water was flowing and the recovery system operated. The study also suggested that capture of dryer exhaust heat to heat incoming air to the dryer should be examined as an alternative to using drying exhaust energy for water heating. The study found that over a 6-week test period, the system in each house was able to recover on average approximately 3000 W-h of waste heat daily from these appliance and showers with slightly less on simulated weekdays and slightly more on simulated weekends which were heavy wash/dry days. Most of these energy savings were due to the shower/GFX operation, and the least savings were for the dishwasher/GFX operation. Overall, the value of the 3000 W-h of displaced energy would have been $0.27/day based on an electricity price of $.09/kWh. Although small for today s convention house, these savings are significant for a home designed to approach maximum affordable efficiency where daily operating costs for the whole house are less than a dollar per day. In 2010 the actual measured cost of energy in one of the simulated occupancy houses which waste heat recovery testing was undertaken was $0.77/day.

  9. 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating March 26, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo...

  10. Space Heating and Cooling Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Space Heating and Cooling Basics Space Heating and Cooling Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:04pm Addthis A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling homes and other buildings. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have certain supporting equipment in common, such as thermostats and ducts, which provide opportunities for saving energy. Learn how these technologies and systems work. Learn about: Cooling Systems Heating Systems Heat Pump Systems Supporting Equipment for

  11. Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumpsand Ground Source Water Loops Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and...

  12. Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs...

  13. Jones-Onslow EMC- Residential Heating and Cooling Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jones-Onslow Electric Membership Corporation offers rebates to residential members who install energy efficient heating and cooling equipment. Members can replace an existing central AC or heat...

  14. Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jardine, D.M.

    1983-03-22

    This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle. 18 figs.

  15. Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jardine, Douglas M. (Colorado Springs, CO)

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle.

  16. Cooling, heating, and power for industry: A market assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-08-01

    The focus of this study was to assess the market for cooling, heating, and power applications in the industrial sector.

  17. Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/activesteve/5259747234/">Flickr user ActiveSteve</a>. Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Use the following links to get product information and locate professional services for space

  18. Principles of Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Principles of Heating and Cooling Principles of Heating and Cooling To heat and cool your house efficiently, it is important to know how heat transfers to and from objects. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kryzanek. To heat and cool your house efficiently, it is important to know how heat transfers to and from objects. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kryzanek. Understanding how heat is transferred from the outdoors into your home and from your home to your body is important for

  19. Retrospective Evaluation of Appliance Price Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Larry; Antinori, Camille; McNeil, Michael; McMahon, James E.; Fujita, K. Sydny

    2008-07-20

    Real prices of major appliances (refrigerators, dishwashers, heating and cooling equipment) have been falling since the late 1970s despite increases in appliance efficiency and other quality variables. This paper demonstrates that historic increases in efficiency over time, including those resulting from minimum efficiency standards, incur smaller price increases than were expected by Department of Energy (DOE) forecasts made in conjunction with standards. This effect can be explained by technological innovation, which lowers the cost of efficiency, and by market changes contributing to lower markups and economies of scale in production of higher efficiency units. We reach four principal conclusions about appliance trends and retail price setting: 1. For the past several decades, the retail price of appliances has been steadily falling while efficiency has been increasing. 2. Past retail price predictions made by DOE analyses of efficiency standards, assuming constant prices over time, have tended to overestimate retail prices. 3. The average incremental price to increase appliance efficiency has declined over time. DOE technical support documents have typically overestimated this incremental price and retail prices. 4. Changes in retail markups and economies of scale in production of more efficient appliances may have contributed to declines in prices of efficient appliances.

  20. Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Categories | Department of Energy Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product

  1. Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

    2006-10-31

    A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

  2. Solar heating and cooling diode module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maloney, Timothy J. (Winchester, VA)

    1986-01-01

    A high efficiency solar heating system comprising a plurality of hollow modular units each for receiving a thermal storage mass, the units being arranged in stacked relation in the exterior frame of a building, each of the units including a port for filling the unit with the mass, a collector region and a storage region, each region having inner and outer walls, the outer wall of the collector region being oriented for exposure to sunlight for heating the thermal storage mass; the storage region having an opening therein and the collector region having a corresponding opening, the openings being joined for communicating the thermal storage mass between the storage and collector regions by thermosiphoning; the collector region being disposed substantially below and in parallel relation to the storage region in the modular unit; and the inner wall of the collector region of each successive modular unit in the stacked relation extending over the outer wall of the storage region of the next lower modular unit in the stacked relation for reducing heat loss from the system. Various modifications and alternatives are disclosed for both heating and cooling applications.

  3. Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting August 14, 2013 - 1:39pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's efforts to reduce energy bills for American families and businesses and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the Energy Department today announced 12 projects to develop innovative heating, cooling and insulation technologies as well

  4. Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed Cooling/Heating with

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Devices | Department of Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed Cooling/Heating with Thermoelectric Devices Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed Cooling/Heating with Thermoelectric Devices 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace048_bozeman_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating

  5. Covered Product Category: Light Commercial Heating and Cooling | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Commercial Heating and Cooling Covered Product Category: Light Commercial Heating and Cooling Federal purchases of light commercial heating and cooling equipment must be ENERGY STAR-qualified. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. This product overview explains how to meet energy-efficiency requirements for Federal purchases of light commercial

  6. Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting August 14, 2013 - 1:39pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's efforts to reduce energy bills for American families and businesses and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the Energy Department today announced 12 projects to develop innovative heating, cooling and insulation technologies as well as open source

  7. Cooling, Heating and Power in the Nation's Colleges and Universities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This 2002 study presents data on cooling, heating, and power in the collegeuniversity ... Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use in Campus District Energy Systems, May 2005

  8. Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... with Cooling ......",58474,56361,49482,58474,42420,57936,50055 "Buildings with Water Heating .",56115,54204,48070,52589,38844,55586,48125 "Buildings with Cooking ...

  9. Property:Distributed Generation System Heating-Cooling Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "Distributed Generation System Heating-Cooling Application" Showing 21 pages using this property. D Distributed...

  10. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Industry: A Market Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry: A Market Assessment, August 2003 Cooling, Heating, and Power for Industry: A Market Assessment, August 2003 Industrial applications of CHP have been around for decades,...

  11. Principles of Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    To heat and cool your house efficiently, it is important to know how heat transfers to and from objects. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kryzanek. To heat and cool your house efficiently, it is important to know how heat transfers to and from objects. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kryzanek. Understanding how heat is transferred from the outdoors into your home and from your home to your body is important for understanding the challenge of keeping your house cool. Understanding the

  12. Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:28pm Addthis Thermostats and ducts provide opportunities for saving energy. Dehumidifying heat pipes provide a way to help central air conditioners and heat pumps dehumidify air. Electric and gas meters allow users to track energy use. Thermostats Programmable thermostats can store and repeat multiple daily settings. Users can adjust the times heating or air-conditioning is activated

  13. The impact of summer heat islands on cooling energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Huang, J.; Martien, P.; Rainer, L.; Rosenfeld, A.; Taha, H.

    1988-08-01

    It has been well documented that summer heat islands increase the demand for air conditioning. Several studies have suggested developing guidelines to mitigate this negative effect, on both micro- and meso-scales. Reducing summer heat islands saves cooling energy, reduces peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} from electric power plants. This paper summarizes some of the efforts to quantify the effects of techniques to reduce heat islands. In particular, the authors summarize simulations they have made on the effects of plating trees and switching to light colored surfaces in cities. The results indicate that these techniques effectively reduce building cooling loads and peak power in selected US cities, and are the cheapest way to save energy and reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. This paper compares the economics of technologies to mitigate summer heat islands with other types of conservation measures. The authors estimate the cost of energy conserved by planting trees and recoating surfaces on a national level and compare it with the cost of energy conserved by increasing efficiencies in electrical appliances and cars. Early results indicate that the cost of energy saved by controlling heat islands is less than 1{cents}/kWh, more attractive than efficient electric appliances ({approximately} 2{cents}/kWh), and far more attractive than new electric supplies ({approximately}10{cents}/kWh). In transportation, the cost of conserving a gallon of gasoline, though far more attractive than buying gasoline at current prices, is again more expensive than controlling heat islands. By accounting for the carbon content of the fuels used for power generation and transportation, the authors restate these comparisons in terms of cents per avoided pound of carbon emitted as CO{sub 2}. The results show that the cost of avoided CO{sub 2} from planting trees/increasing albedo is about 0.3--1.3{cents}/lb. of carbon; for buying efficient electric appliances, 2.5{cents}/lb. of carbon; and for efficient cars, 10{cents}/lb. of carbon.

  14. Alternative cooling resource for removing the residual heat of reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, C. Y.; Choi, K. Y. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 260 Naa-ri Yangnam-myeon Gyeongju-si, Gyeonasangbuk-do, 780-815 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The Recirculated Cooling Water (RCW) system of a Candu reactor is a closed cooling system which delivers demineralized water to coolers and components in the Service Building, the Reactor Building, and the Turbine Building and the recirculated cooling water is designed to be cooled by the Raw Service Water (RSW). During the period of scheduled outage, the RCW system provides cooling water to the heat exchangers of the Shutdown Cooling System (SDCS) in order to remove the residual heat of the reactor, so the RCW heat exchangers have to operate at all times. This makes it very hard to replace the inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers because the replacement work requires the isolation of the RCW. A task force was formed to prepare a plan to substitute the recirculated water with the chilled water system in order to cool the SDCS heat exchangers. A verification test conducted in 2007 proved that alternative cooling was possible for the removal of the residual heat of the reactor and in 2008 the replacement of inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers for both Wolsong unit 3 and 4 were successfully completed. (authors)

  15. Cooling, Heating and Power in the Nation's Colleges and Universities -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Census, Survey, and Lessons Learned, February 2002 | Department of Energy Heating and Power in the Nation's Colleges and Universities - Census, Survey, and Lessons Learned, February 2002 Cooling, Heating and Power in the Nation's Colleges and Universities - Census, Survey, and Lessons Learned, February 2002 This 2002 study presents data on cooling, heating, and power in the college/university sector including technologies, size of systems, locations, and plans for growth. The data will

  16. Heating and Cooling with Mini Splits in the Northeast

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    buildingscience.com Heating and Cooling with Mini Splits in the Northeast Kohta Ueno October 23, 2014 2014 BA Webinar Mini Splits in Northeast 2 © buildingscience.com Background 2014 BA Webinar Mini Splits in Northeast 3 © buildingscience.com Overview  Transformations, Inc. currently building net-zero homes in Massachusetts  Mini split heat pumps (MSHPs) part of builder's strategy: tradeoff package  Single point of heating/ cooling on each floor  BA study of temperatures throughout

  17. Heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts receives heat from a heat source. The acoustic cooling engine comprises an elongated resonant pressure vessel having first and second ends. A compressible fluid having a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave is contained in the resonant pressure vessel. The heat source supplies heat to the first end of the vessel. A first heat exchanger in the vessel is spaced-apart from the first end and receives heat from the first end. A first thermodynamic element is adjacent to the first heat exchanger and converts some of the heat transmitted by the first heat exchanger into acoustic power. A second thermodynamic element has a first end located spaced-apart from the first thermodynamic element and a second end farther away from the first thermodynamic element than is its first end. The first end of the second thermodynamic element heats while its second end cools as a consequence of the acoustic power. A second heat exchanger is adjacent to and between the first and second thermodynamic elements. A heat sink outside of the vessel is thermally coupled to and receives heat from the second heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one-fourth wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir.

  18. Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    This document provides an overview of the NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebook for Heating and Cooling with information directing people to the Web site for more in-depth information.

  19. Geothermal Heating and Cooling Systems Featured on NBC Nightly News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NBC Nightly News recently featured a story on geothermal heating and cooling systems that are providing 30%-70% energy and cost savings for homeowners in Jordan, New York.

  20. Heat pipe radiation cooling evaluation: Task 2 concept studies report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverstein, C.C.

    1991-10-01

    This report presents the result of Task 2, Concept Studies for Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC), which was performed for Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract 9-XT1-U9567. Studies under a prior contract defined a reference HPRC conceptual design for hypersonic aircraft engines operating at Mach 5 and an altitude of 80,000 ft. Task 2 involves the further investigation of heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) systems for additional design and operating conditions.

  1. Covered Product Category: Light Commercial Heating and Cooling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal purchases of light commercial heating and cooling equipment must be ENERGY STAR®–qualified. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. This product overview explains how to meet energy-efficiency requirements for Federal purchases of light commercial heating and cooling equipment and how to maximize energy savings throughout products' useful lives.

  2. Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    available to heat our homes, nearly half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2011, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type...

  3. Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to heat our homes, nearly half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2011, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type...

  4. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings- Benefits Analysis, April 2002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An analysis of the benefits of cooling, heating, and power (CHP) technologies in commercial buildings

  5. Urban Heat Islands: Cool Roof Infrastructure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cool Roof Infrastructure Urban Heat Islands: Cool Roof Infrastructure Lead Performer: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center Project Partners: -- Guangdong Provincial Academy of Building Research - Guangdong, China -- Chongqing University - Chongqing, China -- Research Institute of Standards and Norms - China -- Chinese Academy of Sciences - Beijing, China DOE Funding: $795,000 Project Term: Jan. 2011 - Dec. 2015 Project Objective The U.S.-China Clean

  6. Method and apparatus for heat extraction by controlled spray cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Christopher Francis (5492 Lenore Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Meeks, Ellen (304 Daisyfield Dr., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Kee, Robert (864 Lucille St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); McCarty, Kevin (304 Daisyfield Dr., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

    1999-01-01

    Two solutions to the problem of cooling a high temperature, high heat flux surface using controlled spray cooling are presented for use on a mandrel. In the first embodiment, spray cooling is used to provide a varying isothermal boundary layer on the side portions of a mandrel by providing that the spray can be moved axially along the mandrel. In the second embodiment, a spray of coolant is directed to the lower temperature surface of the mandrel. By taking advantage of super-Leidenfrost cooling, the temperature of the high temperature surface of the mandrel can be controlled by varying the mass flux rate of coolant droplets. The invention has particular applicability to the field of diamond synthesis using chemical vapor deposition techniques.

  7. Geothermal district heating and cooling in Vicenza, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, P.

    1995-06-01

    The discovery of a large low-enthalpy geothermal water reservoir under the city of Vicenza (110,000 people) in northern Italy, through an oil prospecting venture, opened up the opportunity to install a district heating system with low energy consumption. Although the geothermal water is at 67{degrees}C, this is insufficient for heating the city`s commercial and residential buildings using their existing high-temperature heat distribution systems. Heat pumps are, therefore, used to obtain optimum useful heat energy from the geothermal source. Experience so far suggests that the system can reduce energy consumption by up to 60%, or 3885 MWh/year. The 2000 m deep well was completed in 1983 and is the first such well in Italy to be located within an urban area, making it ideal as a heat source for a district heating system. It produces 100 m{sup 3}/h of low salt-content water. The {open_quotes}Vicenza{close_quotes} geothermal heating and cooling project was developed by {open_quotes}Aziende Industriali Muncipalizzate{close_quotes} from 1988 to 1991, a utility company owned by the city of Vicenza, with the purpose of distributing approximately 40,000 MWh year to residential and commercial buildings. The project includes the installation of a power plant, and a district heating and cooling network. A reduction in the consumption of conventional fuels both for heating and domestic water has been achieved through a highly-efficient thermodynamic system based on reversible heat pumps. The system provides heating in the winter and air conditioning in summer.

  8. Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josh A. Salmond

    2009-08-07

    The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

  9. Predicts the Steady-State Heating and Cooling Performance of Electric Heat Pump

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-01-13

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a leader in the development of analytical tools for the design of electrically driven, air-to-air heat pumps. Foremost among these tools is the ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, which can be used to predict the steady-state heating and cooling performance of an electrically driven, air-source heat pump. This version is three to five times faster than the earlier version, easier to use and more versatile.

  10. A fundamentally new approach to air-cooled heat exchangers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    We describe breakthrough results obtained in a feasibility study of a fundamentally new architecture for air-cooled heat exchangers. A longstanding but largely unrealized opportunity in energy efficiency concerns the performance of air-cooled heat exchangers used in air conditioners, heat pumps, and refrigeration equipment. In the case of residential air conditioners, for example, the typical performance of the air cooled heat exchangers used for condensers and evaporators is at best marginal from the standpoint the of achieving maximum the possible coefficient of performance (COP). If by some means it were possible to reduce the thermal resistance of these heat exchangers to a negligible level, a typical energy savings of order 30% could be immediately realized. It has long been known that a several-fold increase in heat exchanger size, in conjunction with the use of much higher volumetric flow rates, provides a straight-forward path to this goal but is not practical from the standpoint of real world applications. The tension in the market place between the need for energy efficiency and logistical considerations such as equipment size, cost and operating noise has resulted in a compromise that is far from ideal. This is the reason that a typical residential air conditioner exhibits significant sensitivity to reductions in fan speed and/or fouling of the heat exchanger surface. The prevailing wisdom is that little can be done to improve this situation; the 'fan-plus-finned-heat-sink' heat exchanger architecture used throughout the energy sector represents an extremely mature technology for which there is little opportunity for further optimization. But the fact remains that conventional fan-plus-finned-heat-sink technology simply doesn't work that well. Their primary physical limitation to performance (i.e. low thermal resistance) is the boundary layer of motionless air that adheres to and envelops all surfaces of the heat exchanger. Within this boundary layer region, diffusive transport is the dominant mechanism for heat transfer. The resulting thermal bottleneck largely determines the thermal resistance of the heat exchanger. No one has yet devised a practical solution to the boundary layer problem. Another longstanding problem is inevitable fouling of the heat exchanger surface over time by particulate matter and other airborne contaminants. This problem is especially important in residential air conditioner systems where often little or no preventative maintenance is practiced. The heat sink fouling problem also remains unsolved. The third major problem (alluded to earlier) concerns inadequate airflow to heat exchanger resulting from restrictions on fan noise. The air-cooled heat exchanger described here solves all of the above three problems simultaneously. The 'Air Bearing Heat Exchanger' provides a several-fold reduction in boundary layer thickness, intrinsic immunity to heat sink fouling, and drastic reductions in noise. It is also very practical from the standpoint of cost, complexity, ruggedness, etc. Successful development of this technology is also expected to have far reaching impact in the IT sector from the standpointpoint of solving the 'Thermal Brick Wall' problem (which currently limits CPU clocks speeds to {approx}3 GHz), and increasing concern about the the electrical power consumption of our nation's information technology infrastructure.

  11. THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS R. K. Hadlock 0 . B. Abbey Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories Prepared for U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission b + NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, nor

  12. BETTER DUCT SYSTEMS FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS,J.

    2001-01-01

    This is a series of six guides intended to provide a working knowledge of residential heating and cooling duct systems, an understanding of the major issues concerning efficiency, comfort, health, and safety, and practical tips on installation and repair of duct systems. These guides are intended for use by contractors, system designers, advanced technicians, and other HVAC professionals. The first two guides are also intended to be accessible to the general reader.

  13. Strategy Guideline. Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, Arlan

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  14. Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  15. Enhanced heat transfer surface for cast-in-bump-covered cooling surfaces and methods of enhancing heat transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiu, Rong-Shi Paul (Glenmont, NY); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT); Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR)

    2002-01-01

    An annular turbine shroud separates a hot gas path from a cooling plenum containing a cooling medium. Bumps are cast in the surface on the cooling side of the shroud. A surface coating overlies the cooling side surface of the shroud, including the bumps, and contains cooling enhancement material. The surface area ratio of the cooling side of the shroud with the bumps and coating is in excess of a surface area ratio of the cooling side surface with bumps without the coating to afford increased heat transfer across the element relative to the heat transfer across the element without the coating.

  16. Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.J.; Wang, X.L.; Brueck, H.D.; /DESY

    2011-06-10

    Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world; however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal intercepts. The model is validated by comparing the numerical model results to ideal cases where analytical equations are valid. In addition, the XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) prototype current leads are modeled and compared to the experimental results from testing at DESY's XFEL Magnet Test Stand (XMTS) and Cryomodule Test Bench (CMTB).

  17. Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1981-09-01

    Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

  18. 1992 National census for district heating, cooling and cogeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    District energy systems are a major part of the energy use and delivery infrastructure of the United States. With nearly 6,000 operating systems currently in place, district energy represents approximately 800 billion BTU per hour of installed thermal production capacity, and provides over 1.1 quadrillion BTU of energy annually -- about 1.3% of all energy used in the US each year. Delivered through more that 20,000 miles of pipe, this energy is used to heat and cool almost 12 billion square feet of enclosed space in buildings that serve a diverse range of office, education, health care, military, industrial and residential needs. This Census is intended to provide a better understanding of the character and extent of district heating, cooling and cogeneration in the United States. It defines a district energy system as: Any system that provides thermal energy (steam, hot water, or chilled water) for space heating, space cooling, or process uses from a central plant, and that distributes the energy to two or more buildings through a network of pipes. If electricity is produced, the system is a cogenerating facility. The Census was conducted through surveys administered to the memberships of eleven national associations and agencies that collectively represent the great majority of the nation`s district energy system operators. Responses received from these surveys account for about 11% of all district systems in the United States. Data in this report is organized and presented within six user sectors selected to illustrate the significance of district energy in institutional, community and utility settings. Projections estimate the full extent of district energy systems in each sector.

  19. Earth-sheltered compromise home saves on heating, cooling costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankhauser, T.

    1985-02-01

    Building a home into the side of a hill to take advantage of the earth's temperature-neutralizing qualities and facing it to the south will reduce heating and cooling costs. A home in North Dakota based on these principles has never had two unheated rooms freeze and needs no air conditioning. Mutli-zoned thermostats are located in the south-facing rooms. Other features are a five-foot overhang, lower ceilings, aluminum foil deflectors beneath carpets and above the plasterboard in the ceiling, and extra insulation. By eliminating an earth covering that would require sturdier support, construction costs were competitive with regular frame construction.

  20. Solar Heating & Cooling: Energy for a Secure Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, more than 30,000 solar heating and cooling systems (SHC) are being installed annually in the United States, employing more than 5,000 American workers from coast to coast. These numbers are good – but they can be a lot better. Installing more SHC systems would provide a huge boost to the economy and help the environment, too. This first-of-its-kind SHC roadmap, developed by a task force made up of SEIA-member companies and BEAM Engineering, lays the groundwork – as well as makes a compelling case – for driving installed SHC capacity from 9 GW thermal to 300 GW thermal by 2050.

  1. Heating and cooling gas-gun targets: nuts and bolts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Richard L; Bartram, Brian D; Gehr, Russell J; Bucholtz, Scott M

    2009-01-01

    The nuts and bolts of a system used to heat and cool gas-gun targets is described. We have now used the system for more than 35 experiments, all of which have used electromagnetic gauging. Features of the system include a cover which is removed (remotely) just prior to projectile impact and the widespread use of metal/polymer insulations. Both the cover and insulation were required to obtain uniform temperatures in samples with low thermal conductivity. The use of inexpensive video cameras to make remote observations of the cover removal was found to be very useful. A brief catalog of useful glue, adhesive tape, insulation, and seal materials is given.

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Main Commercial Primary Energy Use of Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995 Heating Equipment | Cooling Equipment Packaged Heating Units 25% | Packaged Air Conditioning Units 54% Boilers 21% | Room Air Conditioning 5% Individual Space Heaters 2% | PTAC (2) 3% Furnaces 20% | Centrifugal Chillers 14% Heat Pumps 5% | Reciprocating Chillers 12% District Heat 7% | Rotary Screw Chillers 3% Unit Heater 18% | Absorption Chillers 2% PTHP & WLHP (1) 2% | Heat Pumps 7% 100% | 100% Note(s):

  3. Fluid-cooled heat sink with improved fin areas and efficiencies for use in cooling various devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan; Bennion, Kevin; Kelly, Kenneth; Narumanchi, Sreekant

    2015-04-21

    The disclosure provides a fluid-cooled heat sink having a heat transfer base and a plurality of heat transfer fins in thermal communication with the heat transfer base, where the heat transfer base and the heat transfer fins form a central fluid channel through which a forced or free cooling fluid may flow. The heat transfer pins are arranged around the central fluid channel with a flow space provided between adjacent pins, allowing for some portion of the central fluid channel flow to divert through the flow space. The arrangement reduces the pressure drop of the flow through the fins, optimizes average heat transfer coefficients, reduces contact and fin-pin resistances, and reduces the physical footprint of the heat sink in an operating environment.

