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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency andSurvey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency andby electric resistance storage tank water heaters (geysers),

Johnson, Alissa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Heat pump water heater and storage tank assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water heater and storage tank assembly comprises a housing defining a chamber, an inlet for admitting cold water to the chamber, and an outlet for permitting flow of hot water from the chamber. A compressor is mounted on the housing and is removed from the chamber. A condenser comprises a tube adapted to receive refrigerant from the compressor, and winding around the chamber to impart heat to water in the chamber. An evaporator is mounted on the housing and removed from the chamber, the evaporator being adapted to receive refrigerant from the condenser and to discharge refrigerant to conduits in communication with the compressor. An electric resistance element extends into the chamber, and a thermostat is disposed in the chamber and is operative to sense water temperature and to actuate the resistance element upon the water temperature dropping to a selected level. The assembly includes a first connection at an external end of the inlet, a second connection at an external end of the outlet, and a third connection for connecting the resistance element, compressor and evaporator to an electrical power source.

Dieckmann, John T. (Belmont, MA); Nowicki, Brian J. (Watertown, MA); Teagan, W. Peter (Acton, MA); Zogg, Robert (Belmont, MA)

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

3

Experimental study of a thermosyphon solar water heater coupled to a fibre-reinforced plastic (FRP) storage tank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal performance of the thermosyphon solar water heater was analyzed to show its ... %. Also, an analysis of the temperature storage characteristics of a novel fibre-reinforced plastic (FRP) storage tank w...

P. N. Nwosu; O. U. Oparaku; W. I. Okonkwo; G. O. Unachukwu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water heating is a main consumer of energy in households, especially in temperate and cold climates. In South Africa, where hot water is typically provided by electric resistance storage tank water heaters (geysers), water heating energy consumption exceeds cooking, refrigeration, and lighting to be the most consumptive single electric appliance in the home. A recent analysis for the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) performed by the authors estimated that standing losses from electric geysers contributed over 1,000 kWh to the annual electricity bill for South African households that used them. In order to reduce this burden, the South African government is currently pursuing a programme of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labelling (EES&L) for electric appliances, including geysers. In addition, Eskom has a history of promoting heat pump water heaters (HPWH) through incentive programs, which can further reduce energy consumption. This paper provides a survey of international electric storage water heater test procedures and efficiency metrics which can serve as a reference for comparison with proposed geyser standards and ratings in South Africa. Additionally it provides a sample of efficiency technologies employed to improve the efficiency of electric storage water heaters, and outlines programs to promote adoption of improved efficiency. Finally, it surveys current programs used to promote HPWH and considers the potential for this technology to address peak demand more effectively than reduction of standby losses alone

Johnson, Alissa; Lutz, James; McNeil, Michael A.; Covary, Theo

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Experimental investigation of the night heat losses of hot water storage tanks in thermosyphon solar water heaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of night heat losses on the performance of thermosyphon solar water heaters have been experimentally examined. Three typical thermosyphon solar water heating systems with different storage tank sizes were tested by utilising the method suggested by ISO 9459-2:95. The results were analysed to quantify the night heat losses and to investigate the effect that these may have on the system daily performance. Analysis of the results showed that a linear behavior of the heat losses with the night mean ambient temperature exists. The correlation coefficients of the linearity for the three systems under consideration range from 0.93 to 0.97 with the losses reaching almost 8000 kJ at a mean ambient air temperature of 10 C. This value represents a significant percentage of the daily collected energy making the night losses one of the most important sources of energy loss in thermosyphonic systems.

Ioannis Michaelides; Polyvios Eleftheriou; George A. Siamas; George Roditis; Paraskevas Kyriacou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Storage Gas Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Gas Water Heaters Storage Gas Water Heaters The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance...

7

Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Water Heaters Storage Water Heaters Storage Water Heaters June 15, 2012 - 6:00pm Addthis Consider energy efficiency when selecting a conventional storage water heater to avoid paying more over its lifetime. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JulNichols. Consider energy efficiency when selecting a conventional storage water heater to avoid paying more over its lifetime. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JulNichols. Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for the home. Here you'll find basic information about how storage water heaters work; what criteria to use when selecting the right model; and some installation, maintenance, and safety tips. How They Work A single-family storage water heater offers a ready reservoir -- from 20 to

8

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On top of the tank are two thin pipes; one pipe is the hot water outlet, and the other is the cold water inlet. A large pipe in the middle is called a vent pipe. A pressure/temperature relief valve is also on top of the tank and is connected to an open pipe that runs down the side of the tank. Another valve near the bottom of the outside of the tank is the thermostat and gas valve. A cutout shows the parts inside the tank, which include a large tube called a flue tube/heat exchanger. Inside this tube is a jagged insert called a flue baffle. Beside the flue tube/heat exchanger is a thin tube called the anode rod. At the bottom of the tank is a gas burner, and beneath the burner are combustion air openings.

9

Onboard Storage Tank Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories co-hosted the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on April 29th, 2010. Onboard storage tank experts gathered to share lessons learned...

10

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagram 1: A Typical Tank Water Heater Source: http://to-unit comparisons of tank versus tankless water heaters.Energy Use MJ/(unit*year) Tank Tankless MJ/(unit*year) Tank

Lu, Alison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of TANK water heater simulation model as embedded in HWSim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this scheme for operating TANK with HWSim is successful.LBNL # Evaluation of TANK water heater simulation model asCalifornia. Evaluation of TANK water heater simulation model

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage...

13

Savings Project: Insulate Your Water Heater Tank | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savings Project: Insulate Your Water Heater Tank Savings Project: Insulate Your Water Heater Tank Savings Project: Insulate Your Water Heater Tank Addthis Project Level medium Energy Savings $20-$45 annually Time to Complete 1.5 hours Overall Cost $30 Insulate your hot water tank to save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/glennebo Insulate your hot water tank to save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/glennebo Just like insulating your walls or roof, insulating your hot water tank is an easy and inexpensive way to improve energy efficiency and save you money each month. If your water tank is new, it is likely already insulated. If you have an older hot water tank, check to see if it has insulation with an R-value of at least 24. If not, consider insulating your water tank, which

14

Phase change material storage heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A storage heater for storing heat and for heating a fluid, such as water, has an enclosure defining a chamber therein. The chamber has a lower portion and an upper portion with a heating element being disposed within the enclosure. A tube through which the fluid flows has an inlet and an outlet, both being disposed outside of the enclosure, and has a portion interconnecting the inlet and the outlet that passes through the enclosure. A densely packed bed of phase change material pellets is disposed within the enclosure and is surrounded by a viscous liquid, such as propylene glycol. The viscous liquid is in thermal communication with the heating element, the phase change material pellets, and the tube and transfers heat from the heating element to the pellets and from the pellets to the tube. The viscous fluid has a viscosity so that the frictional pressure drop of the fluid in contact with the phase change material pellets substantially reduces vertical thermal convection in the fluid. As the fluid flows through the tube heat is transferred from the viscous liquid to the fluid flowing through the tube, thereby heating the fluid.

Goswami, D. Yogi (Gainesville, FL); Hsieh, Chung K. (Gainesville, FL); Jotshi, Chand K. (Gainesville, FL); Klausner, James F. (Gainesville, FL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Experimental study of integrated collector storage solar water heaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three Integrated Collector Storage Solar Water Heaters (ICSSWH) have been designed, constructed and experimentally studied in comparison to a Flat Plate Thermosiphonic Unit (FPTU). Each of the ICS experimental models consists of one cylindrical tank horizontally mounted in a stationary symmetrical Compound Parabolic Concentrating (CPC) reflector trough. The main objective is the design and construction of low cost solar water heaters with improved thermal performance and lower possible depths. The experimental models can be mounted on horizontal as well as on inclined roofs by adopting the lowest possible depth. The results show that these solar devices perform more than effectively all year long. This could contribute significantly on the development of ICS type solar water heaters.

M. Souliotis; D. Chemisana; Y.G. Caouris; Y. Tripanagnostopoulos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Regulated underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. (40 CFR 280). The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a roadmap'' for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Regulated underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. [40 CFR 280]. The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a ``roadmap`` for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Enhanced Integrity LNG Storage Tanks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years close attention has been given to increasing the integrity of LNG storage tanks. The M.W. Kellogg Company is a participant in four major LNG projects that incorporate enhanced integrity LNG storag...

W. S. Jacobs; S. E. Handman

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Investigating leaking underground storage tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATING LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS A Thesis by DAVID THOMPSON UPTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989... Major Subject: Geology INVESTIGATING LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS A Thesis by DAVID THOMPSON UPTON Approved as to sty)e and content by: P. A, Domenico (Chair of Committee) jj K. W. Brown (Member) C. C Mathewson (Member) J. H. S ng Head...

Upton, David Thompson

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Storage Water Heaters Gas Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters October 7, 2013 - 10:43am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases For the most up-to-date efficiency levels required by ENERGY STAR, look for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1CFostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility Ryan Haerer, Program Analyst, Alternative Fuels, Office of Underground Storage Tanks, Environmental Protection Agency

22

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential water heating is a large source of energy use in California homes. This project took a life cycle approach to comparing tank and tankless water heaters in Northern and Southern California. Information about the life cycle phases was calculated using the European Union?s Methodology study for EcoDesign of Energy-using Products (MEEUP) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Life Cycle Inventory (NREL LCI) database. In a unit-to-unit comparison, it was found that tankless water heaters would lessen impacts of water heating by reducing annual energy use by 2800 MJ/year (16% compared to tank), and reducing global warming emissions by 175 kg CO2 eqv./year (18% reduction). Overall, the production and combustion of natural gas in the use phase had the largest impact. Total waste, VOCs, PAHs, particulate matter, and heavy-metals-to-air categories were also affected relatively strongly by manufacturing processes. It was estimated that tankless water heater users would have to use 10 more gallons of hot water a day (an increased usage of approximately 20%) to have the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results suggest that if a higher percentage of Californians used tankless water heaters, environmental impacts caused by water heating would be smaller.

Lu, Alison; McMahon, James; Masanet, Eric; Lutz, Jim

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form Petroleum Bulk Storage Form Facility Name: ______________________ Tank No:_______________ Date:_____________ Inspection Parameter Result Comments/Corrective Actions 1. Is there leaking in the interstitial space (not DRY)? YES/NO/NA 2. Tank surface shows signs of leakage? YES/NO/NA 3

Pawlowski, Wojtek

24

Storage Tanks (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Tanks (Arkansas) Storage Tanks (Arkansas) Storage Tanks (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Storage Tanks regulations is a set of rules and permit requirements mandated by the Arkansas Pollution and Ecology Commission in order to protect the public health and the lands and the waters of the State of Arkansas. They are promulgated pursuant to Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7-801 and the Petroleum Storage Trust Fund Act 8-7-901. It covers all storage tanks, above (AST) and underground (UST). Most importantly these regulations establish that all owners and operators of storage tanks must

25

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

26

Underground Storage Tank Regulations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage Tank Regulations Underground Storage Tank Regulations Underground Storage Tank Regulations < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Underground Storage Tank Regulations is relevant to all energy projects

27

Comparative safety analysis of LNG storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LNG storage tank design and response to selected release scenarios were reviewed. The selection of the scenarios was based on an investigation of potential hazards as cited in the literature. A review of the structure of specific LNG storage facilities is given. Scenarios initially addressed included those that most likely emerge from the tank facility itself: conditions of overfill and overflow as related to liquid LNG content levels; over/underpressurization at respective tank vapor pressure boundaries; subsidence of bearing soil below tank foundations; and crack propagation in tank walls due to possible exposure of structural material to cryogenic temperatures. Additional scenarios addressed include those that result from external events: tornado induced winds and pressure drops; exterior tank missile impact with tornado winds and rotating machinery being the investigated mode of generation; thermal response due to adjacent fire conditions; and tank response due to intense seismic activity. Applicability of each scenario depended heavily on the specific tank configurations and material types selected. (PSB)

Fecht, B.A.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, K.O.; Marr, G.D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Onboard Storage Tank Onboard Storage Tank Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings

29

Utah Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Utah Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit Form Type...

30

Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and...

31

Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive...

32

Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for...

33

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Promulgation of Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

34

Solar Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar Water Heater Basics Solar Water Heater Basics Solar Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 3:01pm Addthis Illustration of an active, closed loop solar water heater. A large, flat panel called a flat plate collector is connected to a tank called a solar storage/backup water heater by two pipes. One of these pipes runs through a cylindrical pump into the bottom of the tank, where it becomes a coil called a double-wall heat exchanger. This coil runs up through the tank and out again to the flat plate collector. Antifreeze fluid runs only through this collector loop. Two pipes run out the top of the water heater tank; one is a cold water supply into the tank, and the other sends hot water to the house. Solar water heaters use the sun's heat to provide hot water for a home or

35

Evaluation of TANK Water Heater Simulation Model as Embedded in HWSim  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TANK Water Heater Simulation Model as Embedded in HWSim TANK Water Heater Simulation Model as Embedded in HWSim Title Evaluation of TANK Water Heater Simulation Model as Embedded in HWSim Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5092E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Lutz, James D. Document Number LBNL-5092E Pagination 11 Date Published December 22 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-5092E Abstract This report evaluates the hot water temperatures and flow rates as calculated by the combined HWSim and TANK simulation models. Notes This work was sponsored by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) which is funded by the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program, under Residential Water Heating Program Contract No. 500-08-060. This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State, and Community Programs, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

36

A Comparison of Popular Remedial Technologies for Petroleum Contaminated Soils from Leaking Underground Storage Tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Underground Storage Tanks. Chelsea: Lewis Publishers.and Underground Storage Tank Sites. Database on-line.Michigan Underground Storage Tank Rules. Database on-line.

Kujat, Jonathon D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Assessing the Effectiveness of California's Underground Storage Tank Annual Inspection Rate Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leaks from Underground Storage Tanks by Media Affected Soilfrom Underground Storage Tank Facilities Cities CountiesCities Counties Leaks per Underground Storage Tank Facility

Cutter, W. Bowman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Underground Storage Tank Program (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules are intended to protect public health and the environment by establishing standards for the design, installation, operation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of underground storage...

39

NMAC 20.5 Petroleum Storage Tanks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Petroleum Storage Tanks Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: NMAC 20.5 Petroleum Storage TanksLegal Abstract...

40

Notification for Underground Storage Tanks (EPA Form 7530-1)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Notification for Underground Storage Tanks (EPA Form 7530-1) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Notification for Underground Storage Tanks...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - aboveground storage tanks Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tanks Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aboveground storage tanks...

42

Hydrogen Storage "Think Tank" Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is a compilation of information exchanged at a forum on March 14, 2003 in Washington, DC. The forum was assembled for innovative and non-conventional brainstorming on this issue of hydrogen storage technologies.

43

Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons Who  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons Who Install, Alter, and Remove Underground Storage Tanks (Mississippi) Underground Storage Tank Regulations for the Certification of Persons Who Install, Alter, and Remove Underground Storage Tanks (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells

44

A Small Scale Solar Agricultural Dryer with Biomass Burner and Heat Storage Back-Up Heater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a small scale solar agricultural dryer with a simple biomass burner and heat storage back-up heater. The key design features ... are the combination of direct and indirect type solar dryer, t...

Elieser Tarigan; Perapong Tekasakul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Thermal performance evaluation of a solar air heater with and without thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This communication presents the experimental study and performance analysis of a solar air heater with and without phase change ... found that the output temperature in case with thermal energy storage (TES) is h...

V. V. Tyagi; A. K. Pandey; S. C. Kaushik

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters May 2, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis Diagram of a tankless water heater. Diagram of a tankless water heater. How does it work? Tankless water heaters deliver hot water as it is needed, eliminating the need for storage tanks. Tankless water heaters, also known as demand-type or instantaneous water heaters, provide hot water only as it is needed. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters, which can save you money. Here you'll find basic information about how they work, whether a tankless water heater might be right for your home, and what criteria to use when selecting the right model. Check out the Energy Saver 101: Water Heating infographic to learn if a tankless water heater is right for you.

47

PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES Fabien FouiHen, INERIS, Parc. Reflections led on this accident have pushed to consider the phenomenon of tank pressurization as a potential initiating event of the fire ball observed. In concrete terms, when a fixed roof storage tank is surrounded

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

Georgia Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) Georgia Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Underground Storage Act (GUST) provides a comprehensive program to prevent, detect, and correct releases from underground storage tanks

49

Alaska Underground Storage Tanks Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanks Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Alaska Underground Storage Tanks Website Author Division of Spill Prevention and Response...

50

Idaho DEQ Storage Tanks Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanks Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Idaho DEQ Storage Tanks Webpage Abstract This webpage provides an overview of the...

51

NMED Petroleum Storage Tank Bureau webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tank Bureau webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: NMED Petroleum Storage Tank Bureau webpage Abstract This is the website for the...

52

Hawaii Department of Health Underground Storage Tank Webpage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract This webpage provides information on the regulation of underground storage tanks. Author State of Hawaii Department of Health Published State of Hawaii, Date Not...

53

Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010Beijing, P.R. China September 27, 2010 Bonfire Tests of High...

54

Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines This chapter constitutes rules for all underground storage tank facilities- including registration, reporting, permitting, certification, financial responsibility and to protect human health and the environment

55

Permanent Closure of the TAN-664 Underground Storage Tank  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the TAN-664 gasoline underground storage tank in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, 'Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.'

Bradley K. Griffith

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Alabama Underground Storage Tank And Wellhead Protection Act (Alabama) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alabama Underground Storage Tank And Wellhead Protection Act Alabama Underground Storage Tank And Wellhead Protection Act (Alabama) Alabama Underground Storage Tank And Wellhead Protection Act (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations The department, acting through the commission, is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations governing underground storage tanks and is authorized to seek the approval of the United States Environmental Protection Agency to operate the state underground storage tank program in lieu of the federal program. In addition to specific authorities provided by this chapter, the department is authorized, acting through the commission, to

57

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Onboard Storage Tank Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Onboard Storage Tank Workshop Onboard Storage Tank Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories co-hosted the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on April 29th, 2010. Onboard storage tank experts gathered to share lessons learned about research and development (R&D) needs; regulations, codes and standards (RCS); and a path forward to enable the successful deployment of hydrogen storage tanks in early market fuel cell applications. The workshop also included initial follow up to the DOE and Department of Transportation (DOT) International Workshop on Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels held on December 10-11, 2009. Here you will find information about Workshop proceedings including all presentations. Agenda and Notes The following agenda and notes provide summary information about the workshop.

58

Sizing a New Water Heater | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sizing a New Water Heater Sizing a New Water Heater Sizing a New Water Heater May 29, 2012 - 7:16pm Addthis Is your water heater the right size for you house? | Photo credit ENERGY STAR® Is your water heater the right size for you house? | Photo credit ENERGY STAR® A properly sized water heater will meet your household's hot water needs while operating more efficiently. Therefore, before purchasing a water heater, make sure it's the correct size. Here you'll find information about how to size these systems: Tankless or demand-type water heaters Solar water heating system Storage and heat pump (with tank) water heaters. For sizing combination water and space heating systems -- including some heat pump systems, and tankless coil and indirect water heaters -- consult a qualified contractor.

59

Underground Storage Tanks (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tanks (West Virginia) Tanks (West Virginia) Underground Storage Tanks (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This rule governs the construction, installation, upgrading, use, maintenance, testing, and closure of underground storage tanks, including certification requirements for individuals who install, repair, retrofit,

60

Underground Storage Tank Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Act (West Virginia) Act (West Virginia) Underground Storage Tank Act (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection New underground storage tank construction standards must include at least the following requirements: (1) That an underground storage tank will prevent releases of regulated substances stored therein, which may occur as

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Underground storage tank 511-D1U1 closure plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the closure plan for diesel fuel underground storage tank 511-D1U1 and appendices containing supplemental information such as staff training certification and task summaries. Precision tank test data, a site health and safety plan, and material safety data sheets are also included.

Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

NM Underground Storage Tank Registration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: NM Underground Storage Tank RegistrationLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2012 Legal Citation...

63

ARM 17-56 - Underground Storage Tanks Petroleum and Chemical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground Storage Tanks Petroleum and Chemical Substance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: ARM 17-56 -...

64

Robotic Inspection System for Bulk Liquid Storage Tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) requires: drainage of the product; cleaning of the vessel with water or solvents; physical removal, collection and containment of petroleum and chemical waste residues, including the waste streams created by the cleaning...

Hartsell, D. R.; Hakes, K. J.

65

30 TAC, part 1, chapter 334 Underground storage tanks general...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground storage tanks general provisions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 30 TAC, part 1, chapter 334...

66

Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report on technical assessment of cyro-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

67

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the stored water compared to the heat content of the water (water heaters with storage tanks) Cycling losses - the loss of heat as the water circulates through a water heater...