  4. Radiant heating and cooling, displacement ventilation with heat recovery and storm water cooling: An environmentally responsible HVAC system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, S.C.; Kokko, J.P.

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes the design, operation, and performance of an HVAC system installed as part of a project to demonstrate energy efficiency and environmental responsibility in commercial buildings. The systems installed in the 2180 m{sup 2} office building provide superior air quality and thermal comfort while requiring only half the electrical energy of conventional systems primarily because of the hydronic heating and cooling system. Gas use for the building is higher than expected because of longer operating hours and poor performance of the boiler/absorption chiller.

  5. State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 2 - Program...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program Design Lessons Learned HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Presentation...

  6. GE Appliance Park Louisville, KY Plant Wide Assessment Final Report October 25th, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandon Rao; Richard Urschel

    2007-10-25

    Used a team of experts to analyze and model major systems at a large industrial appliance manufacturer. During the data gathering stage, the team specifically looked for baselining the efficiency of the systems as well as developing short term and longer term efficiency projects. Electrical distribution, Compressed air generation and thermal heat recovery for the production facility and front office heating and cooling optimization were all baselined during the study.

  7. Counter flow cooling drier with integrated heat recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shivvers, Steve D. (Prole, IA)

    2009-08-18

    A drier apparatus for removing water or other liquids from various materials includes a mixer, drying chamber, separator and regenerator and a method for use of the apparatus. The material to be dried is mixed with a heated media to form a mixture which then passes through the chamber. While passing through the chamber, a comparatively cool fluid is passed counter current through the mixture so that the mixture becomes cooler and drier and the fluid becomes hotter and more saturated with moisture. The mixture is then separated into drier material and media. The media is transferred to the regenerator and heated therein by the hot fluid from the chamber and supplemental heat is supplied to bring the media to a preselected temperature for mixing with the incoming material to be dried. In a closed loop embodiment of the apparatus, the fluid is also recycled from the regenerator to the chamber and a chiller is utilized to reduce the temperature of the fluid to a preselected temperature and dew point temperature.

  8. FLUID-COOLED HEAT SINK WITH IMPROVED FIN AREAS AND EFFICENCIES FOR USE IN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COOLING VARIOUS DEVICES - Energy Innovation Portal Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Find More Like This Return to Search FLUID-COOLED HEAT SINK WITH IMPROVED FIN AREAS AND EFFICENCIES FOR USE IN COOLING VARIOUS DEVICES DOE Grant Recipients National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact GRANT About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary A heat transfer device utilizing a central fluid channel to service multiple heat

  9. BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (Phase I) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (Phase I) BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (Phase I) Project objectives: Create a campus geothermal heating and cooling system; Validate the cost savings associated with a geothermal system; Reduce emissions of CO2, CO, PM, SO2, NOx. PDF icon gshp_lowe_ball_state.pdf More Documents & Publications Retrofit of the Local 150 of International Union of Operating Engineers Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment Klamath

  10. Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The emergence of technologies that efficiently convert heat into cooling, such as absorption chillers, has opened up many new opportunities and markets for combined heat and power systems. These...

  11. Secretary Chu Announces More Stringent Appliance Standards for Home Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heaters and Other Heating Products | Department of Energy Stringent Appliance Standards for Home Water Heaters and Other Heating Products Secretary Chu Announces More Stringent Appliance Standards for Home Water Heaters and Other Heating Products April 1, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Department has finalized higher energy efficiency standards for a key group of heating appliances that will together save consumers

  12. Innovative Miniaturized Heat Pumps for Buildings: Modular Thermal Hub for Building Heating, Cooling and Water Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Georgia Tech is using innovative components and system design to develop a new type of absorption heat pump. Georgia Techs new heat pumps are energy efficient, use refrigerants that do not emit greenhouse gases, and can run on energy from combustion, waste heat, or solar energy. Georgia Tech is leveraging enhancements to heat and mass transfer technology possible in microscale passages and removing hurdles to the use of heat-activated heat pumps that have existed for more than a century. Use of microscale passages allows for miniaturization of systems that can be packed as monolithic full-system packages or discrete, distributed components enabling integration into a variety of residential and commercial buildings. Compared to conventional heat pumps, Georgia Techs design innovations will create an absorption heat pump that is much smaller, has higher energy efficiency, and can also be mass produced at a lower cost and assembly time.

  13. Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) and water heating products into tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and ...

  14. Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-09-01

    This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

  15. Evaluation of advanced technologies for residential appliances and residential and commercial lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turiel, I.; Atkinson, B.; Boghosian, S.; Chan, P.; Jennings, J.; Lutz, J.; McMahon, J.; Rosenquist, G.

    1995-01-01

    Section 127 of the Energy Policy Act requires that the Department of Energy (DOE) prepare a report to Congress on the potential for the development and commercialization of appliances that substantially exceed the present federal or state efficiency standards. Candidate high-efficiency appliances must meet several criteria including: the potential exists for substantial improvement (beyond the minimum established in law) of the appliance`s energy efficiency; electric, water, or gas utilities are prepared to support and promote the commercialization of such appliances; manufacturers are unlikely to undertake development and commercialization of such appliances on their own, or development and production would be substantially accelerated by support to manufacturers. This report describes options to improve the efficiency of residential appliances, including water heaters, clothes washers and dryers, refrigerator/freezers, dishwashers, space heating and cooling devices, as well as residential and commercial lighting products. Data from this report (particularly Appendix 1)were used to prepare the report to Congress mentioned previously. For the residential sector, national energy savings are calculated using the LBL Residential Energy Model. This model projects the number of households and appliance saturations over time. First, end-use consumption is calculated for a base case where models that only meet the standard replace existing models as these reach the end of their lifetime. Second, models with efficiencies equal to the technology under consideration replace existing models that reach the end of their lifetime. For the commercial sector, the COMMEND model was utilized to project national energy savings from new technologies. In this report, energy savings are shown for the period 1988 to 2015.

  16. Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jukkola, Walfred W.; Leon, Albert M.; Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C.; McCoy, Daniel E.; Fisher, Barry L.; Saiers, Timothy L.; Karstetter, Marlin E.

    1981-11-24

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

  17. Tips: Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Purchase the most energy-efficient appliances. Kitchen Appliances Use your dishwasher, refrigerator, and other common kitchen appliances efficiently. Laundry Use your...

  18. Wood and Pellet Heating | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heat & Cool » Home Heating Systems » Wood and Pellet Heating Wood and Pellet Heating A wood stove on a stone hearth. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/King_Louie A wood stove on a stone hearth. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/King_Louie Today you can choose from a new generation of wood- and pellet-burning appliances that are cleaner burning, more efficient, and powerful enough to heat many average-sized, modern homes. Pellet fuel appliances burn small pellets that measure 3/8 to 1

  19. Geothermal Heating and Cooling Systems Featured on NBC Nightly...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cooling systems that are providing 30%-70% energy and cost savings for homeowners in Jordan, New York. Demand for these systems is growing; nationally, shipments of geothermal...

  20. Subcooled Boiling Heat Transfer for Cooling of Power Electronics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiator and associated pumping system are still required in HEVs. This additional cooling system adds weight and cost while decreasing the efficiency of HEVs. With the...

  1. Cool Roofs and Heat Islands | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cool Roofs AgencyCompany Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Resource...

  2. Principles of Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is heat traveling through a solid material. On hot days, heat is conducted into your home through the roof, walls, and windows. Heat-reflecting roofs, insulation, and energy...

  3. Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tell Us Addthis Microwave or electric kettle, which appliance should win the honor of heating your water? | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory ...

  4. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 In this paper, an analysis was performed to determine that the increased production of waste heat...

  5. How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? September 23, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Chris told you about his new ceiling fan and how it's changed the way he cools his home. In warm weather, ceiling fans cool people (not rooms) by producing a wind-chill effect-which is why you should turn off fans when you leave the room. A ceiling fan allows you to raise the thermostat setting

  6. Reduction of pumping energy losses in district heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakin, J.L.; Christensen, R.N.

    1992-10-01

    This project was designed to find effective surfactant friction reducing additives for use in district heating systems with temperatures of 50 to 90[degrees]C and effective additives fore district cooling systems with temperatures of 5 to 15[degrees]C. Heat transfer measurements in conventional shell and tube heat exchangers and in plate heat exchangers were also carried out to see how seriously these surfactant drag reducing additives reduce heat transfer coefficients.

  7. Reduction of pumping energy losses in district heating and cooling systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakin, J.L.; Christensen, R.N.

    1992-10-01

    This project was designed to find effective surfactant friction reducing additives for use in district heating systems with temperatures of 50 to 90{degrees}C and effective additives fore district cooling systems with temperatures of 5 to 15{degrees}C. Heat transfer measurements in conventional shell and tube heat exchangers and in plate heat exchangers were also carried out to see how seriously these surfactant drag reducing additives reduce heat transfer coefficients.

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Main Commercial Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995, 1999, and 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Heating Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Cooling Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Packaged Heating Units 29% 38% 28% Packaged Air Conditioning Units 45% 54% 46% Boilers 29% 29% 32% Individual Air Conditioners 21% 21% 19% Individual Space Heaters 29% 26% 19% Central Chillers 19% 19% 18% Furnaces 25% 21% 30% Residential Central Air Conditioners 16% 12% 17% Heat Pumps 10% 13% 14% Heat Pumps 12% 14%

  9. Trends in Heating and Cooling Degree Days: Implications for Energy Demand Issues (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Weather-related energy use, in the form of heating, cooling, and ventilation, accounted for more than 40% of all delivered energy use in residential and commercial buildings in 2006. Given the relatively large amount of energy affected by ambient temperature in the buildings sector, the Energy Information Administration has reevaluated what it considers normal weather for purposes of projecting future energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation. The Annual Energy Outlook 2008, estimates of normal heating and cooling degree-days are based on the population-weighted average for the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006.

  10. Survey and evaluation of available thermal insulation materials for use on solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    This is the final report of a survey and evaluation of insulation materials for use with components of solar heating and cooling systems. The survey was performed by mailing questionnaires to manufacturers of insulation materials and by conducting an extensive literature search to obtain data on relevant properties of various types of insulation materials. The study evaluated insulation materials for active and passive solar heating and cooling systems and for multifunction applications. Primary and secondary considerations for selecting insulation materials for various components of solar heating and cooling systems are presented.

  11. Emergency Decay Heat Removal in a GEN-IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Ludewig, Hans; Jo, Jae [Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A series of transient analyses using the system code RELAP5-3d has been performed to confirm the efficacy of a proposed hybrid active/passive combination approach to the decay heat removal for an advanced 2400 MWt GEN-IV gas-cooled fast reactor. The accident sequence of interest is a station blackout simultaneous with a small break (10 sq.inch/0.645 m{sup 2}) in the reactor vessel. The analyses cover the three phases of decay heat removal in a depressurization accident: (1) forced flow cooling by the power conversion unit (PCU) coast down, (2) active forced flow cooling by a battery powered blower, and (3) passive cooling by natural circulation. The blower is part of an emergency cooling system (ECS) that by design is to sustain passive decay heat removal via natural circulation cooling 24 hours after shutdown. The RELAP5 model includes the helium-cooled reactor, the ECS (primary and secondary side), the PCU with all the rotating machinery (turbine and compressors) and the heat transfer components (recuperator, pre-cooler and inter-cooler), and the guard containment that surrounds the reactor and the PCU. The transient analysis has demonstrated the effectiveness of passive decay heat removal by natural circulation cooling when the guard containment pressure is maintained at or above 800 kPa. (authors)

  12. Federal Appliance Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: HR 6582 of 2012 made some modifications to the efficiency standards previously adopted for some appliance types. The bill did not adopt new standards for previously unregulated appliances,...

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Residential Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Cooling Efficiencies 2005 2007 2007 Stock Equipment Type Air Conditioners SEER 10.2 13.0 21.0 Heat Pump - Cooling Air-Source SEER 10.0 13.0 17.0 Ground-Source EER 13.8 16.0 30.0 Heat Pump - Heating Air-Source HSPF 6.8 7.7 10.6 Ground-Source COP 3.4 3.4 5.0 Source(s): EIA/Navigant Consulting, EIA - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Buildings Technologies Reference Case, Second Edition (Revised), Sept. 2007, p. 26-31. Efficiency

  14. Solar heating and cooling system installed at RKL Controls Company, Lumberton, New Jersey. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-03-01

    Solar heating and cooling of a 40,000 square foot manufacturing building, sales offices and the solar computer control center/display room are described. Information on system description, test data, major problems and resolutions, performance, operation and maintenance manual, manufacturer's literature and as-built drawings are provided also. The solar system is composed of 6000 square feet of Sunworks double glazed flat plate collectors, external above ground storage subsystem, controls, ARKLA absorption chiller, heat recovery and a cooling tower.

  15. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Industry: A Market Assessment, August 2003

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Industry: A Market Assessment, August 2003 Cooling, Heating, and Power for Industry: A Market Assessment, August 2003 Industrial applications of CHP have been around for decades, producing electricity and byproduct thermal energy onsite, and converting 80 percent or more of the input fuel into useable energy. The focus of this study was to assess the market for cooling, heating, and power applications in the industrial sector. PDF icon

  16. Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (CHP) Systems - Fact Sheet, 2015 | Department of Energy Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems - Fact Sheet, 2015 Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems - Fact Sheet, 2015 University of California, Irvine, in collaboration with Siemens Corporate Research, developed and demonstrated novel algorithms and dynamic control technology for optimal economic use of CHP systems under 5 MW. The control

  17. Tips: Kitchen Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kitchen Appliances Tips: Kitchen Appliances ENERGY STAR<sup>&reg;</sup> Refrigerators Are Cool! ENERGY STAR-qualified refrigerators use 15% less energy than non-qualified models. Models with top-mounted freezers use 10%-25% less energy than side-by-side or bottom-mount units. ENERGY STAR® Refrigerators Are Cool! ENERGY STAR-qualified refrigerators use 15% less energy than non-qualified models. Models with top-mounted freezers use 10%-25% less energy than side-by-side or

  18. Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Johnson, F. Thomas (Baldwin Boro, PA); Orr, Richard S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tubesheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tubesheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tubesheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch therebetween. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight.

  19. Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air Conditioning Research Institute A directory listing air conditioning and heat pump products that meet energy performance tiers established by the Consortium for Energy...

  20. 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or deductions for solar energy systems. Solar heating systems reduce the amount of air pollution and greenhouse gases that generally come from the use of fossil fuels for...

  1. Crosslinked crystalline polymer and methods for cooling and heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH); Botham, Ruth A. (Dayton, OH); Ball, III, George L. (West Carrollton, OH)

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to crystalline polyethylene pieces having optimum crosslinking for use in storage and recovery of heat, and it further relates to methods for storage and recovery of heat using crystalline polymer pieces having optimum crosslinking for these uses. Crystalline polymer pieces are described which retain at least 70% of the heat of fusion of the uncrosslinked crystalline polymer and yet are sufficiently crosslinked for the pieces not to stick together upon being cycled above and below the melting point of said polymer, preferably at least 80% of the heat of fusion with no substantial sticking together.

  2. Off-axis cooling of rotating devices using a crank-shaped heat pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Todd A.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Waynert, Joseph A.

    2007-01-30

    The present invention is a crank-shaped heat pipe for cooling rotating machinery and a corresponding method of manufacture. The crank-shaped heat pipe comprises a sealed cylindrical tube with an enclosed inner wick structure. The crank-shaped heat pipe includes a condenser section, an adiabatic section, and an evaporator section. The crank-shape is defined by a first curve and a second curve existing in the evaporator section or the adiabatic section of the heat pipe. A working fluid within the heat pipe provides the heat transfer mechanism.

  3. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Coico, Patrick A.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2015-09-15

    A method is provided for fabricating a cooling apparatus for cooling an electronics rack, which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures, and a tube. The heat exchanger is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  4. Method and system for simulating heat and mass transfer in cooling towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan; Hassani, A. Vahab

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method for simulating the performance of a cooling tower. More precisely, the simulator of the present invention predicts values related to the heat and mass transfer from a liquid (e.g., water) to a gas (e.g., air) when provided with input data related to a cooling tower design. In particular, the simulator accepts input data regarding: (a) cooling tower site environmental characteristics; (b) cooling tower operational characteristics; and (c) geometric characteristics of the packing used to increase the surface area within the cooling tower upon which the heat and mass transfer interactions occur. In providing such performance predictions, the simulator performs computations related to the physics of heat and mass transfer within the packing. Thus, instead of relying solely on trial and error wherein various packing geometries are tested during construction of the cooling tower, the packing geometries for a proposed cooling tower can be simulated for use in selecting a desired packing geometry for the cooling tower.

  5. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO); Anderson, Ren (Broomfield, CO)

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  6. ASHRAE Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product categories. Download the tables below to incorporate FEMP and ENERGY STAR purchasing requirements into federal product acquisition documents.

  7. Impact of urban heat island on cooling and environment: A demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Landscaping has been shown in simulation and field studies to reduce building cooling loads by affecting microclimatic factors such as solar radiation, wind speed and air temperature. A demonstration project was undertaken to determine the magnitude of landscape induced changes in microclimate on building cooling loads and water use on four typical residences in Phoenix, Arizona. The energy use and microclimate of three unlandscaped (bare soil, rock mulch) and one landscaped (turf) home were monitored during summer 1990. In the fall, turf was placed around one of the unlandscaped houses, and shade trees planted on the west and south sides of another. Measurements continued during the summer of 1991. Total house air conditioning and selected appliance electrical data were collected, as well as inside and outside air temperatures. Detailed microclimate measurements were obtained for one to two week periods during both summers. Maximum reductions of hourly outside air temperatures of 1 to 1.5{degrees}C, and of daily average air temperatures of up to 1{degrees}C, resulted from the addition of turf landscaping. Addition of small trees to the south and west sides of another treatment did not have a noticeable effect on air temperature. Cooling load reductions of 10% to 17% were observed between years when well-watered turf landscaping was added to a house previously surrounded by bare soil. Addition of small trees to another bare landscape did not produce a detectable change in cooling load. The results of the study are used as input to a standard building energy use simulation model to predict landscape effects on cooling load and water usage for three typical houses, and to develop guidelines for use of energy efficient residential landscapes in Phoenix, Arizona.

  8. Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, J.E.; Johnson, F.T.; Orr, R.S.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-11-30

    A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tube sheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tube sheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tube sheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch there between. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight. 6 figures.

  9. State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 2 - Program Results

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy 2 - Program Results State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 2 - Program Results View the report PDF icon State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 2 - Program Results More Documents & Publications State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program Design Lessons Learned HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Presentation

  10. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chainer, Timothy J; Coico, Patrick A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    A cooling apparatus for an electronics rack is provided which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures and a tube. The heat exchanger, which is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of distinct, coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and a coolant outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  11. Appliance and Equipment Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance and Equipment Standards April 22, 2014 John Cymbalsky Program Manager 1 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Appliance & Equipment Standards Mission The Appliance and Equipment Standards Program's Mission to Fulfill its Statutory Obligation to: * Develop and amend energy conservation standards that achieve the maximum energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. * Develop and amend test procedures that are repeatable,

  12. Energy Star Appliances

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updates and News ENERGY STAR appliances have been a successful program offer for many BPA utility customers and are expected to continue. However, as ENERGY STAR specifications...

  13. Appliance Efficiency Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of...

  14. Guide to Kitchen Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    This fact sheet tells you how to buy and maintain energy-efficient kitchen appliances, including refrigerators, freezers, and dishwashers, to save energy and money.

  15. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. ); Silverstein, C.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

  16. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Silverstein, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

  17. Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumpsand Ground Source Water Loops

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Improve the indoor air quality and lower the cost of cooling and heating the buildings that make up the campus of Cedarville High School and Middle School.; Provide jobs; and reduce requirements of funds for the capital budget of the School District; and thus give relief to taxpayers in this rural region during a period of economic recession.

  18. Urban Heat Islands: Anti-Soiling Cool Roof Coatings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anti-Soiling Cool Roof Coatings Urban Heat Islands: Anti-Soiling Cool Roof Coatings Performers: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Project Partners: -- Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN -- Dow Chemical Company - Midland, MI DOE Funding: $500,000 Cost Share: $500,000 Project Term: Jan. 2013 - Dec. 2014 Project Objective The U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) is a pioneering research and development (R&D) consortium bringing together governments, key policymakers,

  19. CERC-BEE Cool Roofs and Urban Heat Islands: infrastructure and anti-soiling coatings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ronnen Levinson, Staff Scientist, LBNL RMLevinson@LBL.gov Scott Hunter, Senior Research Scientist, ORNL HunterSR@ORNL.gov CERC-BEE Cool Roofs and Urban Heat Islands: infrastructure and anti-soiling coatings 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2 Project Summary (Cool Roof Infrastructure) Timeline: Start date: January 2011 Planned end date: December 2015 Key Milestones 1. Initiate natural exposure trials in many Chinese cities for roof product rating (6/2014) 2. Start black/white/garden

  20. Department of Energy Opens Appliance Standards Investigation for Certain

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Air Con International Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps | Department of Energy Opens Appliance Standards Investigation for Certain Air Con International Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Department of Energy Opens Appliance Standards Investigation for Certain Air Con International Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps March 26, 2010 - 6:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it has opened an investigation to determine whether certain air conditioners and heat

  1. While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell, Sr., City officials, and DOE representatives at Monday's groundbreaking. Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell, Sr., City officials, and DOE representatives at Monday's groundbreaking. Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Birmingham received a $2.4 million Energy Efficiency Community Block Grant under the Recovery Act. The HVAC system will use ground source heat pump technology. It seems like

  2. Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    A passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated box located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

  3. Thermionic nuclear reactor with internal heat distribution and multiple duct cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, C.R.; Perry, L.W. Jr.

    1975-11-01

    A Thermionic Nuclear Reactor is described having multiple ribbon-like coolant ducts passing through the core, intertwined among the thermionic fuel elements to provide independent cooling paths. Heat pipes are disposed in the core between and adjacent to the thermionic fuel elements and the ribbon ducting, for the purpose of more uniformly distributing the heat of fission among the thermionic fuel elements and the ducts.

  4. A Novel Absorption Cycle for Combined Water Heating, Dehumidification, and Evaporative Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHUGH, Devesh; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R; Abdelaziz, Omar; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    In this study, development of a novel system for combined water heating, dehumidification, and space evaporative cooling is discussed. Ambient water vapor is used as a working fluid in an open system. First, water vapor is absorbed from an air stream into an absorbent solution. The latent heat of absorption is transferred into the process water that cools the absorber. The solution is then regenerated in the desorber, where it is heated by a heating fluid. The water vapor generated in the desorber is condensed and its heat of phase change is transferred to the process water in the condenser. The condensed water can then be used in an evaporative cooling process to cool the dehumidified air exiting the absorber, or it can be drained if primarily dehumidification is desired. Essentially, this open absorption cycle collects space heat and transfers it to process water. This technology is enabled by a membrane-based absorption/desorption process in which the absorbent is constrained by hydrophobic vapor-permeable membranes. Constraining the absorbent film has enabled fabrication of the absorber and desorber in a plate-and-frame configuration. An air stream can flow against the membrane at high speed without entraining the absorbent, which is a challenge in conventional dehumidifiers. Furthermore, the absorption and desorption rates of an absorbent constrained by a membrane are greatly enhanced. Isfahani and Moghaddam (Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 2013) demonstrated absorption rates of up to 0.008 kg/m2s in a membrane-based absorber and Isfahani et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2013) have reported a desorption rate of 0.01 kg/m2s in a membrane-based desorber. The membrane-based architecture also enables economical small-scale systems, novel cycle configurations, and high efficiencies. The absorber, solution heat exchanger, and desorber are fabricated on a single metal sheet. In addition to the open arrangement and membrane-based architecture, another novel feature of the cycle is recovery of the solution heat energy exiting the desorber by process water (a process-solution heat exchanger ) rather than the absorber exiting solution (the conventional solution heat exchanger ). This approach has enabled heating the process water from an inlet temperature of 15 C to 57 C (conforming to the DOE water heater test standard) and interfacing the process water with absorbent on the opposite side of a single metal sheet encompassing the absorber, process-solution heat exchanger, and desorber. The system under development has a 3.2 kW water heating capacity and a target thermal coefficient of performance (COP) of 1.6.