68

A model for a variable-volume, density-stratified, liquid desiccant storage tank.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A stratified, single-vessel liquid desiccant storage tank is an attractive option for the seasonal storage of solar energy. Maintaining stratified storage preserves the chemical energy (more)

Mallinak, Jason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

200-Area plateau inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks locations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluor Daniel Northwest (FDNW) has been tasked by Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) to incorporate current location data for 64 of the 200-Area plateau inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUST) into the centralized mapping computer database for the Hanford facilities. The IMUST coordinate locations and tank names for the tanks currently assigned to the Hanford Site contractors are listed in Appendix A. The IMUST are inactive tanks installed in underground vaults or buried directly in the ground within the 200-East and 200-West Areas of the Hanford Site. The tanks are categorized as tanks with a capacity of less than 190,000 liters (50,000 gal). Some of the IMUST have been stabilized, pumped dry, filled with grout, or may contain an inventory or radioactive and/or hazardous materials. The IMUST have been out of service for at least 12 years.

Brevick, C.H.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Buckling of oil storage tanks in SPPL tank farm during the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An oil storage tank that suffered damage during the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake is studied using a laboratory model. The tank is unanchored and includes a floating roof. The tank is subjected to a single horizontal axis base excitation. Buckling is studied under both harmonic and simulated earthquake base motion. The model buckling results are in reasonable agreement with the field observations. It was also found that the floating roof has no effect on the buckling behavior. Comparison with the API design provisions shows that the empirical model used as the basis of the code for both tip-over and bucking have little resemblance to the actual tank behavior.

Shih, C.F.; Babcock, C.D.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Buckling of oil storage tanks in sppl tank farm during the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An oil storage tank that suffered damage during the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake is studied using a laboratory model. The tank is unanchored and includes a floating roof. The tank is subjected to a single horizontal axis base excitation. Buckling is studied under both harmonic and simulated earthquake base motion. The model buckling results are in reasonable agreement with the field observations. It was also found that the floating roof has no effect on the buckling behavior. Comparison with the API design provisions shows that the empirical model used for both tip-over and buckling have little resemblance to the actual tank behavior

Shih, C.F.; Babcock, C.D.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Underground Storage Tank Management (District of Columbia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The installation, upgrade and operation of any petroleum UST (>110 gallons) or hazardous substance UST System, including heating oil tanks over 1,100 gallons capacity in the District requires a...

73

Stress evaluation of the primary tank of a double-shell underground storage tank facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility called the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) is being designed at the Department of Energy`s Hanford site. The MWTF is expected to be completed in 1998 and will consist of six underground double-shell waste storage tanks and associated systems. These tanks will provide safe and environmentally acceptable storage capacity to handle waste generated during single-shell and double-shell tank safety mitigation and remediation activities. This paper summarizes the analysis and qualification of the primary tank structure of the MWTF, as performed by ICF Kaiser Hanford during the latter phase of Title 1 (Preliminary) design. Both computer finite element analysis (FEA) and hand calculations methods based on the so-called Tank Seismic Experts Panel (TSEP) Guidelines were used to perform the analysis and evaluation. Based on the evaluations summarized in this paper, it is concluded that the primary tank structure of the MWTF satisfies the project design requirements. In addition, the hand calculations performed using the methodologies provided in the TSEP Guidelines demonstrate that, except for slosh height, the capacities exceed the demand. The design accounts for the adverse effect of the excessive slosh height demand, i.e., inadequate freeboard, by increasing the hydrodynamic wall and roof pressures appropriately, and designing the tank for such increased pressures.

Atalay, M.B. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States); Stine, M.D. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Farnworth, S.K. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

An Overview of the New Residential Water Heater Efficiency Standards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Overview of the New Residential Water Heater Efficiency Standards An Overview of the New Residential Water Heater Efficiency Standards Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Date: April 26, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 DOE issued new standards for residential water heaters last month that will save an estimated 2.6 quads of energy over 30 years. For most product sizes sold, the new standards can be met with modest changes, such as adding more insulation to today's conventional tank-style water heaters. For the most common size electric water heater (50 gallons), the standards will save 4 percent, while for the most common size gas water heater (40 gallons), the new standards will save 3 percent. However, for the biggest products (those with over 55 gallons in storage capacity, which is about 9% and 4% of the electric and gas storage water heater markets, respectively), the new

75

RCRA closure plan for underground storage tank 105-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Reactor Department program for repairing heat exchangers created a low level radioactive waste, which was held in underground storage tank (UST) 105-C, hereafter referred to as the tank. According to Procedures used at the facility, the waste`s pH was adjusted to the 8.0--12.0 range before shipping it to the SRS Waste Management Department. For this reason, area personnel did not anticipate that the waste which is currently contained in the tank would have corrosive hazardous characteristic. However, recent analysis indicates that waste contained in the tank has a pH of greater than 12.5, thereby constituting a hazardous waste. Because the Department of Energy-Savannah River Office (DOE-SR) could not prove that the hazardous waste had been stored in the tank for less than 90 days, the State of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) alleged that DOE-SR was in violation of the 1976 Code of Laws of South Carolina. As agreed in Settlement Agreement 90-74-SW between the DOE and SCDHEC, this is the required closure plan for Tank 105-C. The purpose of this document is to present SCDHEC with an official plan for closing the underground storage tank. Upon approval by SCDHEC, the schedule for closure will be an enforceable portion of this agreement.

Miles, W.C. Jr.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Soil load above Hanford waste storage tanks (2 volumes)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of work performed as part of the Dome Load Control Project in 1994. Section 2 contains the calculations of the weight of the soil over the tank dome for each of the 75-feet-diameter waste-storage tanks located at the Hanford Site. The chosen soil specific weight and soil depth measured at the apex of the dome crown are the same as those used in the primary analysis that qualified the design. Section 3 provides reference dimensions for each of the tank farm sites. The reference dimensions spatially orient the tanks and provide an outer diameter for each tank. Section 4 summarizes the available soil surface elevation data. It also provides examples of the calculations performed to establish the present soil elevation estimates. The survey data and other data sources from which the elevation data has been obtained are printed separately in Volume 2 of this Supporting Document. Section 5 contains tables that provide an overall summary of the present status of dome loads. Tables summarizing the load state corresponding to the soil depth and soil specific weight for the original qualification analysis, the gravity load requalification for soil depth and soil specific weight greater than the expected actual values, and a best estimate condition of soil depth and specific weight are presented for the Double-Shell Tanks. For the Single-Shell Tanks, only the original qualification analysis is available; thus, the tabulated results are for this case only. Section 6 provides a brief overview of past analysis and testing results that given an indication of the load capacity of the waste storage tanks that corresponds to a condition approaching ultimate failure of the tank. 31 refs.

Pianka, E.W. [Advent Engineering Services, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)

1995-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

Optimized LNG Storage Tanks for Fleet-Size Refueling Stations with Local LNG Liquefiers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capacity of a liquid natural gas (LNG) storage tank in a LNG fleet-size refueling station is determined in ... . These considerations drive the selection of the LNG storage tank size upwards. On the other han...

J. A. Barclay; A. J. Corless; E. H. Nelson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon storage tanks Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

storage tanks Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: argon storage tanks Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Large and Small (Far and Near) Liquid...

79

7 C.C.R. 1101-14 - Underground Storage Tanks and Aboveground...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1101-14 - Underground Storage Tanks and Aboveground Storage tanks Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 7 C.C.R....

80

OAR 340-150 - DEQ Underground Storage Tank Rules | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storage Tank RulesLegal Abstract Provide for the regulation of underground storage tanks. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2003 Legal Citation OAR 340-150 (1990) DOI...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Selecting a new water heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the types of water heaters available (storage water heaters, demand water heaters, heat pump water heaters, tankless coil and indirect water heaters, and solar water heaters). The criteria for selection are discussed. These are capacity, efficiency rating, and cost. A resource list is provided for further information.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Rollover Test in LNG Storage Tank and Simulation Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As is widely known, in 1971 an accident occurred at the LNG terminal in La Spezia1, Italy, in which a sharp increase in the quantity of boil off gas was observed in a storage tank. This phenomenon was called roll...

Y. Sugawara; A. Kubota; S. Muraki

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Modeling and simulation of a high pressure hydrogen storage tank with Dynamic Wall.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Hydrogen storage is one of the divisions of hydrogen powered vehicles technology. To increase performances of high pressure hydrogen storage tanks, a multilayered design is (more)

Cumalioglu, Ilgaz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Modeling and simulation of a high pressure hydrogen storage tank with dynamic wall.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Hydrogen storage is one of the divisions of hydrogen powered vehicles technology. To increase performances of high pressure hydrogen storage tanks, a multilayered design is (more)

Cumalioglu, Ilgaz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Integrated heat exchanger design for a cryogenic storage tank  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field demonstrations of liquid hydrogen technology will be undertaken for the proliferation of advanced methods and applications in the use of cryofuels. Advancements in the use of cryofuels for transportation on Earth, from Earth, or in space are envisioned for automobiles, aircraft, rockets, and spacecraft. These advancements rely on practical ways of storage, transfer, and handling of liquid hydrogen. Focusing on storage, an integrated heat exchanger system has been designed for incorporation with an existing storage tank and a reverse Brayton cycle helium refrigerator of capacity 850 watts at 20 K. The storage tank is a 125,000-liter capacity horizontal cylindrical tank, with vacuum jacket and multilayer insulation, and a small 0.6-meter diameter manway opening. Addressed are the specific design challenges associated with the small opening, complete modularity, pressure systems re-certification for lower temperature and pressure service associated with hydrogen densification, and a large 8:1 length-to-diameter ratio for distribution of the cryogenic refrigeration. The approach, problem solving, and system design and analysis for integrated heat exchanger are detailed and discussed. Implications for future space launch facilities are also identified. The objective of the field demonstration will be to test various zero-loss and densified cryofuel handling concepts for future transportation applications.

Fesmire, J. E.; Bonner, T.; Oliveira, J. M.; Johnson, W. L.; Notardonato, W. U. [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NE-F6, KSC, FL 32899 (United States); Tomsik, T. M. [NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States); Conyers, H. J. [NASA Stennis Space Center, Building 3225, SSC, MS 39529 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

86

Integrated heat exchanger design for a cryogenic storage tank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Field demonstrations of liquid hydrogen technology will be undertaken for the proliferation of advanced methods and applications in the use of cryofuels. Advancements in the use of cryofuels for transportation on Earth from Earth or in space are envisioned for automobiles aircraft rockets and spacecraft. These advancements rely on practical ways of storage transfer and handling of liquid hydrogen. Focusing on storage an integrated heat exchanger system has been designed for incorporation with an existing storage tank and a reverse Brayton cycle helium refrigerator of capacity 850 watts at 20 K. The storage tank is a 125 000-liter capacity horizontal cylindrical tank with vacuum jacket and multilayer insulation and a small 0.6-meter diameter manway opening. Addressed are the specific design challenges associated with the small opening complete modularity pressure systems re-certification for lower temperature and pressure service associated with hydrogen densification and a large 8:1 length-to-diameter ratio for distribution of the cryogenic refrigeration. The approach problem solving and system design and analysis for integrated heat exchanger are detailed and discussed. Implications for future space launch facilities are also identified. The objective of the field demonstration will be to test various zero-loss and densified cryofuel handling concepts for future transportation applications.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

GRR/Section 18-UT-a - Underground Storage Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-UT-a - Underground Storage Tank GRR/Section 18-UT-a - Underground Storage Tank < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-UT-a - Underground Storage Tank 18UTAUndergroundStorageTank (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Utah Underground Storage Tank Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18UTAUndergroundStorageTank (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of Environmental Response and Remediation oversees the underground storage tank (UST) program in

88

GRR/Section 18-TX-a - Underground Storage Tank Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-a - Underground Storage Tank Process TX-a - Underground Storage Tank Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-TX-a - Underground Storage Tank Process 18TXAUndergroundStorageTanks (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies 30 Texas Administrative Code 334 - Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks 30 Texas Administrative Code 37 - Financial Assurance for Petroleum Underground Storage Tanks Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18TXAUndergroundStorageTanks (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

89

GRR/Section 18-AK-a - Storage Tank Registration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-AK-a - Storage Tank Registration GRR/Section 18-AK-a - Storage Tank Registration < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-AK-a - Storage Tank Registration 18AKA - StorageTankRegistration (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies AS 46.03.380 As 46.03.385 18 AAC 78 Underground Storage Tanks Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18AKA - StorageTankRegistration (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Any project that requires installation or operation of a storage tank must

90

Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID). Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE complex currently has 332 underground storage tanks (USTs) that have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production. Very little of the over 100 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste has been treated and disposed of in final form. Two waste storage tank design types are prevalent across the DOE complex: single-shell wall and double-shell wall designs. They are made of stainless steel, concrete, and concrete with carbon steel liners, and their capacities vary from 5000 gallons (19 m{sup 3}) to 10{sup 6} gallons (3785 m{sup 3}). The tanks have an overburden layer of soil ranging from a few feet to tens of feet. Responding to the need for remediation of tank waste, driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements (FFCAs) at all participating sites, the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Program was created by the US DOE Office of Technology Development in February 1991. Its mission is to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat to concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to the public and the regulators. The UST-ID has focused on five DOE locations: the Hanford Site, which is the host site, in Richland, Washington; the Fernald Site in Fernald, Ohio; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in Savannah River, South Carolina.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

92

Hydrogen Storage Using Lightweight Tanks Andrew H. Weisberg, Blake Myers, and Gene Berry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage Using Lightweight Tanks Andrew H. Weisberg, Blake Myers, and Gene Berry Lawrence As tooling was being designed for compressed hydrogen tank experiments, a series of discoveries were made. Their preliminary results may change the best solutions to hydrogen storage. Recent Progress LLNL tank design

93

Maintenance Scheduling of Oil Storage Tanks using Tabu-based Genetic Algorithm *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maintenance Scheduling of Oil Storage Tanks using Tabu-based Genetic Algorithm * Sheng-Tun Li1 the distribution channel of products, which consists of gas stations, pipelines, and storage tanks. Due days or 50,000 kiloliters. Therefore, they unavoidably have to rent tanks from the domestic oil

Chen, Shu-Ching

94

CFD Simulation on LNG Storage Tank to Improve Safety and Reduce Cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When a storage tank containing LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) is further filled with different-density LNG, stratification may occur. It occasionally results ... study on tank filling procedures with different-densi...

Kazuo Koyama

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Site High Level Waste Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This criticality safety evaluation covers operations for waste in underground storage tanks at the high-level waste tank farms on the Hanford site. This evaluation provides the bases for criticality safety limits and controls to govern receipt, transfer, and long-term storage of tank waste. Justification is provided that a nuclear criticality accident cannot occur for tank farms operations, based on current fissile material and operating conditions.

ROGERS, C.A.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

GRR/Section 18-CO-a - Underground Storage Tank Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-CO-a - Underground Storage Tank Permit GRR/Section 18-CO-a - Underground Storage Tank Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-CO-a - Underground Storage Tank Permit 18COAUndergroundStorageTankPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Labor and Employment Regulations & Policies Solid Waste Disposal Act 7 CCR 1101-14 Article 2 Underground Storage Tanks Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18COAUndergroundStorageTankPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The design, installation, registration, construction, and operation of

97

GRR/Section 18-OR-a - State Underground Storage Tank | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-OR-a - State Underground Storage Tank GRR/Section 18-OR-a - State Underground Storage Tank < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-OR-a - State Underground Storage Tank 18ORAStateUndergroundStorageTank (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR 340-150: Underground Storage Tank Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18ORAStateUndergroundStorageTank (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 18-OR-a.1 - Application for General Permit Registration Certificate, EPA

98

GRR/Section 18-NV-a - Underground Storage Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a - Underground Storage Tank a - Underground Storage Tank < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-NV-a - Underground Storage Tank 18NVAUndergroundStorageTank.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Regulations & Policies Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18NVAUndergroundStorageTank.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) administers the Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program for the State of Nevada.

99

GRR/Section 18-MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks 18MTAUndergroundStorageTanks (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated 75-11-501 Administrative Rules of Montana 17-56 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18MTAUndergroundStorageTanks (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A developer must obtain an Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit

100

GRR/Section 18-ID-a - Underground Storage Tank Systems | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-ID-a - Underground Storage Tank Systems GRR/Section 18-ID-a - Underground Storage Tank Systems < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-ID-a - Underground Storage Tank Systems 18IDAUndergroundStorageTankSystems.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies IDAPA 58.01.07 Rules Regulating Underground Storage Tank Systems Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18IDAUndergroundStorageTankSystems.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) requires notification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

U.S. Department of Energy Onboard Storage Tank Workshop Notes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and standards (RCS), and a path forward to enable the deployment of hydrogen storage tanks in early market fuel cell applications. Background The objectives of the Workshop were...

102

Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report examines performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems compared to the US Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications.

103

Numerical simulation of Large Solar Hot Water system in storage tank.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research is aimed to study the storage tank design parameters effects on the efficiency of the large solar hot water system. Detailed CFD simulation (more)

Shue, Nai-Shen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Analysis of the rigid porous manifold as an effevtive device to stratify solar thermal storage tanks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??One of the most effective and simplest methods to maintain thermal stratification of solar hot water storage tanks during charge and discharge is the use (more)

Ghosh, Vivekananda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Solar Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters May 7, 2012 - 9:52am Addthis Solar water heaters -- also called solar domestic hot water systems -- can be a cost-effective way to generate hot water for your home. They can be used in any climate, and the fuel they use -- sunshine -- is free. How They Work Solar water heating systems include storage tanks and solar collectors. There are two types of solar water heating systems: active, which have circulating pumps and controls, and passive, which don't. Active Solar Water Heating Systems There are two types of active solar water heating systems: Direct circulation systems Pumps circulate household water through the collectors and into the home. They work well in climates where it rarely freezes. Indirect circulation systems

106

Solar water heaters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heaters heaters Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of Solar Water Heating technology.)[1] Solar Water Heater One of the most cost-effective ways to include renewable technologies into a building is by incorporating solar hot water. A typical residential solar water-heating system reduces the need for conventional water heating by about two-thirds. It minimizes the expense of electricity or fossil fuel to heat the water and reduces the associated environmental impacts. Solar Water Heating for Buildings Most solar water-heating systems for buildings have two main parts: (1) a solar collector and (2) a storage tank. The most common collector used in solar hot water systems is the flat-plate collector. Solar water heaters use the sun to heat either water

107

Development of solar air heaters & thermal energy storage system for drying applications in food processing industries.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the present work, the author has designed and developed all types of solar air heaters called porous and nonporous collectors. The developed solar air (more)

Sreekumar, A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Two-tank working gas storage system for heat engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A two-tank working gas supply and pump-down system is coupled to a hot gas engine, such as a Stirling engine. The system has a power control valve for admitting the working gas to the engine when increased power is needed, and for releasing the working gas from the engine when engine power is to be decreased. A compressor pumps the working gas that is released from the engine. Two storage vessels or tanks are provided, one for storing the working gas at a modest pressure (i.e., half maximum pressure), and another for storing the working gas at a higher pressure (i.e., about full engine pressure). Solenoid valves are associated with the gas line to each of the storage vessels, and are selectively actuated to couple the vessels one at a time to the compressor during pumpdown to fill the high-pressure vessel with working gas at high pressure and then to fill the low-pressure vessel with the gas at low pressure. When more power is needed, the solenoid valves first supply the low-pressure gas from the low-pressure vessel to the engine and then supply the high-pressure gas from the high-pressure vessel. The solenoid valves each act as a check-valve when unactuated, and as an open valve when actuated.

Hindes, Clyde J. (Troy, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

H.A.R. 11-281 - Underground Storage Tanks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 - Underground Storage Tanks Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: H.A.R. 11-281 - Underground Storage...

110

Hydrogen Composite Tank Program Principal Investigator: Dr. Neel Sirosh, Director of Fuel Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Composite Tank Program Principal Investigator: Dr. Neel Sirosh, Director of Fuel Storage "TriShield" tank technology (see Fig. 1) meets the percent weight, energy density, and specific energy reductions are possible with further optimization. Fig. 1 TriShieldTM Type IV Tank The 5,000 and 10,000 psi

111

Permanent Closure of MFC Biodiesel Underground Storage Tank 99ANL00013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the Materials and Fuels Complex biodiesel underground storage tank 99ANL00013 in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.

Kerry L. Nisson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.

Vail, T.S.