  5. Integrated three-dimensional module heat exchanger for power electronics cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennion, Kevin; Lustbader, Jason

    2013-09-24

    Embodiments discussed herein are directed to a power semiconductor packaging that removes heat from a semiconductor package through one or more cooling zones that are located in a laterally oriented position with respect to the semiconductor package. Additional embodiments are directed to circuit elements that are constructed from one or more modular power semiconductor packages.

  6. Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Silverstein, C.C.

    1994-03-25

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

  7. Study of fuel consumption and cooling system in low heat rejection turbocharged diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taymaz, I.; Gur, M.; Cally, I.; Mimaroglu, A.

    1998-07-01

    In a conventional internal combustion engine, approximately one-third of total fuel input energy is converted to useful work. Since the working gas in a practical engine cycle is not exhausted at ambient temperature, a major part of the energy is lost with the exhaust gases. In addition another major part of energy input is rejected in the form of heat via the cooling system. If the energy normally rejected to the coolant could be recovered instead on the crankshaft as useful work, then a substantial improvement in fuel economy would result. At the same time, the cooling water, antifreeze, thermostat, radiator, water pump, cooling fan, and associated hoses and clamps could be eliminated. A new trend in the field of internal combustion engines is to insulate the heat transfer surfaces such as the combustion chamber, cylinder wall, cylinder head, piston and valves by ceramic insulating materials for the improvement of engine performance and elimination of cooling system. In this study, the effect of insulated heat transfer surfaces on direct injected and turbocharged diesel engine fuel consumption and cooling system were investigated. The research engine was a four-stroke, direct injected, six cylinder, turbocharged and intercooled diesel engine. This engine was tested at different speeds and loads conditions without coating. Then, combustion chamber surfaces, cylinder head, valves and piston crown faces was coated with ceramic materials. Ceramic layers were made of CaZrO{sub 3} and MgZrO{sub 3} and plasma coated onto base of the NiCrAl bond coat. The ceramic coated research engine was tested at the same operation conditions as the standard (without coating) engine. The results indicate a reduction in fuel consumption and heat losses to engine cooling system of the ceramic coated engine.

  8. Handbook of experiences in the design and installation of solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, D.S.; Oberoi, H.S.

    1980-07-01

    A large array of problems encountered are detailed, including design errors, installation mistakes, cases of inadequate durability of materials and unacceptable reliability of components, and wide variations in the performance and operation of different solar systems. Durability, reliability, and design problems are reviewed for solar collector subsystems, heat transfer fluids, thermal storage, passive solar components, piping/ducting, and reliability/operational problems. The following performance topics are covered: criteria for design and performance analysis, domestic hot water systems, passive space heating systems, active space heating systems, space cooling systems, analysis of systems performance, and performance evaluations. (MHR)

  9. Micro-scale heat-exchangers for Joule-Thomson cooling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, Andrew John

    2014-01-01

    This project focused on developing a micro-scale counter flow heat exchangers for Joule-Thomson cooling with the potential for both chip and wafer scale integration. This project is differentiated from previous work by focusing on planar, thin film micromachining instead of bulk materials. A process will be developed for fabricating all the devices mentioned above, allowing for highly integrated micro heat exchangers. The use of thin film dielectrics provides thermal isolation, increasing efficiency of the coolers compared to designs based on bulk materials, and it will allow for wafer-scale fabrication and integration. The process is intended to implement a CFHX as part of a Joule-Thomson cooling system for applications with heat loads less than 1mW. This report presents simulation results and investigation of a fabrication process for such devices.

  10. Tips: Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliances Tips: Appliances This chart shows how much energy a typical appliance uses per year and its corresponding cost based on national averages. For example, a refrigerator/freezer uses almost five times the electricity the average television uses. This chart shows how much energy a typical appliance uses per year and its corresponding cost based on national averages. For example, a refrigerator/freezer uses almost five times the electricity the average television uses. Appliances account

  11. Appliance Energy Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our appliance and electronic energy use calculator allows you to estimate your annual energy use and cost to operate specific products. The wattage values provided are samples only; actual wattage...

  12. Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-09-01

    This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

  13. Very low temperature radiant heating/cooling indoor end system for efficient use of renewable energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Jianbo; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Congrong; Xiong, Weicheng; Zhu, Li

    2010-06-15

    Solar or solar-assisted space heating systems are becoming more and more popular. The solar energy utilization efficiency is high when the collector is coupled with indoor radiant heating suppliers, since in principle, lower supply temperature means lower demand temperature and then the system heat loss is less. A new type radiant end system is put forward for even lower supply temperature compared to the conventional radiant floor heating systems. A three dimensional model was established to investigate its energy supply capacities. Simulation results show that 50 W per meter length tube can be achieved with the medium temperature of 30 C for heating and 15 C for cooling. The predicted results agree well with the actual data from a demonstration building. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a supply temperature of 22 C in winter and of 17 C in summer already met the indoor requirements. The new end system has good prospects for effective use of local renewable resources. (author)

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Major Commercial HVAC Equipment Lifetimes and Ages Median Equipment Type Lifetime Air Conditioners Through-the-Wall 15 Water-CooledPackage 24 (1) Roof-Top 15 Chillers Reciprocating 20 Centrifugal 25 (1) Absorption 23 Heat Pumps Air-to-Air 15 Water-to-Air 24 (1) Furnaces (gas or oil) 18 Boilers (gas or oil) Hot-Water 24 - 35 Steam 25 - 30 Unit Heaters Gas-Fired or Electric 13 Hot-Water or Steam 20 Cooling Towers (metal or wood) Metal 22 (1) Wood 20 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Data from 2005. All

  15. Stirling cycle heat pump for heating and/or cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijer, R.J.; Khalili, K.; Meijer, E.; Godett, T.M.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a duplex Stirling cycle machine acting as a heat pump. It comprises: a Stirling engine having pistons axially displaceable within parallel cylinders, the engine further having a swashplate rotatable about an axis of, rotation parallel to the cylinders and defining a plane inclined from the axis of rotation. The pistons connected to the swashplate via crossheads whereby axial displacement of the pistons is converted to rotation of the swashplate, and a Stirling cycle heat pump having a compression heat exchanger, an expansion heat exchanger and a regenerator with pistons equal in number to the engine pistons and axially displaceable within cylinders which are oriented co-axially with the engine cylinders. The crossheads further connected to the heat pump pistons whereby the heat pump pistons move simultaneously with the engine pistons over an equal stroke distance.

  16. IMPACTS OF REFRIGERANTLINE LENGTH ON SYSTEM EFFICIENCY IN RESIDENTIAL HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS USING REFRIGERANT DISTRIBUTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS, J.W.

    2001-04-01

    The effects on system efficiency of excess refrigerant line length are calculated for an idealized residential heating and cooling system. By excess line length is meant refrigerant tubing in excess of the 25 R provided for in standard equipment efficiency test methods. The purpose of the calculation is to provide input for a proposed method for evaluating refrigerant distribution system efficiency. A refrigerant distribution system uses refrigerant (instead of ducts or pipes) to carry heat and/or cooling effect from the equipment to the spaces in the building in which it is used. Such systems would include so-called mini-splits as well as more conventional split systems that for one reason or another have the indoor and outdoor coils separated by more than 25 ft. This report performs first-order calculations of the effects on system efficiency, in both the heating and cooling modes, of pressure drops within the refrigerant lines and of heat transfer between the refrigerant lines and the space surrounding them.

  17. Appliances and Electronics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    appliances Home office and electronics. Follow Us followontwitter.png followonfacebook.png Appliance & Electronics Blogs Save Energy on Appliances this Holiday Season...

  18. Tips: Shopping for Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliances Tips: Shopping for Appliances What's the real cost? Every appliance has two price tags -- the purchase price and the operating cost. Consider both when buying a new...

  19. ISSUANCE 2015-06-30: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Working Group | Department of Energy Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Working Group ISSUANCE 2015-06-30: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Working Group This document is the Appliance Standards and

  20. Demonstration of a high heat removal CVD diamond substrate edge-cooled multichip module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.; Andaleon, D.D.; Renzi, R.F.; Johnson, D.R.

    1994-05-01

    A single substrate intended for a 3-dimensional (3D) edge-cooled multichip module (MCM) has been built and thermally tested. The substrate, with dimensions 1.9 in. by 2 in., is mounted in a fluid cooled block at one end. To test this cooling architecture and verify the accuracy of thermal models, the authors constructed thermal test modules using alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum nitride (AlN), and CVD diamond substrate materials. Each module was populated with an array of 16 Sandia ATC03 test chips with resistive heaters and temperature sensing diode thermometers. Comparative measurements of the 3 substrates were made in which the top row of 4 die were heated at 5 W each for a total of 20 W. The maximum temperature differences between the heated die and the interface with the cold chuck, {delta}T{sub js}, were 24, 126, and 265{degrees}C for diamond, AIN and alumina, respectively. Measurements on the diamond thermal test module, uniformly heated at a total power of 40 W, gave a measured junction-to-sink temperature of {delta}T{sub js} = 18{degrees}C. This result indicates that the diamond edge-cooled substrate could dissipate a total power {approximately}200 W for a maximum {delta}T{sub js} {approximately}100{degrees}C. If multiple substrates were mounted in the fluid cooled block, spaced 0.075 in. apart, the volumetric power density would be about 880 W/in.

  1. Exterior Insulation Implications for Heating and Cooling Systems in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herk, Anastasia; Poerschke, Andrew

    2015-04-09

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) is interested in finding cost-effective solutions for deep energy retrofits (DERs) related to exterior wall insulation in a cold climate, with targets of 50% peak load reduction and 50% space conditioning energy savings. The U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, Inc. (GHA), was contracted by NYSERDA to research exterior wall insulation solutions. In addition to exterior wall insulation, the strategies included energy upgrades where needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, basement, band joist, walls, and floors. Under Building America, IBACOS is studying the impact of a “thermal enclosure” DER on the sizing of the space conditioning system and the occupant comfort if the thermal capacity of the heating and cooling system is dramatically downsized without any change in the existing heating and cooling distribution system (e.g., size, tightness and supply outlet configurations).

  2. Exterior Insulation Implications for Heating and Cooling Systems in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herk, Anastasia; Poerschke, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) is interested in finding cost-effective solutions for deep energy retrofits (DERs) related to exterior wall insulation in a cold climate, with targets of 50% peak load reduction and 50% space conditioning energy savings. The U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, Inc. (GHA), was contracted by NYSERDA to research exterior wall insulation solutions. In addition to exterior wall insulation, the strategies included energy upgrades where needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, basement, band joist, walls, and floors. Under Building America, IBACOS is studying the impact of a “thermal enclosure” DER on the sizing of the space conditioning system and the occupant comfort if the thermal capacity of the heating and cooling system is dramatically downsized without any change in the existing heating and cooling distribution system (e.g., size, tightness and supply outlet configurations).

  3. Simplified method for calculating heating and cooling energy in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonderegger, R.C.; Garnier, J.Y.

    1981-10-01

    A microcomputer-based program, Computerized, Instrumented, Residential Audit (CIRA), for determining economically optimal mixes of energy-saving measures in existing residential buildings was developed which requires extensive calculation of heating and cooling energy consumptions. In this paper, a simplified method of calculation that satisfies the requirements of speed and memory imposed by the type of microcomputer on which CIRA runs is presented. The method is based on monthly calculations of degree days and degree nights for both heating and cooling seasons. The base temperatures used in calculating the degree days and degree nights are derived from thermostat settings, solar and internal gains, sky radiation losses, and the thermal characteristics of the building envelope. Thermostat setbacks are handled by using the concept of effective thermal mass of the house. Performance variations of HVAC equipment with changes of part load and ambient conditions are taken into account using correlation curves based on experimental data. Degree days and nights for different base temperatures are evaluated by using a climate-specific empirical correlation with monthly average daily and nightly temperatures. Predictions obtained by this method and by DOE-2.1 are compared for the so-called Hastings ranch house for seven different climates in the United States. Heating and cooling energy consumptions predicted by CIRA lie generally within +- 10% of DOE-2.1 predictions.

  4. Experimental evaluation of dry/wet air-cooled heat exchangers. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, S.G.; Gruel, R.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.; Eschbach, E.J.; Johnson, B.M.; Kreid, D.K.

    1982-08-01

    The ultimate goal of this project was to contribute to the development of improved cooling facilities for power plants. Specifically, the objective during FY-81 was to experimentally determine the thermal performance and operating characteristics of an air-cooled heat exchanger surface manufactured by the Unifin Company. The performance of the spiral-wound finned tube surface (Unifin) was compared with two inherently different platefin surfaces (one developed by the Trane Co. and the other developed by the HOETERV Institute) which were previously tested as a part of the same continuing program. Under dry operation the heat transfer per unit frontal area per unit inlet temperature difference (ITD) of the Unifin surface was 10% to 20% below that of the other two surfaces at low fan power levels. At high fan power levels, the performances of the Unifin and Trane surfaces were essentially the same, and 25% higher than the HOETERV surface. The design of the Unifin surface caused a significantly larger air-side pressure drop through the heat exchanger both in dry and deluge operation. Generally higher overall heat transfer coefficients were calculated for the Unifin surface under deluged operation. They ranged from 2.0 to 3.5 Btu/hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F as compared to less than 2.0 Btu hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F for the Trane and HOETERV surfaces under similar conditions. The heat transfer enhancement due to the evaporative cooling effect was also measureably higher with the Unifin surface as compared to the Trane surface. This can be primarily attributed to the better wetting characteristics of the Unifin surface. If the thermal performance of the surfaces are compared at equal face velocities, the Unifin surface is as much as 35% better. This method of comparison accounts for the wetting characteristics while neglecting the effect of pressure drop. Alternatively the surfaces when compared at equal pressure drop essentially the same thermal performance.

  5. Effects of Hot Streak and Phantom Cooling on Heat Transfer in a Cooled Turbine Stage Including Particulate Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bons, Jeffrey; Ameri, Ali

    2015-09-30

    The objective of this research effort was to develop a validated computational modeling capability for the characterization of the effects of hot streaks and particulate deposition on the heat load of modern gas turbines. This was accomplished with a multi-faceted approach including analytical, experimental, and computational components. A 1-year no cost extension request was approved for this effort, so the total duration was 4 years. The research effort succeeded in its ultimate objective by leveraging extensive experimental deposition studies complemented by computational modeling. Experiments were conducted with hot streaks, vane cooling, and combinations of hot streaks with vane cooling. These studies contributed to a significant body of corporate knowledge of deposition, in combination with particle rebound and deposition studies funded by other agencies, to provide suitable conditions for the development of a new model. The model includes the following physical phenomena: elastic deformation, plastic deformation, adhesion, and shear removal. It also incorporates material property sensitivity to temperature and tangential-normal velocity rebound cross-dependencies observed in experiments. The model is well-suited for incorporation in CFD simulations of complex gas turbine flows due to its algebraic (explicit) formulation. This report contains model predictions compared to coefficient of restitution data available in the open literature as well as deposition results from two different high temperature turbine deposition facilities. While the model comparisons with experiments are in many cases promising, several key aspects of particle deposition remain elusive. The simple phenomenological nature of the model allows for parametric dependencies to be evaluated in a straightforward manner. This effort also included the first-ever full turbine stage deposition model published in the open literature. The simulations included hot streaks and simulated vane cooling. The new deposition model was implemented into the CFD model as a wall boundary condition, with various particle sizes investigated in the simulation. Simulations utilizing a steady mixing plane formulation and an unsteady sliding mesh were conducted and the flow solution of each was validated against experimental data. Results from each of these simulations, including impact and capture distributions and efficiencies, were compared and potential reasons for differences discussed in detail. The inclusion of a large range of particle sizes allowed investigation of trends with particle size, such as increased radial migration and reduced sticking efficiency at the larger particle sizes. The unsteady simulation predicted lower sticking efficiencies on the rotor blades than the mixing plane simulation for the majority of particle sizes. This is postulated to be due to the preservation of the hot streak and cool vane wake through the vane-rotor interface (which are smeared out circumferentially in the mixing-plane simulation). The results reported here represent the successful implementation of a novel deposition model into validated vane-rotor flow solutions that include a non-uniform inlet temperature profile and simulated vane cooling.

  6. System for thermal energy storage, space heating and cooling and power conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Fields, Paul R.

    1981-04-21

    An integrated system for storing thermal energy, for space heating and cong and for power conversion is described which utilizes the reversible thermal decomposition characteristics of two hydrides having different decomposition pressures at the same temperature for energy storage and space conditioning and the expansion of high-pressure hydrogen for power conversion. The system consists of a plurality of reaction vessels, at least one containing each of the different hydrides, three loops of circulating heat transfer fluid which can be selectively coupled to the vessels for supplying the heat of decomposition from any appropriate source of thermal energy from the outside ambient environment or from the spaces to be cooled and for removing the heat of reaction to the outside ambient environment or to the spaces to be heated, and a hydrogen loop for directing the flow of hydrogen gas between the vessels. When used for power conversion, at least two vessels contain the same hydride and the hydrogen loop contains an expansion engine. The system is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators, but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  7. Method of energy load management using PCM for heating and cooling of buildings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stovall, T.K.; Tomlinson, J.J.

    1996-03-26

    A method is described for energy load management for the heating and cooling of a building. The method involves utilizing a wallboard as a portion of the building, the wallboard containing about 5 to about 30 wt.% phase change material such that melting of the phase change material occurs during a rise in temperature within the building to remove heat from the air, and a solidification of the phase change material occurs during a lowering of the temperature to dispense heat into the air. At the beginning of either of these cooling or heating cycles, the phase change material is preferably ``fully charged``. In preferred installations one type of wallboard is used on the interior surfaces of exterior walls, and another type as the surface on interior walls. The particular PCM is chosen for the desired wall and room temperature of these locations. In addition, load management is achieved by using PCM-containing wallboards that form cavities of the building such that the cavities can be used for the air handling duct and plenum system of the building. Enhanced load management is achieved by using a thermostat with reduced dead band of about the upper half of a normal dead band of over three degrees. In some applications, air circulation at a rate greater than normal convection provides additional comfort. 7 figs.

  8. Method of energy load management using PCM for heating and cooling of buildings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stovall, Therese K.; Tomlinson, John J.

    1996-01-01

    A method of energy load management for the heating and cooling of a building. The method involves utilizing a wallboard as a portion of the building, the wallboard containing about 5 to about 30 wt. % a phase change material such that melting of the phase change material occurs during a rise in temperature within the building to remove heat from the air, and a solidification of the phase change material occurs during a lowering of the temperature to dispense heat into the air. At the beginning of either of these cooling or heating cycles, the phase change material is preferably "fully charged". In preferred installations one type of wallboard is used on the interior surfaces of exterior walls, and another type as the surface on interior walls. The particular PCM is chosen for the desired wall and room temperature of these locations. In addition, load management is achieved by using PCM-containing wallboard that form cavities of the building such that the cavities can be used for the air handling duct and plenum system of the building. Enhanced load management is achieved by using a thermostat with reduced dead band of about the upper half of a normal dead band of over three degree. In some applications, air circulation at a rate greater than normal convection provides additional comfort.

  9. Water-Heating Dehumidifier - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Find More Like This Return to Search Water-Heating Dehumidifier Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryA small appliance developed at ORNL dehumidifies air and then recycles heat to warm water in a water heater. The device circulates cool, dry air in summer and warm air in winter. In addition, the invention can cut the energy required to run

  10. Appliance Standards and Building Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Manager Presentation Appliance Standards and Building Codes John Cymbalsky U.S Department of Energy - Building Technologies Office john.cymbalsky@ee.doe.gov 202.287.1692 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Appliance Standards and Building Codes Program Goals Appliance Standards Program Goals Provide cost-effective energy savings through national appliance and equipment standards: Issue 23 final rules by end of FY2015 Deliver at least 1 qBtu of savings annually by 2030

  11. Air-Cooled Heat Exchanger for High-Temperature Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waye, S. K.; Lustbader, J.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2015-05-06

    This work demonstrates a direct air-cooled heat exchanger strategy for high-temperature power electronic devices with an application specific to automotive traction drive inverters. We present experimental heat dissipation and system pressure curves versus flow rate for baseline and optimized sub-module assemblies containing two ceramic resistance heaters that provide device heat fluxes. The maximum allowable junction temperature was set to 175 deg.C. Results were extrapolated to the inverter scale and combined with balance-of-inverter components to estimate inverter power density and specific power. The results exceeded the goal of 12 kW/L and 12 kW/kg for power density and specific power, respectively.

  12. Experimental validation of advanced regulations for superconducting magnet cooling undergoing periodic heat loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Hoa, C.; Bonnay, P.

    2014-01-29

    Superconducting magnets used in tokamaks undergo periodic heat load caused by cycling plasma operations inducing AC losses, neutrons fluxes and eddy currents in magnet structures. In the cryogenic system of JT60-SA tokamak, the Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB) distributes helium from the refrigerator to the cryogenic users and in particular to the superconducting magnets. ACB comprises a saturated helium bath with immersed heat exchangers, extracting heat from independent cooling loops. The supercritical helium flow in each cooling loop is driven by a cold circulator. In order to safely operate the refrigerator during plasma pulses, the interface between the ACB and the refrigerator shall be as stable as possible, with well-balanced bath inlet and outlet mass flows during cycling operation. The solution presented in this paper relies on a combination of regulations to smooth pulsed heat loads and to keep a constant refrigeration power during all the cycle. Two smoothing strategies are presented, both regulating the outlet mass flow of the bath: the first one using the bath as a thermal buffer and the second one storing energy in the loop by varying the cold circulator speed. The bath outlet mass flow is also controlled by an immersed resistive heater which enables a constant evaporation rate in the bath when power coming from the loops is decreasing. The refrigeration power is controlled so that the compensating power remains within an acceptable margin. Experimental validation is achieved using the HELIOS facility. This facility running at CEA Grenoble since 2010 is a scaled down model of the ACB bath and Central Solenoid magnet cooling loop of the JT60-SA tokamak. Test results show performances and robustness of the regulations.

  13. Use of impure inert gases in the controlled heating and cooling of mixed conducting metal oxide materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Bernhart, John Charles (Fleetwood, PA)

    2012-08-21

    Method for processing an article comprising mixed conducting metal oxide material. The method comprises contacting the article with an oxygen-containing gas and either reducing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a cooling period or increasing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a heating period; during the cooling period, reducing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the cooling period and increasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is reduced during at least a portion of the cooling period; and during the heating period, increasing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the heating period and decreasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is increased during at least a portion of the heating period.

  14. Passive solar heating and natural cooling of an earth-integrated design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Shapira, H.B.

    1980-01-01

    The Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research is being designed with innovative features that will greatly reduce its energy consumption for heating, cooling, and lighting. A reference design has been studied and the effects of extending the overhang during summer and fall, varying glazing area, employing RIB, and reducing internal heat by natural lighting have been considered. The use of RIB and the extendable overhang increases the optimum window glazing area and the solar heating fraction. A mass-storage wall which will likely be included in the final design has also been considered. A figure of merit for commercial buildings is the total annual energy consumption per unit area of floor space. A highly efficient office building in the Oak Ridge area typically uses 120 to 160 kWhr/m/sup 2/. The Joint Institute reference design with natural lighting, an annual average heat pump coefficient of performance (COP) equal to 1.8, RIB, and the extendable overhang uses 71 kWhr/m/sup 2/. This figure was determined from NBSLD simulations corrected for the saving from RIB. The internal heat energy from lighting and equipment used in the simulation was 1653 kWhrs/month (high natural lighting case) which is much lower than conventional office buildings. This value was adopted because only a portion of the building will be used as office space and efforts will be made to keep internal heat generation low. The mass-storage wall and ambient air cooling will reduce energy consumption still further. The combined savings of the innovative features in the Joint Institute building are expected to result in a very energy efficient design. The building will be instrumented to monitor its performance and the measured data will provide a means of evaluating the energy-saving features. The efficiency of the design will be experimentally verified over the next several years.

  15. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, R. M.

    1980-06-01

    The solar heating and cooling system installed at the headquarters of Citizens Mutual Savings Association in Leavenworth, Kansas, is described in detail. The project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's solar demonstration program and became operational in March, 1979. The designer was TEC, Inc. Consulting Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri and contractor was Norris Brothers, Inc., Lawrence, Kansas. The solar system is expected to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2200 square feet. Five, 3-ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two, 3000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  16. Passive cooling and heating program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapira, H.B.; Kaplan, S.I.; Chester, C.V.

    1981-01-01

    Construction was completed of an earth-sheltered, passively solar heated office-dormitory, the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, designed at ORNL. Instrumentation of the building was designed, procured, and installed. Building performance will be monitored and compared with predictions of the DOE-2 code. A study of the incorporation of vegetation on architecture was conducted by the Harvard School of Design. A final report was issued which is a prototype handbook for the use of vegetation to reduce cooling loads in structures. An experiment to reduce the cooling requirement of mobile homes by shading with fast-growing vines was begun: a maintenance-oriented trellis was constructed and vines were planted. An RFP for the production of a prototype set of reflective insulating blinds was issued.

  17. Combined refrigeration system with a liquid pre-cooling heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaul, Christopher J.

    2003-07-01

    A compressor-pump unit for use in a vapor-compression refrigeration system is provided. The compressor-pump unit comprises a driving device including a rotatable shaft. A compressor is coupled with a first portion of the shaft for compressing gaseous refrigerant within the vapor-compression refrigeration system. A liquid pump is coupled with a second portion of the shaft for receiving liquid refrigerant having a first pressure and for discharging the received liquid refrigerant at a second pressure with the second pressure being higher than the first pressure by a predetermined amount such that the discharged liquid refrigerant is subcooled. A pre-cooling circuit is connected to the liquid pump with the pre-cooling circuit being exposed to the gaseous refrigerant whereby the gaseous refrigerant absorbs heat from the liquid refrigerant, prior to the liquid refrigerant entering the liquid pump.

  18. Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

    2008-06-18

    The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

  19. Mist/steam cooling in a heated horizontal tube -- Part 1: Experimental system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, T.; Wang, T.; Gaddis, J.L.

    2000-04-01

    To improve the airfoil cooling significantly for the future generation of advanced turbine systems (ATS), a fundamental experimental program has been developed to study the heat transfer mechanisms of mist/steam cooling under highly superheated wall temperatures. The mist/steam mixture was obtained by blending fine water droplets (3 {approximately} 15 {micro}m in diameter) with the saturated steam at 1.5 bars. Two mist generation systems were tested by using the pressure atomizer and the steam-assisted pneumatic atomizer, respectively. The test section, heated directly by a DC power supply, consisted of a thin-walled ({approximately} 0.9 mm), circular stainless steel tube with an ID of 20 mm and a length of 203 mm. Droplet size and distribution were measured by a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) system through view ports grafted at the inlet and the outlet of the test section. Mist transportation and droplet dynamics were studied in addition to the heat transfer measurements. The experiment was conducted with steam Reynolds numbers ranging from 10,000 to 35,000, wall superheat up to 300 C, and droplet mass ratios ranging from 1 {approximately} 6%.

  20. Research & Development Roadmap for Next-Generation Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetzler, William; Sutherland, Timothy; Foley, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    Appliances present an attractive opportunity for near-term energy savings in existing building, because they are less expensive and replaced more regularly than heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems or building envelope components. This roadmap targets high-priority research and development (R&D), demonstration and commercialization activities that could significantly reduce residential appliance energy consumption. The main objective of the roadmap is to seek activities that accelerate the commercialization of high-efficiency appliance technologies while maintaining the competitiveness of American industry. The roadmap identified and evaluated potential technical innovations, defined research needs, created preliminary research and development roadmaps, and obtained stakeholder feedback on the proposed initiatives.

  1. Overall U-values and heating/cooling loads: Manufactured homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, C.C.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1992-02-01

    This manual specifies a method for calculating the overall thermal transmittance (also referred to as the overall U-value or U{sub o}), heating load, and cooling load of a manufactured (mobile) home. Rules, examples, and data required by the method are also presented. Compliance with the Department of Housing and Urban Development`s (HUD) U{sub o} and load calculation regulations contained in Sections 3280.506, 3280.510 and 3280.511 of the Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards must be demonstrated through the application of the method provided herein.

  2. KEY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR NUCLEAR HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01

    Key requirements that affect the design of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear heat supply system (HTGR-NHSS) as the NGNP Project progresses through the design, licensing, construction and testing of the first of a kind HTGR based plant are summarized. These requirements derive from pre-conceptual design development completed to-date by HTGR Suppliers, collaboration with potential end users of the HTGR technology to identify energy needs, evaluation of integration of the HTGR technology with industrial processes and recommendations of the NGNP Project Senior Advisory Group.

  3. Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, K.T.

    2005-10-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

  4. Appliance/Equipment Efficiency Standards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ApplianceEquipment Efficiency Standards Massachusetts Boilers Furnaces No Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards (Maryland) ApplianceEquipment Efficiency Standards Maryland...

  5. The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor: Report on Safety System Design for Decay Heat Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Y. C. Wei; E. E. Feldman; M. J. Driscoll; H. Ludewig

    2003-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radiotoxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. This report addresses/discusses the decay heat removal options available to the GFR, and the current solutions. While it is possible to design a GFR with complete passive safety (i.e., reliance solely on conductive and radiative heat transfer for decay heat removal), it has been shown that the low power density results in unacceptable fuel cycle costs for the GFR. However, increasing power density results in higher decay heat rates, and the attendant temperature increase in the fuel and core. Use of active movers, or blowers/fans, is possible during accident conditions, which only requires 3% of nominal flow to remove the decay heat. Unfortunately, this requires reliance on active systems. In order to incorporate passive systems, innovative designs have been studied, and a mix of passive and active systems appears to meet the requirements for decay heat removal during accident conditions.

  6. Cooling and Heating Season Impacts of Right-Sizing of Fixed- and Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps With Attic and Indoor Ductwork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Kono, Jamie

    2015-06-01

    ?A new generation of central, ducted variable-capacity heat pump systems has come on the market, promising very high cooling and heating efficiency. They are controlled differently than standard fixed-capacity systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and then cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, they vary their cooling and heating output over a wide range (approximately 40% - 118% of nominal full capacity), thus staying 'on' for 60% - 100% more hours per day compared to fixed -capacity systems. Experiments in this research examined the performance of 2-ton and 3-ton fixed- and variable-capacity systems and the impacts of system oversizing.

  7. Prediction of critical heat flux in water-cooled plasma facing components using computational fluid dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, James H.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Several commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes now have the capability to analyze Eulerian two-phase flow using the Rohsenow nucleate boiling model. Analysis of boiling due to one-sided heating in plasma facing components (pfcs) is now receiving attention during the design of water-cooled first wall panels for ITER that may encounter heat fluxes as high as 5 MW/m2. Empirical thermalhydraulic design correlations developed for long fission reactor channels are not reliable when applied to pfcs because fully developed flow conditions seldom exist. Star-CCM+ is one of the commercial CFD codes that can model two-phase flows. Like others, it implements the RPI model for nucleate boiling, but it also seamlessly transitions to a volume-of-fluid model for film boiling. By benchmarking the results of our 3d models against recent experiments on critical heat flux for both smooth rectangular channels and hypervapotrons, we determined the six unique input parameters that accurately characterize the boiling physics for ITER flow conditions under a wide range of absorbed heat flux. We can now exploit this capability to predict the onset of critical heat flux in these components. In addition, the results clearly illustrate the production and transport of vapor and its effect on heat transfer in pfcs from nucleate boiling through transition to film boiling. This article describes the boiling physics implemented in CCM+ and compares the computational results to the benchmark experiments carried out independently in the United States and Russia. Temperature distributions agreed to within 10 C for a wide range of heat fluxes from 3 MW/m2 to 10 MW/m2 and flow velocities from 1 m/s to 10 m/s in these devices. Although the analysis is incapable of capturing the stochastic nature of critical heat flux (i.e., time and location may depend on a local materials defect or turbulence phenomenon), it is highly reliable in determining the heat flux where boiling instabilities begin to dominate. Beyond this threshold, higher heat fluxes lead to the boiling crisis and eventual burnout. This predictive capability is essential in determining the critical heat flux margin for the design of complex 3d components.

  8. Tips: Smart Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliances Tips: Smart Appliances Smart appliances can help you shift your electricity use to off-peak hours. Smart appliances can help you shift your electricity use to off-peak hours. Some manufacturers are now offering "smart" appliances -- appliances that can be connected to smart electric meters or home energy management systems to help you shift your electricity use to off-peak hours. Air conditioners, refrigerators, dishwashers, and other appliances may be available as smart

  9. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-11-01

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  10. Transient analysis and energy optimization of solar heating and cooling systems in various configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calise, F.; Dentice d'Accadia, M.; Palombo, A.

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, a transient simulation model of solar-assisted heating and cooling systems (SHC) is presented. A detailed case study is also discussed, in which three different configurations are considered. In all cases, the SHC system is based on the coupling of evacuated solar collectors with a single-stage LiBr-H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, and a gas-fired boiler is also included for auxiliary heating, only during the winter season. In the first configuration, the cooling capacity of the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are designed on the basis of the maximum cooling load, and an electric chiller is used as the auxiliary cooling system. The second layout is similar to the first one, but, in this case, the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are sized in order to balance only a fraction of the maximum cooling load. Finally, in the third configuration, there is no electric chiller, and the auxiliary gas-fired boiler is also used in summer to feed the absorption chiller, in case of scarce solar irradiation. The simulation model was developed using the TRNSYS software, and included the analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the building in which the SHC systems were supposed to be installed. The building was simulated using a single-lumped capacitance model. An economic model was also developed, in order to assess the operating and capital costs of the systems under analysis. Furthermore, a mixed heuristic-deterministic optimization algorithm was implemented, in order to determine the set of the synthesis/design variables that maximize the energy efficiency of each configuration under analysis. The results of the case study were analyzed on monthly and weekly basis, paying special attention to the energy and monetary flows of the standard and optimized configurations. The results are encouraging as for the potential of energy saving. On the contrary, the SHC systems appear still far from the economic profitability: however, this is notoriously true for the great majority of renewable energy systems. (author)

  11. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, Lap-Yan; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2009-01-01

    The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR) in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow weremore » evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.« less

  12. A solar thermal cooling and heating system for a building: Experimental and model based performance analysis and design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Ming; Yin, Hongxi; Archer, David H.

    2010-02-15

    A solar thermal cooling and heating system at Carnegie Mellon University was studied through its design, installation, modeling, and evaluation to deal with the question of how solar energy might most effectively be used in supplying energy for the operation of a building. This solar cooling and heating system incorporates 52 m{sup 2} of linear parabolic trough solar collectors; a 16 kW double effect, water-lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption chiller, and a heat recovery heat exchanger with their circulation pumps and control valves. It generates chilled and heated water, dependent on the season, for space cooling and heating. This system is the smallest high temperature solar cooling system in the world. Till now, only this system of the kind has been successfully operated for more than one year. Performance of the system has been tested and the measured data were used to verify system performance models developed in the TRaNsient SYstem Simulation program (TRNSYS). On the basis of the installed solar system, base case performance models were programmed; and then they were modified and extended to investigate measures for improving system performance. The measures included changes in the area and orientation of the solar collectors, the inclusion of thermal storage in the system, changes in the pipe diameter and length, and various system operational control strategies. It was found that this solar thermal system could potentially supply 39% of cooling and 20% of heating energy for this building space in Pittsburgh, PA, if it included a properly sized storage tank and short, low diameter connecting pipes. Guidelines for the design and operation of an efficient and effective solar cooling and heating system for a given building space have been provided. (author)

  13. Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

  14. Streamlining ENERGY STAR Appliance Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To save taxpayer dollars and help lower the costs of innovative energy-efficient technologies, the Energy Department is streamlining ENERGY STAR testing for appliances.

  15. Purification of water from cooling towers and other heat exchange systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan; Enid J. , Carlson; Bryan J. , Wingo; Robert M. , Robison; Thomas W.

    2012-08-07

    The amount of silica in cooling tower water is reduced by passing cooling tower water through a column of silica gel.

  16. Final draft: IEA Task 1. Report on Subtask D, optimization of solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, T.L.

    1981-03-01

    A review of general techniques and specific methods useful in the optimization of solar heating and cooling systems is undertaken. A discussion of the state-of-the-art and the principal problems in both the simplified thermal performance analysis and economic analysis portions of the optimization problem are presented. Sample economic analyses are performed using several widely used economic criteria. The predicted thermal results of one typical, widely used simplified method is compared to detailed simulation results. A methodology for and the results of a sensitivity study of key economic parameters in the life cycle cost method are presented. Finally, a simple graphical optimization technique based on the life cycle cost method is proposed.

  17. Evaluation of a Heat Flux Sensor for Spray Cooling for the Die Casting Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wu, Zhuoxi

    2007-02-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. In this paper, a new technique for measuring the heat flux during lubricant application is evaluated. Data from experiments conducted using water spray are first presented. Water spray experiments were conducted for different initial plate temperatures. Measurements were conducted for the application of two different lubricants, of dilution ratios of 1/15 and 1/50 of lubricant in water. The measurement uncertainties were documented. The results show that the surface temperature decreases initially very fast. Numerical simulation results confirmed that the abrupt temperature drop is not an artifact but illustrates the thermal shock experienced by the dies during the initial stages of lubricant application. The lubricant experiments show that the sensor can be successfully used for testing die lubricants with typical dilution ratios encountered in the die casting process.

  18. Reduction of pumping energy losses in district heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakin, J.L.

    1991-12-01

    This project was designed to explore the effects of different structures of cationic surfactant drag reducing additives on their efficiency and on their effective temperature ranges. The goal was to develop surfactant systems that would be useful in the appropriate temperature ranges for district heating systems (50--110{degree}C) and for district cooling systems (2--20{degree}C). To this end the chemical compositions of quaternary annonium salts and of counter-ions were varied. More than twenty different commercial or semi commercial quarterly ammonium salts from US suppliers and two from a German supplier (Hoechst) were tested along with thirty five different counter-ions. In addition, blends of several of each were also tested. A further object of this project was to check the compatibility of surfactant drag reducers with commercial or semi-commercial corrosion inhibitors in regard to maintaining their drag reducing ability and corrosion inhibiting capability.

  19. Reduction of pumping energy losses in district heating and cooling systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakin, J.L.

    1991-12-01

    This project was designed to explore the effects of different structures of cationic surfactant drag reducing additives on their efficiency and on their effective temperature ranges. The goal was to develop surfactant systems that would be useful in the appropriate temperature ranges for district heating systems (50--110{degree}C) and for district cooling systems (2--20{degree}C). To this end the chemical compositions of quaternary annonium salts and of counter-ions were varied. More than twenty different commercial or semi commercial quarterly ammonium salts from US suppliers and two from a German supplier (Hoechst) were tested along with thirty five different counter-ions. In addition, blends of several of each were also tested. A further object of this project was to check the compatibility of surfactant drag reducers with commercial or semi-commercial corrosion inhibitors in regard to maintaining their drag reducing ability and corrosion inhibiting capability.

  20. How to solve materials and design problems in solar heating and cooling. Energy technology review No. 77

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, D.S.; Oberoi, H.S.; Weinstein, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    A broad range of difficulties encountered in active and passive solar space heating systems and active solar space cooling systems is covered. The problems include design errors, installation mistakes, inadequate durability of materials, unacceptable reliability of components, and wide variations in performance and operation of different solar systems. Feedback from designers and manufacturers involved in the solar market is summarized. The designers' experiences with and criticisms of solar components are presented, followed by the manufacturers' replies to the various problems encountered. Information is presented on the performance and operation of solar heating and cooling systems so as to enable future designs to maximize performance and eliminate costly errors. (LEW)

  1. Tips: Smart Appliances | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Some manufacturers are now offering "smart" appliances -- appliances that can be connected to smart electric meters or home energy management systems to help you shift your...

  2. Xcel Energy - Appliance Recycling Rebate Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Rebate Amount 40appliance Summary The Appliance Recycling Program offers free pick up and recycling of old, inefficient, working refrigerators and freezers....

  3. CONNECTING STAR FORMATION QUENCHING WITH GALAXY STRUCTURE AND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL HEATING OF COOLING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Fulai

    2014-12-20

    Recent observations suggested that star formation quenching in galaxies is related to galaxy structure. Here we propose a new mechanism to explain the physical origin of this correlation. We assume that while quenching is maintained in quiescent galaxies by a feedback mechanism, cooling flows in the hot halo gas can still develop intermittently. We study cooling flows in a large suite of around 90 hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated galaxy group, and find that the flow development depends significantly on the gravitational potential well in the central galaxy. If the galaxy's gravity is not strong enough, cooling flows result in a central cooling catastrophe, supplying cold gas and feeding star formation to galactic bulges. When the bulge grows prominent enough, compressional heating starts to offset radiative cooling and maintains cooling flows in a long-term hot mode without producing a cooling catastrophe. Our model thus describes a self-limited growth channel for galaxy bulges and naturally explains the connection between quenching and bulge prominence. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate that M{sub ?}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5} is a good structural predictor of quenching. We further find that the gravity from the central supermassive black hole also affects the bimodal fate of cooling flows, and we predict a more general quenching predictor to be M{sub bh}{sup 1.6}M{sub ?}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5}, which may be tested in future observational studies.

  4. Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility 6801 Industrial Road Springfield, VA Date: October 9, 2014 Time: ...

  5. Remote repair appliance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heumann, Frederick K. (Ballston Spa, NY); Wilkinson, Jay C. (Ballston Spa, NY); Wooding, David R. (Saratoga Springs, NY)

    1997-01-01

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a worksite on a substantially circular bore of a workpiece and for providing video signals of the worksite to a remote monitor comprising: a baseplate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the baseplate and positioned to roll against the bore of the workpiece when the baseplate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the baseplate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the baseplate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the baseplate; a camera for providing video signals of the worksite to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the baseplate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the baseplate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris.

  6. Remote repair appliance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heumann, F.K.; Wilkinson, J.C.; Wooding, D.R.

    1997-12-16

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a work site on a substantially circular bore of a work piece and for providing video signals of the work site to a remote monitor comprises: a base plate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the base plate and positioned to roll against the bore of the work piece when the base plate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the base plate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the base plate; a camera for providing video signals of the work site to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the base plate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris. 5 figs.

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Commercial Equipment Efficiencies Equipment Type Chiller Screw COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.02 / 4.45 Scroll COP 2.80 / 3.06 2.96 / 4.40 N.A. Reciprocating COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.52 / 4.40 Centrifugal COP(full-load / IPLV) 5.0 / 5.2 6.1 / 6.4 7.3 / 9.0 Gas-Fired Absorption COP 1.0 1.1 N.A. Gas-Fired Engine Driven COP 1.5 1.8 N.A. Rooftop A/C EER 10.1 11.2 13.9 Rooftop Heat Pump EER (cooling) 9.8 11.0 12.0 COP (heating) 3.2 3.3 3.4 Boilers Gas-Fired

  8. Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    #EnergyFaceoff Round 4? | Department of Energy Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in #EnergyFaceoff Round 4? Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water in #EnergyFaceoff Round 4? November 24, 2014 - 9:38am Q&A Which appliance do you think is more efficient? Tell Us Addthis Microwave or electric kettle, which appliance should win the honor of heating your water? | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Microwave or

  9. Ductless Heat Pumps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  10. Heat Pump Water Heaters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  11. Performance of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. Final report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

    1981-03-01

    Operation of CSU Solar House I during the heating season of 1978-1979 and during the 1979 cooling season was based on the use of systems comprising an experimental evacuated tubular solar collector, a non-freezing aqueous collection medium, heat exchange to an insulated conventional vertical cylindrical storage tank and to a built-up rectangular insulated storage tank, heating of circulating air by solar heated water and by electric auxiliary in an off-peak heat storage unit, space cooling by lithium bromide absorption chiller, and service water heating by solar exchange and electric auxiliary. Automatic system control and automatic data acquisition and computation are provided. This system is compared with others evaluated in CSU Solar Houses I, II and III, and with computer predictions based on mathematical models. Of the 69,513 MJ total energy requirement for space heating and hot water during a record cold winter, solar provided 33,281 MJ equivalent to 48 percent. Thirty percent of the incident solar energy was collected and 29 percent was delivered and used for heating and hot water. Of 33,320 MJ required for cooling and hot water during the summer, 79 percent or 26,202 MJ were supplied by solar. Thirty-five percent of the incident solar energy was collected and 26 percent was used for hot water and cooling in the summer. Although not as efficient as the Corning evacuated tube collector previously used, the Philips experimental collector provides solar heating and cooling with minimum operational problems. Improved performance, particularly for cooling, resulted from the use of a very well-insulated heat storage tank. Day time (on-peak) electric auxiliary heating was completely avoided by use of off-peak electric heat storage. A well-designed and operated solar heating and cooling system provided 56 percent of the total energy requirements for heating, cooling, and hot water.

  12. Tips: Shopping for Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shopping for Appliances Tips: Shopping for Appliances What's the real cost? Every appliance has two price tags -- the purchase price and the operating cost. Consider both when buying a new appliance. What's the real cost? Every appliance has two price tags -- the purchase price and the operating cost. Consider both when buying a new appliance. When you're shopping for appliances, think of two price tags. The first one covers the purchase price -- think of it as a down payment. The second price

  13. TRITIUM IN-BED ACCOUNTABILITY FOR A PASSIVELY COOLED, ELECTRICALLY HEATED HYDRIDE BED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J.; Foster, P.

    2011-01-21

    A PAssively Cooled, Electrically heated hydride (PACE) Bed has been deployed into tritium service in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facilities. The bed design, absorption and desorption performance, and cold (non-radioactive) in-bed accountability (IBA) results have been reported previously. Six PACE Beds were fitted with instrumentation to perform the steady-state, flowing gas calorimetric inventory method. An IBA inventory calibration curve, flowing gas temperature rise ({Delta}T) versus simulated or actual tritium loading, was generated for each bed. Results for non-radioactive ('cold') tests using the internal electric heaters and tritium calibration results are presented. Changes in vacuum jacket pressure significantly impact measured IBA {Delta}T values. Higher jacket pressures produce lower IBA {Delta}T values which underestimate bed tritium inventories. The exhaust pressure of the IBA gas flow through the bed's U-tube has little influence on measured IBA {Delta}T values, but larger gas flows reduce the time to reach steady-state conditions and produce smaller tritium measurement uncertainties.

  14. Phase change based cooling for high burst mode heat loads with temperature regulation above the phase change temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The United States of America as represented by the United States Department of Energy

    2009-12-15

    An apparatus and method for transferring thermal energy from a heat load is disclosed. In particular, use of a phase change material and specific flow designs enables cooling with temperature regulation well above the fusion temperature of the phase change material for medium and high heat loads from devices operated intermittently (in burst mode). Exemplary heat loads include burst mode lasers and laser diodes, flight avionics, and high power space instruments. Thermal energy is transferred from the heat load to liquid phase change material from a phase change material reservoir. The liquid phase change material is split into two flows. Thermal energy is transferred from the first flow via a phase change material heat sink. The second flow bypasses the phase change material heat sink and joins with liquid phase change material exiting from the phase change material heat sink. The combined liquid phase change material is returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. The ratio of bypass flow to flow into the phase change material heat sink can be varied to adjust the temperature of the liquid phase change material returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. Varying the flowrate and temperature of the liquid phase change material presented to the heat load determines the magnitude of thermal energy transferred from the heat load.

  15. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Full report (4.1 mb) Heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.9...