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

GRR/Section 18-WA-a - Underground Storage Tank Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-WA-a - Underground Storage Tank Process GRR/Section 18-WA-a - Underground Storage Tank Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-WA-a - Underground Storage Tank Process 18-WA-a - Underground Storage Tank Process.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.76 Washington Administrative Code Chapter 173-360 Triggers None specified Washington has a federally-approved state Underground Storage Tank (UST) program regulated by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) under Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.76 and Washington Administrative Code Chapter 173-360. Washington defines an "Underground

114

Performance of a solid oxide fuel cell CHP system coupled with a hot water storage tank for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of a solid oxide fuel cell CHP system coupled with a hot water storage tank for single storage tank is studied. Thermal stratification in the tank increases the heat recovery performance of the residence. Two fuels are considered, namely syngas and natural gas. The tank model considers the temperature

Berning, Torsten

115

Airborne Emissions from Storage Tanks: What's New on the Regulatory Front and How to Cope with the Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U.S. EPA is developing new maximum achievable control technology (MACT) rules, which include provisions for aboveground storage tanks (AST's). While each industry category will have its own MACT rule, the trend for storage tank requirements...

Ferry, R. L.

116

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Improving the Efficiency of a Non-Pressurized Thermal Storage Tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Pressurized Thermal Storage Tank Overview Hydroflex had provided the team with a tank and the heat exchanger coil that was to be used to heat the tank. While attempting to improve the tank's efficiency, the team was required to keep certain parameters of the tank the same, such as it insulation and the type of coil that was used

Demirel, Melik C.

117

Polymers for subterranean containment barriers for underground storage tanks (USTs). Letter report on FY 1992 activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) set up the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration Program (USTID) to demonstrate technologies for the retrieval and treatment of tank waste, and closure of underground storage tanks (USTs). There are more than 250 underground storage tanks throughout the DOE complex. These tanks contain a wide variety of wastes including high level, low level, transuranic, mixed and hazardous wastes. Many of the tanks have performed beyond the designed lifetime resulting in leakage and contamination of the local geologic media and groundwater. To mitigate this problem it has been proposed that an interim subterranean containment barrier be placed around the tanks. This would minimize or prevent future contamination of soil and groundwater in the event that further tank leakages occur before or during remediation. Use of interim subterranean barriers can also provide sufficient time to evaluate and select appropriate remediation alternatives. The DOE Hanford site was chosen as the demonstration site for containment barrier technologies. A panel of experts for the USTID was convened in February, 1992, to identify technologies for placement of subterranean barriers. The selection was based on the ability of candidate grouts to withstand high radiation doses, high temperatures and aggressive tank waste leachates. The group identified and ranked nine grouting technologies that have potential to place vertical barriers and five for horizontal barriers around the tank. The panel also endorsed placement technologies that require minimal excavation of soil surrounding the tanks.

Heiser, J.H.; Colombo, P.; Clinton, J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

EIS-0212: Safe Interim Storage of Hanford Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, WA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental impact statement asseses Department of Energy and Washington State Department of Ecology maintanence of safe storage of high-level radioactive wastes currently stored in the older single-shell tanks, the Watchlist Tank 101-SY, and future waste volumes associated with tank farm and other Hanford facility operations, including a need to provide a modern safe, reliable, and regulatory-compliant replacement cross-site transfer capability. The purpose of this action is to prevent uncontrolled releases to the environment by maintaining safe storage of high-level tank wastes.

119

EA-1044: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

44: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak 44: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1044: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 25, 1995 EA-1044: Finding of No Significant Impact Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee May 25, 1995 EA-1044: Final Environmental Assessment

120

Solar water heaters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water heaters water heaters (Redirected from - Solar Hot Water) Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of Solar Water Heating technology.)[1] Solar Water Heater One of the most cost-effective ways to include renewable technologies into a building is by incorporating solar hot water. A typical residential solar water-heating system reduces the need for conventional water heating by about two-thirds. It minimizes the expense of electricity or fossil fuel to heat the water and reduces the associated environmental impacts. Solar Water Heating for Buildings Most solar water-heating systems for buildings have two main parts: (1) a solar collector and (2) a storage tank. The most common collector used in solar hot water systems is the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

SORPTION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM AND NEPTUNIUM ONTO SOLIDS PRESENT IN HIGH CAUSTIC NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solids such as granular activated carbon, hematite and sodium phosphates, if present as sludge components in nuclear waste storage tanks, have been found to be capable of precipitating/sorbing actinides like plutonium, neptunium and uranium from nuclear waste storage tank supernatant liqueur. Thus, the potential may exists for the accumulation of fissile materials in such nuclear waste storage tanks during lengthy nuclear waste storage and processing. To evaluate the nuclear criticality safety in a typical nuclear waste storage tank, a study was initiated to measure the affinity of granular activated carbon, hematite and anhydrous sodium phosphate to sorb plutonium, neptunium and uranium from alkaline salt solutions. Tests with simulated and actual nuclear waste solutions established the affinity of the solids for plutonium, neptunium and uranium upon contact of the solutions with each of the solids. The removal of plutonium and neptunium from the synthetic salt solution by nuclear waste storage tank solids may be due largely to the presence of the granular activated carbon and transition metal oxides in these storage tank solids or sludge. Granular activated carbon and hematite also showed measurable affinity for both plutonium and neptunium. Sodium phosphate, used here as a reference sorbent for uranium, as expected, exhibited high affinity for uranium and neptunium, but did not show any measurable affinity for plutonium.

Oji, L; Bill Wilmarth, B; David Hobbs, D

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

Underground storage tank compliance activities at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site covers 560 mi{sup 2} of semi-arid land that is owned by the US Government and managed by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is located in the Columbia Basin and northwest of the City of Richland, Washington, which lies approximately 5 mi from the southernmost portion of the Hanford Site boundary and is the nearest population center. In early 1943, the US Army Corps of Engineers selected the Hanford Site for the production and purification of plutonium. The purpose of this report is fourfold: it describes the underground storage tanks (UST) at the Hanford Site regulated by title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 280 (EPA 1988a); it defines the compliance programs completed, underway, or planned by the affected Hanford Site contractors; it provides costs of program compliance; and it defines long-range planning to comply with 40 CFR 280 after 1998. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Morton, M.R.; Mihalic, M.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

U.S. Department of Energy Onboard Storage Tank Workshop Notes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Onboard Storage Tank Workshop Workshop Notes April 29, 2010 Sandia National Laboratories - Livermore, CA 2 Report from the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop Livermore, CA April 29 th , 2010 The Onboard Storage Tank Workshop was held on April 29 th , 2010, at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Livermore, CA. The Workshop was co-hosted by SNL and the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the Workshop was to identify key issues including research and development (R&D) needs, regulations, codes and standards (RCS), and a path forward to enable the deployment of hydrogen storage tanks in early market fuel cell applications. Background The objectives of the Workshop were to: * Provide initial follow up to the DOE and Department of Transportation (DOT)

124

IDAPA 58.01.07 - Rules Regulating Underground Storage Tank Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rules Regulating Underground Storage Tank Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: IDAPA 58.01.07 - Rules...

125

UC 19-6-401 et seq. - Utah Underground Storage Tank Act | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UC 19-6-401 et seq. - Utah Underground Storage Tank Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: UC 19-6-401 et seq. -...

126

MCA 75-11-501 et seq. - Montana Underground Storage Tank Act...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ActLegal Abstract Sets forth statutory requirements for regulating underground storage tanks. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1997 Legal Citation 75-11-501 et seq., MCA...

127

Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab)

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid storage tank Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Attachment A PPOP 08.10 Summary: < Refrigerant Storage Tanks Ventilated vaults: < Acid Vaults (May or may not require a permit depending... Side of...

129

Long Term Solar Heat Storage through Underground Water Tanks for the Heating of Housing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This project consists in the development of design methods of solar plants for heating of housing by means of the interseasonal storage of solar energy through water tanks located under or...

M. Cucumo; V. Marinelli; G. Oliveti; A. Sabato

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Different Models for Determination of Thermal Stratification in A Solar Storage Tank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work two different models are shown for describing the thermal stratification in the solar storage tank of the solar water heating system. The first model was ... hour from the average hourly data of the

P. Gczy-Vg; I. Farkas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

GRR/Section 18-HI-a - Underground Storage Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 18-HI-a - Underground Storage Tank < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-HI-a - Underground Storage Tank 18HIAUndergroundStorageTankPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch Regulations & Policies Hawaii Administrative Regulations Title 11, Chapter 281 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18HIAUndergroundStorageTankPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

132

Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

metrics include the off-board Well-to-Tank (WTT) energy efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Cost metrics include the refueling costs and combined fuel system...

133

South Tank Farm underground storage tank inspection using the topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the winter of 1997 the Topographical Mapping System (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and the Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote-Viewing System (ICERVS) were used to perform wall inspections on underground storage tanks (USTs) W5 and W6 of the South Tank Farm (STF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The TMS was designed for deployment in the USTs at the Hanford Site. Because of its modular design, the TMS was also deployable in the USTs at ORNL. The USTs at ORNL were built in the 1940s and have been used to store radioactive waste during the past 50 years. The tanks are constructed with an inner layer of Gunite{trademark} that has been spalling, leaving sections of the inner wall exposed. Attempts to quantify the depths of the spalling with video inspection have proven unsuccessful. The TMS surface-mapping campaign in the STF was initiated to determine the depths of cracks, crevices, and/or holes in the tank walls and to identify possible structural instabilities in the tanks. The development of the TMS and the ICERVS was initiated by DOE for the purpose of characterization and remediation of USTs at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a three-dimensional, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is mapping the interiors of USTs as part of DOE`s waste characterization and remediation efforts, to obtain both baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors and changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Site, the TMS has been designed to be a self-contained, compact, and reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention.

Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.; Hoesen, S.D. van

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Underground storage tank 291-D1U1: Closure plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 291-D1U1 tank system was installed in 1983 on the north side of Building 291. It supplies diesel fuel to the Building 291 emergency generator and air compressor. The emergency generator and air compressor are located southwest and southeast, respectively, of the tank (see Appendix B, Figure 2). The tank system consists of a single-walled, 2,000- gallon, fiberglass tank and a fuel pump system, fill pipe, vent pipe, electrical conduit, and fuel supply and return piping. The area to be excavated is paved with asphalt and concrete. It is not known whether a concrete anchor pad is associated with this tank. Additionally, this closure plan assumes that the diesel tank is below the fill pad. The emergency generator and air compressor for Building 291 and its associated UST, 291-D1U1, are currently in use. The generator and air compressor will be supplied by a temporary above-ground fuel tank prior to the removal of 291-D1U1. An above-ground fuel tank will be installed as a permanent replacement for 291-D1U1. The system was registered with the State Water Resources Control Board on June 27, 1984, as 291-41D and has subsequently been renamed 291-D1U1. Figure 1 (see Appendix B) shows the location of the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Figure 2 (see Appendix B) shows the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to Building 291. Figure 3 (see Appendix B) shows a plan view of the 291-D1U1 tank system.

Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Imaging and Characterizing the Waste Materials Inside an Underground Storage Tank Using Seismic Normal Modes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is necessary to know something about the nature of the wastes in a Hanford underground storage tank (UST) so that the correct hardware can be inserted into a tank for sampling, sluicing, or pumping operations. It is also important to know if a layer of gas exists beneath solid and liquid layers of waste. Given that the tank will have only one liquid observation well (LOW), the authors examined the information that could be obtained from the natural seismic vibrations of a tank as a whole; that is, the normal modes of that tank. As in the case of a bell, the natural vibration, or normal modes, of a tank depend on many things, including the construction of the tank, the kinds of waste materials in the tank, the amount of each material in the tank, and where the energy is placed that excites the vibrations (i.e., where you will ''hit'' the tank). The nature of a normal mode of vibration can be given by its frequency and amplitude. For any given frequency, the amplitude of vibration can be given as a function of position in and around the tank. Since they assumed that one would be ''listening'' to a tank from locations along a LOW, they show their computed amplitudes as a function of position inside and around the tank, and in the case of the physical models they display the observations along various lines inside the tank model. This allowed us to see the complex geometry of each mode of oscillation as a function of increasing frequency.

M. N. Toksoz; R. M. Turpening

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

136

Solar radiation effects on evaporative losses of floating roof storage tanks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are 40 storage tanks in the Khark Island for storing crude oil. Considering the hot summers of the island, light hydrocarbons vaporise and vented to the atmosphere. This process causes environmental pollution and also affects the quality of the crude oil besides the economic detriment. Therefore, crude oil evaporation loss associated with the storage tank is an important issue which should be carefully investigated to identify the potential means of its reduction. The aim of the present work is to determine the evaporative losses from external floating storage tanks and to study the absorptivity effects of their exterior surface paint on the losses due to the solar irradiation. The API standards along with the thermal analysis of the tank have been employed to evaluate the tank temperature variations and the evaporative losses of a typical tank based on the actual ambient conditions of the Khark Island. The results show that the paints with low absorptivity can reduce the evaporative losses significantly. Furthermore, experimental data has been provided to validate the calculated tank temperature variations, and reasonable agreements have been found. [Received: April 10, 2010; Accepted: May 31, 2010

Mahmood Farzaneh-Gord; Amin Nabati; Hamid Niazmand

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Modeling and analysis of ORNL horizontal storage tank mobilization and mixing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The retrieval and treatment of radioactive sludges that are stored in tanks constitute a prevalent problem at several US Department of Energy sites. The tanks typically contain a settled sludge layer with non-Newtonian rheological characteristics covered by a layer of supernatant. The first step in retrieval is the mobilization and mixing of the supernatant and sludge in the storage tanks. Submerged jets have been proposed to achieve sludge mobilization in tanks, including the 189 m{sup 3} (50,000 gallon) Melton Valley Storage tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the planned 378 m{sup 3} (100,000 gallon) tanks being designed as part of the MVST Capacity Increase Project (MVST-CIP). This report focuses on the modeling of mixing and mobilization in horizontal cylindrical tanks like those of the MVST design using submerged, recirculating liquid jets. The computer modeling of the mobilization and mixing processes uses the TEMPEST computational fluid dynamics program (Trend and Eyler 1992). The goals of the simulations are to determine under what conditions sludge mobilization using submerged liquid jets is feasible in tanks of this configuration, and to estimate mixing times required to approach homogeneity of the contents.

Mahoney, L.A.; Terrones, G.; Eyler, L.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Underground storage tank 253-D1U1 Closure Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a closure plan for a diesel fuel tank at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Included are maps of the site, work plans, and personnel information regarding training and qualification.

Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

ERS 14.3 Underground and Above Ground Diesel Fuel Storage Tanks FPS 12.1, 1/9/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The objective of this surveillance is to verify underground and above ground diesel storage tanks are maintained, monitored, configured and marked as required. These surveillance activities...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ERS 14.3 Underground and Above Ground Diesel Fuel Storage Tanks FPS 12.1, 1/9/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The objective of this surveillance is to verify underground and above ground diesel storage tanks are maintained, monitored, configured and marked as required. These surveillance activities...

142

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Kyle Gluesenkamp Building Equipment Group, ETSD gluesenkampk@ornl.gov 865-241-2952 April 3, 2013 CRADA - GE Development of High Performance Residential Gas Water Heater Image courtesy John Wilkes 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Absorption technology could greatly boost water heater efficiency, but faces barriers of high first cost and working fluid challenges. Impact of Project: Energy factor of gas storage water

143

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Kyle Gluesenkamp Building Equipment Group, ETSD gluesenkampk@ornl.gov 865-241-2952 April 3, 2013 CRADA - GE Development of High Performance Residential Gas Water Heater Image courtesy John Wilkes 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Absorption technology could greatly boost water heater efficiency, but faces barriers of high first cost and working fluid challenges. Impact of Project: Energy factor of gas storage water

144

Pressure Build?Up in LNG and LH2 Vehicular Cryogenic Storage Tanks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of LNG and LH2 as fuels in heavy duty vehicles is increasing steadily because cryogenic liquids provides superior volumetric and gravimetric energy densities compared to other means of on?board storage. Although several sizes and types of tanks exist a typical vehicular storage tank has a volume of ?400 liters (?100 gallons). The pressure in the ullage space of a tank freshly filled is usually ?0.25 MPa but may vary during use from ?0.25 MPa (?20 psig) to ?0.92 MPa (?120 psig). Cryogenic vehicular tanks are typically dual?walled stainless steel vessels with vacuum and superinsulation isolation between the inner and outer vessel walls. The heat leaks into such tanks are measured as a percentage boil?off per day. For a storage tank of vehicular size range the boil?off may be ? 1 % day depending upon the cryogen and the quality of the tank. The corresponding heat leak into the cryogenic liquid vaporizes a certain amount of liquid that in turn increases the pressure in the tank which in turn significantly influences the properties of the cryogens. We have used a novel approach to calculate the increase in pressure of LNG and LH2 in a closed cryogenic vessel with a fixed heat leak as a function of time using real equations of state for the properties of the cryogens. The method and results for the time it takes for a freshly filled tank to increase in pressure from the filling pressure of ?0.25 MPa to a venting pressure of ?1.73 MPa are presented.

J. A. Barclay; A. M. Rowe; M. A. Barclay

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Review of sensors for the in situ chemical characterization of the Hanford underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in the Technical Task Plan (TTP) SF-2112-03 subtask 2, is responsible for the conceptual design of a Raman probe for inclusion in the in-tank cone penetrometer. As part of this task, LLNL is assigned the further responsibility of generating a report describing a review of sensor technologies other than Raman that can be incorporated in the in-tank cone penetrometer for the chemical analysis of the tank environment. These sensors would complement the capabilities of the Raman probe, and would give information on gaseous, liquid, and solid state species that are insensitive to Raman interrogation. This work is part of a joint effort involving several DOE laboratories for the design and development of in-tank cone penetrometer deployable systems for direct UST waste characterization at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID).

Kyle, K.R.; Mayes, E.L.

1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

American Petroleum Institute (API) Standard 653 compliance program for aboveground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With increased pressure from federal regulators to inspect and maintain aboveground storage tanks -- and with no specific guidelines in API (American Petroleum Institute) Standard 653, Tank Inspection, Repair, Alteration, and Reconstruction -- the need to develop an effective compliance program is warranted. Although many programs can be developed to comply with API Standard 653, this paper presents one interpretation of the document. An API Standard 653 compliance program has several components, including inspection scheduling, engineering evaluations, documentation, repairs and alterations, and the possibility of hydrotesting. Each of these components is integral to the other. Effective coordination of these activities will minimize tank downtime.

Butler, D.M.; Stadler, P.M. (Chicago Bridge Iron Co., Oak Brook, IL (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Surveillance Guide - ERS 14.3 Underground and Above Ground Diesel Fuel Storage Tanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

UNDERGROUND AND ABOVE GROUND DIESEL FUEL STORAGE TANKS UNDERGROUND AND ABOVE GROUND DIESEL FUEL STORAGE TANKS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify underground and above ground diesel storage tanks are maintained, monitored, configured and marked as required. These surveillance activities provide a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for implementation of appropriate controls and compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 1. DOE O 440.1A, Worker Protection Management For DOE Federal And Contractor Employees [http://www.explorer.doe.gov:1776/cgi-bin/w3vdkhgw?qryBGD07_rSj;doe- 1261] 1. 29CFR1910.1200, Subpart Z, Hazard Communication [Access http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_1200.html ] 2. 29CFR1910.106, Subpart H, Flammable And Combustible Liquids [Access at

148

Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1995/01eis0212_cl.html[6/27/2011 1:02:59 PM] 1995/01eis0212_cl.html[6/27/2011 1:02:59 PM] Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes DOE/EIS-0212 VOLUME 1 OF 2 VOLUME 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SAFE INTERIM STORAGE OF HANFORD TANK WASTES Hanford Site Richland, Washington October, 1995 WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY NUCLEAR WASTE PROGRAM LACEY, WASHINGTON 98503 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE

149

Techno-economic assessment of substituting natural gas based heater with thermal energy storage system in parabolic trough concentrated solar power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Parabolic-trough (PT) concentrated solar power (CSP) plants are very vulnerable to daily fluctuations in solar radiation. This dependence can be mitigated through a hybridization of solar energy with natural gas based heaters that supply thermal energy during the night or whenever solar irradiance level is dimmed. However, there is more sustainable way for CSP plants to avoid power-generation-outages caused by transient weather conditions, i.e. installation of thermal energy storage (TES). Such a system stores surplus thermal energy provided by solar field during sunny hours and discharges it when the sun is not available. Shams-1PT plant in Madinat-Zayed, United-Arab-Emirates (UAE) has two natural gas based components, i.e. steam-booster heater and heat transfer fluid (HTF) heater. In the current study, model of Shams-1 was developed and analyzed in the System Advisor Model (SAM) software. It has been attempted to replace the HTF heater with TES. A parametric study has been conducted to determine the size of the TES as well as the solar field such that the specified power target demand would be satisfied. The results of the parametric analysis showed that TES can't completely replace the HTF heater, within reasonable sizes. Nevertheless, consequent simulations depicts that TES increases the capacity factor on one hand and decreases fuel consumption on the other hand.

V. Poghosyan; Mohamed I. Hassan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ex Parte Memorandum on Grid-Enabled Water Heaters | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

with DOE representatives regarding water heater standards and thermal storage and demand response programs. DOE exparte memo100213 Grid-EnabledWaterHeaterAmendment More...

151

Implementation plan for Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 280 and 281; Final rules for underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the schedules and methods required to comply with the newly promulgated Underground Storage Tank (UST) Regulations Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 280 and 281. These rules were promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on September 23, 1988, and became effective December 22, 1988. These regulations are required by Subtitle I of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. Their purpose is to protect the groundwater supplies of the United States in the following ways: Closing old tanks; detecting and remediating tank leaks and spills; establishing stringent standards for new tanks; and upgrade of existing tanks to new-tank standards. 3 refs., 5 tabs.

Stupka, R.C.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A visual assessment of the concrete vaults which surround underground waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is stored in underground tanks. There are four different waste tank designs. For each waste tank design the outermost containment shield between the waste and the soil is a concrete vault surrounding the carbon steel liner(s). Should the primary and/or secondary liner be breached, the concrete vault would slow transport of the waste so that contamination of the soil is minimized. The type 3 waste tanks have a stated design life of 40--60 years. With the uncertainty of the schedule for transfer of the waste to the Defense Waste Processing Facility, it is conceivable that the tanks will be required to function past their design life. The Department of Energy formed a Waste Tank Structural Integrity Panel to investigate the potential for aging and degradation of underground radioactive waste storage tanks employed in the weapons complex. The panel is focusing on how each site in the complex: (1) inspects the waste tanks for degradation, (2) understands the potential degradation mechanisms which may occur at their sites, and (3) mitigates the known potential degradation mechanisms. In addition to the carbon steel liners, the degradation of the concrete vault has also been addressed by the panel. High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) at SRS has formed a task team to identify key issues that determine and/or effect the condition of the concrete. In June 1993, slides were reviewed which showed the inside of the concrete vault in Type 1, 2, and 4 tanks. The authors subsequently visited the tank farm and assessed the visible portions of the outer concrete vault. Later a team of engineers knowledgeable in concrete degradation performed a walk-down. Photographs showing the concrete condition were taken at this time. This report summarizes the findings of these walk-downs and reinforces previous recommendations.

Wiersma, B.J.; Shurrab, M.S.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Simplified design and evaluation of liquid storage tanks relative to earthquake loading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of earthquake-induced damage in liquid storage tanks is provided. The general analysis steps for dynamic response of fluid-filled tanks subject to horizontal ground excitation are discussed. This work will provide major attention to the understanding of observed tank-failure modes. These modes are quite diverse in nature, but many of the commonly appearing patterns are believed to be shell buckling. A generalized and simple-to-apply shell loading will be developed using Fluegge shell theory. The input to this simplified analysis will be horizontal ground acceleration and tank shell form parameters. A dimensionless parameter will be developed and used in predictions of buckling resulting from earthquake-imposed loads. This prediction method will be applied to various tank designs that have failed during major earthquakes and during shaker table tests. Tanks that have not failed will also be reviewed. A simplified approach will be discussed for early design and evaluation of tank shell parameters and materials to provide a high confidence of low probability of failure during earthquakes.

Poole, A.B.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Forklift Storage Tank R&D: Timely, Critical, Exemplary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, Material Characterization of Storage Vessels for Fuel Cell Forklifts, presented by Sandia National Laboratories on August 14, 2012.

155

Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of stored H 2 . References 1. Berry, G., Aceves, S., Espinosa, F., Ross, T., Switzer, V., Smith, R., and Weisberg, A., "Compact L(H 2 ) Storage with Extended Dormancy in Cryogenic...

156

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters October 8, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Water Heater Electric Gas Electric Average Daily Usage (gallons per day)* gallons 64* Energy Factor† 0.92 (electric) 0.61 (gas) Energy Cost $ / kWh $0.06 per kWh $.60 per therm Quantity of Water Heaters to be Purchased unit(s) 1 unit * See assumptions for various daily water use totals. † The comparison assumes a storage tank water heater as the input type. To allow demand water heaters as the comparison type, users can specify an input EF of up to 0.85; however, 0.66 is currently the best available EF for storage water heaters.

157

Optimal design of ground source heat pump system integrated with phase change cooling storage tank in an office building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal design of ground source heat pump system integrated with phase change cooling storage tank in an office building Na Zhu*, Yu Lei, Pingfang Hu, Linghong Xu, Zhangning Jiang Department of Building Environment and Equipment Engineering... heat pump system integrated with phase change cooling storage technology could save energy and shift peak load. This paper studied the optimal design of a ground source heat pump system integrated with phase change thermal storage tank in an office...

Zhu, N.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (Macrobatch) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. preliminary) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

Peters, T. B.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

CSER 94-004: Criticality safety of double-shell waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This criticality safety evaluation covers double-shell waste storage tanks (DSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), vault tanks, and the 242-A Evaporator located in the High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farms on the Hanford Site. Limits and controls are specified and the basis for ensuring criticality safety is discussed. A minimum limit of 1,000 is placed upon the solids/plutonium mass ratio in incoming waste. The average solids/Pu mass ratio over all waste in tank farms is estimated to be about 74,500, about 150 times larger than required to assure subcriticality in homogeneous waste. PFP waste in Tank-102-SY has an estimated solids/Pu mass ratio of 10,000. Subcriticality is assured whenever the plutonium concentration is less than 2.6 g. The median reported plutonium concentration for 200 samples of waste solids is about 0.01 g (0.038 g/gal). A surveillance program is proposed to increase the knowledge of the waste and provide added assurance of the high degree of subcriticality.

Rogers, C.A.

1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

160

Numerical Simulation of Single- and Dual-media Thermocline Tanks for Energy Storage in Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A single molten-salt thermocline tank is a low-cost alternative to conventional multiple-tank systems for concentrating solar power thermal energy storage. Thermocline tanks are typically composed of molten salt and a filler material that provides sensible heat capacity at reduced cost; such tanks are referred to as a dual-media thermocline (DMT). However, inclusion of quartzite rock filler introduces the potential for mechanical ratcheting of the tank wall during thermal cycling. To avoid this potential thermomechanical mode of failure, the tank can be operated solely with molten salt, as a single-medium thermocline (SMT) tank. In the absence of a filler material to suppress formation of tank-scale convection eddies, the SMT tank may exhibit undesirable internal fluid flows in the tank cross-section. The performance of DMT and SMT tanks is compared under cyclic operation, assuming adiabatic external wall boundary conditions. A computational fluid dynamics model is used to solve for the spatial temperature and velocity distributions within the tank. For the DMT tank, a two-temperature model is used to account for the non-thermal equilibrium between the molten salt and the filler material, and Forchheimer's extension of Darcy's Law is added to the porous-medium formulation of the laminar momentum equation. The governing equations are solved numerically using a finite volume approach. For adiabatic external boundaries, the SMT tank yields a percentage point increase in the first and second law efficiencies relative to the DMT tank. Future work is needed to compare the thermocline tank designs with respect to capital cost and storage performance under non-adiabatic wall boundaries.

C. Mira-Hernndez; S.M. Flueckiger; S.V. Garimella

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Lightweight concrete materials and structural systems for water tanks for thermal storage. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermally efficient hot water storage tanks were designed, fabricated and evaluated. The tanks were made using cellular concrete at a nominal density of 100 lb/ft/sup 3/ for the structural elements and at a 30 lb/ft/sup 3/ density for the insulating elements. Thermal performance testing of the tanks was done using a static decay test since the test procedure specified in ASHRAE 94-77 was not experimentally practical. A series of composition modifications to the cellular concrete mix were investigated and the addition of alkaline resistant glass fibers was found to enhance the mechanical properties at no sacrifice in thermal behavior. Economic analysis indicated that cellular concrete provides a cost-effective insulating material. The total portability of the plant for producing cellular concrete makes cellular concrete amenable to on-site fabrication and uniquely adaptable to retrofit applications.

Buckman, R.W. Jr.; Elia, G.G.; Ichikawa, Y.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

EIS-0062: Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High Level Waste Storage, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes the impacts of the various design alternatives for the construction of fourteen 1.3 million gallon high-activity radioactive waste tanks. The EIS further evaluates the effects of these alternative designs on tank durability, on the ease of waste retrieval from such tanks, and the choice of technology and timing for long-term storage or disposal of the wastes.

163

EIS-0063: Waste Management Operations, Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the existing tank design and consider additional specific design and safety feature alternatives for the thirteen tanks being constructed for storage of defense high-level radioactive liquid waste at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This statement supplements ERDA-1538, "Final Environmental Statement on Waste Management Operation."

164

Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

09-33 09-33 Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Nuclear Engineering Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne

165

List of Publications A Numerical Study of Transient Mixed Convection Flows in a Thermal Storage Tank, J. Solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

List of Publications A Numerical Study of Transient Mixed Convection Flows in a Thermal Storage Tank, J. Solar Energy Eng. 105, 246­253 (1983) (with A.M.C. Chan & D. Giusti) An Approximate Analytical

Smereka, Peter

166

Technical assessment of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems has been assessed and compared to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for compressed hydrogen tanks with design pressures of 350 bar ({approx}5000 psi) and 700 bar ({approx}10,000 psi) capable of storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen. The off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen was determined for hydrogen produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR). The main conclusions of the assessment are that the 350-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet the 2010 and 2015 targets for system gravimetric capacity but will not likely meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, given our base case assumptions. The 700-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet only the 2010 target for system gravimetric capacity and is not likely to meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, despite the fact that its volumetric capacity is much higher than that of the 350-bar system. Both the 350-bar and 700-bar systems come close to meeting the Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency target, but fall short by about 5%. These results are summarized.

Hua, T. Q.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (TIAX, LLC)

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

167

Equipment design guidance document for flammable gas waste storage tank new equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is intended to be used as guidance for design engineers who are involved in design of new equipment slated for use in Flammable Gas Waste Storage Tanks. The purpose of this document is to provide design guidance for all new equipment intended for application into those Hanford storage tanks in which flammable gas controls are required to be addressed as part of the equipment design. These design criteria are to be used as guidance. The design of each specific piece of new equipment shall be required, as a minimum to be reviewed by qualified Unreviewed Safety Question evaluators as an integral part of the final design approval. Further Safety Assessment may be also needed. This guidance is intended to be used in conjunction with the Operating Specifications Documents (OSDs) established for defining work controls in the waste storage tanks. The criteria set forth should be reviewed for applicability if the equipment will be required to operate in locations containing unacceptable concentrations of flammable gas.

Smet, D.B.

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

168

Rainwater harvesting systems that collect and convey rain-water from roofs to storage tanks are often the best or only  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tanks are often the best or only source of water for many communities in the developing world. A common are swept into the storage tank along with the rainwater. While some systems divert the "first flush into gutters, through a series of pipes and into storage tanks. Three rainwater harvesting systems

Polz, Martin

169

METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 7 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs. The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as a waste group B (or A) tank identifies the potential for an induced flammable gas release hazard, the hazard only exists for specific operations that can release the retained gas in the tank at a rate and quantity that results in reaching 100% of the lower flammability limit in the tank headspace. The identification and evaluation of tank farm operations that could cause an induced flammable gas release hazard in a waste group B (or A) tank are included in other documents. The third criterion is the buoyancy ratio. This criterion addresses tanks that are not waste group C double-shell tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0. For these double-shell tanks, the buoyancy ratio considers whether the saturated solids can retain sufficient gas to exceed neutral buoyancy relative to the supernatant layer and therefore have buoyant displacement gas release events. If the buoyancy ratio is {ge} 1.0, that double-shell tank is assigned to waste group A. These tanks are considered to have a potential spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard in addition to a potential induced flammable gas release hazard.

FOWLER KD

2007-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as a waste group B (or A) tank identifies the potential for an induced flammable gas release hazard, the hazard only exists for specific operations that can release the retained gas in the tank at a rate and quantity that results in reaching 100% of the lower flammability limit in the tank headspace. The identification and evaluation of tank farm operations that could cause an induced flammable gas release hazard in a waste group B (or A) tank are included in other documents. The third criterion is the buoyancy ratio. This criterion addresses tanks that are not waste group C double-shell tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0. For these double-shell tanks, the buoyancy ratio considers whether the saturated solids can retain sufficient gas to exceed neutral buoyancy relative to the supernatant layer and therefore have buoyant displacement gas release events. If the buoyancy ratio is {ge} 1.0, that double-shell tank is assigned to waste group A. These tanks are considered to have a potential spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard in addition to a potential induced flammable gas release hazard. This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 8 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

WEBER RA

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electric Storage Water Heaters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy can be wasted even when a hot water tap isn't running. This is called standby heat loss. The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy provides a helpful...

172

Water Heaters (Storage Electric)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards.

173

Short term performance comparisons between a solar thermosyphon water heater and two numerical models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of a solar thermosyphon domestic water heater was conducted in the indoor solar simulator facility at Colorado State University (Bickford, 1994). The system consisted of a closed-loop collector circuit filled with propylene glycol and water solution and a horizontal storage tank with an annular tank-in-tank heat exchanger. Short-term irradiated tests with and without timed draws were performed to assess overall performance and monitor collector flow rate, storage tank stratification, and heat exchanger temperature distribution. The measured performance was compared with the ``standard`` thermosyphon model in TRNSYS 13.1 (transient system simulation program). A revised TRNSYS model was developed by Graham Morrison at the University of New South Wales, Australia. The revised model specifically addressed the horizontal tank, closed-loop configuration. The standard TRNSYS version predicted solar gain within 17% of the measured values and differed dramatically from experimental collector temperatures, closed-loop flow rate, and tank stratification. This is not surprising since this model does not include the tank and tank heat exchanger. The revised TRNSYS model agreed more closely with experimental results. It predicted closed-loop flow at 8% lower than observed flow and collector temperature rise that was higher than the observed flow by approximately the same amount, resulting in extremely accurate prediction of collector output energy. Losses from the storage tank and piping were significantly underpredicted in both models, however.

Bickford, C.; Hittle, D.C. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Solar Energy Applications Lab.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives for the gunite and associated tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gunite and associated tanks (GAAT) are inactive, liquid low-level waste tanks located in and around the North and South Tank Farms at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These underground tanks are the subject of an ongoing treatability study that will determine the best remediation alternatives for the tanks. As part of the treatability study, an assessment of viable treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) alternatives has been conducted. The report summarizes relevant waste characterization data and statistics obtained to date. The report describes screening and evaluation criteria for evaluating TSD options. Individual options that pass the screening criteria are described in some detail. Order-or-magnitude cost estimates are presented for each of the TSD system alternatives. All alternatives are compared to the baseline approach of pumping all of the GAAT sludge and supernate to the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility for eventual TSD along with the existing MOST waste. Four TSD systems are identified as alternatives to the baseline approach. The baseline is the most expensive of the five identified alternatives. The least expensive alternative is in-situ grouting of all GAAT sludge followed by in-situ disposal. The other alternatives are: (1) ex-situ grouting with on-site storage and disposal at Nevada Test Site (NTS); (2) ex-situ grouting with on-site storage and disposal at NTS and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); and (3) ex-situ vitrification with on-site storage and disposal at NTS and WIPP.

DePew, R.E.; Rickett, K. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Redus, K.S. [MACTEC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DuMont, S.P. [Hazardous and Medical Waste Services, Inc. (United States); Lewis, B.E.; DePaoli, S.M.; Van Hoesen, S.D. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Cryograb: A Novel Approach to the Retrieval of Waste from Underground Storage Tanks - 13501  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is investigating the use of cryogenic technology for the recovery of nuclear waste. Cryograb, freezing the waste on a 'cryo-head' and then retrieves it as a single mass which can then be treated or stabilized as necessary. The technology has a number of benefits over other retrieval approaches in that it minimizes sludge disturbance thereby reducing effluent arising and it can be used to de-water, and thereby reduce the volume of waste. The technology has been successfully deployed for a variety of nuclear and non-nuclear waste recovery operations. The application of Cryograb for the recovery of waste from US underground storage tanks is being explored through a US DOE International Technology Transfer and Demonstration programme. A sample deployment being considered involves the recovery of residual mounds of sludge material from waste storage tanks at Savannah River. Operational constraints and success criteria were agreed prior to the completion of a process down selection exercise which specified the preferred configuration of the cryo-head and supporting plant. Subsequent process modeling identified retrieval rates and temperature gradients through the waste and tank infrastructure. The work, which has been delivered in partnership with US DOE, SRNL, NuVision Engineering and Frigeo AB has demonstrated the technical feasibility of the approach (to TRL 2) and has resulted in the allocation of additional funding from DOE to take the programme to bench and cold pilot-scale trials. (authors)

O'Brien, Luke; Baker, Stephen; Bowen, Bob [UK National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington (United Kingdom)] [UK National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington (United Kingdom); Mallick, Pramod; Smith, Gary [US Department of Energy (United States)] [US Department of Energy (United States); King, Bill [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Judd, Laurie [NuVision Engineering (United States)] [NuVision Engineering (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Heat Pump Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Heaters Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters May 4, 2012 - 5:21pm Addthis A diagram of a heat pump water heater. A diagram of a heat pump water heater. What does this mean for me? Heat pump water heaters can be two to three times more energy efficient than conventional electric storage water heaters. Heat pump water heaters work in locations that remain in the 40º-90ºF range year-round. Most homeowners who have heat pumps use them to heat and cool their homes. But a heat pump also can be used to heat water -- either as stand-alone water heating system, or as combination water heating and space conditioning system. How They Work Heat pump water heaters use electricity to move heat from one place to another instead of generating heat directly. Therefore, they can be two to

177

Application of Quantitative NDE Techniques to High Level Waste Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As various issues make the continued usage of high-level waste storage tanks attractive, there is an increasing need to sharpen the assessment of their structural integrity. One aspect of a structural integrity program, nondestructive evaluation, is the focus of this paper. In September 2000, a program to support the sites was initiated jointly by Tanks Focus Area and Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technologies Crosscutting Program of the Office of Environmental Management, Department of Energy (DOE). The vehicle was the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, one of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers that is operated in close collaboration with the Ames Laboratory, USDOE. The support activities that have been provided by the center will be reviewed. Included are the organization of a series of annual workshops to allow the sites to share experiences and develop coordinated approaches to common problems, the development of an electronic source of relevant information, and assistance of the sites on particular technical problems. Directions and early results on some of these technical assistance projects are emphasized. Included are the discussion of theoretical analysis of ultrasonic wave propagation in curved plates to support the interpretation of tandem synthetic aperture focusing data to detect flaws in the knuckle region of double shell tanks; the evaluation of guided ultrasonic waves, excited by couplant free, electromagnetic acoustic transducers, to rapidly screen for inner wall corrosion in tanks; the use of spread spectrum techniques to gain information about the structural integrity of concrete domes; and the use of magnetic techniques to identify the alloys used in the construction of tanks.

Thompson, R. B.; Rehbein, D. K.; Bastiaans, G.; Terry, M.; Alers, R.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fluid dynamic studies for a simulated Melton Valley Storage Tank slurry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs), are used for the collection and storage of remote-handled radioactive liquid wastes. These wastes, which were typically acidic when generated, were neutralized with the addition of sodium hydroxide to protect the storage tanks from corrosion, but this caused the transuranic and heavy metals to precipitate. These wastes will eventually need to be removed from the tanks for ultimate disposal. The objective of the research activities discussed in this report is to support the design of a pipeline transport system between the MVSTs and a treatment facility. Since the wastes in the MVSTs are highly radioactive, a surrogate slurry was developed for this study. Rheological properties of the simulated slurry were determined in a test loop in which the slurry was circulated through three pipeline viscometers of different diameters. Pressure drop data at varying flow rates were used to obtain shear stress and shear rate data. The data were analyzed, and the slurry rheological properties were analyzed by the Power Law model and the Bingham plastic model. The plastic viscosity and yield stress data obtained from the rheological tests were used as inputs for a piping design software package, and the pressure drops predicted by the software compared well with the pressure drop data obtained from the test loop. The minimum transport velocity was determine for the slurry by adding known nominal sizes of glass spheres to the slurry. However, it was shown that the surrogate slurry exhibited hindered settling, which may substantially decrease the minimum transport velocity. Therefore, it may be desired to perform additional tests with a surrogate with a lower concentration of suspended solids to determine the minimum transport velocity.