  16. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    characterizes most major residential equipment and commercial heating, cooling, and water heating equipment. Appendix A was used in developing Reference case projections, while...

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Residential Boiler Efficiencies (1) Gas-Fired Boilers Oil-Fired Boilers Average shipped in 1985 (2): 74% AFUE Average shipped in 1985 (2): 79% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 81% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 86% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 96% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 89% AFUE Note(s): Source(s): 1) Federal appliance standards effective Jan. 1, 1992, require a minimum of 80% AFUE (except gas-fired steam boiler, which must have a 75% AFUE or higher). 2) Includes furnaces. GAMA, Consumer's

  18. Appliances and Electronics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Saver » Appliances and Electronics Appliances and Electronics Choose efficient appliances and use them wisely to save money and energy. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder/NREL. Choose efficient appliances and use them wisely to save money and energy. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder/NREL. You can save money and energy at home by choosing energy efficient appliances and electronics and reducing the amount you use them. Explore the following topics to reduce your electricity use and

  19. Nebraska Appliance Rebate Program opens

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nearly 500 people lined up outside of Omaha's Nebraska Furniture Mart on July 6, waiting to get ENERGY STAR washing machines, dishwashers and refrigerators on the first day of Nebraska's Appliance Rebate Program.

  20. Appliances & Electronics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    href"node587248">Check out these tips -- which include using a power strip and switching to ENERGY STAR appliances -- that every homeowner should try. Looking for ways to...

  1. Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arizona’s Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards (Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 44, Section 1375) set minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have since been...

  2. High strength and heat resistant chromium steels for sodium-cooled fast reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamal, S.; Grandy, C.; Farmer, M.; Brunsvold, A.

    2004-12-22

    This report provides the results of a preliminary phase of a project supporting the Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Initiative at ANL. The project targets the Generation IV nuclear energy systems, particularly the area of reducing the cost of sodium-cooled fast-reactors by utilizing innovative materials. The main goal of the project is to provide the nuclear heat exchanger designers a simplified means to quantify the cost advantages of the recently developed high strength and heat resistant ferritic steels with 9 to 13% chromium content. The emphasis in the preliminary phase is on two steels that show distinctive advantages and have been proposed as candidate materials for heat exchangers and also for reactor vessels and near-core components of Gen IV reactors. These steels are the 12Cr-2W (HCM12A) and 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo). When these steels are in tube form, they are referred to in ASTM Standards as T122 and T91, respectively. A simple thermal-hydraulics analytical model of a counter-flow, shell-and-tube, once-through type superheated steam generator is developed to determine the required tube length and tube wall temperature profile. The single-tube model calculations are then extended to cover the following design criteria: (i) ratio of the tube stress due to water/steam pressure to the ASME B&PV Code allowable stress, (ii) ratio of the strain due to through-tube-wall temperature differences to the material fatigue limit, (iii) overall differential thermal expansion between the tube and shell, and (iv) total amount of tube material required for the specified heat exchanger thermal power. Calculations were done for a 292 MW steam generator design with 2200 tubes and a steam exit condition of 457 C and 16 MPa. The calculations were performed with the tubes made of the two advanced ferritic steels, 12Cr-2W and 9Cr-1MoVNb, and of the most commonly used steel, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo. Compared to the 2 1/4Cr-1Mo results, the 12Cr-2W tubes required 29% less material and the 9Cr-1MoVNb tubes required 25% less material. Also, with the advanced steels, the thermal strains in the tubes and differential thermal expansion between tubes and shell were significantly better. For steam generators with higher steam exit temperatures, the benefits of the advanced steels become much larger. A thorough search for the thermal and mechanical properties of the two advanced steels was conducted. A summary of the search results is provided. It shows what is presently known about these two advanced steels and what still needs to be determined so that they can be used in nuclear heat exchanger designs. Possible follow up steps are outlined.

  3. The absorption chiller in large scale solar pond cooling design with condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsilingiris, P.T. )

    1992-07-01

    The possibility of using solar ponds as low-cost solar collectors combined with commercial absorption chillers in large scale solar cooling design is investigated. The analysis is based on the combination of a steady-state solar pond mathematical model with the operational characteristics of a commercial absorption chiller, assuming condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone (U.C.Z.). The numerical solution of the nonlinear equations involved leads to results which relate the chiller capacity with pond design and environmental parameters, which are also employed for the investigation of the optimum pond size for a minimum capital cost. The derived cost per cooling kW for a 350 kW chiller ranges from about 300 to 500 $/kW cooling. This is almost an order of magnitude lower than using a solar collector field of evacuated tube type.

  4. Economic analysis of wind-powered refrigeration cooling/water-heating systems in food processing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

    1980-03-01

    Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in refrigeration cooling and water heating systems in food processing plants. Types of plants included were meat and poultry, dairy, fruit and vegetable, and aquaculture.

  5. Micro Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center, Mississippi State University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louay Chamra

    2008-09-26

    Initially, most micro-CHP systems will likely be designed as constant-power output or base-load systems. This implies that at some point the power requirement will not be met, or that the requirement will be exceeded. Realistically, both cases will occur within a 24-hour period. For example, in the United States, the base electrical load for the average home is approximately 2 kW while the peak electrical demand is slightly over 4 kW. If a 3 kWe micro- CHP system were installed in this situation, part of the time more energy will be provided than could be used and for a portion of the time more energy will be required than could be provided. Jalalzadeh-Azar [6] investigated this situation and presented a comparison of electrical- and thermal-load-following CHP systems. In his investigation he included in a parametric analysis addressing the influence of the subsystem efficiencies on the total primary energy consumption as well as an economic analysis of these systems. He found that an increase in the efficiencies of the on-site power generation and electrical equipment reduced the total monthly import of electricity. A methodology for calculating performance characteristics of different micro-CHP system components will be introduced in this article. Thermodynamic cycles are used to model each individual prime mover. The prime movers modeled in this article are a spark-ignition internal combustion engine (Otto cycle) and a diesel engine (Diesel cycle). Calculations for heat exchanger, absorption chiller, and boiler modeling are also presented. The individual component models are then linked together to calculate total system performance values. Performance characteristics that will be observed for each system include maximum fuel flow rate, total monthly fuel consumption, and system energy (electrical, thermal, and total) efficiencies. Also, whether or not both the required electrical and thermal loads can sufficiently be accounted for within the system specifications is observed. Case study data for various micro-CHP system configurations have been discussed and compared. Comparisons are made of the different prime mover/fuel combinations. Also, micro- CHP monthly energy cost results are compared for each system configuration to conventional monthly utility costs for equivalent monthly building power, heating, and cooling requirements.

  6. In-Bed Accountability Development for a Passively Cooled, Electrically Heated Hydride (PACE) Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J.E.

    2005-07-15

    A nominal 1500 STP-L PAssively Cooled, Electrically heated hydride (PACE) Bed has been developed for implementation into a new Savannah River Site tritium project. The 1.2 meter (four-foot) long process vessel contains on internal 'U-tube' for tritium In-Bed Accountability (IBA) measurements. IBA will be performed on six, 12.6 kg production metal hydride storage beds.IBA tests were done on a prototype bed using electric heaters to simulate the radiolytic decay of tritium. Tests had gas flows from 10 to 100 SLPM through the U-tube or 100 SLPM through the bed's vacuum jacket. IBA inventory measurement errors at the 95% confidence level were calculated using the correlation of IBA gas temperature rise, or (hydride) bed temperature rise above ambient temperature, versus simulated tritium inventory.Prototype bed IBA inventory errors at 100 SLPM were the largest for gas flows through the vacuum jacket: 15.2 grams for the bed temperature rise and 11.5 grams for the gas temperature rise. For a 100 SLPM U-tube flow, the inventory error was 2.5 grams using bed temperature rise and 1.6 grams using gas temperature rise. For 50 to 100 SLPM U-tube flows, the IBA gas temperature rise inventory errors were nominally one to two grams that increased above four grams for flows less than 50 SLPM. For 50 to 100 SLPM U-tube flows, the IBA bed temperature rise inventory errors were greater than the gas temperature rise errors, but similar errors were found for both methods at gas flows of 20, 30, and 40 SLPM.Electric heater IBA tests were done for six production hydride beds using a 45 SLPM U-tube gas flow. Of the duplicate runs performed on these beds, five of the six beds produced IBA inventory errors of approximately three grams: consistent with results obtained in the laboratory prototype tests.

  7. In-Bed Accountability Development for a Passively Cooled, Electrically Heated Hydride (PACE) Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KLEIN, JAMES

    2004-10-12

    A nominal 1500 STP-L PAssively Cooled, Electrically heated hydride (PACE) Bed has been developed for implementation into a new Savannah River Site tritium project. The 1.2 meter (four-foot) long process vessel contains an internal ''U-tube'' for tritium In-Bed Accountability (IBA) measurements. IBA will be performed on six, 12.6 kg production metal hydride storage beds. IBA tests were done on a prototype bed using electric heaters to simulate the radiolytic decay of tritium. Tests had gas flows from 10 to 100 SLPM through the U-tube or 100 SLPM through the bed's vacuum jacket. IBA inventory measurement errors at the 95 percent confidence level were calculated using the correlation of IBA gas temperature rise, or (hydride) bed temperature rise above ambient temperature, versus simulated tritium inventory. Prototype bed IBA inventory errors at 100 SLPM were the largest for gas flows through the vacuum jacket: 15.2 grams for the bed temperature rise and 11.5 grams for the gas temperature rise. For a 100 SLPM U-tube flow, the inventory error was 2.5 grams using bed temperature rise and 1.6 grams using gas temperature rise. For 50 to 100 SLPM U-tube flows, the IBA gas temperature rise inventory errors were nominally one to two grams that increased above four grams for flows less than 50 SLPM. For 50 to 100 SLPM U-tube flows, the IBA bed temperature rise inventory errors were greater than the gas temperature rise errors, but similar errors were found for both methods at gas flows of 20, 30, and 40 SLPM. Electric heater IBA tests were done for six production hydride beds using a 45 SLPM U-tube gas flow. Of the duplicate runs performed on these beds, five of the six beds produced IBA inventory errors of approximately three grams: consistent with results obtained in the laboratory prototype tests.

  8. Roof aperture system for selective collection and control of solar energy for building heating, cooling and daylighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, William J. (Kansas City, KS); Snyder, Marvin K. (Overland Park, KS); Harter, James W. (Independence, MO)

    1983-01-01

    The amount of building heating, cooling and daylighting is controlled by at least one pair of solar energy passing panels, with each panel of the pair of panels being exposed to a separate direction of sun incidence. A shutter-shade combination is associated with each pair of panels and the shutter is connected to the shade so that rectilinear movement of the shutter causes pivotal movement of the shade.

  9. Roof aperture system for selective collection and control of solar energy for building heating, cooling and daylighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, W.J.; Harter, J.W.; Snyder, M.K.

    1983-12-06

    The amount of building heating, cooling and daylighting is controlled by at least one pair of solar energy passing panels, with each panel of the pair of panels being exposed to a separate direction of sun incidence. A shutter-shade combination is associated with each pair of panels and the shutter is connected to the shade so that rectilinear movement of the shutter causes pivotal movement of the shade.

  10. ETs HVAC, WH and Appliance R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ET's HVAC, WH and Appliance R&D Antonio M. Bouza, DOE/BTO Technology Manager April 14-15 2015 2 Introduction Program Goals: Support BTO's goals to achieve 50 percent building energy savings * By 2020, develop technologies enabling 10 percent energy savings in HVAC; 20 percent energy savings in water heating, and 15 percent energy savings in appliances * By 2030, develop technologies enabling 25 percent energy savings in HVAC; 35 percent energy savings in water heating, and 30 percent energy

  11. Design Report for the Scale Air-Cooled RCCS Tests in the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisowski, D. D.; Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Bremer, N.; Aeschlimann, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) is a large scale thermal hydraulics test facility that has been built at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility was constructed in order to carry out highly instrumented experiments that can be used to validate the performance of passive safety systems for advanced reactor designs. The facility has principally been designed for testing of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) concepts that rely on natural convection cooling for either air or water-based systems. Standing 25-m in height, the facility is able to supply up to 220 kW at 21 kW/m2 to accurately simulate the heat fluxes at the walls of a reactor pressure vessel. A suite of nearly 400 data acquisition channels, including a sophisticated fiber optic system for high density temperature measurements, guides test operations and provides data to support scaling analysis and modeling efforts. Measurements of system mass flow rate, air and surface temperatures, heat flux, humidity, and pressure differentials, among others; are part of this total generated data set. The following report provides an introduction to the top level-objectives of the program related to passively safe decay heat removal, a detailed description of the engineering specifications, design features, and dimensions of the test facility at Argonne. Specifications of the sensors and their placement on the test facility will be provided, along with a complete channel listing of the data acquisition system.

  12. Fort Collins Utilities- Residential Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers. The appliance rebate program offers a $50 rebate for Energy Star rated...

  13. Tips: Shopping for Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliances July 16, 2014 - 7:33pm Addthis What's the real cost? Every appliance has two price tags -- the purchase price and the operating cost. Consider both when buying a new...

  14. Tips: Smart Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    available as smart appliances. Smart appliances don't just turn off during times of peak electricity demand -- instead, they use subtle ways to shift energy use. You might not...

  15. MC Appliance: Order (2014-CE-20002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered MC Appliance Corporation to pay a $16,000 civil penalty after finding MC Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of residential clothes washers and residential clothes dryers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  16. Midea Washing Appliance: Order (2011-CE-1903)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Midea Washing Appliance Mfg. Co., Ltd. to pay a $6,000 civil penalty after finding Midea Washing Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of dishwashers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  17. Distinctive Appliances: Order (2014-CE-23020)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Distinctive Appliances Distributing, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Distinctive Appliances had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  18. BSH Home Appliances: Order (2014-CE-23013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered BSH Home Appliances Corporation to pay a $12,000 civil penalty after finding BSH Home Appliances had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  19. GE Appliances: Order (2010-CE-2113)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued an Order after entering into a Compromise Agreement with General Electric Appliances after finding GE Appliances had failed to certify that certain models of dehumidifiers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatiblemore » with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-ε turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.« less

  1. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatible with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-? turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.

  2. Appliance Standards Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementation, Certification, & Enforcement Rulemakings & Notices Further Guidance ENERGY STAR Building Energy Codes Appliance Standards Guidance and Frequently Asked...

  3. A validated methodology for the prediction of heating and cooling energy demand for buildings within the Urban Heat Island: Case-study of London

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolokotroni, Maria; Bhuiyan, Saiful; Davies, Michael; Croxford, Ben; Mavrogianni, Anna

    2010-12-15

    This paper describes a method for predicting air temperatures within the Urban Heat Island at discreet locations based on input data from one meteorological station for the time the prediction is required and historic measured air temperatures within the city. It uses London as a case-study to describe the method and its applications. The prediction model is based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) modelling and it is termed the London Site Specific Air Temperature (LSSAT) predictor. The temporal and spatial validity of the model was tested using data measured 8 years later from the original dataset; it was found that site specific hourly air temperature prediction provides acceptable accuracy and improves considerably for average monthly values. It thus is a very reliable tool for use as part of the process of predicting heating and cooling loads for urban buildings. This is illustrated by the computation of Heating Degree Days (HDD) and Cooling Degree Hours (CDH) for a West-East Transect within London. The described method could be used for any city for which historic hourly air temperatures are available for a number of locations; for example air pollution measuring sites, common in many cities, typically measure air temperature on an hourly basis. (author)

  4. Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling Products into Federal Acquisition Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) organized information about FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) and water heating products into tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 minimum efficiency requirement tables. Federal buyers can use these tables as a reference and to incorporate the proper purchasing requirements set by FEMP and ENERGY STAR into federal acquisition documents.

  5. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  6. U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney Barracks.

  7. U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-01

    FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney Barracks.

  8. Cooling and Heating Season Impacts of Right-Sizing of Fixed- and Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps With Attic and Indoor Ductwork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Kono, Jamie

    2015-06-24

    A new generation of full variable-capacity air-conditioning (A/C) and heat pump units has come on the market that promises to deliver very high cooling and heating efficiency. The units are controlled differently than standard single-capacity (fixed-capacity) systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, the new units can vary their capacity over a wide range (approximately 40%118% of nominal full capacity) and stay on for 60%100% more hours per day than the fixed-capacity systems depending on load-to-capacity ratios. Two-stage systems were not evaluated in this research effort.

  9. Oregon State Energy-Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program Helps Low-Income

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Families | Department of Energy Oregon State Energy-Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program Helps Low-Income Families Oregon State Energy-Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program Helps Low-Income Families April 16, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) provides low-income Oregon homeowners with rebates on energy-efficient equipment. SEEARP began in January 2010 with a 70% reimbursement (up to $2,000) on ENERGY STAR® qualified heat pumps and furnaces. It

  10. Optimization of biological recycling of plant nutrients in livestock waste by utilizing waste heat from cooling water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddox, J.J.; Behrends, L.L.; Burch, D.W.; Kingsley, J.B.; Waddell, E.L. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Results are presented from a 5-year study to develop aquatic methods which beneficially use condenser cooling water from electric generating power plants. A method is proposed which uses a system for aquatic farming. Livestock waste is used to fertilize planktonic algae production and filter-feeding fish are used to biologically harvest the algae, condenser cooling water (simulated) is used to add waste heat to the system, and emergent aquatic plants are used in a flow through series as a bio-filter to improve the water quality and produce an acceptable discharge. Two modes of operation were tested; one uses untreated swine manure as the source of aquatic fertilizer and the other uses anaerobic digester waste as a means of pretreating the manure to produce an organic fertilizer. A set of operating conditions (temperature, retention time, fish stocking rate, fertilizer rates, land and water requirements, suggested fish and plant species, and facility design) were developed from these results. The integrated system allows continual use of power plant condenser cooling water from plants in the southeastern United States.

  11. Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. H. Oh; C. Davis; S. Sherman

    2008-08-01

    A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic and cycleefficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. This paper also includes a portion of stress analyses performed on pipe configurations.

  12. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  13. Water Cooling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Water Cooling: Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an...

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    U.S. Heating and Air-Conditioning System Manufacturer Shipments, by Type (Including Exports) 2005 Value of 2000 2005 2007 2009 2010 Shipments Equipment Type (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) ($million) (7) Air-Conditioners (1) 5,346 6,472 4,508 3,516 3419 5,837 Heat Pumps 1,539 2,336 1,899 1,642 1,748 2,226 Air-to-Air Heat Pumps 1,339 2,114 1,899 1,642 1748 1,869 Water-Source Heat Pumps (2) 200 222 N.A. N.A. N.A. 357 Chillers 38 37 37 25 29 1,093 Reciprocating 25 24 30 20 24 462

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2008 Unitary Air-Conditioner/Heat Pump Manufacturer Market Shares (Percent of Products Produced) Company Market Share (%) Total Units Shipped: (1) UTC/Carrier 27% Goodman (Amana) 14% American Standard (Trane) 14% York 12% Nordyne 12% Rheem 9% Lennox 9% Others 3% Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 5,833,354 1) Does not include water-source or ground-source heat pumps.

  16. Radiant Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Systems » Radiant Cooling Radiant Cooling Radiant cooling cools a floor or ceiling by absorbing the heat radiated from the rest of the room. When the floor is cooled, it is often referred to as radiant floor cooling; cooling the ceiling is usually done in homes with radiant panels. Although potentially suitable for arid climates, radiant cooling is problematic for homes in more humid climates. Most radiant cooling home applications in North America have been based on aluminum panels

  17. Appliance Standard Program - The FY 2003 Priority -Setting Summary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Standard for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Public Meeting ISSUANCE...

  18. Guide to Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    among the most effcient and comfortable heating and cooling technologies available because they use the earth's natural heat to provide heating, cooling, and often, water heating. ...

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 Main Residential Heating Fuel, by Vintage, as of 2005 (Percent of Total Households) 1949 or 1950 to 1960 to 1970 to 1980 to 1990 to 2000 to Heating Fuel Before 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 2005 Natural Gas 56% 57% 55% 46% 45% 45% 45% Electricity 8% 18% 26% 36% 42% 42% 43% Fuel Oil 14% 10% 7% 5% 2% 2% 2% LPG 5% 3% 2% 5% 6% 8% 8% Other (1) 17% 12% 10% 8% 4% 3% 2% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Other includes wood and kerosene. EIA, Residential Energy Consumption

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Main Residential Heating Equipment as of 1987, 1993, 1997, 2001, and 2005 (Percent of Total Households) Equipment Type 1987 1993 1997 2001 2005 Natural Gas 55% 53% 53% 55% 52% Central Warm-Air Furnace 35% 36% 38% 42% 40% Steam or Hot-Water System 10% 9% 7% 7% 7% Floor/Wall/Pipeless Furnace 6% 4% 4% 3% 2% Room Heater/Other 4% 3% 4% 3% 3% Electricity 20% 26% 29% 29% 30% Central Warm-Air Furnace 8% 10% 11% 12% 14% Heat Pump 5% 8% 10% 10% 8% Built-In Electric Units 6% 7% 7% 6% 5% Other 1% 1% 2% 2%

  1. Review of state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes. Task 1 of solar collector studies for solar heating and cooling applications. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, J E; Diegle, R B

    1980-04-11

    The state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes is reviewed, and Task 1 of a current research program on use of aqueous heat transfer fluids for solar heating and cooling is summarized. The review of available published literature has indicated that lack of quantitative information exists relative to collector corrosion at the present time, particularly for the higher temperature applications of solar heating and cooling compared to domestic water heating. Solar collector systems are reviewed from the corrosion/service life viewpoint, with emphasis on various applications, collector design, heat transfer fluids, and freeze protection methods. Available information (mostly qualitative) on collector corrosion technology is reviewed to indicate potential corrosion problem areas and corrosion prevention practices. Sources of limited quantitative data that are reviewed are current solar applications, research programs on collector corrosion, and pertinent experience in related applications of automotive cooling and non-solar heating and cooling. A data bank was developed to catalog corrosion information. Appendix A of this report is a bibliography of the data bank, with abstracts reproduced from presently available literature accessions (about 220). This report is presented as a descriptive summary of information that is contained in the data bank.

  2. Appliance Standards Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance Standards Resources Appliance Standards Resources The federal government, and some states, have established minimum efficiency standards for certain appliances and equipment, such as refrigerators and clothes washers. Standards may require products adhere to a certain maximum allowable energy consumption or dictate that a product contain particular features or devices. Alternatively, they may also require an average efficiency across all models of a product, which allows a mix of less

  3. Stochastic Optimal Scheduling of Residential Appliances with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Return to Search Stochastic Optimal Scheduling of Residential Appliances with Renewable Energy Sources National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology ...

  4. Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York appliance efficiency standards legislation, enacted in 2005, covers the following products offered for sale in New York not preempted by federal standards as of August 2011:

  5. Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 2005, Oregon passed legislation setting minimum energy efficiency standards for 11 appliances. The standards have been updated to include additional products, most recently by Senate Bill...

  6. Distinctive Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-23020)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Distinctive Appliances Distributing Inc. failed to certify cooking products as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  7. Smart Domestic Appliances Provide Flexibility for Sustainable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentsmart-domestic-appliances-provide-fle Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible...

  8. ASKO Appliances: Compliance Determination (2010-SE-0601)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE tested four units dishwasher manufactured by ASKO Appliances, Inc. Applying statistical analysis, DOE found that the dishwasher meets the federal energy standards for maximum energy use.

  9. Appliances & Electronics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science & Innovation » Energy Efficiency » Homes » Appliances & Electronics Appliances & Electronics Looking for ways to save energy? <a href="/node/587248">Check out these tips</a> -- which include using a power strip and switching to ENERGY STAR appliances -- that every homeowner should try. Looking for ways to save energy? Check out these tips -- which include using a power strip and switching to ENERGY STAR appliances -- that every homeowner should try.

  10. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) for Power and Process Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles; Hu, Lin-wen; Peterson, Per; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-01-21

    In 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy through its Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) awarded a 3- year integrated research project (IRP) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its partners at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW). The IRP included Westinghouse Electric Company and an advisory panel chaired by Regis Matzie that provided advice as the project progressed. The first sentence of the proposal stated the goals: The objective of this Integrated Research Project (IRP) is to develop a path forward to a commercially viable salt-cooled solid-fuel high-temperature reactor with superior economic, safety, waste, nonproliferation, and physical security characteristics compared to light-water reactors. This report summarizes major results of this research.