Hylton, T.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Cummins, R.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

DOE underground storage tank waste remediation chemical processing hazards. Part I: Technology dictionary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document has been prepared to aid in the development of Regulating guidelines for the Privatization of Hanford underground storage tank waste remediation. The document has been prepared it two parts to facilitate their preparation. Part II is the primary focus of this effort in that it describes the technical basis for established and potential chemical processing hazards associated with Underground Storage Tank (UST) nuclear waste remediation across the DOE complex. The established hazards involve those at Sites for which Safety Analysis Reviews (SARs) have already been prepared. Potential hazards are those involving technologies currently being developed for future applications. Part I of this document outlines the scope of Part II by briefly describing the established and potential technologies. In addition to providing the scope, Part I can be used as a technical introduction and bibliography for Regulatory personnel new to the UST waste remediation, and in particular Privatization effort. Part II of this document is not intended to provide examples of a SAR Hazards Analysis, but rather provide an intelligence gathering source for Regulatory personnel who must eventually evaluate the Privatization SAR Hazards Analysis.

DeMuth, S.F.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

ADMINISTRATIVE AND ENGINEERING CONTROLS FOR THE OPERATION OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS FOR UNDERGROUND RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Site are stored in large underground carbon steel tanks. The majority of the waste is confined in double shell tanks, which have a primary shell, where the waste is stored, and a secondary shell, which creates an annular region between the two shells, that provides secondary containment and leak detection capabilities should leakage from the primary shell occur. Each of the DST is equipped with a purge ventilation system for the interior of the primary shell and annulus ventilation system for the secondary containment. Administrative flammability controls require continuous ventilation to remove hydrogen gas and other vapors from the waste tanks while preventing the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Should a leak from the primary to the annulus occur, the annulus ventilation would also serve this purpose. The functionality of the annulus ventilation is necessary to preserve the structural integrity of the primary shell and the secondary. An administrative corrosion control program is in place to ensure integrity of the tank. Given the critical functions of the purge and annulus ventilation systems, engineering controls are also necessary to ensure that the systems remain robust. The system consists of components that are constructed of metal (e.g., steel, stainless steel, aluminum, copper, etc.) and/or polymeric (polypropylene, polyethylene, silicone, polyurethane, etc.) materials. The performance of these materials in anticipated service environments (e.g., normal waste storage, waste removal, etc.) was evaluated. The most aggressive vapor space environment occurs during chemical cleaning of the residual heels by utilizing oxalic acid. The presence of NO{sub x} and mercury in the vapors generated from the process could potentially accelerate the degradation of aluminum, carbon steel, and copper. Once identified, the most susceptible materials were either replaced and/or plans for discontinuing operations are executed.

Wiersma, B.; Hansen, A.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage has been assessed and compared to the DOE 2010, 2015 and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The Gen-3 prototype system of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was modeled to project the performance of a scaled-down 5.6-kg usable hydrogen storage system. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers 1.5 kg/min of liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm (4000 psi). The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) and by central electrolysis using electricity from renewable sources. The main conclusions from the assessment are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity and the 2015 target for system volumetric capacity (see Table I). The system compares favorably with targets for durability and operability although additional work is needed to understand failure modes for combined pressure and temperature cycling. The system may meet the targets for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. The high-volume manufacturing cost is projected to be 2-4 times the current 2010 target of $4/kWh. For the reference conditions considered most applicable, the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production and liquid H{sub 2} delivery scenario is 60%-140% higher than the current target of $2-$3/gge while the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

183

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

Aluminium alloy based hydrogen storage tank operated with sodium aluminium hexahydride Na3AlH6  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Here we present the development of an aluminium alloy based hydrogen storage tank, charged with Ti-doped sodium aluminium hexahydride Na3AlH6. This hydride has a theoretical hydrogen storage capacity of 3mass-% and can be operated at lower pressure compared to sodium alanate NaAlH4. The tank was made of aluminium alloy EN AW 6082 T6. The heat transfer was realised through an oil flow in a bayonet heat exchanger, manufactured by extrusion moulding from aluminium alloy EN AW 6060 T6. Na3AlH6 is prepared from 4mol-% TiCl3 doped sodium aluminium tetrahydride NaAlH4 by addition of two moles of sodium hydride NaH in ball milling process. The hydrogen storage tank was filled with 213g of doped Na3AlH6 in dehydrogenated state. Maximum of 3.6g (1.7mass-% of the hydride mass) of hydrogen was released from the hydride at approximately 450K and the same hydrogen mass was consumed at 2.5MPa hydrogenation pressure. 45 cycle tests (rehydrogenation and dehydrogenation) were carried out without any failure of the tank or its components. Operation of the tank under real conditions indicated the possibility for applications with stationary HT-PEM fuel cell systems.

R. Urbanczyk; K. Peinecke; M. Felderhoff; K. Hauschild; W. Kersten; S. Peil; D. Bathen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ANL-10/24 ANL-10/24 Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Nuclear Engineering Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov. Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

186

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 4) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Radiation Protection and Operations.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

High level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 6) outlines the standards and requirements for the sections on: Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Research and Development and Experimental Activities, and Nuclear Safety.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document (S/RID), Vol. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation protection of personnel and the public is accomplished by establishing a well defined Radiation Protection Organization to ensure that appropriate controls on radioactive materials and radiation sources are implemented and documented. This Requirements Identification Document (RID) applies to the activities, personnel, structures, systems, components, and programs involved in executing the mission of the Tank Farms. The physical boundaries within which the requirements of this RID apply are the Single Shell Tank Farms, Double Shell Tank Farms, 242-A Evaporator-Crystallizer, 242-S, T Evaporators, Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF), Purgewater Storage Facility (PWSF), and all interconnecting piping, valves, instrumentation, and controls. Also included is all piping, valves, instrumentation, and controls up to and including the most remote valve under Tank Farms control at any other Hanford Facility having an interconnection with Tank Farms. The boundary of the structures, systems, components, and programs to which this RID applies, is defined by those that are dedicated to and/or under the control of the Tank Farms Operations Department and are specifically implemented at the Tank Farms.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters May 16, 2013 - 7:21pm Addthis An indirect water heater. An indirect water heater. How does it work? Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use your home's heating system to heat water. Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use a home's space heating system to heat water. They're part of what's called integrated or combination water and space heating systems. How They Work A tankless coil water heater provides hot water on demand without a tank. When a hot water faucet is turned on, water is heated as it flows through a heating coil or heat exchanger installed in a main furnace or boiler. Tankless coil water heaters are most efficient during cold months when the heating system is used regularly but can be an inefficient choice for many

190

Convective heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Convective heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Sampling and analysis of radioactive liquid wastes and sludges in the Melton Valley and evaporator facility storage tanks at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sampling and analysis of the radioactive liquid wastes and sludges in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs), as well as two of the evaporator service facility storage tanks at ORNL, are described. Aqueous samples of the supernatant liquid and composite samples of the sludges were analyzed for major constituents, radionuclides, total organic carbon, and metals listed as hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Liquid samples from five tanks and sludge samples from three tanks were analyzed for organic compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Target Compound List. Estimates were made of the inventory of liquid and sludge phases in the tanks. Descriptions of the sampling and analytical activities and tabulations of the results are included. The report provides data in support of the design of the proposed Waste Handling and Packaging Plant, the Liquid Low-Level Waste Solidification Project, and research and development activities (R D) activities in developing waste management alternatives. 7 refs., 8 figs., 16 tabs.

Sears, M.B.; Botts, J.L.; Ceo, R.N.; Ferrada, J.J.; Griest, W.H.; Keller, J.M.; Schenley, R.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Request for closure, underground storage tank 2130-U: Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID {number_sign}0-010117  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a summary of the activities and analytical data related to the removal of underground storage tank (UST) 2130-U, previously located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Removal of this tank was conducted in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulation 1200-1-15 (1992). A completed copy of the State of Tennessee, Division of Underground Storage Tanks, Permanent Closure Report Form is included as Appendix A of this document Based on the information and data presented herein, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant requests permanent closure for the tank 2130-U site.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Revised corrective action plan for underground storage tank 2331-U at the Building 9201-1 Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document represents the Corrective Action Plan for underground storage tank (UST) 2331-U, previously located at Building 9201-1, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Tank 2331-U, a 560-gallon UST, was removed on December 14, 1988. This document presents a comprehensive summary of all environmental assessment investigations conducted at the Building 9201-1 Site and the corrective action measures proposed for remediation of subsurface petroleum product contamination identified at the site. This document is written in accordance with the regulatory requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-15-.06(7).

Bohrman, D.E.; Ingram, E.M. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Selecting a New Water Heater You have a lot to consider when selecting a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the water heater's annual operation costs but also its size and energy efficiency. Natural gas, oil or tank water heater operates by releasing hot water from the top of the tank when the hot water tap is turned on. The hot water is released into the hot water line. As the hot water leaves the tank, cold

196

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 124, Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata Sheet, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 124, Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This report complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). This CR provides documentation and justification for the closure of CAU 124 without further corrective action. This justification is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative activities conducted in accordance with the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 124: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The SAFER Plan provides information relating to site history as well as the scope and planning of the investigation. Therefore, this information will not be repeated in this CR.

Alfred Wickline

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Underground storage tank management plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems at the facility and to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks. UST systems have been removed or upgraded in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance. With the closure of a significant portion of the USTs, the continuing mission of the UST Management Program is to manage the remaining active UST systems and continue corrective actions in a safe regulatory compliant manner. This Program outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Program provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. The plan is divided into three major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) active UST sites, and (3) out-of-service UST sites. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Program, and the procedures and guidance for compliance.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 134: Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 134, Aboveground Storage Tanks. CAU 134 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008) and consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 15, and 29 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1): (1) CAS 03-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; (2) CAS 03-01-04, Tank; (3) CAS 15-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (4) CAS 29-01-01, Hydrocarbon Stain. CAS 03-01-03 consists of a mud tank that is located at the intersection of the 3-07 and the 3-12 Roads in Area 3 of the NTS. The tank and its contents are uncontaminated and will be dispositioned in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations. This CAS will be closed by taking no further action. CAS 03-01-04 consists of a potable water tank that is located at the Core Complex in Area 3 of the NTS. The tank will be closed by taking no further action. CAS 15-01-05 consists of an aboveground storage tank (AST) and associated impacted soil, if any. This CAS is located on a steep slope near the Climax Mine in Area 15 of the NTS. The AST is empty and will be dispositioned in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations. Soil below the AST will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted by chemicals at concentrations exceeding the action levels. It appears that the tank is not at its original location. Soil will also be sampled at the original tank location, if it can be found. If soil at either location has been impacted at concentrations that exceed the action levels, then the extent of contamination will be identified and a use restriction (UR) will be implemented. The site may be clean closed if contamination is less than one cubic yard in extent and can be readily excavated. If action levels are not exceeded, then no further action is required. CAS 29-01-01 consists of soil that has been impacted by a release or operations from an active diesel AST that fuels the generator at the Shoshone Receiver Site in Area 29 of the NTS. Soil below the AST will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted at concentrations exceeding the action levels. If it is, then the extent of contamination will be identified and a UR will be implemented. The site may be clean closed if contamination is less than one cubic yard in extent, can be readily excavated, and it is determined that clean closure is feasible based upon site conditions. If action levels are not exceeded, then no further action is required. Based on review of the preliminary assessment information for CAU 134 and recent site inspections, there is sufficient process knowledge to close CAU 134 using the SAFER process.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Chiller Start/Stop Optimization for a Campus-wide Chilled Water System with a Thermal Storage Tank Under a Four-Period Electricity Rate Schedule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of a 1.4-million-gallon chilled water thermal storage tank greatly increases the operational flexibility of a campuswide chilled water system under a four-part electricity rate structure. While significant operational savings can...

Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.; Contreras, O.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

Evans, S.K.

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Heat Pump Water Heaters and American Homes: A Good Fit?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as conventional electric resistance water heaters, with thetwo technologies: (1) an electric resistance storage watertransfers heat from the electric resistance element to the

Franco, Victor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 130: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 130, Storage Tanks, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 130 consists of the seven following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 7, 10, 20, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site: 01-02-01, Underground Storage Tank 07-02-01, Underground Storage Tanks 10-02-01, Underground Storage Tank 20-02-03, Underground Storage Tank 20-99-05, Tar Residue 22-02-02, Buried UST Piping 23-02-07, Underground Storage Tank This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 130 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) finalized on April 3, 2008, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 130. The DQO process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the final action levels, leading to a no further action declaration; (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions; or (3) clean closure by remediation and verification. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 130: Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, geophysical surveys). Move or remove and dispose of debris at various CASs, as required. Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. If no COCs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. If a COC is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. Obtain consensus from NDEP that the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment. Close the underground storage tank(s) and their contents, if any, in accordance with Nevada Administrative Code regulations. Remove the lead brick(s) found at any CAS in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

Alfred Wickline

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Basic and Acidic Leaching of Sludge from Melton Valley Storage Tank W-25  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-scale leaching tests were conducted with samples of tank waste sludge from the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate separation technology processes for use in concentrating the radionuclides and reducing the volume of waste for final disposal. This paper discusses the hot cell apparatus, the characterization of the sludge, the leaching methodology, and the results obtained from a variety of basic and acidic leaching tests of samples of sludge at ambient temperature. Basic leaching tests were also conducted at 75 and 95 deg C. The major alpha-,gamma., and beta-emitting radionuclides in the centrifuged, wet sludge solids were {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 244}Cm {sup 90}Sr, Pu, U, and Th. The other major metals (in addition to the U and Th) and anions were Na, Ca, Al, K, Mg, NO{sub 3}{sup -},CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, and O{sup 2-} organic carbon content was 3.0 +/- 1.0%. The pH was 13. A surprising result was that about 93% of the {sup 137}Cs in the centrifuged, wet sludge solids was bound in the solids and could not be solubilized by basic leaching at ambient temperature and 75 deg C. However, the solubility of the {sup 137}Cs was enhanced by heating the sludge to 95 deg C. In one of the tests,about 42% of the {sup 137}Cs was removed by leaching with 6.3 M NaOH at 95 deg C.Removing {sup 137}Cs from the W-25 sludge with nitric acid was a slow process. About 13% of the {sup 137}Cs was removed in 16 h with 3.0 M HNO{sub 3}. Only 22% of the {sup 137}Cs was removed in 117 h usi 6.0 M HNO{sub 3}. Successive leaching of sludge solids with 0.5 M, 3.0 M, 3.0 M; and 6.0 M HNO{sub 3} for a total mixing time of 558 h removed 84% of the {sup 137}Cs. The use of caustic leaching prior to HNO{sub 3} leaching, and the use of HF with HNO{sub 3} in acidic leaching, increased the rate of {sup 137}Cs dissolution. Gel formation proved to be one of the biggest problems associated with HNO{sub 3} leaching of the W-25 sludge.

Collins, J.L., Egan, B.Z., Beahm, E.C., Chase, C.W., Anderson, K.K.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Use of the Modified Light Duty Utility Arm to Perform Nuclear Waste Cleanup of Underground Waste Storage Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modified Light Duty Utility Arm (MLDUA) is a selectable seven or eight degree-of-freedom robot arm with a 16.5 ft (5.03 m) reach and a payload capacity of 200 lb. (90.72 kg). The utility arm is controlled in either joystick-based telerobotic mode or auto sequence robotics mode. The MLDUA deployment system deploys the utility arm vertically into underground radioactive waste storage tanks located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These tanks are constructed of gunite material and consist of two 25 ft (7.62 m) diameter tanks in the North Tank Farm and six 50 ft (15.24 m) diameter tanks in the South Tank Farm. After deployment inside a tank, the utility arm reaches and grasps the confined sluicing end effecter (CSEE) which is attached to the hose management arm (HMA). The utility arm positions the CSEE within the tank to allow the HMA to sluice the tank's liquid and solid waste from the tank. The MLDUA is used to deploy the characterization end effecter (CEE) and gunite scarifying end effecter (GSEE) into the tank. The CEE is used to survey the tank wall's radiation levels and the physical condition of the walls. The GSEE is used to scarify the tank walls with high-pressure water to remove the wall scale buildup and a thin layer of gunite which reduces the radioactive contamination that is embedded into the gunite walls. The MLDUA is also used to support waste sampling and wall core-sampling operations. Other tools that have been developed for use by the MLDUA include a pipe-plugging end effecter, pipe-cutting end effecter, and pipe-cleaning end effecter. Washington University developed advance robotics path control algorithms for use in the tanks. The MLDUA was first deployed in June 1997 and has operated continuously since then. Operational experience in the first four tanks remediated is presented in this paper.

Blank, J.A.; Burks, B.L.; DePew, R.E.; Falter, D.D.; Glassell, R.L.; Glover, W.H.; Killough, S.M.; Lloyd, P.D.; Love, L.J.; Randolph, J.D.; Van Hoesen, S.D.; Vesco, D.P.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. This report is an update, and replaces the previous report by the same title issued April 2003. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, Jeffrey W.

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

Rational analysis of mass, momentum, and heat transfer phenomena in liquid storage tanks under realistic operating conditions: 1. Basic formulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a computer code that analyses the performance of storage tanks using water as the working fluid. The new aspects of the authors work include the following items: (a) the transient Navier-Stokes equations are expressed in two-dimensional Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates, under the assumption of the Boussinesq approximation, (b) the effective viscosity and thermal diffusivity are evaluated by using a simplified form of the Deardorff turbulence model, (c) the energy equation is solved over a domain which includes the tank and a large portion of the surrounding soil, (d) some properly defined source terms have been introduced in the governing equations to describe inlet/outlet devices inside the tank, and localized friction losses, and (e) the boundary conditions are time-dependent to correctly describe the daily heat exchanges between tank, solar collectors and heat pumps for space conditioning. The Finite Differences (FD) technique and an improved formulation of the Marker and Cell (MAC) method are used to solve the conservation equations. Comparisons with literature studies indicate discrepancies between 0.02 and 0.5%. The results of several tests simulating realistic operating conditions will be shown in the second part of the paper.

Parrini, F.; Vitale, S.; Alabiso, M. (ENEL-Italian National Electricity Board-CRTN, Milan (Italy)); Castellano, L. (MATEC S.r.l., Milan (Italy))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Frangible roof joint behavior of cylindrical oil storage tanks designed to API 650 rules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an investigation into the frangible joint behavior of tanks designed to API 650 rules. In such tanks, the roof-to-shell joint is intended to fail in the event of overpressurization, venting the tank and containing any remaining fluid. The reasoning behind present API design formulas is reviewed. Combustion analyses, structural analyses, and the results of testing are presented. Results show that higher pressures are reached before frangible joint failure than predicted by the present API 650 calculation. One consequence is that (for empty tanks) uplift of the bottom can be expected to occur more frequently than predicted using API 650. However, uplift does not necessarily mean bottom failure. Instead, the relative strength of the shell-to-bottom and roof-to-shell joints will determine failure. This ratio is larger for larger tanks. Recommendations are made as to possible changes in the design approach of API 650.

Lu, Z.; Swenson, D.V.; Fenton, D.L. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Feasibility of accompanying uncontrolled linear heater with solar system innatural gas pressure drop stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas (NG) must be preheated before pressure reduction takes places at City Gate Stations (CGS). Indirect Water Bath Gas Heaters are employed in the CGS for preheating. The heaters consume a considerable amount of NG for preheating. As low temperature is required, a solar system has been proposed to provide part of heat demand. The system consists of a collector array and a storage tank. The tank stores solar heat during the day and releases it during the night. To show the capabilities of the proposed system, the Akand CGS has been chosen as a case study. The results show that as the number of collector increases, the fuel cost decreases but the capital cost increases. An optimum number of collectors and the storage tank capacity have been found based on economic analysis. The fuel saving occurs throughout the year with the maximum at June. The economic feasibility study of the proposed system has been carried out using two methods. These methods are Simple Payback Ratio (SPR) and (Net Present Value) NPV. The first one unveils that the payback ratio is only 6.9 years. The NPV method shows that the system will give net benefit after 11 years.

M. Farzaneh-Gord; A. Arabkoohsar; M. Deymi Dasht-bayaz; V. Farzaneh-Kord

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Alternative methods for proposed explosive demolition of large, obsolete pol storage tanks, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A desk study was undertaken to assess explosion demolition methodologies that would allow Army Explosive Ordinance Demolition (EOD) engineer teams assigned to Ft. Leonard Wood to safely and effectively demolish to ground level three very large metal POL (petroleum, oil, and lubricant) storage tanks. These tanks have outlived their usefulness and are scheduled for removal by the most rapid and cost effective method. An analysis by Ft. Leonard Wood determined explosive demolition to be the method of choice. A primary concern was possible corollary damage to nearby military and civilian housing and occupants. This study investigated several explosive sources and methodologies and provided predictions of corollary damage effects versus distance from the charge to be expected for explosive charge weights ranging from 10 to 500 lb. Prediction curves were developed for both ideal and average weather conditions.

Ingram, J.K.; Cheek, J.B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ultra compact direct hydrogen fuel cell prototype using a metal hydride hydrogen storage tank for a mobile phone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The small fuel cell is being researched as an alternative power source to the Li-ion battery in mobile phone. In this paper, a direct hydrogen fuel cell system which powers a mobile phone without a supplementary battery is compactly integrated below 25ml volume at the backside of the phone. The system consists of a small (8ml) metal hydride hydrogen storage tank with 4L hydrogen storage or an energy density of ?640Wh/L, a thin air-breathing planar polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack (13.44cm2נ3mm for a volumetric power density of 335W/L), miniature pressure regulator, and a high efficiency DCDC voltage converting circuitry. The hydrogen storage tank is packed with the AB5 type metal hydride alloy. The eight-cell air-breathing planar stack (8ml) is very thin (3mm) due to a thin flexible printed circuit board current collectors as well as a unique riveting assembly and is capable of a robust performance of 2.68W (200mW/cm2). A miniature pressure regulator is compact with fluidic and electrical connections within 4ml. A miniature DCDC voltage converter operates at an overall efficiency of 90%. Consequently, the estimated energy density of a fully integrated fuel cell system is 205Wh/L (70.5Wh/kg).

Sung Han Kim; Craig M. Miesse; Hee Bum Lee; Ik Whang Chang; Yong Sheen Hwang; Jae Hyuk Jang; Suk Won Cha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Practical guidelines for small-volume additions of uninhibited water to waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Allowable volumes of uninhibited water additions to waste tanks are limited to volumes in which hydroxide and nitrite inhibitors reach required concentrations by diffusion from the bulk waste within five days. This diffusion process was modeled conservatively by Fick`s second law of diffusion. The solution to the model was applied to all applicable conditions which exist in the waste tanks. Plant engineers adapted and incorporated the results into a practical working procedure for controlling and monitoring the addition of uninhibited water. Research, technical support, and field engineers worked together to produce an effective solution to a potential waste tank corrosion problem.

Hsu, T.C.; Wiersma, B.J.; Zapp, P.E.; Pike, J.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Practical guidelines for small volume additions of uninhibited water to waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Allowable volumes of uninhibited water additions to waste tanks are limited to volumes in which hydroxide and nitrite inhibitors reach required concentrations by diffusion from the bulk waste within five days. This diffusion process was modeled conservatively by Fick`s second law of diffusion. The solution to the model was applied to all applicable conditions which exist in the waste tanks. Plant engineers adapted and incorporated the results into a practical working procedure for controlling and monitoring the addition of uninhibited water. Research, technical support, and field engineers worked together to produce an effective solution to a potential waste tank corrosion problem.

Hsu, T.C.; Wiersma, B.J.; Zapp, P.E.; Pike, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Systems engineering study: tank 241-C-103 organic skimming,storage, treatment and disposal options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates alternatives for pumping, storing, treating and disposing of the separable phase organic layer in Hanford Site Tank 241-C-103. The report provides safety and technology based preferences and recommendations. Two major options and several varations of these options were identified. The major options were: 1) transfer both the organic and pumpable aqueous layers to a double-shell tank as part of interim stabilization using existing salt well pumping equipment or 2) skim the organic to an above ground before interim stabilization of Tank 241-C-103. Other options to remove the organic were considered but rejected following preliminary evaluation.

Klem, M.J.

1996-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

216

Collection and Usage of Reliability Data for Risk Analysis of LNG Storage Tanks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of their inflammable contents LNG storage facilities are considered as installations with...

Dr.Ing. O. Klingmller

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessing the Effectiveness of California's Underground Storage Tank Annual Inspection Rate Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tanks used at retail gas stations. The Energy Policy Act ofapplied had far more gas stations (the location of mostwith an average of 48 gas stations in the applicant cities

Cutter, W. Bowman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

An Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration report. Volume 1, Waste Characterization Data and Technology Development Needs Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Characterization Data and Technology Development Needs Assessment provides direct support to the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID). Key users of the study`s products may also include individuals and programs within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30), and the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). The goal of this work is to provide the UST-ID with a procedure for allocating funds across competing characterization technologies in a timely and defensible manner. It resulted in three primary products: 1. It organizes and summarizes information on underground storage tank characterization data needs. 2. It describes current technology development activity related to each need and flags areas where technology development may be beneficial. 3. It presents a decision process, with supporting software, for evaluating, prioritizing, and integrating possible technology development funding packages. The data presented in this document can be readily updated as the needs of the Waste Operations and Environmental Restoration programs mature and as new and promising technology development options emerge.

Quadrel, M.J.; Hunter, V.L.; Young, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Lini, D.C.; Goldberg, C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 124: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 124, Areas 8, 15, and 16 Storage Tanks, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 124 consists of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 15, and 16 of the Nevada Test Site as follows: 08-02-01, Underground Storage Tank 15-02-01, Irrigation Piping 16-02-03, Underground Storage Tank 16-02-04, Fuel Oil Piping 16-99-04, Fuel Line (Buried) and UST This plan provides the methodology of field activities necessary to gather information to close each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 124 using the SAFER process.

Alfred Wickline

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Heaters Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales...

222

Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Currently, DOE's physical hydrogen storage R&D focuses on the development of high-pressure (10,000 psi) composite tanks, cryo-compressed tanks, conformable tanks, and other advanced concepts...

223

The Trials and Tribulations of Testing Water Heaters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Trials and Tribulations of Testing Water Heaters The Trials and Tribulations of Testing Water Heaters Speaker(s): James Lutz Date: August 14, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn During our work on efficiency standards for electric water heaters, we discovered significant discrepancies between the rated and tested efficiencies of the highest rated electric resistance water heaters. For high efficiency electric resistance water heaters with an Energy Factor above .92, the heat losses are so small that minor flaws in the tank or obscure problems in the test procedure become more apparent. This seminar reports on our investigation into the causes of inconsistent results obtained during testing of high efficiency electric resistance water heaters at different test labs. We discovered some reasons for the

224

Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative - Solar Water Heater Rebate Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $500 Provider Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative Association Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative Association (Linn County RECA) is a member-owned cooperative. To encourage energy efficiency, Linn County offers a number of rebates to commercial, residential, and agricultural customers. Owners of both new construction and existing buildings are eligible for a $500 rebate for solar water heaters. The water heaters must have an auxiliary tank of at least 40 gallons and the solar water heater

225

Computation of fluid circulation in a cryogenic storage tank and heat transfer analysis during jet impingement.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The study presents a systematic single and two-phase analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a liquid hydrogen storage vessel for both earth and (more)

Mukka, Santosh Kumar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Two-tank indirect thermal storage designs for solar parabolic trough power plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The performance of a solar thermal parabolic trough plant with thermal storage is dependent upon the arrangement of the heat exchangers that ultimately transfer energy (more)

Kopp, Joseph E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - ax tank farm Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In collaboration with The Dow Chemical Company 12;A tank farm is a set of storage tanks that hold finished product... product Dedicated Tanks Without available storage ......

228

HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

BERRIOCHOA MV

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

Final Environmental Impact Statement (Supplement to ERDA-1537, September 1977) Waste Management Operations Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage Savannah River Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Do Do E/EIS-0062 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT mATEIUIENT (Supplement to ERDA-1537, September 1977) Waste ~ Management Operations Savannah River Plant ! Aiken, South Carolina Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage April 1980 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON. D.C.20545 1980 WL 94273 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Waste Management Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C. Wednesday, July 9, 1980 *46154 Record of Decision Decision. The decision has been made to complete the construction of the 14 double-shell tanks and use them to store defense high-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Background. The SRP, located near Aiken, South Carolina, is a major installation of the

230

Analysis of Underground Storage Tanks System Materials to Increased Leak Potential Associated with E15 Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 was enacted by Congress to move the nation toward increased energy independence by increasing the production of renewable fuels to meet its transportation energy needs. The law establishes a new renewable fuel standard (RFS) that requires the nation to use 36 billion gallons annually (2.3 million barrels per day) of renewable fuel in its vehicles by 2022. Ethanol is the most widely used renewable fuel in the US, and its production has grown dramatically over the past decade. According to EISA and RFS, ethanol (produced from corn as well as cellulosic feedstocks) will make up the vast majority of the new renewable fuel requirements. However, ethanol use limited to E10 and E85 (in the case of flex fuel vehicles or FFVs) will not meet this target. Even if all of the E0 gasoline dispensers in the country were converted to E10, such sales would represent only about 15 billion gallons per year. If 15% ethanol, rather than 10% were used, the potential would be up to 22 billion gallons. The vast majority of ethanol used in the United States is blended with gasoline to create E10, that is, gasoline with up to 10% ethanol. The remaining ethanol is sold in the form of E85, a gasoline blend with as much as 85% ethanol that can only be used in FFVs. Although DOE remains committed to expanding the E85 infrastructure, that market will not be able to absorb projected volumes of ethanol in the near term. Given this reality, DOE and others have begun assessing the viability of using intermediate ethanol blends as one way to transition to higher volumes of ethanol. In October of 2010, the EPA granted a partial waiver to the Clean Air Act allowing the use of fuel that contains up to 15% ethanol for the model year 2007 and newer light-duty motor vehicles. This waiver represents the first of a number of actions that are needed to move toward the commercialization of E15 gasoline blends. On January 2011, this waiver was expanded to include model year 2001 light-duty vehicles, but specifically prohibited use in motorcycles and off-road vehicles and equipment. UST stakeholders generally consider fueling infrastructure materials designed for use with E0 to be adequate for use with E10, and there are no known instances of major leaks or failures directly attributable to ethanol use. It is conceivable that many compatibility issues, including accelerated corrosion, do arise and are corrected onsite and, therefore do not lead to a release. However, there is some concern that higher ethanol concentrations, such as E15 or E20, may be incompatible with current materials used in standard gasoline fueling hardware. In the summer of 2008, DOE recognized the need to assess the impact of intermediate blends of ethanol on the fueling infrastructure, specifically located at the fueling station. This includes the dispenser and hanging hardware, the underground storage tank, and associated piping. The DOE program has been co-led and funded by the Office of the Biomass Program and Vehicle Technologies Program with technical expertise from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The infrastructure material compatibility work has been supported through strong collaborations and testing at Underwriters Laboratories (UL). ORNL performed a compatibility study investigating the compatibility of fuel infrastructure materials to gasoline containing intermediate levels of ethanol. These results can be found in the ORNL report entitled Intermediate Ethanol Blends Infrastructure Materials Compatibility Study: Elastomers, Metals and Sealants (hereafter referred to as the ORNL intermediate blends material compatibility study). These materials included elastomers, plastics, metals and sealants typically found in fuel dispenser infrastructure. The test fuels evaluated in the ORNL study were SAE standard test fuel formulations used to assess material-fuel compatibility within a relatively short timeframe. Initially, these material studies included test fuels of Fuel C,

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document (S/RID), Vol. 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Requirements Identification Document (RID) describes an Occupational Health and Safety Program as defined through the Relevant DOE Orders, regulations, industry codes/standards, industry guidance documents and, as appropriate, good industry practice. The definition of an Occupational Health and Safety Program as specified by this document is intended to address Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendations 90-2 and 91-1, which call for the strengthening of DOE complex activities through the identification and application of relevant standards which supplement or exceed requirements mandated by DOE Orders. This RID applies to the activities, personnel, structures, systems, components, and programs involved in maintaining the facility and executing the mission of the High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A Method to Determine the Optimal Tank Size for a Chilled Water Storage System Under a Time-of-Use Electricity Rate Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the downtown area of Austin, it is planned to build a new naturally stratified chilled water storage tank and share it among four separated chilled water plants. An underground piping system is to be established to connect these four plants...

Zhang, Z.; Turner, W. D.; Chen, Q.; Xu, C.; Deng, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 7. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 7) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Occupational Safety and Health, and Environmental Protection.

Burt, D.L.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Cost Benefit Analysis of California's Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks (LUFTs). Submitted to theCalifornias Underground Storage Tank Program. Submitted tos Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks by Samantha Carrington

Carrington-Crouch, Robert

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

DOE HydrogenDOE Hydrogen Composite Tank ProgramComposite Tank Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOE HydrogenDOE Hydrogen Composite Tank ProgramComposite Tank Program Dr. Neel Sirosh DIRECTOR and validate 5,000 psi storage tanks ­ Tank efficiency: 7.5 ­ 8.5 wt% · Validate 5,000 psi in-tank-pressure regulators ­ Total storage system efficiency: 5.7 wt% · Develop and validate 10,000 psi storage tanks ­ Tank

236

Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency Homes Water Heating Swimming Pool Heaters Swimming Pool Heaters July 10, 2014 Gas Swimming Pool Heaters Selecting the right kind of swimming pool heater...

237

Grouped exposed metal heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

238

NREL Develops Heat Pump Water Heater Simulation Model (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulation model helps researchers evaluate real-world simulation model helps researchers evaluate real-world impacts of heat pump water heaters in U.S. homes. Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) remove heat from the air and use it to heat water, presenting an energy-saving opportunity for homeowners. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a simulation model to study the inter- actions of HPWHs and space conditioning equipment, related to climate and installa- tion location in the home. This model was created in TRNSYS and is based on data from HPWHs tested at NREL's Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory. The HPWH model accounts for the condenser coil wrapped around the outside of the storage tank, and uses a data-based performance map. Researchers found that simulated energy use was within 2% of lab results, which confirms

239

Tri-County Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficient Water Heater Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tri-County Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficient Water Heater Tri-County Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficient Water Heater Rebate Program Tri-County Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficient Water Heater Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $75 Provider Tri-County Electric Cooperative Tri-County Electric Cooperative offers a $75 rebate on the purchase of energy-efficient electric water heaters. The rebate is valid for new or replacement units which have an Energy Factor Rating of 0.90 or higher. The minimum tank size is 40 gallons, with a minimum 4,500 watt heating element. For validation purposes, a copy of the sales or installation receipt must accompany the [http://www.tcectexas.com/Forms/water%20heater%20rebate%20form.pdf

240

Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as conventional electric resistance water heaters. Atwo technologies: (1) an electric resistance storage waterin heat pump or in electric resistance mode. The electric

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Utilization of Heat Pump Water Heaters for Load Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters require residential electric storage water heaters with volumes larger than 55 gallons to have an energy factor greater than 2.0 after April 2015. While this standard will significantly increase the energy efficiency of water heaters, large electric storage water heaters that do not use heat pump technologies may no longer be available. Since utilities utilize conventional large-volume electric storage water heaters for thermal storage in demand response programs, there is a concern that the amended standard will significantly limit demand response capacity. To this end, Oak Ridge National Laboratory partnered with the Tennessee Valley Authority to investigate the load management capability of heat pump water heaters that meet or exceed the forthcoming water heater standard. Energy consumption reduction during peak periods was successfully demonstrated, while still meeting other performance criteria. However, to minimize energy consumption, it is important to design load management strategies that consider the home s hourly hot water demand so that the homeowner has sufficient hot water.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Lyne, Christopher T [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

244

Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Current on-board hydrogen storage approaches involve compressed hydrogen gas tanks, liquid hydrogen tanks, cryogenic compressed hydrogen, metal hydrides,...

245

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks (USTs), which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

A sequential checklist for the assessment of natural attenuation of dissolved petroleum contaminant plumes from leaking underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of the number of leaking underground storage tanks (UST) are measured in the hundreds of thousands in the United States alone. The discussion in this article largely pertains to the lighter motor fuels which contain aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons. These include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX). The occurrence of dissolved BTEX groundwater contaminant plumes is most commonly associated with leaking gasoline USTs. However, their association with other petroleum products is not uncommon. this article and checklist provide guidance for completing UST assessments, which can support the decision-making process presented in the ASTM Emergency Standard Guide. Following the checklist will measure that the initial site assessment results in an accurate and functional characterization of the details and subtleties of the UST Source Impact Zone. This includes evaluating the UST area to identify release pathways for residual contamination in soil and groundwater. Based on the results obtained from the Source Impact Zone Evaluation, natural attenuation can be assessed for its applicability and performance.

De Rose, N. [Langan Engineering and Environmental Services, Inc., Doylestown, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Rational analysis of mass, momentum, and heat transfer phenomena in liquid storage tanks under realistic operating conditions: 2. Application to a feasibility study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is the second part of a two-part paper that deals with modelling the thermal performances of storage tanks of liquid water coupled with solar-assisted heatpump systems. The computer code THESTA, described in detail in the first part, has been applied to compare configurations which differ from one another in the distribution and thickness of the insulating panels. These numerical experiments show very clearly the capability of the code in simulating realistic operating conditions. The validity of the present release is also discussed. The results obtained have been assumed to be a reliable theoretical support to the definition of the features of the storage device of a pilot plant.

F. Parrini; S. Vitale; L. Castellano

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Experimental analysis of a direct expansion solar assisted heat pump with integral storage tank for domestic water heating under zero solar radiation conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the experimental evaluation of the performance of a direct expansion solar assisted heat pump water heating (DX-SAHPWH) system working under zero solar radiation conditions at static heating operation mode of the storage tank. The DX-SAHPWH system includes two bare solar collectors as evaporator, a \\{R134a\\} rotary-type hermetic compressor, a thermostatic expansion valve and a helical coil condenser immersed in a 300L water storage tank. The zero solar radiation and stable ambient air temperature working conditions were established by placing the solar collectors into a climate chamber. The analysis is based on experimental data taken from the DX-SAHPWH provided by the manufacturer and equipped with an appropriate data acquisition system. In the paper, the experimental facility, the data acquisition system and the experimental methodology are described. Performance parameters to evaluate the energy efficiency, such as COP and equivalent seasonal performance factors (SPFe) for the heating period, and the water thermal stratification in the storage tank are defined and obtained from the experimental data. Results from the experimental analysis under transient operating working conditions of the DX-SAHPWH system and its main components are shown and discussed. Lastly, the Huang and Lee DX-SAHPWH performance evaluation method was applied resulting in a characteristic COP of 3.23 for the DX-SAHPWH system evaluated under zero solar radiation condition.

Jos Fernndez-Seara; Carolina Pieiro; J. Alberto Dopazo; F. Fernandes; Paulo X.B. Sousa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Explosives tester with heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inspection tester system for testing for explosives. The tester includes a body and a swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body. At least one reagent holder and dispenser is operatively connected to the body. The reagent holder and dispenser contains an explosives detecting reagent and is positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagent to the swab unit. A heater is operatively connected to the body and the swab unit is adapted to be operatively connected to the heater.

Del Eckels, Joel (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Whipple, Richard E. (Livermore, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

Life Cycle Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage: Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Turchi, C.; Burkhardt, J.; Kutscher, C.; Decker, T.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

AWSWAH - the heat pipe solar water heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An all weather heat pipe solar water heater (AWSWAH) comprising a collector of 4 m/sup 2/ (43 ft/sup 2/) and a low profile water tank of 160 liters (42 gal.) was developed. A single heat pipe consisting of 30 risers and two manifolds in the evaporator and a spiral condenser was incorporated into the AWSWAH. Condensate metering was done by synthetic fiber wicks. The AWSWAH was tested alongside two conventional solar water heaters of identical dimensions, an open loop system and a closed loop system. It was found that the AWSWAH was an average of 50% more effective than the open system in the temperature range 30-90 /sup 0/C (86-194 /sup 0/F). The closed loop system was the least efficient of the three systems.

Akyurt, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank Inspection Program How To's Petroleum Bulk-material-storage/petroleum-bulk-storage/Documents/Inspect_GD.pdf What is Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank Inspection Program? Cornell University's Online Aboveground Petroleum Tank Inspection Program enables assigned tank inspectors to record

Pawlowski, Wojtek

254

Department of Energy - Swimming Pool Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

736189 en Gas Swimming Pool Heaters http:energy.govenergysaverarticlesgas-swimming-pool-heaters heaters" class"title-link">

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated tank calibrations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Reviewed 809) Summary: Safe Operating Procedure (Reviewed 809) UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS - AUTOMATIC TANK GAUGING... tank gauging (ATG) system requirements for Underground...

256

Regulation of Leaky Underground Fuel Tanks: An Anatomy of Regulatory Failure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

any leaks. (b) Most storage tank owners have only vagueaddition, regulations for tanks installed prior to Januarypertaining to existing tanks are more appropriately termed

White, Christen Carlson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Floating solar pool heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A floating solar heater for swimming pools is disclosed which includes a top cover, a vertical outer side wall with inclined inner side wall segments connected thereto, an outside rim and a bottom wall. The inner side wall segments are octagonal, coated with light reflective material, and aid in reflecting the sun's rays to heat the space inside the walls formed by the cover which dead air space also provides for floatation of the heater. The bottom wall is heated by direct sun inpingement and by the air in contact with it and is formed of a material having high heat conductivity.