  11. Novel Controls for Time-Dependent Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling Heating and Power (CCHP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuelsen, Scott; Brouwer, Jack

    2013-08-31

    The research and development effort detailed in this report directly addresses the challenge of reducing U.S. industrial energy and carbon intensity by contributing to an increased understanding of potential CCHP technology, the CCHP market and the challenges of widespread adoption. This study developed a number of new tools, models, and approaches for the design, control, and optimal dispatch of various CCHP technologies. The UC Irvine campus served as a ‘living laboratory’ of new CCHP technologies and enabled the design and demonstration of several novel control methods. In particular, the integration of large scale thermal energy storage capable of shifting an entire day of cooling demand required a novel approach to the CCHP dispatch optimization. The thermal energy storage proved an economically viable resource which reduced both costs and emissions by enabling generators and chillers to operate under steady high efficiency conditions at all times of the day.

  12. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  13. High Efficiency Adsorption Chillers: High Efficiency Adsorption Cooling Using Metal Organic Heat Carriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: PNNL is incorporating significant improvements in materials that adsorb liquids or gases to design more efficient adsorption chillers. An adsorption chiller is a type of air conditioner that is powered by heat, solar or waste heat, or combustion of natural gas. Unlike typical chillers, this type has few moving parts and uses almost no electricity to operate. PNNL is designing adsorbent materials at the molecular level with at least 3 times higher refrigerant capacity and up to 20 times faster kinetics than adsorbents used in current chillers. By using the new adsorbent, PNNL is able to create a chiller that is significantly smaller, has twice the energy efficiency, and lower costs for materials and assembly time compared to conventional adsorption chillers.

  14. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  15. Appliance Rebate Program Still Buzzing in the Beehive State

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah's appliance rebate program, known as Cash for Appliances Utah, distributes rebates across the state ranging from $30-$300 for ENERGY STAR appliances - including washers, furnaces, storage and tankless water heaters, and air conditioners.

  16. Appliance energy efficiency in new home construction. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-30

    A survey of 224 builders was conducted to which 160 builders responded. Each respondent completed between one and seven separate questionnaires. Each of the seven questionnaires were designed to collect information about one type of equipment or major appliance. These are: heat pump; heating system; air conditioner; domestic water heater; dishwasher; range; and refrigerator. Analysis of the resulting 406 questionnaires indicated that builders were primarily responsible for brand selection. These choices were made primarily without regard for the energy efficiency of the product. A similar apparent lack of consideration of energy efficiency during brand and model selection was found among home buyers and specialized subcontractors.

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 Major Residential HVAC Equipment Lifetimes, Ages, and Replacement Picture Equipment Type Central Air Conditioners 8 - 14 11 8 5,354 Heat Pumps 9 - 15 12 8 1,260 Furnaces Electric 10 - 20 15 11 N.A. Gas-Fired 12 - 17 15 11 2,601 Oil-Fired 15 - 19 17 N.A. 149 Gas-Fired Boilers (1) 17 - 24 20 17 204 Note(s): Source(s): Lifetimes based on use by the first owner of the product, and do not necessarily indicate that the product stops working after this period. A replaced unit may be discarded or used

  18. Passive containment cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  19. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Appliance & Equipment Standards » Rulemakings & Notices » Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee The Appliance and Equipment Standards Program established the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) in an effort to further improve the Department of Energy's (DOE) process of establishing energy efficiency standards for certain appliances and commercial

  20. Combining nanocalorimetry and dynamic transmission electron microscopy for in situ characterization of materials processes under rapid heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grapes, Michael D.; LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; LaVan, David A.; Weihs, Timothy P.

    2014-08-15

    Nanocalorimetry is a chip-based thermal analysis technique capable of analyzing endothermic and exothermic reactions at very high heating and cooling rates. Here, we couple a nanocalorimeter with an extremely fast in situ microstructural characterization tool to identify the physical origin of rapid enthalpic signals. More specifically, we describe the development of a system to enable in situ nanocalorimetry experiments in the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), a time-resolved TEM capable of generating images and electron diffraction patterns with exposure times of 30 ns500 ns. The full experimental system consists of a modified nanocalorimeter sensor, a custom-built in situ nanocalorimetry holder, a data acquisition system, and the DTEM itself, and is capable of thermodynamic and microstructural characterization of reactions over a range of heating rates (10{sup 2} K/s10{sup 5} K/s) accessible by conventional (DC) nanocalorimetry. To establish its ability to capture synchronized calorimetric and microstructural data during rapid transformations, this work describes measurements on the melting of an aluminum thin film. We were able to identify the phase transformation in both the nanocalorimetry traces and in electron diffraction patterns taken by the DTEM. Potential applications for the newly developed system are described and future system improvements are discussed.

  1. Four-County EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Four-County EMC offers its customers $50 rebates for purchasing certain Energy Star appliances. Eligible appliances include refrigerators, dishwashers, clothes washers and freezers. The rebates are...

  2. State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) reports...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) reports database The State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) reports database includes rebate reports...

  3. Cixi Renhe Photovoltaic Electrical Appliance Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cixi Renhe Photovoltaic Electrical Appliance Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cixi Renhe Photovoltaic Electrical Appliance Co Ltd Place: Cixi, Zhejiang Province, China Zip:...

  4. Shenzhen Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shenzhen Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd Place: Xixiang Town,Shenzhen, Guangdong...

  5. State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program Design Lessons Learned State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program Design Lessons...

  6. EIA Energy Efficiency-Appliance Standards and Labeling Links

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and enforcement requirements for residential appliances; final rule Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Appliances & Commercial Equipment Standards, the program develops test...

  7. Energy Efficient Appliance Sales Soar in North Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It took just eight days for retailers to rack up $64 million in sales of appliances through the state's Appliance Rebate Program.

  8. Appliance Standards and Building Codes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building Codes Appliance Standards and Building Codes Appliance Standards Overview for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review appstdsoverviewcymbalsky040213...

  9. MC Appliance: Order (2012-CE-1508)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered CNA International Inc. d/b/a MC Appliance Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding MC Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of room air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  10. Appliance Standards Awareness Project | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appliance Standards Awareness Project Appliance Standards Awareness Project On January 14, representatives of energy efficiency advocates and fan manufacturers met to describe technical considerations related to fan efficiency with DOE. PDF icon ex parte memo for Jan 15 PDF icon BSQ-300 (1) More Documents & Publications Ex parte communication Ex parte communication NRDC Ex Parte Communication

  11. Rebates for ENERGY STAR Appliances: State Stories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As you're probably aware by now, every state and U.S. territory has been given funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to allow eligible consumers to receive rebates for the purchase of new energy-efficient appliances when they replace used appliances.

  12. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: A Guide to Developing Air-Cooled LiBr Absorption for Combined Heat and Power Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to Developing Air- Cooled LiBr Absorption for Combined Heat and Power Applications April 2005 By Robert A. Zogg Michael Y. Feng Detlef Westphalen TIAX LLC Re: D0281 Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND .................................................................................................1 2.0 LIBR ABSORPTION OVERVIEW...................................................................................................3 3.0 KEY TECHNOLOGY BARRIERS

  13. Promising Technology: Cool Roofs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A cool roof increases the solar reflectance of the roof surface. By reflecting more sunlight, the roof surface maintains a cooler temperature. This decrease in temperature leads to less heat transfer through the roof into the building below. During the cooling season, the addition of a cool roof can decrease the cooling load of the building.

  14. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mago, Pedro; Newell, LeLe

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  15. Wood and Pellet Heating Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wood and Pellet Heating Basics Wood and Pellet Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:02pm Addthis Wood-burning and pellet fuel appliances use biomass or waste resources to heat homes or buildings. Types of Wood- and Pellet-Burning Appliances The following is a brief overview of the different types of wood and pellet fuel appliances available. High-Efficiency Fireplaces and Fireplace Inserts Designed more for show, traditional open masonry fireplaces should not be considered heating devices.

  16. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) Advisory Committee Charter.

  17. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Wednesday, 25 May 2011 00:00 Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost

  18. Comparison of heating and cooling energy consumption by HVAC system with mixing and displacement air distribution for a restaurant dining area in different climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhivov, A.M.; Rymkevich, A.A.

    1998-12-31

    Different ventilation strategies to improve indoor air quality and to reduce HVAC system operating costs in a restaurant with nonsmoking and smoking areas and a bar are discussed in this paper. A generic sitting-type restaurant is used for the analysis. Prototype designs for the restaurant chain with more than 200 restaurants in different US climates were analyzed to collect the information on building envelope, dining area size, heat and contaminant sources and loads, occupancy rates, and current design practices. Four constant air volume HVAC systems wit h a constant and variable (demand-based) outdoor airflow rate, with a mixing and displacement air distribution, were compared in five representative US climates: cold (Minneapolis, MN); Maritime (Seattle, WA); moderate (Albuquerque, NM); hot-dry (Phoenix, AZ); and hot-humid (Miami, FL). For all four compared cases and climatic conditions, heating and cooling consumption by the HVAC system throughout the year-round operation was calculated and operation costs were compared. The analysis shows: Displacement air distribution allows for better indoor air quality in the breathing zone at the same outdoor air supply airflow rate due to contaminant stratification along the room height. The increase in outdoor air supply during the peak hours in Miami and Albuquerque results in an increase of both heating and cooling energy consumption. In other climates, the increase in outdoor air supply results in reduced cooling energy consumption. For the Phoenix, Minneapolis, and Seattle locations, the HVAC system operation with a variable outdoor air supply allows for a decrease in cooling consumption up to 50% and, in some cases, eliminates the use of refrigeration machines. The effect of temperature stratification on HVAC system parameters is the same for all locations; displacement ventilation systems result in decreased cooling energy consumption but increased heating consumption.

  19. U-197: Cisco Adaptive Security Appliances Denial of Service Vulnerability |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 7: Cisco Adaptive Security Appliances Denial of Service Vulnerability U-197: Cisco Adaptive Security Appliances Denial of Service Vulnerability June 22, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in Cisco Adaptive Security Appliances (ASA), which can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service). PLATFORM: Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance (ASA) 8.x Cisco ASA 5500 Series Adaptive Security Appliances ABSTRACT: The vulnerability

  20. Distinctive Appliances: Order (2015-CE-14019) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distinctive Appliances: Order (2015-CE-14019) Distinctive Appliances: Order (2015-CE-14019) February 19, 2015 DOE ordered Distinctive Appliances Distributing, Inc. to pay a $16,000 civil penalty after finding Distinctive Appliances had failed to certify that certain models of Fhiaba-brand refrigerator-freezers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Distinctive Appliances. PDF icon

  1. About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance & Equipment Standards » About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Buildings Technologies Office sets minimum energy efficiency standards for approximately 50 categories of appliances and equipment used in homes, businesses, and other applications, as required by existing law. The appliances and equipment covered provide services that are used by consumers and businesses each day,

  2. Appliance and Equipment Standards Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance and Equipment Standards Program Appliance and Equipment Standards Program Appliance and equipment standards are saving are saving consumers and businesses billions of dollars. Appliance and equipment standards are saving are saving consumers and businesses billions of dollars. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) implements minimum energy conservation standards for more than 65 categories of appliances and equipment. As a result of these standards, American consumers saved $63

  3. MC Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-20002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that MC Appliance Corporation failed to certify residential clothes washers and residential clothes dryers as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  4. West Virginia Consumers Have Appliance Rebate 'Trifecta'

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Virginians didn’t waste any time in taking advantage of the Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program. Only three months in, and almost half of the available $1.7 million is already spoken for.

  5. Equator Appliance: ENERGY STAR Referral (EZ 3720)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE referred Equator Appliance clothes washer EZ 3720 to EPA, brand manager of the ENERGY STAR program, for appropriate action after DOE testing revealed that the model does not meet ENERGY STAR requirements.

  6. Wyoming's Appliance Rebate Program Surges Ahead

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wyoming’s appliance rebate program, which opened in April, continues through this fall. Residents of the Equality State can receive rebates on ENERGY STAR certified clothes washers, dishwashers, water heaters and gas furnaces ranging from $50 to $250.

  7. MC Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2012-CE-1508)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that CNA International Inc. d/b/a MC Appliance Corporation failed to certify a variety of room air conditioners as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  8. Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington enacted appliance efficiency legislation in 2005, creating minimum efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have been preempted by federal law. HB 1004, signed in May 2009...

  9. State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed the State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) to...

  10. Distinctive Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2015-CE-14019)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Distinctive Appliances Distributing, Inc. failed to certify various Fhiaba-brand refrigerator-freezers as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  11. Non-intrusive appliance monitor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, George W. (Natick, MA); Kern, Jr., Edward C. (Lincoln, MA); Schweppe, Fred C. (Carlisle, MA)

    1989-08-15

    A non-intrusive monitor of energy consumption of residential appliances is described in which sensors, coupled to the power circuits entering a residence, supply analog voltage and current signals which are converted to digital format and processed to detect changes in certain residential load parameters, i.e., admittance. Cluster analysis techniques are employed to group change measurements into certain categories, and logic is applied to identify individual appliances and the energy consumed by each.

  12. State Appliance Standards (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    State appliance standards have existed for decades, starting with Californias enforcement of minimum efficiency requirements for refrigerators and several other products in 1979. In 1987, recognizing that different efficiency standards for the same products in different states could create problems for manufacturers, Congress enacted the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA), which initially covered 12 products. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT92), EPACT2005, and EISA2007 added additional residential and commercial products to the 12 products originally specified under NAECA.

  13. Non-intrusive appliance monitor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.; Schweppe, F.C.

    1989-08-15

    A non-intrusive monitor of energy consumption of residential appliances is described in which sensors, coupled to the power circuits entering a residence, supply analog voltage and current signals which are converted to digital format and processed to detect changes in certain residential load parameters, i.e., admittance. Cluster analysis techniques are employed to group change measurements into certain categories, and logic is applied to identify individual appliances and the energy consumed by each. 9 figs.

  14. Saving Energy and Money with Appliance and Equipment Standards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to nearly one-half of the carbon pollution from the entire U.S. energy sector for ... lamps (GSFLs), commercial air cooled air conditioners and heat pumps, and furnace fans. ...

  15. Market assessment for active solar heating and cooling products. Category B: a survey of decision-makers in the HVAC marketplace. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-09-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of the market for solar heating and cooling products for new and retrofit markets is reported. The emphasis is on the analysis of solar knowledge among HVAC decision makers and a comprehensive evaluation of their solar attitudes and behavior. The data from each of the following sectors are described and analyzed: residential consumers, organizational and manufacturing buildings, HVAC engineers and architects, builders/developers, and commercial/institutional segments. (MHR)

  16. Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment is an action issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  17. Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Xu, Tengfang; Taha, Haider; Wray, Craig; Sathaye, Jayant; Garg, Vishal; Tetali, Surekha; Babu, M. Hari; Reddy, K. Niranjan

    2011-05-25

    Cool roofs, cool pavements, and urban vegetation reduce energy use in buildings, lower local air pollutant concentrations, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions from urban areas. This report summarizes the results of a detailed monitoring project in India and related simulations of meteorology and air quality in three developing countries. The field results quantified direct energy savings from installation of cool roofs on individual commercial buildings. The measured annual energy savings potential from roof-whitening of previously black roofs ranged from 20-22 kWh/m2 of roof area, corresponding to an air-conditioning energy use reduction of 14-26% in commercial buildings. The study estimated that typical annual savings of 13-14 kWh/m2 of roof area could be achieved by applying white coating to uncoated concrete roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10-19%. With the assumption of an annual increase of 100,000 square meters of new roof construction for the next 10 years in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, the annual cooling energy savings due to whitening concrete roof would be 13-14 GWh of electricity in year ten alone, with cumulative 10-year cooling energy savings of 73-79 GWh for the region. The estimated savings for the entire country would be at least 10 times the savings in Hyderabad, i.e., more than 730-790 GWh. We estimated that annual direct CO2 reduction associated with reduced energy use would be 11-12 kg CO2/m2 of flat concrete roof area whitened, and the cumulative 10-year CO2 reduction would be approximately 0.60-0.65 million tons in India. With the price of electricity estimated at seven Rupees per kWh, the annual electricity savings on air-conditioning would be approximately 93-101 Rupees per m2 of roof. This would translate into annual national savings of approximately one billion Rupees in year ten, and cumulative 10-year savings of over five billion Rupees for cooling energy in India. Meteorological simulations in this study indicated that a reduction of 2C in air temperature in the Hyderabad area would be likely if a combination of increased surface albedo and vegetative cover are used as urban heat-island control strategies. In addition, air-temperature reductions on the order of 2.5-3.5C could be achieved if moderate and aggressive heat-island mitigation measures are adopted, respectively. A large-scale deployment of mitigation measures can bring additional indirect benefit to the urban area. For example, cooling outside air can improve the efficiency of cooling systems, reduce smog and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and indirectly reduce pollution from power plants - all improving environmental health quality. This study has demonstrated the effectiveness of cool-roof technology as one of the urban heat-island control strategies for the Indian industrial and scientific communities and has provided an estimate of the national energy savings potential of cool roofs in India. These outcomes can be used for developing cool-roof building standards and related policies in India. Additional field studies, built upon the successes and lessons learned from this project, may be helpful to further confirm the scale of potential energy savings from the application of cooler roofs in various regions of India. In the future, a more rigorous meteorological simulation using urbanized (meso-urban) meteorological models should be conducted, which may produce a more accurate estimate of the air-temperature reductions for the entire urban area.

  18. Home Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Home Cooling Energy Saver 101 Energy Saver 101 We're covering everything you need to know about home cooling to help you save energy and money. Read more Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Learn how to avoid heat buildup and keep your home cool with ventilation. Read more Cooling with a Whole House Fan Cooling with a Whole House Fan A whole-house fan, in combination with other cooling systems, can meet all or most of your home cooling needs year round. Read

  19. High-Performance Refrigerator Using Novel Rotating Heat Exchanger |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy High-Performance Refrigerator Using Novel Rotating Heat Exchanger High-Performance Refrigerator Using Novel Rotating Heat Exchanger Rotating heat exchangers installed in appliances and heat pumps have the potentially to reduce energy costs and refrigerant charge in a compact space. Rotating heat exchangers installed in appliances and heat pumps have the potentially to reduce energy costs and refrigerant charge in a compact space. Sandia-developed rotating heat exchanger

  20. ETs HVAC, WH and Appliance R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ET's HV!, WH and !ppliance R&D Antonio M. Bouza, DOE/BTO Technology Manager April 24-25, 2014 Introduction Program Goals: * Support BTO's goals to achieve 50 percent building energy savings * By 2020, develop technologies enabling 20 percent energy savings in HVAC; 30 percent energy savings in water heating, and 10 percent energy savings in appliances * By 2030, develop technologies enabling 40 percent energy savings in HVAC; 60 percent energy savings in water heating, and 20 percent

  1. Issues in federal preemption of state appliance energy efficiency regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.M.; Balistocky, S.; Schaefler, A.M.

    1982-12-01

    The findings and conclusions of the analysis of the various issues involved in the federal preemption of state regulations for the DOE no standard rule on covered appliances are summarized. The covered products are: refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, kitchen ranges and ovens, water heaters (excluding heat pump water heaters), room air conditioners, central air conditioners (excluding heat pumps), and furnaces. A detailed discussion of the rationale for the positions of groups offering comment for the record is presneted. The pertinent categories of state and local regulations and programs are explained, then detailed analysis is conducted on the covered products and regulations. Issues relating to the timing of preemption of state regulations are discussed, as well as issues relating to burden of proof, contents of petitions for exemptions from preemption, criteria for evaluating petitions, and procedural and other issues. (LEW)

  2. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability

  3. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability

  4. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability

  5. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability

  6. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability

  7. Cool Magnetic Molecules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability

  8. ISSUANCE 2015-12-17: Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment and Commercial Warm Air Furnaces

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment and Commercial Warm Air Furnaces, Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  9. An experimental study of external reactor vessel cooling strategy on the critical heat flux using the graphene oxide nano-fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, S. D.; Lee, S. W.; Kang, S.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    External reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR) of corium as a key severe accident management strategy can be achieved by flooding the reactor cavity during a severe accident. In this accident mitigation strategy, the decay heat removal capability depends on whether the imposed heat flux exceeds critical heat flux (CHF). To provide sufficient cooling for high-power reactors such as APR1400, there have been some R and D efforts to use the reactor vessel with micro-porous coating and nano-fluids boiling-induced coating. The dispersion stability of graphene-oxide nano-fluid in the chemical conditions of flooding water that includes boric acid, lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) was checked in terms of surface charge or zeta potential before the CHF experiments. Results showed that graphene-oxide nano-fluids were very stable under ERVC environment. The critical heat flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel external wall was measured using the small scale two-dimensional slide test section. The radius of the curvature is 0.1 m. The dimension of each part in the facility simulated the APR-1400. The heater was designed to produce the different heat flux. The magnitude of heat flux follows the one of the APR-1400 when the severe accident occurred. All tests were conducted under inlet subcooling 10 K. Graphene-oxide nano-fluids (concentration: 10 -4 V%) enhanced CHF limits up to about 20% at mass flux 50 kg/m{sup 2}s and 100 kg/m{sup 2}s in comparison with the results of the distilled water at same test condition. (authors)

  10. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Full report (3.6 mb) Major residential equipment and commercial heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1 mb) Appendix B - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1 mb) Lighting and commercial ventilation & refrigeration equipment Appendix C - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies

  11. Analysis of space heating and domestic hot water systems for energy-efficient residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennehy, G

    1983-04-01

    An analysis of the best ways of meeting the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) needs of new energy-efficient houses with very low requirements for space heat is provided. The DHW load is about equal to the space heating load in such houses in northern climates. The equipment options which should be considered are discussed, including new equipment recently introduced in the market. It is concluded that the first consideration in selecting systems for energy-efficient houses should be identification of the air moving needs of the house for heat distribution, heat storage, ventilation, and ventilative cooling. This is followed, in order, by selection of the most appropriate distribution system, the heating appliances and controls, and the preferred energy source, gas, oil, or electricity.

  12. Data center cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  13. Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Space Heating & Cooling » Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp

  14. Comparing Appliance and Lighting Energy Costs Online Just Got...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance and Lighting Energy Costs Online Just Got Easier Comparing Appliance and Lighting Energy Costs Online Just Got Easier January 11, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis The EnergyGuide...

  15. Fort Collins Utilities- Residential and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers. The appliance rebate program offers a $50 rebate for Energy Star rated...

  16. Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You...

  17. Reading Municipal Light Department- Residential Energy Star Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers rebates to residential customers who install Energy Star appliances in eligible homes. The offer is limited to one rebate per appliance, or a...

  18. How Much Are Your Appliances and Electronics Costing You?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Use our updated Estimating Appliance and Home Electronic Energy Use page to calculate the electricity consumption of your appliances in preparation for the #EnergyFaceoff campaign in November.

  19. NJ Clean Energy- ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When mail-in rebates are active, as a general rule, all appliances must be ENERGY STAR rated; however, additional requirements may apply to different types of appliances. Rebate requests must...

  20. ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report dated February 3, 2012 energystarpilotprogramreport020312.pdf More Documents & Publications Haier:...

  1. Department Sets Aggressive Schedule for New Appliance Standards |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Sets Aggressive Schedule for New Appliance Standards Department Sets Aggressive Schedule for New Appliance Standards February 1, 2006 - 8:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today released a schedule for setting new appliance efficiency standards. The five-year plan outlines how DOE will work with all of its partners to address the appliance standards rulemaking backlog and meet all of the statutory requirements established in the Energy Policy

  2. Comparing Appliance and Lighting Energy Costs Online Just Got Easier

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The new Energy Labeling Rule makes it easy to compare energy use and costs when shopping for appliances or lighting.