McCluskey, J.E.

1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Storage Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Gas Storage Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

259

Portable Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portable Heaters Portable Heaters Portable Heaters November 26, 2013 - 2:41pm Addthis Portable heaters can be an efficient way to supplement inadequate heating. | Photo courtesy iStockphoto.com Portable heaters can be an efficient way to supplement inadequate heating. | Photo courtesy iStockphoto.com What does this mean for me? A portable heater is a good choice if you have a space that requires supplemental heating or is infrequently occupied. You should carefully follow all the manufacturer's installation and operation instructions. Small space heaters are typically used when the main heating system is inadequate or when central heating is too costly to install or operate. In some cases, small space heaters can be less expensive to use if you only want to heat one room or supplement inadequate heating in one room. They

260

Energy Conservation in Process Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY CONSERVATION IN PROCESS HEATERS Roger l~. Bagge Neste Engineering Porvoo, Finland ABSTRACT OPTIMIZATION OF EMER~Y USE Energy savings in refinery and petrochemical fired heaters can basically be achieved in two ways: Thru optimization...

Bagge, R. W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance Title The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-47352 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., James D. Lutz, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL-47352 Date Published January 12 Abstract The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 (NAECA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consider amendments to the energy conservation standards to increase energy efficiency in residential water heaters. A driving force affecting efficiency is the ozone-depletion regulation regarding blowing agents for insulation in all water heater fuel types. This paper presents results of cost and efficiency impacts of three potential blowing agents. Residential water heaters are typically insulated with polyurethane foam in the space between the tank and the jacket. Currently, water heater manufacturers use HCFC-141b, an ozone-depleting substance, as a blowing agent. After 2003, as a result of the Montreal Protocol (1993), manufacturers must use blowing agents that do not deplete the ozone layer. The analysis presented in this paper considers three replacement candidates, HFC-245fa, HFC-134a, and cyclopentane by comparing their efficiency and cost effectiveness when applied to water heater insulation. This analysis used computer simulation models and other analytical methods to investigate the efficiency improvements due to different design options, when alternative blowing agents are applied. The calculations were based on the DOE test procedure for residential water heaters. The analysis used average manufacturer, retailer, and installer costs to calculate the total consumer costs. Consumer operating expenses were calculated based on modeled energy consumption under test procedure conditions and U.S. average energy prices. With this information, a cost-efficiency relationship was developed to show the average manufacturer and consumer cost to achieve increased efficiency.

262

Accelerated safety analyses - structural analyses Phase I - structural sensitivity evaluation of single- and double-shell waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerated Safety Analyses - Phase I (ASA-Phase I) have been conducted to assess the appropriateness of existing tank farm operational controls and/or limits as now stipulated in the Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs) and Operating Specification Documents, and to establish a technical basis for the waste tank operating safety envelope. Structural sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the response of the different waste tank configurations to variations in loading conditions, uncertainties in loading parameters, and uncertainties in material characteristics. Extensive documentation of the sensitivity analyses conducted and results obtained are provided in the detailed ASA-Phase I report, Structural Sensitivity Evaluation of Single- and Double-Shell Waste Tanks for Accelerated Safety Analysis - Phase I. This document provides a summary of the accelerated safety analyses sensitivity evaluations and the resulting findings.

Becker, D.L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Dehumidifying water heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The indoor swimming pool at the Glen Cove YMCA in Glen Cove, New York, has been selected for the dehumidification/water heating system demonstration project. This report provides the specifications for this system which includes a dehumidifier/air handler, condenser/water heater, and outdoor condenser. Current progress underway includes construction, vendor selection, and control system selection. (SM)

Stark, W.

1991-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Optimal Tank Farm Operation Sebastian Terrazas-Moreno  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Tank Farm Operation Sebastian Terrazas-Moreno Ignacio E. Grossmann John M. Wassick EWOIn collaboration with The Dow Chemical Company #12;A tank farm is a set of storage tanks that hold finished product until it is shipped Each tank can only hold one Loading of product takes place only from storage tanks

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

265

18 - Tanks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents various nomographs, which are based on the guidelines presented in American Petroleum Institute (API) Publication No. 2519, and used to estimate the average evaporation loss from internal floating-roof tanks. The loss determined from the charts can be used to evaluate the economies of seal conversion and to reconcile refinery, petrochemical plant, and storage terminal losses. The losses represent average standing losses only and they do not cover losses associated with the movement of product into or out of the tank. The nomographs can estimate evaporation loss for product true vapor pressures (TVP) ranging from 1.5 to 14 psia, the most commonly used seals for average and tight fit conditions, tank diameters ranging from 50-250 ft, welded and bolted designs, and both self-supporting and column-supported fixed roof designs. Typical values of the deck fitting loss factors presented as a function of tank diameters in the API Publication 2519 have been used in the preparation of these nomographs. In addition, for the calculations of the evaporation loss for the bolted deck design, a typical deck seam loss factor value of 0.2 has been assumed.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Immersible solar heater for fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An immersible solar heater comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

An Assessment of Technologies to Provide Extended Sludge Retrieval from Underground Storage Tanks at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify sludge mobilization technologies that can be readily installed in double-shell tanks along with mixer pumps to augment mixer pump operation when mixer pumps do not adequately mobilize waste. The supplementary technologies will mobilize sludge that may accumulate in tank locations out-of-reach of the mixer-pump jet and move the sludge into the mixer-pump range of operation. The identified technologies will be evaluated to determine if their performances and configurations are adequate to meet requirements developed for enhanced sludge removal systems. The study proceeded in three parallel paths to identify technologies that: (1) have been previously deployed or demonstrated in radioactive waste tanks, (2) have been specifically evaluated for their ability to mobilize or dislodge waste simulants with physical and theological properties similar to those anticipated during waste retrieval, and (3) have been used in similar industrial conditions, bu t not specifically evaluated for radioactive waste retrieval.

JA Bamberger

2000-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document (S/RID), Vol. 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fire Protection functional area for the Hanford Site Tank Farm facilities and support structures is based on the application of relevant DOE orders, regulations, and industry codes and standards. The fire protection program defined in this document may be divided into three areas: (1) organizational, (2) administrative programmatic features, and (3) technical features. The information presented in each section is in the form of program elements and orders, regulations, industry codes, and standards that serve as the attributes of a fire protection program for the Tank Farm facilities. Upon completion this document will be utilized as the basis to evaluate compliance of the fire protection program being implemented for the Tank Farm facilities with the requirements of DOE orders and industry codes and standards.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Modeling of Electric Water Heaters for Demand Response: A Baseline PDE Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response (DR)control can effectively relieve balancing and frequency regulation burdens on conventional generators, facilitate integrating more renewable energy, and reduce generation and transmission investments needed to meet peak demands. Electric water heaters (EWHs) have a great potential in implementing DR control strategies because: (a) the EWH power consumption has a high correlation with daily load patterns; (b) they constitute a significant percentage of domestic electrical load; (c) the heating element is a resistor, without reactive power consumption; and (d) they can be used as energy storage devices when needed. Accurately modeling the dynamic behavior of EWHs is essential for designing DR controls. Various water heater models, simplified to different extents, were published in the literature; however, few of them were validated against field measurements, which may result in inaccuracy when implementing DR controls. In this paper, a partial differential equation physics-based model, developed to capture detailed temperature profiles at different tank locations, is validated against field test data for more than 10 days. The developed model shows very good performance in capturing water thermal dynamics for benchmark testing purposes

Xu, Zhijie; Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Yu

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

271

Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

272

Tank characterization reference guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research.

De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Simpson, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Monthly Tank Inspection Log Name of Campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monthly Tank Inspection Log Name of Campus Street Address of Campus City, State, and Zip Code of Campus 1 of 2 1. Facility PBS Registration Number 6. DISTRIBUTE TO : 2. Tank Number 3. Tank Registered(S) Satisfactory Repair or Adjustment Required Not Applicable Additional Comments Attached ABOVEGROUND STORAGE TANK

Rosen, Jay

274

DOE Vehicular Tank Workshop Sandia National Laboratories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOE Vehicular Tank Workshop Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA April 29, 2010 Thursday the deployment of hydrogen storage tanks in early market fuel cell applications for vehicles Workshop Objectives at the first workshop in more detail, including Type 4 tank and PRD testing, tank service life and tracking

275

1 BASEMENT STORAGE 3 MICROSCOPE LAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECHANICAL ROOM 13 SHOWER ROOMSAIR COMPRESSOR 14 NITROGEN STORAGE 15 DIESEL FUEL STORAGE 16 ACID NEUT. TANK 17a ACID STORAGE 17b INERT GAS STORAGE 17c BASE STORAGE 17d SHELVES STORAGE * KNOCK-OUT PANEL

Boonstra, Rudy

276

Lifecycle Verification of Polymeric Storage Tank Liners - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Barton Smith (Primary Contact) and Lawrence M. Anovitz Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Phone: (865) 574-2196 Email: smithdb@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov Start Date: June 2008 Projected End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Continue temperature cycling and permeation * measurements on tank liner polymers, and use permeation data to assess ability of tank liners to retain a steady-state hydrogen discharge rate that does not exceed 110% of the 75 normal cubic centimeters per minute (Ncc)/min permeation requirement of SAE International

277

TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

WILLIS WL; AHRENDT MR

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hydrogen Tank Testing R&D | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Tank Testing R&D Hydrogen Tank Testing R&D These slides were presented at the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on April 29, 2010. hydrogentanktestingostw.pdf More Documents...

279

Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

Livingston, R. A. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., U. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schweitzer, J. S. [Physics Dept., U. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States); Parsons, A. M. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt (United States); Arens, E. E. [John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

280

Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today's state of the art for hydrogen storage includes 5,000- and 10,000-psi compressed gas tanks and cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks for on-board hydrogen storage.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Technical requirements specification for tank waste retrieval  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the technical requirements specification for the retrieval of waste from the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. All activities covered by this scope are conducted in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission.

Lamberd, D.L.

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

282

Do You Have a Solar Water Heater?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Earlier this week, Ernie wrote about theeconomics of getting a solar water heater. As Ernie explained, a solar water heater is more expensive than a normal water heater, but depending on your area...

283

Three-dimensional numerical simulation of settling and resuspension of solids in storage tanks with air injection recirculators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transient three-dimensional finite-difference numerical modeling of flow with settling solids in a 3.7 x 10/sup 3/ m/sup 3/ tank was performed. The number-average diameter of the particles was 15..mu..m and nominal volumetric concentration was 24 percent. Using dilute suspension, concentration dependent viscosity, and settling velocity assumption, modeled air lift circulators were shown to be sufficient to maintain solids in suspension during normal operation. Resuspension of solids was also shown to be accomplished by impulsive circulator startup in the absence of particle agglomeration. Settling velocity was shown to be a dominant parameter under the assumptions made.

Eyler, L.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document (S/RID), Vol. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Requirements Identification Document (RID) section is to identify, in one location, all of the facility specific requirements and good industry practices which are necessary or important to establish an effective Issues Management Program for the Tank Farm Facility. The Management Systems Functional Area includes the site management commitment to environmental safety and health (ES&H) policies and controls, to compliance management, to development and management of policy and procedures, to occurrence reporting and corrective actions, resource and issue management, and to the self-assessment process.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Immersible solar heater for fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An immersible solar heater is described comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Immersible solar heater for fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An immersible solar heater is described comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater. 11 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

287

Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor Xergy is using its Electro Chemical Compression (ECC)...

288

Tankless Gas Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tankless Gas Water Heaters Tankless Gas Water Heaters Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results tanklessgaswaterheaterv12.xlsx More Documents & Publications Heat Pump...

289

Commercial Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Heaters Commercial Water Heaters Standardized DOE Testing Templates commercialwaterheater v1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications Refrigerators and Refrigerator-Freezers...

290

Heat Pump Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heat Pump Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results heatpumpwaterheaterv1.7.xlsx More Documents & Publications Tankless Gas Water...

291

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Petroleum Product Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication focuses on safe storage of gasoline, diesel, kerosene and liquid heating fuels. It includes information about storage tank location, tank design and installation, tank monitoring, and tank closure....

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

Evaluation of the TORE(R)Lance for Radioactive Waste Mobilization and Retrieval from Underground Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TORE? Lance is a hand-held hydro transportation device with the ability to convey solids at pre-determined slurry concentrations over great distances. The TORE? Lance head generates a precessing vortex core to mobilize solids. Solids retrieval is accomplished using an eductor. The device contains no parts and requires pressurized fluid to operate the eductor and produce mobilization. Three configurations of TORE? Lance operation were evaluated for mobilization and eduction during these tests: compressed air, water, and an air and water mixture. These tests have shown that the TORE? Lance is a tool that can be used at Hanford for mobilization and retrieval of wastes. The system is versatile and can be configured for many types of applications. These studies showed that the diverse applications require unique solutions so care is recommended for TORE? Lance equipment selection for each application. The two components of the TORE? Lance are the precessing vortex for mobilizing and the eductor for retrieval. The precessing vortex is sensitive to fluid flow rate and pressure. In the hand-held unit these parameters are controlled both internally, by changing shim spacing, and externally by controlling the flow split between the eductor and the head. For in-tank applications out-of-tank control of both these parameters are recommended.

Bamberger, Judith A.; Bates, Cameron J.; Bates, James M.; White, M.

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

293

Methods for forming long subsurface heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a longitudinal subsurface heater includes longitudinally welding an electrically conductive sheath of an insulated conductor heater along at least one longitudinal strip of metal. The longitudinal strip is formed into a tubular around the insulated conductor heater with the insulated conductor heater welded along the inside surface of the tubular.

Kim, Dong Sub

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

295

Heater head for stirling engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

Corey, John A. (R.D. #2, Box 101 E, North Troy, NY 12182)

1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development of a Market Optimized Condensing Gas Water Heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program covered the development of a market optimized condensing gas water heater for residential applications. The intent of the program was to develop a condensing design that minimized the large initial cost premium associated with traditional condensing water heater designs. Equally important was that the considered approach utilizes design and construction methods that deliver the desired efficiency without compromising product reliability. Standard condensing water heater approaches in the marketplace utilize high cost materials such as stainless steel tanks and heat exchangers as well as expensive burner systems to achieve the higher efficiencies. The key in this program was to develop a water heater design that uses low-cost, available components and technologies to achieve higher efficiency at a modest cost premium. By doing this, the design can reduce the payback to a more reasonable length, increasing the appeal of the product to the marketplace. Condensing water heaters have been in existence for years, but have not been able to significantly penetrate the market. The issue has typically been cost. The high purchase price associated with existing condensing water heaters, sometimes as much as $2000, has been a very difficult hurdle to overcome in the marketplace. The design developed under this program has the potential to reduce the purchase price of this condensing design by as much as $1000 as compared to traditional condensing units. The condensing water heater design developed over the course of this program led to an approach that delivered the following performance attributes: 90%+ thermal efficiency; 76,000 Btu/hr input rate in a 50 gallon tank; First hour rating greater than 180 gph; Rapid recovery time; and Overall operating condition well matched to combination heat and hot water applications. Over the final three years of the program, TIAX worked very closely with A.O. Smith Water Products Company as our commercial partner to optimize the design for manufacturing. This work included the initiation of a large field testing program (over 125 units) and an in-depth reliability program intended to minimize the risks associated with a new product introduction. At the time of this report, A.O. Smith plans to introduce this product to the marketplace in the early 2006 time period.

Peter Pescatore

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

297

Development of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tank for Storage and Gaseous Truck Delivery - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Jon Knudsen (Primary Contact), Don Baldwin Lincoln Composites 5117 N.W. 40 th Street Lincoln, NE 68524 Phone: (402) 470-5039 Email: jknudsen@lincolncomposites.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18062 Project Start Date: July 1, 2008 Project End Date: April 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives The objective of this project is to design and develop the most effective bulk hauling and storage solution for hydrogen in terms of: Cost * Safety * Weight * Volumetric Efficiency * Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

298

Economic analysis of using above ground gas storage devices for compressed air energy storage system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Above ground gas storage devices for compressed air energy storage (CAES) have three types: air storage tanks, gas cylinders, and gas storage pipelines. A cost model of these gas storage devices is established on...

Jinchao Liu; Xinjing Zhang; Yujie Xu; Zongyan Chen

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous tank waste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: by tank truck. The various wastes, when received, are pumped to storage tanks, then blended to produce... of Liquid Fluid Wastes General Description Light...

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - anechoic water tank Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1, 2, and 3 including steam drums, water drums, firebox, and exhaust stack. All tanks including... Side of Surface Condenser < Fuel Oil Storage Tanks < Chilled Water...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic tank waste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 1 Attachment A PPOP 08.10 Summary: but not limited to: < East and West Condensate Tanks < DFT < Waste Pit < Surge Tank < Softeners < Polishers < RO... < Refrigerant Storage...

302

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Incorporating tankless water heaters was one Incorporating tankless water heaters was one of many energy-efficiency recommendations Building America's research team IBACOS had for San Antonio builder Imagine Homes. Although tankless gas water heaters should save approximately 33% on hot water heating compared to a conventional storage water heater, actual energy savings vary significantly based on individual draw volume. Above 10 gallons per draw, the efficiency approaches the rated energy factor. The greatest savings occur at a daily use quantity of about 50 gallons. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.2 Energy Efficient Components Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance As improved thermal enclosures dramatically reduce heating and cooling loads,

303

Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into carbon gas-fired absorption heat pump water heaters. This project will employ innovative techniques to increase water heating energy efficiency over conventional gas storage water heaters by 40%. Project Description This project seeks to develop a natural gas-fired water heater using an absorption heat. The development effort is targeting lithium bromide aqueous solutions as a working fluid in order to avoid the negative implications of using more toxic ammonia. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a Cooperative Research and Development

304

Small Space Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Small Space Heater Basics Small Space Heater Basics Small Space Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 10:38am Addthis Small space heaters, also called portable heaters, are typically used when the main heating system is inadequate or when central heating is too costly to install or operate. Space heater capacities generally range between 10,000 Btu to 40,000 Btu per hour. Common fuels used for this purpose are electricity, propane, natural gas, and kerosene. Although most space heaters rely on convection (the circulation of air in a room), some rely on radiant heating; that is, they emit infrared radiation that directly heats up objects and people that are within their line of sight. Combustion Space Heaters Space heaters are classified as vented and unvented, or "vent free." Unvented combustion units are not recommended for inside use, as they

305

Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top Innovation Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a hot water heater...

306

Heat Pump Water Heaters and American Homes: A Good Fit?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.V. Lapsa. 2001. Residential Heat Pump Water Heater (HPWH)Calwell. 2005. Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters: Energyfor Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters Installed in

Franco, Victor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Heat Pump Water Heaters and American Homes: A Good Fit?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001. Residential Heat Pump Water Heater (HPWH) Development2005. Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters: Energy Efficiencyfor Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters Installed in

Franco, Victor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A performance correlation of horizontal solar heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar heaters are shown tn Figure VI, page 31 30 Figure VI Horizontal Solar Heaters ~GLAZING AND FRAME ~~ POLYETHYLENE HEATERS THERMAL IN S U LA T I N 8 CELLS THERMOCOUPLES HORIZONTAL TABLE TOP THERMOCOUPLES COPPER LEADS TO CONTROL... The solar heaters are shown tn Figure VI, page 31 30 Figure VI Horizontal Solar Heaters ~GLAZING AND FRAME ~~ POLYETHYLENE HEATERS THERMAL IN S U LA T I N 8 CELLS THERMOCOUPLES HORIZONTAL TABLE TOP THERMOCOUPLES COPPER LEADS TO CONTROL...

Gopffarth, Wilford Hugo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

Tanks focus area. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM`s technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE`s four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program.

Frey, J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Heater head for Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a heater head for a Stirling engine comprising: a housing for enclosing the heater head with gas at a substantial elevated pressure; insulator means attached to the housing for insulating the heater head; inlet means attached to a regenerator in the housing for admission of relatively high pressure working fluid from the regenerator of a Stirling engine; a first annular heating wall in the housing attached to the inlet means for heating the working fluid; and, a second annular heating wall in the housing concentric with the first heating wall but of lesser diameters so that an annular space is formed between the first heating wall and the second heating wall for heating working fluid; and a third heating wall in the housing concentric with and smaller in diameter than the second heating wall forming the condensing area of a heat pipe between the second heating wall and the third heating wall.

White, M.A.; Emigh, S.G.

1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM); Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumhansl, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Chwirka, Joseph D. (Tijeras, NM)

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Numerical Analysis of Water Temperature Distribution in the Tank of ASHPWH it ha Cylindrical Condenser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air source heat pump water heaters (ASHPWH) are becoming increasingly popular for saving energy, protecting the environment and security purposes. The water temperature distribution in the tank is an important parameter for an ASHPWH. This paper...