  3. Appliance and Equipment Standards Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance and Equipment Standards Fact Sheet Appliance and Equipment Standards Fact Sheet Appliance and equipment efficiency standards have served as one of the nation's most effective policies for improving energy efficiency and saving consumers energy and money. Today, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Appliance and Equipment Standards Program covers more than 65 products, representing about 90% of home energy use, 60% of commercial building energy use, and 30% of industrial energy use.

  4. Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Appliances | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Appliances Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Appliances The Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap for Next-Generation Appliances provides recommendations to the Building Technologies Office (BTO) on R&D activities to pursue that will aid in achieving BTO's energy savings goals. For appliances, BTO targets 14% and 29% primary energy savings by 2020 and 2030, respectively. The recommended initiatives in the report target high-priority R&D, demonstration,

  5. Estimating Appliance and Home Electronic Energy Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel » Appliances & Electronics » Estimating Appliance and Home Electronic Energy Use Estimating Appliance and Home Electronic Energy Use Our appliance and electronic energy use calculator allows you to estimate your annual energy use and cost to operate specific products. The wattage values provided are samples only; actual wattage of products varies depending on product age and features. Enter a wattage value for your own product for the most accurate estimate. Wattage

  6. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  7. Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation for ASHRAE Conference, January 31, 2011 | Department of Energy Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation for ASHRAE Conference, January 31, 2011 Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation for ASHRAE Conference, January 31, 2011 This document is Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and Enforcement

  8. Appliance Standards and Building Codes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance Standards and Building Codes Appliance Standards and Building Codes Appliance Standards Overview for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon appstds_overview_cymbalsky_040213.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices Residential Buildings Integration Program Stretch/Reach Codes

  9. MECS 2006 - Computer, Electronics and Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Computer, Electronics and Appliances MECS 2006 - Computer, Electronics and Appliances Manufacturing Energy Footprint for Computer, Electronics and Appliances (NAICS 334, 335) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006) All available footprints and supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint PDF icon Computers, Electronics, and Electrical Equipment More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Cement MECS 2006 - Glass MECS 2006 - Plastics

  10. United Cool Air | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Air United Cool Air While our process may start with a "basic model" it is seldom that we fabricate more than a few units that are identical. Therefore, the definition of "basic model" has a large impact on the implications associated with testing. PDF icon United_Cool_Air.pdf More Documents & Publications AeroSys: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0302) Haier: Compromise Agreement (2011-SE-1428) GE Appliances: Order (2012-SE-1403)

  11. Heat rejection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Gregory C. (Richland, WA); Tokarz, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Parry, Jr., Harvey L. (Richland, WA); Braun, Daniel J. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

  12. Energy Department Releases Roadmaps on HVAC Technologies, Water Heating,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Appliances, and Low-GWP Refrigerants | Department of Energy Energy Department Releases Roadmaps on HVAC Technologies, Water Heating, Appliances, and Low-GWP Refrigerants Energy Department Releases Roadmaps on HVAC Technologies, Water Heating, Appliances, and Low-GWP Refrigerants December 18, 2014 - 4:50pm Addthis The Research & Development Roadmap for Next-Generation Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants provides recommendations on R&D activities that will help accelerate the

  13. Gas turbine cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

  14. Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, Helcio; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-05-14

    We investigate the existence of the principal-agent (PA) problem in non-government, non-mall commercial buildings in the U.S. in 2003. The analysis concentrates on space heating and cooling energy consumed by centrally installed equipment in order to verify whether a market failure caused by the PA problem might have prevented the installation of energy-efficient devices in non-owner-occupied buildings (efficiency problem) and/or the efficient operation of space-conditioning equipment in these buildings (usage problem). Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003 data for single-owner, single-tenant and multi-tenant occupied buildings were used for conducting this evaluation. These are the building subsets with the appropriate conditions for assessing both the efficiency and the usage problems. Together, these three building types represent 51.9percent of the total floor space of all buildings with space heating and 59.4percent of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings; similarly, for space cooling, they represent 52.7percent of floor space and 51.6percent of energy consumption. Our statistical analysis shows that there is a usage PA problem. In space heating it applies only to buildings with a small floor area (<_50,000 sq. ft.). We estimate that in 2003 it accounts for additional site energy consumption of 12.3 (+ 10.5 ) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 14.6 [+- 12.4] TBtu), corresponding to 24.0percent (+- 20.5percent) of space heating and 10.2percent (+- 8.7percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings. In space cooling, however, the analysis shows that the PA market failure affects the complete set of studied buildings. We estimate that it accounts for a higher site energy consumption of 8.3 (+-4.0) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 25.5 [+- 12.2]TBtu), which corresponds to 26.5percent (+- 12.7percent) of space cooling and 2.7percent (+- 1.3percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings.

  15. Mississippi Residents Save Through Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    April 22 was more than just Earth Day for Cowboy Maloney’s Electric City. The Jackson store—one of 12 Cowboy Maloney’s across Mississippi—opened at midnight to celebrate Mississippi’s appliance rebate program launch.

  16. Appliance and Equipment Standards Program Logic Model

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Manufacturers produce products with a high level of compliance that meet minimum energy conservation standards, resulting in energy savings in the buildings sector The Appliance & Equipment Standards Program promulgates energy conservation standards and test procedures in a rulemaking process to reduce energy consumption across residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. External Influences: DOE budget, Energy prices, Real estate market, Market incentives, Legislation / Regulation

  17. Modeling of GE Appliances: Final Presentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Vyakaranam, Bharat; Leistritz, Sean M.; Parker, Graham B.

    2013-01-31

    This report is the final in a series of three reports funded by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) in collaboration with GE Appliances’ through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to describe the potential of GE Appliances’ DR-enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid.

  18. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanger, Philip Albert (Monroeville, PA); Lindberg, Frank A. (Baltimore, MD); Garcen, Walter (Glen Burnie, MD)

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  19. Absorption Cooling Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Absorption coolers use heat rather than electricity as their energy source. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption cooling, it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption coolers are commercially available for large residential homes. How Absorption Cooling Works An absorption cooling cycle relies on three

  20. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hultgren, Kent Goran (Winter Park, FL); McLaurin, Leroy Dixon (Winter Springs, FL); Bertsch, Oran Leroy (Titusville, FL); Lowe, Perry Eugene (Oviedo, FL)

    1998-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

  1. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

    1998-05-26

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

  2. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  3. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  4. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  5. DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Violating Minimum Appliance Standards | Department of Energy Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards June 3, 2010 - 2:17pm Addthis Today, the Department of Energy announced that three manufacturers -- Aspen Manufacturing, Inc., Summit Manufacturing, and Advanced Distributor Products -- must stop distributing 61 heat

  6. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Combustion Safety Using Appliances for Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this case study, the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit team provides guidance on how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings.

  7. Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  8. Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Berglund, Robert C. (Saratoga, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  9. Hybrid Radiator Cooling System | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiator Cooling System Technology available for licensing: Hybrid radiator cooling system uses conventional finned air cooling under most driving conditions that would be sufficient to remove all of the required engine heat, but adds active evaporate cooling under extreme conditions. Enables an existing engine to function with a smaller radiator and cooling system Increases heat removal by 46%, over conventional radiator PDF icon hybrid_radiator-cooling_system

  10. Data center cooling method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  11. Best Management Practice #10: Cooling Tower Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cooling towers dissipate heat from recirculating water used to cool chillers, air conditioners, or other process equipment to the ambient air. Heat is rejected to the environment from cooling towers through the process of evaporation. Therefore, by design, cooling towers use significant amounts of water.

  12. cooling | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer...

  13. HMX Cooling Core Optimization Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-08-31

    The Software consists of code which is used to determine the optimal configuration of an HMX cooling core in a heat exchanger.

  14. Table 2.6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics, Selected Years, 1978-2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics, Selected Years, 1978-2009 Appliance Year Change 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 1980 to 2009 Total Households (millions) 77 78 82 83 84 86 91 94 97 101 107 111 114 32 Percent of Households<//td> Space Heating - Main Fuel 1 Natural Gas 55 55 55 56 57 55 55 55 53 52 55 52 50 -5 Electricity 2 16 17 18 17 16 17 20 23 26 29 29 30 35 17 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0 Distillate

  15. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Through Appliance Zone Isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Bohac, D.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the isolation of natural draft combustion appliances from the conditioned space of low-rise residential buildings. It deals with combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage. This subset of houses does not require comprehensive combustion safety tests and simplified prescriptive procedures can be used to address safety concerns. This allows residential energy retrofit contractors inexperienced in advanced combustion safety testing to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits including tightening and changes to distribution and ventilation systems to proceed.

  16. Appliance Standard Program - The FY 2003 Priority -Setting Summary Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Actions Proposed - Appendix B | Department of Energy Report and Actions Proposed - Appendix B Appliance Standard Program - The FY 2003 Priority -Setting Summary Report and Actions Proposed - Appendix B This appendix contains data sheets for existing appliance standards program rulemaking priorities PDF icon fy03_priority_setting_app_b.pdf More Documents & Publications 2006 Draft Rulemaking Activities Data Sheets Appliance Standards Program - The FY 2003 Priority Setting Report and

  17. Appliance Standards Program - The FY 2003 Priority Setting Report and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Actions Proposed - Appendix C | Department of Energy Appendix C Appliance Standards Program - The FY 2003 Priority Setting Report and Actions Proposed - Appendix C This appendix contains data sheets for new products that will be covered under appliance standards program rulemaking priorities PDF icon fy03_priority_setting_app_c.pdf More Documents & Publications Appliance Standards Program - The FY 2003 Priority Setting Report and Actions Proposed -Appendix A 2006 Draft Rulemaking

  18. Appliance Standards Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 4 BTO Peer Review Appliance Standards Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: John Cymbalsky, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Appliance and Equipment Standards Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the presentation PDF icon BTO_PeerReview_ApplianceStandardsOverview_042214.pdf More Documents &

  19. Appliance Standards Program Schedule - CCE Overview and Update, dated

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    October 26, 2011 | Department of Energy dated October 26, 2011 Appliance Standards Program Schedule - CCE Overview and Update, dated October 26, 2011 This document is Appliance Standards Program Schedule & CCE Overview and Update presentation, dated 10/26/2011, presented to Energy-Efficiency Advocacy Groups PDF icon doe_eeag_present2011.pdf More Documents & Publications Appliance Standards Program Schedule - CCE Overview and Update, presented at AHRI 2011 Annual Meeting, dated

  20. DOE Issues Final Appliance Test Procedure Rule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appliance Test Procedure Rule DOE Issues Final Appliance Test Procedure Rule December 8, 2006 - 9:46am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a final rule establishing new test procedures and related definitions to determine the energy efficiency of certain residential appliances and commercial equipment. The rulemaking clarifies and codifies the test procedures mandated by the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005. "These new test procedures are the

  1. Appliance Standards Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Appliance Standards Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Appliance Standards Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: John Cymbalsky, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Appliance and Equipment Standards Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the presentation PDF icon

  2. Hydrophilic structures for condensation management in refrigerator appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuehl, Steven John; Vonderhaar, John J; Wu, Guolian; Wu, Mianxue

    2014-10-21

    A refrigerator appliance that includes a freezer compartment having a freezer compartment door, and a refrigeration compartment having at least one refrigeration compartment door. The appliance further includes a mullion with an exterior surface. The mullion divides the compartments and the exterior surface directs condensation toward a transfer point. The appliance may also include a cabinet that houses the compartments and has two sides, each with an exterior surface. Further, at least one exterior surface directs condensation toward a transfer point.

  3. ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    dated February 3, 2012 | Department of Energy ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report dated February 3, 2012 ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report dated February 3, 2012 This document is ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report dated February 3, 2012 PDF icon energystar_pilotprogram_report_02_03_12.pdf More Documents & Publications Haier: ENERGY STAR Referral (PRTS21SAC*) FAQ's for:

  4. Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings This report responds to Section 141 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 regarding DOE's failure to meet deadlines for new or amended energy conservation standards PDF icon congressional_report_013106.pdf More Documents & Publications 3rd Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation

  5. Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Comments on Smart Grid RFI |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Comments on Smart Grid RFI Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Comments on Smart Grid RFI Comments made on behalf of the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM), on the Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, 75 Fed. Reg. 57,006 (Sept. 17, 2010). PDF icon Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy And Logistical Challenges. November 1, 2010 More Documents & Publications Comments of DRSG to DOE

  6. State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program is Closed | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program is Closed State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program is Closed February 23, 2012 - 5:22am Addthis Andrea Spikes Former Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory On Friday, February 17, 2012, the State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program closed officially in all U.S. states and territories. Although the program had already closed in most states by this time, there were 11 states and territories that closed last

  7. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

    1980-05-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  8. EECBG Appliance Rebate Guidance (Program Notice 10-015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guidance for Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program grantees on consumer rebate programs for Energy Star and other qualified energy efficiency appliances.

  9. BSH Home Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-23013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that BSH Home Appliances Corporation failed to certify cooking products as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  10. Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South...

  11. Washington State Energy-Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oregon State Energy-Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program Helps Low-Income Families Washington: RePower's Energy Dashboard Spurs Change on Bainbridge Island Washington: ...

  12. Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Appliances | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    each year for the following appliances*: Clothes washers Clothes dryers* Water heaters Trash compactors* Dishwashers Conventional ovens, ranges, and stoves* Air conditioners...

  13. Solergie Qingdao Electrical Appliance Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    enterprise. which is specialized in developing and manufacturing solar lighting and other energy solar products. References: Solergie (Qingdao)Electrical Appliance Co Ltd1 This...

  14. ISSUANCE 2015-05-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar ISSUANCE 2015-05-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open...

  15. Webinar: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE is conducting a public meeting and webinar regarding the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC). For more information, please visit the ASRAC page.

  16. Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant- Residential Energy Star Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential customers of Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant (TMLP) are eligible for rebates on energy efficient appliances. Clothes washers, dishwashers, refrigerators, and room A/C units are...

  17. Appliance Standards Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BTO Peer Review Appliance Standards Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: John Cymbalsky, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2015 Peer Review provided...

  18. Grid Friendly Appliance(tm) Controller - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Grid Friendly Appliance controller developed at PNNL senses grid conditions by monitoring the frequency of the system and provides automatic demand response in times of ...

  19. Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation for ASHRAE Conference, January 31, 2011 Appliance Standards Update and Review of...

  20. Appliance Standards Program Schedule - CCE Overview and Update...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    13, 2011 Appliance Standards Program Schedule - CCE Overview and Update, dated October 26, 2011 NEMA Distribution Transformers, CCE Overview and Update presentation, dated 0524...

  1. GE Appliances: Order (2012-SE-1403) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Appliances: Order (2012-SE-1403) GE Appliances: Order (2012-SE-1403) October 3, 2012 DOE ordered GE Appliances, a Division of General Electric Company to pay a $63,000 civil penalty after finding GE had privately labeled and distributed in commerce in the U.S. the 4-cubic-foot capacity refrigerator basic model SMR04GAZCS, which includes models SMR04GAZACS and SMR04GAZBCS. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and GE. PDF icon GE Appliances: Order

  2. New Appliance Tax Credits, Rebates, and Incentives for Consumers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Appliance Tax Credits, Rebates, and Incentives for Consumers September 8, 2009 - 11:16am Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory ...

  3. INFOGRAPHIC: How Appliance Standards Help Consumers Save Big | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy How Appliance Standards Help Consumers Save Big INFOGRAPHIC: How Appliance Standards Help Consumers Save Big December 14, 2015 - 3:10pm Addthis FACT: Consumers are saving more than $62 billion a year as a result of the Energy Department's Appliance and Equipment Standards Program. | Infographic by <a href="/node/1332956">Carly Wilkins</a>, Energy Department FACT: Consumers are saving more than $62 billion a year as a result of the Energy Department's Appliance

  4. T-588: HP Virtual SAN Appliance Stack Overflow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability has been reported in HP StorageWorks P4000 Virtual SAN Appliance Software, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a vulnerable system.

  5. Save Energy on Appliances this Holiday Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Save Energy on Appliances this Holiday Season Save Energy on Appliances this Holiday Season November 21, 2014 - 9:52am Addthis Buying ENERGY STAR appliances saves money and energy. | Jim Tetro, U.S. Department of Energy Buying ENERGY STAR appliances saves money and energy. | Jim Tetro, U.S. Department of Energy Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How does it work? Use the ENERGY STAR Rebate Finder tool to find rebates and other

  6. COMBINED ACTIVE/PASSIVE DECAY HEAT REMOVAL APPROACH FOR THE 24 MWt GAS-COOLED FAST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHENG,L.Y.; LUDEWIG, H.

    2007-06-01

    Decay heat removal at depressurized shutdown conditions has been regarded as one of the key areas where significant improvement in passive response was targeted for the GEN IV GFR over the GCFR designs of thirty years ago. It has been recognized that the poor heat transfer characteristics of gas coolant at lower pressures needed to be accommodated in the GEN IV design. The design envelope has therefore been extended to include a station blackout sequence simultaneous with a small break/leak. After an exploratory phase of scoping analysis in this project, together with CEA of France, it was decided that natural convection would be selected as the passive decay heat removal approach of preference. Furthermore, a double vessel/containment option, similar to the double vessel/guard vessel approach of the SFR, was selected as the means of design implementation to reduce the PRA risks of the depressurization accident. However additional calculations in conjunction with CEA showed that there was an economic penalty in terms of decay heat removal system heat exchanger size, elevation heights for thermal centers, and most of all in guard containment back pressure for complete reliance on natural convection only. The back pressure ranges complicated the design requirements for the guard containment. Recognizing that the definition of a loss-of-coolant-accident in the GFR is a misnomer, since gas coolant will always be present, and the availability of some driven blower would reduce fuel temperature transients significantly; it was decided instead to aim for a hybrid active/passive combination approach to the selected BDBA. Complete natural convection only would still be relied on for decay heat removal but only after the first twenty four hours after the initiation of the accident. During the first twenty four hour period an actively powered blower would be relied on to provide the emergency decay power removal. However the power requirements of the active blower/circulators would be kept low by maintaining a pressurized system coolant back pressure of {approx}7-8 bars through the design of the guard containment for such a design pressure. This approach is termed the medium pressure approach by both CEA and the US. Such a containment design pressure is in the range of the LWR experience, both PWRs and BWRs. Both metal containments and concrete guard containments are possible in this pressure range. This approach is then a time-at-risk approach as the power requirements should be low enough that battery/fuel cell banks without diesel generator start-up failure rate issues should be capable of providing the necessary power. Compressed gas sources are another possibility. A companion PRA study is being conducted to survey the reliability of such systems.

  7. District cooling gets hot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeley, R.S.

    1996-07-01

    Utilities across the country are adopting cool storage methods, such as ice-storage and chilled-water tanks, as an economical and environmentally safe way to provide cooling for cities and towns. The use of district cooling, in which cold water or steam is pumped to absorption chillers and then to buildings via a central community chiller plant, is growing strongly in the US. In Chicago, San Diego, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, and elsewhere, independent district-energy companies and utilities are refurbishing neglected district-heating systems and adding district cooling, a technology first developed approximately 35 years ago.

  8. Hydronic rooftop cooling systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourne, Richard C. (Davis, CA); Lee, Brian Eric (Monterey, CA); Berman, Mark J. (Davis, CA)

    2008-01-29

    A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

  9. Conceptual design phase of a district heating and cooling plant with cogeneration to serve James Madison University and the Harrisonburg Electric Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belcher, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    A unique opportunity for cooperation and community development exists in Harrisonburg, Virginia. James Madison University, located in Harrisonburg, is undergoing an aggressive growth plan of its academic base which also includes the physical expansion of its campus. The City of Harrisonburg is presently supplying steam to meet a portion of the heating needs of the existing James Madison campus from a city owned and operated waste-to-energy plant. In an effort of cooperation, Harrisonburg and James Madison University have now negotiated an agreement for the city to provide all of the heating and cooling requirements of the new campus expansion. In another unique turn of events, the local electrical power distributor, Harrisonburg Electric Commission, approached the city concerning the inclusion of cogeneration in the project in order to reduce and maintain existing electric rates thus further benefiting the community. Through the cooperation of these three entities, the conceptual design phase of the project has been completed. The plant design developed through this process includes 3,000 tons of chilled water capacity, an additional 64,000 lb/hr of steam capacity and 2.5 MW of cogeneration capacity. This paper describes the conceptual design process for this interesting project.

  10. Optimization of biological recycling of plant nutrients in livestock waste by utilizing waste heat from cooling water. Final report May 75-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddox, J.J.; Behrends, L.L.; Burch, D.W.; Kingsley, J.B.; Waddell, E.L. Jr

    1982-05-01

    The report summarizes a 5-year study of the beneficial uses of waste heat from condenser cooling water from steam-electric generating plants. The major effort addressed the recovery of plant nutrients in swine manure by aquatic farming of selected fish and Chinese waterchestnuts. Another effort included biogas production from swine manure in an anaerobic digester and the use of the digester waste to fertilize the aquatic farming system. Optimum recovery of plant nutrients resulted from operation of an integrated fish and waterchestnut system. Flowing water systems were 30-50% more productive than static systems. Annual fish yields of 5000-7000 lb/acre are projected for a properly stocked system over a 150-180 day growing period. Similarly, waterchestnut yields of nearly 17.8 tons/acre and dry hay yields of 6.7 tons/acre from sand-bed filters would be expected when fed wastewater from the fish system. The quality of the water leaving the sand beds would meet tertiary wastewater treatment standards during the growing season. An estimated 2000-head swine facility with a $400,000 investment would annually produce a 20% rate of return, save 360,000 bbl of oil through waste heat utilization, and produce biogas equivalent to 3000 bbl of oil.

  11. DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Violating Minimum Appliance Standards | Department of Energy Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards June 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Today, the Department of Energy announced that three manufacturers -- Aspen Manufacturing, Inc., Summit Manufacturing, and Advanced Distributor Products -- must

  12. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  13. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

  14. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

  15. 8th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 8th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy ...

  16. 2nd Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 2nd Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance ...

  17. 11th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 11th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy ...

  18. 4th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 4th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance ...

  19. 1st Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 1st Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance ...

  20. 6th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 6th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy ...

  1. 5th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 5th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance ...

  2. 9th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 9th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy ...

  3. 14th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 14th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy ...

  4. 15th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 15th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy ...

  5. 7th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 7th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy ...

  6. 3rd Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Congress on Appliance Energy-Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 3rd Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance ...

  7. 16th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Congress on Appliance Energy Efficiency Rulemakings - Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities 16th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance Energy ...

  8. Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at U.S. Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at U.S. Department of Defense Exchange Facilities Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at U.S. Department of...

  9. U-027: RSA Key Manager Appliance Session Logout Bug Fails to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROBLEM: RSA Key Manager Appliance Session Logout Bug Fails to Terminate Sessions. PLATFORM: RSA Key Manager Appliance 2.7 Service Pack 1 ABSTRACT: A remote authenticated...

  10. Incorporating Experience Curves in Appliance Standards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbesi, Karina; Chan, Peter; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Kantner, Colleen; Lekov, Alex; Meyers, Stephen; Rosenquist, Gregory; Buskirk, Robert Van; Yang, Hung-Chia; Desroches, Louis-Benoit

    2011-10-31

    The technical analyses in support of U.S. energy conservation standards for residential appliances and commercial equipment have typically assumed that manufacturing costs and retail prices remain constant during the projected 30-year analysis period. There is, however, considerable evidence that this assumption does not reflect real market prices. Costs and prices generally fall in relation to cumulative production, a phenomenon known as experience and modeled by a fairly robust empirical experience curve. Using price data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and shipment data obtained as part of the standards analysis process, we present U.S. experience curves for room air conditioners, clothes dryers, central air conditioners, furnaces, and refrigerators and freezers. These allow us to develop more representative appliance price projections than the assumption-based approach of constant prices. These experience curves were incorporated into recent energy conservation standards for these products. The impact on the national modeling can be significant, often increasing the net present value of potential standard levels in the analysis. In some cases a previously cost-negative potential standard level demonstrates a benefit when incorporating experience. These results imply that past energy conservation standards analyses may have undervalued the economic benefits of potential standard levels.

  11. Safety lock-out device for electrical appliances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cliff, Jr., Paul L. (Bloomingdale, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A safety lock-out device prevents the insertion of an electrical power cord into an electrical power cord receptacle of an electrical appliance. The devise comprises a mounting plate fastened to the appliance and a cover plate hingedly attached to the appliance. The cover plate is movable between a first position and a second position such that, in the first position, the cover plate covers and prevents insertion of a power cord into the appliance receptacle. In said second position, the appliance receptacle is uncovered to permit insertion of a power cord into the receptacle. Extending a lock shank through aligned openings formed in flange members extending from the mounting plate and the cover plate locks the cover plate in the first position.

  12. Safety lock-out device for electrical appliances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cliff, P.L. Jr.

    1996-07-09

    A safety lock-out device prevents the insertion of an electrical power cord into an electrical power cord receptacle of an electrical appliance. The device comprises a mounting plate fastened to the appliance and a hinged cover plate attached to the appliance. The cover plate is movable between a first position and a second position such that, in the first position, the cover plate covers and prevents insertion of a power cord into the appliance receptacle. In said second position, the appliance receptacle is uncovered to permit insertion of a power cord into the receptacle. Extending a lock shank through aligned openings formed in flange members extending from the mounting plate, the cover plate locks the cover plate in the first position. 15 figs.

  13. City of Tallahassee Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Tallahassee Utilities (CTU) offers residential customers rebates for the purchase of ENERGY STAR appliances and heating and cooling equipment. Qualifying appliances include refrigerators,...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    offers residential customers rebates for the purchase of ENERGY STAR appliances and heating and cooling equipment. Qualifying appliances include refrigerators,... Eligibility:...

  15. Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design » Design for Efficiency » Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Learn how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment. A cool roof is one that has been designed to reflect more sunlight and absorb less heat than a standard roof. Cool roofs can be made of a highly reflective type of paint, a sheet covering, or highly reflective tiles or shingles. Nearly any type of building can benefit from a cool roof, but consider the climate and other factors before deciding to install

  16. Method for passive cooling liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors, and system thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Busboom, Herbert J. (San Jose, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel.

  17. Technology Solutions Case Study: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    This case study describes how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  18. New analysis techniques for estimating impacts of federal appliance efficiency standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, James E.

    2003-06-24

    Impacts of U.S. appliance and equipment standards have been described previously. Since 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has updated standards for clothes washers, water heaters, and residential central air conditioners and heat pumps. A revised estimate of the aggregate impacts of all the residential appliance standards in the United States shows that existing standards will reduce residential primary energy consumption and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by 89 percent in 2020 compared to the levels expected without any standards. Studies of possible new standards are underway for residential furnaces and boilers, as well as a number of products in the commercial (tertiary) sector, such as distribution transformers and unitary air conditioners. The analysis of standards has evolved in response to critiques and in an attempt to develop more precise estimates of costs and benefits of these regulations. The newer analysis elements include: (1) valuing energy savings by using marginal (rather than average) energy prices specific to an end-use; (2) simulating the impacts of energy efficiency increases over a sample population of consumers to quantify the proportion of households having net benefits or net costs over the life of the appliance; and (3) calculating marginal markups in distribution channels to derive the incremental change in retail prices associated with increased manufacturing costs for improving energy efficiency.

  19. Best Management Practice #10: Cooling Tower Management | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 0: Cooling Tower Management Best Management Practice #10: Cooling Tower Management Cooling towers dissipate heat from recirculating water used to cool chillers, air conditioners, or other process equipment to the ambient air. Heat is rejected to the environment from cooling towers through the process of evaporation. Therefore, by design, cooling towers use significant amounts of water. Overview The thermal efficiency and longevity of the cooling tower and equipment depend on the

  20. Cool Asphalt Shingles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Asphalt Shingles Cool Asphalt Shingles Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group research assistant Sharon Chen prepares a prototype of high-performance cool shingle roofing. Credit: Heat Island Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group research assistant Sharon Chen prepares a prototype of high-performance cool shingle roofing. Credit: Heat Island Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lead Performer: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - Berkeley, CA Partners: --

  1. Water cooled steam jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  2. Turbine blade cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

  3. Turbine blade cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  4. Turbine blade cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

    2000-01-01

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  5. Water cooled steam jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Other Major Appliance Efficiencies 2010 Efficiency 2005 Stock 2010 U.S. Average Best Available Residential Appliance Type Parameter (1) Efficiency New Efficiency New Efficiency Dishwashers EF 0.30 0.61 1.13 Clothes Washers (2) MEF 2.00 2.00 3.88 Clothes Dryers (electric) EF 3.01 3.10 3.16 Clothes Dryers (gas) EF 2.67 2.75 3.02 Cooktop (Gas) Cooking Efficiency 0.38 0.40 0.42 2010 1992 Efficiency Stock U.S. Average Best Available Commercial Appliance Type Parameter (1) Efficiency New Efficiency

  7. Promising Technology: Cool Paints for Exterior Walls

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cool Paints increase the solar reflectance of exterior walls. By reflecting more sunlight, the wall surface maintains a cooler temperature. This decrease in temperature leads to less heat transfer through the walls into the building. During the cooling season, the addition of cool paints can decrease the cooling load of the building.

  8. Parametric study of a silica gel-water adsorption refrigeration cycle -- The influence of thermal capacitance and heat exchanger UA-values on cooling capacity, power density, and COP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boelman, E.C.; Saha, B.B.; Kashiwagi, Takao

    1997-12-31

    The influence of heat exchanger UA-values (adsorber/desorber, evaporator, and condenser) is investigated for an adsorption chiller, with consideration given to the thermal capacitance of the adsorber/desorber by means of a lumped-parameter cycle simulation model developed by the authors and co-workers for the single-stage silica gel-water adsorption chiller. The closed-cycle-type chiller, for use in air conditioning, is driven by low-grade waste heat (85 C [185 F]) and cooled by water at 31 C (88 F) and operates on relatively short cycle times (420 seconds adsorption/desorption; 30 second adsorber/desorber sensible cooling and heating). The results showed cycle performance to be considerably affected by the thermal capacitance and UA-value of the adsorber/desorber, which is attributed to the severe sensible cooling/heating requirements resulting from batched cycle operation. The model is also sensitive to the evaporator UA-value--but to a lesser extent. The condenser UA-value is the least sensitive parameter due to the working pair adsorption behavior in the temperature range defined for desorption and condensation.

  9. Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

    2012-09-25

    A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

  10. Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Cupertino, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a top entry loop joined satellite assembly with a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This satellite type reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary cooling system when rendered inoperative.

  11. VEA-0016- In the Matter of GE Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sub-Zero Freezer Co. (Sub-Zero), GE Appliances (GE), and Whirlpool Corporation (Whirlpool) filed appeals of our November 3, 2000 decision, granting Viking Range Corporation (Viking) a six-month...

  12. ASKO Appliances: Order (2010-CE-04/0614)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered ASKO Appliances, Inc. to pay a $5,000 civil penalty after finding ASKO had failed to certify that certain models of dishwashers and clothes dryers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  13. Estimating Appliance and Home Electronic Energy Use | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Estimate the energy consumption and cost to operate an appliance when making a purchase. Investing in an energy-efficient product may save you money in the long run. | Photo...

  14. TEE-0074- In the Matter of GE Appliances & Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Decision and Order considers an Application for Exception filed by GE Appliances &Lighting (GE) seeking exception relief from the provision of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, EnergyConservation...

  15. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  16. Cowlitz County PUD- Residential Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cowlitz County PUD offers the EnergySHARE Plus appliance rebate program to its residential customers. Rebates are offered for Energy Star clothes washers, refrigerators and freezers (including the...

  17. Managing Supply Chain Key for Hawaii Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hawaii's appliance rebate program delivered 4,300 rebates to Hawaiians in just three days. And on just the first day of program, almost 4,000 ENERGY STAR qualified refrigerators were sold.

  18. Midea Washing Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Midea Washing Appliances Mfg. Co., Ltd. failed to certify a variety of dishwashers as compliant with the applicable water and energy conservation standards.

  19. ASKO Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-04/0614)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that ASKO Appliances, Inc. failed to certify a variety of residential dishwashers and clothes dryers as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. ASKO Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2012-CE-19/2004)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that ASKO Appliances, Inc. failed to certify residential clothes washers and dishwashers as compliant with the applicable energy and water conservation standards.

  1. How Much Are Your Appliances and Electronics Costing You? | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the electricity consumption of your appliances in preparation for the EnergyFaceoff campaign in November. As we finish up EnergySaverSolar month, we're looking ahead to...

  2. ASKO Appliances: Notice of Investigation (2010-SE-0601)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE notified ASKO Appliances, Inc., by letter that DOE believes ASKO dishwasher model D5122XXLB may violate federal minimum standards for energy efficiency, based on testing performed as part of the ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Pilot Program.

  3. TEE-0070- In the Matter of BSH Home Appliances Corporation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 30, 2010, BSH Home Appliances Corporation (BSH) filed an Application for Exception (Application) with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The firm...

  4. ASKO Appliances: Order (2012-CE-19/2004)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered ASKO Appliances, Inc. to pay a $36,500 civil penalty after finding ASKO had failed to certify that certain models of residential dishwashers and clothes washers comply with the applicable energy and water conservation standards.

  5. Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Comment | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Burden RFI_July 2015_FINAL (00039560) More Documents & Publications Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Comment AHAM Comments Regulatory Burden RFI Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012)

  6. City of Lompoc Utilities- Residential Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Lompoc Utilities (CLU) offers incentives to its residential customers for upgrading the energy efficiency of home appliances. CLU provides rebates paid monthly as credits on utility bills...

  7. Innovative Concept Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-03/0415)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Innovative Concept Appliances, LLC, failed to certify a variety of residential clothes washers and clothes dryers as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  8. Wood and Pellet Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Heating Systems » Wood and Pellet Heating Wood and Pellet Heating A wood stove on a stone hearth. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/King_Louie A wood stove on a stone hearth. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/King_Louie Today you can choose from a new generation of wood- and pellet-burning appliances that are cleaner burning, more efficient, and powerful enough to heat many average-sized, modern homes. Pellet fuel appliances burn small pellets that measure 3/8 to 1 inch in length.

  9. Appliance Standards Program - The FY 2003 Priority Setting Report and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Actions Proposed -Appendix A | Department of Energy Appendix A Appliance Standards Program - The FY 2003 Priority Setting Report and Actions Proposed -Appendix A This appendix identifies products with substantial energy savings potential warranting further analysis. It also describes the derivation of energy consumption and saving estimates for those products PDF icon fy03_priority_setting_app_a.pdf More Documents & Publications Appliance Standards Program - The FY 2003 Priority Setting

  10. Appliance Standards Program Schedule - CCE Overview and Update, presented

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    at AHRI 2011 Annual Meeting, dated November 14, 2011 | Department of Energy presented at AHRI 2011 Annual Meeting, dated November 14, 2011 Appliance Standards Program Schedule - CCE Overview and Update, presented at AHRI 2011 Annual Meeting, dated November 14, 2011 This document is the presentation for the Appliance Standards Program Schedule - CCE Overview and Update, presented at AHRI 2011 Annual Meeting on 11/14/ 2011 PDF icon doe_ahri_present2011.pdf More Documents & Publications

  11. Estimating Price Elasticity using Market-Level Appliance Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2015-08-04

    This report provides and update to and expansion upon our 2008 LBNL report “An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Appliances,” in which we estimated an average relative price elasticity of -0.34 for major household appliances (Dale and Fujita 2008). Consumer responsiveness to price change is a key component of energy efficiency policy analysis; these policies influence consumer purchases through price both explicitly and implicitly. However, few studies address appliance demand elasticity in the U.S. market and public data sources are generally insufficient for rigorous estimation. Therefore, analysts have relied on a small set of outdated papers focused on limited appliance types, assuming long-term elasticities estimated for other durables (e.g., vehicles) decades ago are applicable to current and future appliance purchasing behavior. We aim to partially rectify this problem in the context of appliance efficiency standards by revisiting our previous analysis, utilizing data released over the last ten years and identifying additional estimates of durable goods price elasticities in the literature. Reviewing the literature, we find the following ranges of market-level price elasticities: -0.14 to -0.42 for appliances; -0.30 to -1.28 for automobiles; -0.47 to -2.55 for other durable goods. Brand price elasticities are substantially higher for these product groups, with most estimates -2.0 or more elastic. Using market-level shipments, sales value, and efficiency level data for 1989-2009, we run various iterations of a log-log regression model, arriving at a recommended range of short run appliance price elasticity between -0.4 and -0.5, with a default value of -0.45.

  12. DOE Announces Tougher Enforcement of Appliance Standards Reporting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Requirements | Department of Energy Tougher Enforcement of Appliance Standards Reporting Requirements DOE Announces Tougher Enforcement of Appliance Standards Reporting Requirements December 9, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy announced today that manufacturers of certain residential products have a 30 day window ending January 8, 2010 to submit accurate certification reports and compliance statements as part of enhanced enforcement of DOE's energy efficiency

  13. Memorandum from VP Technical Services, Association of Home Appliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturers to the Department of Energy | Department of Energy from VP Technical Services, Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers to the Department of Energy Memorandum from VP Technical Services, Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers to the Department of Energy This memo memorializes the phone call between AHAM and the Department of Energy on November 4, 2009 for inclusion in the public docket. The issues discussed during the call included (1) an update on ice maker energy into

  14. EECBG Appliance Rebate Guidance (Program Notice 10-015)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EECBG PROGRAM NOTICE 10-015 EFFECTIVE DATE: July 22, 2010 SUBJECT: GUIDANCE FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT GRANTEES ON CONSUMER REBATE PROGRAMS FOR ENERGY STAR AND OTHER QUALIFIED ENERGY EFFICIENCY APPLIANCES. PURPOSE To provide guidance to the Department of Energy's (Department or DOE) Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) grantees on consumer rebate programs for Energy Star and other qualified energy efficiency appliances. SCOPE The provisions of this

  15. Washington State Energy-Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) Spurs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Local Economy, Promotes State-Wide Partnership | Department of Energy Washington State Energy-Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) Spurs Local Economy, Promotes State-Wide Partnership Washington State Energy-Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) Spurs Local Economy, Promotes State-Wide Partnership April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis As a result of funding provided from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, EERE was able to partner with the State of Washington to

  16. Students Compete to Design Energy-Efficient Appliances | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Students Compete to Design Energy-Efficient Appliances Students Compete to Design Energy-Efficient Appliances May 10, 2012 - 1:39pm Addthis 1 of 5 Team Cal Poly Solar is working to significantly reduce the cost and construction time on their solar concentrator for cooking. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 5 Professor Dale Dolan's students from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo Electrical Engineering department testing the placement of their

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 2008 Refrigerator Manufacturer Market Shares (Percent of Products Produced) Company GE 27% Electrolux (Frigidaire) 23% Whirlpool 33% Maytag (Admiral) (1) Haier 6% W.C. Wood 1% Others 10% Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): Market Share (%) Total Units Shipped: 9,310,000 1) Included in Whirpool shipments Appliance Magazine, U.S. Appliance Industry: Market Share, Life Expectancy & Replacement Market, and Saturation Levels, January 2010, p. 5

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2008 Room Air Conditioner Manufacturer Market Shares (Percent of Products Produced) Company Market Share (%) LG Electronics (Goldstar) 32% Fedders 12% Electrolux (Frigidaire) 13% Whirlpool 13% Haier 8% Samsung 5% Sharp 4% Friedrich 4% UTC/Carrier 3% Matsushita 2% Others 4% Total 100% Source(s): Total Units Shipped: 9,085,500 Appliance Magazine, U.S. Appliance Industry: Market Share, Life Expectancy & Replacement Market, and Saturation Levels, January 2010, p. 5

  19. Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

    2009-11-22

    This paper presents a methodology for modeling residential appliance uptake as a function of root macroeconomic drivers. The analysis concentrates on four major energy end uses in the residential sector: refrigerators, washing machines, televisions and air conditioners. The model employs linear regression analysis to parameterize appliance ownership in terms of household income, urbanization and electrification rates according to a standard binary choice (logistic) function. The underlying household appliance ownership data are gathered from a variety of sources including energy consumption and more general standard of living surveys. These data span a wide range of countries, including many developing countries for which appliance ownership is currently low, but likely to grow significantly over the next decades as a result of economic development. The result is a 'global' parameterization of appliance ownership rates as a function of widely available macroeconomic variables for the four appliances studied, which provides a reliable basis for interpolation where data are not available, and forecasting of ownership rates on a global scale. The main value of this method is to form the foundation of bottom-up energy demand forecasts, project energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, and allow for the construction of detailed emissions mitigation scenarios.

  20. Heat Pump Water Heaters | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Heat & Cool Water Heating Heat Pump Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters A diagram of a heat pump water heater. A diagram of a heat pump water heater. Most homeowners who...

  1. Heat Pumps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Geothermal heat pumps are expensive to install but pay for themselves over time in reduced heating and cooling costs. Learn more about how geothermal heat pumps heat and cool buildings by concentrating the naturally existing heat contained within the earth -- a clean, reliable, and renewable source of energy. In moderate climates, heat pumps can be an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Several types of heat pumps are available, including

  2. Combined solar and internal load effects on selection of heat reclaim-economizer HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, H.J. Jr.; Howell, R.H.; Wang, Z. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    The concern for energy conservation has led to the development and use of heat recovery systems which reclaim the building internal heat before it is discarded in the exhaust air. On the other hand, economizer cycles have been widely used for many years in a variety of types of HVAC systems. Economizer cycles are widely accepted as a means to reduce operating time for chilling equipment when cool outside air is available. It has been suggested that heat reclaim systems should not be used in conjunction with an HVAC system which incorporates an economizer cycle because the economizer operation would result in heat being exhausted which might have been recovered. Others suggest that the economizer cycle can be used economically in a heat recovery system if properly controlled to maintain an overall building heat balance. This study looks at potential energy savings of such combined systems with particular emphasis on the effects of the solar load (amount of glass) and the internal load level (lights, people, appliances, etc.). For systems without thermal storage, annual energy savings of up to 60 percent are predicted with the use of heat reclaim systems in conjunction with economizers when the heat reclaim has priority. These results demonstrate the necessity of complete engineering evaluations if proper selection and operation of combined heat recovery and economizer cycles are to be obtained. This paper includes the basic methodology for making such evaluations.

  3. Guide to Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-02-01

    Traditional dark-colored roofing materials absorb sunlight, making them warm in the sun and increasing the need for air conditioning. White or special "cool color" roofs absorb less sunlight, stay cooler in the sun and transmit less heat into the building.

  4. Department of Energy Opens Appliance Standards Investigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it has opened an investigation to determine whether certain air conditioners and heat pump products manufactured ...

  5. Tips: Kitchen Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    that came with your dishwasher for the manufacturer's recommendations on water temperature; many have internal heating elements that allow you to set the water heater in your...

  6. Save on Home Water Heating | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on Home Water Heating Save on Home Water Heating August 19, 2014 - 10:46am Addthis Purchasing a water heater with the ENERGY STAR® label ensures you are buying an energy efficient appliance designed to save consumers money. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Labs Purchasing a water heater with the ENERGY STAR® label ensures you are buying an energy efficient appliance designed to save consumers money. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable

  7. Information technology equipment cooling method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  8. Non-intrusive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, Edward F. (Burnt Hills, NY); Bergman, John W. (Barrington, NH)

    2001-05-22

    A readily replaceable heat exchange cooling jacket for applying fluid to a system conduit pipe. The cooling jacket comprises at least two members, separable into upper and lower portions. A chamber is formed between the conduit pipe and cooling jacket once the members are positioned about the pipe. The upper portion includes a fluid spray means positioned above the pipe and the bottom portion includes a fluid removal means. The heat exchange cooling jacket is adaptable with a drain tank, a heat exchanger, a pump and other standard equipment to provide a system for removing heat from a pipe. A method to remove heat from a pipe, includes the steps of enclosing a portion of the pipe with a jacket to form a chamber between an outside surface of the pipe and the cooling jacket; spraying cooling fluid at low pressure from an upper portion of the cooling jacket, allowing the fluid to flow downwardly by gravity along the surface of the pipe toward a bottom portion of the chamber; and removing the fluid at the bottom portion of the chamber.

  9. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2006-03-07

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  10. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2008-09-02

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  11. Enabling Graph Appliance for Genome Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rina; Graves, Jeffrey A; Lee, Sangkeun; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Shankar, Mallikarjun

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a huge growth in the amount of genomic data available as reads generated from various genome sequencers. The number of reads generated can be huge, ranging from hundreds to billions of nucleotide, each varying in size. Assembling such large amounts of data is one of the challenging computational problems for both biomedical and data scientists. Most of the genome assemblers developed have used de Bruijn graph techniques. A de Bruijn graph represents a collection of read sequences by billions of vertices and edges, which require large amounts of memory and computational power to store and process. This is the major drawback to de Bruijn graph assembly. Massively parallel, multi-threaded, shared memory systems can be leveraged to overcome some of these issues. The objective of our research is to investigate the feasibility and scalability issues of de Bruijn graph assembly on Cray s Urika-GD system; Urika-GD is a high performance graph appliance with a large shared memory and massively multithreaded custom processor designed for executing SPARQL queries over large-scale RDF data sets. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no research on representing a de Bruijn graph as an RDF graph or finding Eulerian paths in RDF graphs using SPARQL for potential genome discovery. In this paper, we address the issues involved in representing a de Bruin graphs as RDF graphs and propose an iterative querying approach for finding Eulerian paths in large RDF graphs. We evaluate the performance of our implementation on real world ebola genome datasets and illustrate how genome assembly can be accomplished with Urika-GD using iterative SPARQL queries.

  12. Assessment of the Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride for Purifying Coolant and Heat Transfer Salts in the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2010-09-28

    This report provides an assessment of the use of nitrogen trifluoride for removing oxide and water-caused contaminants in the fluoride salts that will be used as coolants in a molten salt cooled reactor.

  13. Absorption Cooling Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Absorption coolers use heat rather than electricity as their energy source. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption cooling, it is also referred to as...

  14. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Central Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps Working Group is an action issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between...

  15. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, V. H.; Less, B. D.; Singer, B. C.; Stratton, J. C.; Wray, C. P.

    2015-02-01

    In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is often constrained by safety concerns with naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter residential buildings more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spill combustion exhaust into the living space. Several measures, such as installation guidelines, vent sizing codes, and combustion safety diagnostics, are in place with the intent to prevent backdrafting and combustion spillage, but the diagnostics conflict and the risk mitigation objective is inconsistent. This literature review summarizes the metrics and diagnostics used to assess combustion safety, documents their technical basis, and investigates their risk mitigations. It compiles information from the following: codes for combustion appliance venting and installation; standards and guidelines for combustion safety diagnostics; research evaluating combustion safety diagnostics; research investigating wind effects on building depressurization and venting; and software for simulating vent system performance.

  16. Integrated Heat Pump (IHP) System Development - Air-Source IHP Control Strategy and Specifications and Ground-Source IHP Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Richard W; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D

    2007-05-01

    The integrated heat pump (IHP), as one appliance, can provide space cooling, heating, ventilation, and dehumidification while maintaining comfort and meeting domestic water heating needs in near-zero-energy home (NZEH) applications. In FY 2006 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed development of a control strategy and system specification for an air-source IHP. The conceptual design of a ground-source IHP was also completed. Testing and analysis confirm the potential of both IHP concepts to meet NZEH energy services needs while consuming 50% less energy than a suite of equipment that meets current minimum efficiency requirements. This report is in fulfillment of an FY06 DOE Building Technologies (BT) Joule Milestone.

  17. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed (Framingham, MA); Schwall, Robert E. (Northborough, MA); Driscoll, David I. (South Euclid, OH); Shoykhet, Boris A. (Beachwood, OH)

    2002-01-01

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  18. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2004-11-02

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  19. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

  20. Appliance Rebates: Frequently Asked Questions | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Andrea Spikes Former Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory The appliance rebate program has been wildly successful in many states. So successful, in fact, that people have plenty of questions and aren't always finding the answers they need. Whether you're just learning about the appliance rebate program or have some nagging questions, I hope this information is helpful to you. For the most up-to-date information on rebates in your state, click on your state on Approved