Wang, D.; Shan, S.; Wang, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Solar heater for swimming pools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solar heater for swimming pools is provided having one or more heating panels installable on a roof or the like and arranged to discharge into a pool equipped with an apron without need for disturbing or obstructing the apron. This is accomplished by the provision of an elevated bistable dumper adjacent the perimeter of the apron having a dispensing spout normally inclined upwardly but pivoting at intervals to discharge into the pool across the apron without obstructing it. Water to be heated is diverted from the pool filtering system to the solar heater via a pressure regulator and a solar responsive flow control.

Babcock, H.W.

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

High-Pressure Hydrogen Tanks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

February 8 February 8 th , 2005 Mark J. Warner, P.E. Principal Engineer Quantum Technologies, Inc. Irvine, CA Low Cost, High Efficiency, Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage High Pressure Hydrogen Storage This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. 70 MPa Composite Tanks Vent Line Ports Defueling Port (optional) Fill Port Filter Check Valve Vehicle Interface Bracket with Stone Shield In Tank Regulator with Solenoid Lock-off Pressure Relief Device Manual Valve Compressed Hydrogen Storage System In-Tank Regulator Pressure Sensor (not visible here) Pressure Relief Device (thermal) In Tank Gas Temperature Sensor Carbon Composite Shell (structural) Impact Resistant Outer Shell (damage resistant) Gas Outlet Solenoid Foam Dome (impact protection)

315

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

An internal winding high temperature heater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An internal winding high temperature heater ... General principles are outlined for the construction of compact heaters that are suitable for heating small containers or reaction vessels at constant temperature and up to about 1000 C. ...

A. J. Delbouille; E. G. Derouane

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Energy conversion by an electric space heater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By means of measuring the temperature of the air blown by an electric space heater one can show students that the air is heated at a rate approximately equal to the rated wattage of the heater.

Willem H. van den Berg

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 Failing or nearby septic tank systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 · Failing or nearby septic tank systems · Exfiltration from sanitary sewers in poor repair · Leaking underground storage tanks and pipes · Landfill seepage or natural environment Leaks from underground storage tanks and pipes are a common source of soil

Pitt, Robert E.

319

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS, EMISSIONS, AND WATER IMPACTS Prepared For be divided into two parts: · Well-to-Tank (WTT) Feedstock extraction, transport, storage, processing, distribution, transport, and storage · Tank-to-Wheels (TTW) Refueling, consumption and evaporation The full

320

Hydrogen Storage Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

storing hydrogen include: Physical storage of compressed hydrogen gas in high pressure tanks (up to 700 bar) Physical storage of cryogenic liquid hydrogen (cooled to -253C, at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heater CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater Prototype
Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater Prototype Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab...

322

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 127: Areas 25 and 26 Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of recommended corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 127: Areas 25 and 26 Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 127 consists of twelve corrective action sites (CASs). Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from February 24, 2003, through May 2, 2003, with additional sampling conducted on June 6, 2003, June 9, 2003, and June 24, 2003. Analytes detected during these investigation activities were evaluated against preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern (COCs) for each CAS, resulting in the determination that only two of the CASs did not have COCs exceeding regulatory levels. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following alternatives were developed for consideration: (1) No Further Action is the preferred corrective action for the two CASs (25-02-13, 26-02-01) identified with no COCs; (2) Clean Closure is the preferred corrective action for eight of the CASs (25-01-05, 25-23-11, 25-12-01, 25-01-06, 26-01-01, 26-01-02, 26-99-01, 26-23-01); and (3) Closure in Place is the preferred corrective action for the remaining two CASs (25-01-07, 25-02-02). These three alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. Additionally, these alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites at CAU 127 and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

Oil and Gas Air Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Heating technologies for energy efficiency Vol.III-1-2 Oil and Gas Air Heaters1 Guangxiao Kou Hanqing Wang Jiemin Zhou Doctoral Ph.D Ph.D Candidate Professor Professor Hunan University of Technology Hunan...

Kou, G.; Wang, H.; Zhou, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

SLOSHING OF LIQUIDS IN RIGID ANNULAR CYLINDRICAL AND TORUS TANKS DUE TO SEISMIC GROUND MOTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response of water in annular tank model of water = 1 underof Fixed-Base Liquid Storage Tank,'' U.S. , Japan Seminar onSloshing in Axisymmetric Tanks, 11 Ph.D. Dissertation,

Aslam, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermal buckling of metal oil tanks subject to an adjacent fire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire is one of the main hazards associated with storage tanks containing flammable liquids. These tanks are usually closely spaced and in large groups, so where a petroleum fire occurs, adjacent tanks are susceptible to ...

Liu, Ying

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Thermal buckling of metal oil tanks subject to an adjacent fire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire is one of the main hazards associated with storage tanks containing flammable liquids. These tanks are usually closely spaced and in large groups, so where a petroleum fire occurs, adjacent tanks are susceptible to ...

Liu, Ying

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges Brian A. PowellThe underground storage tanks at the Hanford site containtime, the material in the tanks has stratified to produce a

Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Solar Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Swimming Pool Heaters Swimming Pool Heaters Solar Swimming Pool Heaters May 29, 2012 - 6:03pm Addthis An example of a solar pool heater. An example of a solar pool heater. You can significantly reduce swimming pool heating costs by installing a solar pool heater. They're cost competitive with both gas and heat pump pool heaters, and they have very low annual operating costs. Actually, solar pool heating is the most cost-effective use of solar energy in many climates. How They Work Most solar pool heating systems include the following: A solar collector -- the device through which pool water is circulated to be heated by the sun A filter -- removes debris before water is pumped through the collector A pump -- circulates water through the filter and collector and back to the pool A flow control valve -- automatic or manual device that diverts pool

329

Solar Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Solar Swimming Pool Heaters May 29, 2012 - 6:03pm Addthis An example of a solar pool heater. An example of a solar pool heater. You can significantly reduce swimming pool heating costs by installing a solar pool heater. They're cost competitive with both gas and heat pump pool heaters, and they have very low annual operating costs. Actually, solar pool heating is the most cost-effective use of solar energy in many climates. How They Work Most solar pool heating systems include the following: A solar collector -- the device through which pool water is circulated to be heated by the sun A filter -- removes debris before water is pumped through the collector A pump -- circulates water through the filter and collector and back to the pool

330

Chapter 18 - Tanks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter describes the tank's vapor formation rate. When sizing the vapor piping for a manifold expansion roof tank system, the rate of vapor formation must be known. While the rate of vapor formation can be computed by longhand methods, the calculation is tedious and takes much valuable time. The chapter also explains the hand-held calculator program that simplifies dike computations. Earthen dikes are widely used all over the world to contain flammable volumes of above-ground storage. They perform two vital functions: to prevent loss of fluid into the environment and to reduce the likelihood of fire spreading from one tank to another. Sizing dikes by conventional methods is a time-consuming, trial-and-error process. A complete assessment of the problem involves: applicable codes and regulations; land area available; topography of the area; soil characteristics; and the stipulated volume contained by dike and other dimensions of the dike section.

E.W. McAllister

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Tank Closure  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Closure Closure Sherri Ross Waste Removal and Tank Closure Waste Disposition Project Programs Division Savannah River Operations Office Presentation to the DOE HLW Corporate Board 2  Overview and Status of SRS Tank Closure Program  Issues/Challenges  Communications  Schedule Performance  Ceasing Waste Removal  Compliance with SC Water Protection Standards  Questions? Topics 3 Overview of SRS Tank Closure Program  Two Tank Farms - F Area and H Area  Permitted by SC as Industrial Wastewater Facilities under the Pollution Control Act  Three agency Federal Facility Agreement (FFA)  DOE, SCDHEC, and EPA  51 Tanks  24 old style tanks (Types I, II and IV)  Do not have full secondary containment  FFA commitments to close by 2022  2 closed in 1997

332

Welding shield for coupling heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

Menotti, James Louis (Dickinson, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

Regenerative Boiler Feedwater Heater Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGENERATIVE BOILER FEEDWATER HEATER ECONOMICS William L. Viar, PE waterland, Viar & Associates, Inc. Wilmington, Delaware ABSTRACT The basic Rankine Vapor Cycle has been r,~peatedly modified to improve efficiency. Always, the objective....g., first and second laws of thermodynamics) have improved and contributed to the evolution. The demands for larger systems with higher performance have been persistent. Progress i ve changes in the app1icat ion of the fundamental Rankine cycle have...

Viar, W. L.

334

Addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: 25-25-09, Spill H940825C (from UST 25-3101-1) 25-25-14, Spill H940314E (from UST 25-3102-3) 25-25-15, Spill H941020E (from UST 25-3152-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Addendum 2 to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: 12-25-08, Spill H950524F (from UST 12-B-1) 12-25-10, Spill H950919A (from UST 12-COMM-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

BEHAVIOUR OF A HIGHLY PRESSURISED TANK OF GHz, SUBMITTED TO A THERMAL OR MECHANICAL IMPACT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000-41 BEHAVIOUR OF A HIGHLY PRESSURISED TANK OF GHz, SUBMITTED TO A THERMAL OR MECHANICAL IMPACT will significantly reduce the volume of the necessary tank(s). Whatever this pressure and whatever the volume of the tank(s), the storage System must be designed in such a way that the consequences of an accident

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

337

004.29.2010 | Presented by Joe Wong, P.Eng. DOE Tank Safety Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

004.29.2010 | Presented by Joe Wong, P.Eng. DOE Tank Safety Workshop Hydrogen Tank Safety Testing Discuss CNG Field Performance Data Discuss Safety Testing of Type 4 Tanks Current work to support Codes & Standards Development #12;3 Storage Tank Technologies 4 basic types of tank designs Type 1 ­ all metal

338

Performance improvement of direct- and indirect-fired heaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operating performance of direct and indirect heaters is discussed, and principles and guidelines that can be applied to effect improvements in efficiency are presented. This paper also discusses the associated heater efficiencies and several useful operating techniques to approach the maximum, steady-state heater efficiency. The techniques presented apply to all types of direct-and indirect-fired heaters: salt bath heaters, propane vaporizers, heater/treaters, production heaters, and glycol and amine regenerators.

Sams, G.W.; Hunter, J.D.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Adjusting alloy compositions for selected properties in temperature limited heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Such heaters can be obtained by using the systems and methods described herein. The heater includes a heater section including iron, cobalt, and carbon. The heater section has a Curie temperature less than a phase transformation temperature. The Curie temperature is at least 740.degree. C. The heater section provides, when time varying current is applied to the heater section, an electrical resistance.

Brady; Michael Patrick (Oak Ridge, TN), Horton, Jr.; Joseph Arno (Oak Ridge, TN), Vitek; John Michael (Oak Ridge, TN)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Radionuclide Releases During Normal Operations for Ventilated Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculation estimates the design emissions of radionuclides from Ventilated Tanks used by various facilities. The calculation includes emissions due to processing and storage of radionuclide material.

Blunt, B.

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CO2 Conversion By Nano Heaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A graduate student named Oshadha Ranasingha created this animation on the research he performed on nano heaters while working at NETL.

None

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CO 2 Heat Pump Water Heater 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Evaporator Kyle Gluesenkamp, gluesenkampk@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline:...

343

CO2 Conversion By Nano Heaters  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A graduate student named Oshadha Ranasingha created this animation on the research he performed on nano heaters while working at NETL.

None

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

344

Parallel heater system for subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

345

Combustion heater for oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650 to 700/sup 0/C for use as a process heat source.

Mallon, R.; Walton, O.; Lewis, A.E.; Braun, R.

1983-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

Combustion heater for oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustion heater for oil shale heats particles of spent oil shale containing unburned char by burning the char. A delayed fall is produced by flowing the shale particles down through a stack of downwardly sloped overlapping baffles alternately extending from opposite sides of a vertical column. The delayed fall and flow reversal occurring in passing from each baffle to the next increase the residence time and increase the contact of the oil shale particles with combustion supporting gas flowed across the column to heat the shale to about 650.degree.-700.degree. C. for use as a process heat source.

Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Otis R. (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Braun, Robert L. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing Mark Leavitt Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide, Inc. August 11, 2011 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information History of Innovations... Announced breakthrough in all-composite lightweight, high capacity, low-cost fuel storage technologies. * Developed a series of robust, OEM compatible electronic control products. Developed H 2 storage system for SunLine Tran-sit Hythane® bus. Awarded patent for integrated module including in-tank regulator * Developed high efficiency H 2 fuel storage systems for DOE Future Truck programs Developed H 2 storage and metering system for Toyota's FCEV platform. First to certify 10,000 psi systems in Japan

348

A Study on the Failure of Industrial Electric Heater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The break down mechanism of a cylindrical electric heater is investigated by studying the uneven heating behavior of the heater by measuring the surface temperature variation of the heater when it is subjected to a boundary condition of constant...

Chyu, M. C.

349

Heat Pump Water Heaters and American Homes: A Good Fit?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.V. Lapsa. 2001. Residential Heat Pump Water Heater (HPWH)Calwell. 2005. Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters: EnergyA Specification for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters

Franco, Victor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

351

Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Gas Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For many buildings that do not require space cooling, non-centralized equipment such as unit heaters provide space heating to building occupants. Unit heaters are a major source of energy use nationally, accounting for nearly 18% of primary space heating energy use for commercial buildings, and most prominently appear in warehouses, distribution centers, loading docks, etc.

352

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

353

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity as of September...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

capacity and also allows for tracking seasonal shifts in petroleum product usage of tanks and underground storage. Using the new storage capacity data, it will be possible to...

354

Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of interest for further development into viable storage systems. High pressure hydrogen tanks, systems that store hydrogen in a cryocompressed state, or liquid hydrogen storage...

355

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Advances made in rechargeable solid hydrogen fuel storage tanks. March 21, 2012 Field experiments on the Alamosa Canyon...

356

Mathematical modelling of a metal hydride hydrogen storage system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In order for metal hydride hydrogen storage systems to compete with existing energy storage technology, such as gasoline tanks and batteries, it is important to (more)

MacDonald, Brendan David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Bass, Ronald Marshall (Houston, TX); Kim, Dong Sub (Sugar Land, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX); Keltner, Thomas Joseph (Spring, TX); Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon (Houston, TX)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

358

Department of Energy Workshop High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy Workshop High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing Mark Leavitt Quantum Fuel for integrated module including in-tank regulator · Developed high efficiency H2 fuel storage systems for DOE tank efficiency, the highest weight efficiency ever demonstrated, in partnership with Lawrence

359

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater - 2013 Peer Review | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater - 2013 Peer Review Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater - 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's...

360

Residential Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Pump Water Heater Residential Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Photo credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Photo credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Diagram of absorption heat...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and...

362

Efficient Residential Water Heaters Webinar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Weatherization Assistance Program Pilot Projects Efficient Residential Water Heaters Webinar Efficient Residential Water Heaters Webinar On Feb. 22, 2011, Jerone Gagliano,...

363

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT...

364

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.4 Water Heaters  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 Water Heater Efficiencies 2005 2010 Efficiency Stock Minimum Best-Available Residential Type Parameter (1) Efficiency New Efficiency New Efficiency Electric Storage EF 0.90 0.90 (2) 0.95 (2) Electric Instantaneous EF 0.82 0.82 0.98 Electric Heat Pump EF 2.00 2.00 2.35 Gas-Fired Storage EF 0.60 0.59 (3) 0.85 (3) Gas-Fired Instantaneous EF 0.82 0.82 0.98 Oil-Fired Storage EF 0.50 0.53 (4) 0.68 (4) Solar SEF 2.50 N.A. 2.50 2007 2010 Efficiency Stock Minimum Best-Available Commercial Type Parameter (1) Efficiency New Efficiency New Efficiency Electric Storage Thermal Efficiency 0.98 0.98 (5) 0.98 (5) Electric Instantaneous Thermal Efficiency 0.98 0.98 0.98 Gas-Fired Storage Thermal Efficiency 0.78 0.80 (6) 0.96 (6) Gas-Fired Instantaneous Thermal Efficiency 0.77 0.80 0.85 Oil-Fired Storage Thermal Efficiency 0.79 0.78 (7) 0.85 (7) Note(s):

365

Tank Farms and Waste Feed Delivery - 12507  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Our discussion of the Tank Farms and Waste Feed Delivery will cover progress made to date with Base and Recovery Act funding in reducing the risk posed by tank waste and in preparing for the initiation of waste treatment at Hanford. The millions of gallons of waste are a by-product of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. The underground storage tanks range in capacity from 55,000 gallons to more than 1 million gallons. The tanks were constructed with carbon steel and reinforced concrete. There are eighteen groups of tanks, called 'tank farms', some having as few as two tanks and others up to sixteen tanks. Between 1943 and 1964, 149 single-shell tanks were built at Hanford in the 200 West and East Areas. Heat generated by the waste and the composition of the waste caused an estimated 67 of these single-shell tanks to leak into the ground. Washington River Protection Solutions is the prime contractor responsible for the safe management of this waste. WRPS' mission is to reduce the risk to the environment that is posed by the waste. All of the pumpable liquids have been removed from the single-shell tanks and transferred to the double-shell tanks. What remains in the single-shell tanks are solid and semi-solid wastes. Known as salt-cakes, they have the consistency of wet beach sand. Some of the waste resembles small broken ice, or whitish crystals. Because the original pumps inside the tanks were designed to remove only liquid waste, other methods have been developed to reach the remaining waste. Access to the tank waste is through long, typically skinny pipes, called risers, extending out of the tanks. It is through these pipes that crews are forced to send machines and devices into the tanks that are used to break up the waste or push it toward a pump. These pipes range in size from just a few inches to just over a foot in diameter because they were never intended to be used in this manner. As part of the agreement regulating Hanford cleanup, crews must remove at least 99% of the material in every tank on the site, or at least as much waste that can be removed based on available technology. To date, seven single-shell tanks have been emptied, and work is underway in another 10 tanks in preparation for additional retrieval activities. Two barriers have been installed over single-shell tanks to prevent the intrusion of surface water down to the tanks, with additional barriers planned for the future. Single and double-shell tank integrity analyses are ongoing. Because the volume of the waste generated through plutonium production exceeded the capacity of the single-shell tanks, between 1968 and 1986 Hanford engineers built 28 double-shell tanks. These tanks were studied and made with a second shell to surround the carbon steel and reinforced concrete. The double-shell tanks have not leaked any of their waste. (authors)

Fletcher, Thomas; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Integration of remediation strategy with waste management capabilities and regulatory drivers for radioactive waste storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the plans and strategies for remediation of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system tanks that have been removed from service at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), the EPA-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA is January 1, 1992. One requirement of the FFA is that LLLW tanks that are removed from service must be evaluated and remediated through the CERCLA process. The Environmental Restoration Program intends to meet this requirement by using a {open_quotes}streamlined{close_quote} approach for selected tanks. This approach will combine the CERCLA Site Investigation. Remedial Action, Feasibility Study, and Proposed Plan requirements into a single Interim Proposed Plan document. This streamlined approach is expected to reduce the time required to complete the regulatory process while attaining acceptable risk reduction in a cost-effective way.

Baxter, J.T. [H& R Technical Associates, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hepworth, H.K. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Hooyman, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Residential Water Heater and Certain Commercial Water Heater Test Procedures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy has published a notice of proposed rulemaking regarding test procedures for residential water heaters and certain commercial water heaters.

368

Development of a cogenerating thermophotovoltaic powered combination hot water heater/hydronic boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cogenerating thermophotovoltaic (TPV) device for hot water hydronic space heating and electric power generation was developed designed fabricated and tested under a Department of Energy contracted program. The device utilizes a cylindrical ytterbia superemissive ceramic fiber burner (SCFB) and is designed for a nominal capacity of 80 kBtu/hr. The burner is fired with premixed natural gas and air. Narrow band emission from the SCFB is converted to electricity by single crystal silicon (Si) photovoltaic (PV) arrays arranged concentrically around the burner. A three-way mixing valve is used to direct heated water to either the portable water storage tank radiant baseboard heaters or both. As part of this program QGI developed a microprocessor-based control system to address the safety issues as well as photovoltaic power management. Flame sensing is accomplished via the photovoltaics a technology borrowed from QGIs Quantum Control safety shut-off system. Device testing demonstrated a nominal photovoltaic power output of 200 W. Power consumed during steady state operation was 33 W with power drawn from the combustion air blower hydronic system pump three-way switching valve and the control system resulting in a net power surplus of 142 W. Power drawn during the ignition sequence was 55 W and a battery recharge time of 1 minute 30 seconds was recorded. System efficiency was measured and found to be more than 83%. Pollutant emissions at determined operating conditions were below the South Coast Air Quality Management Districts (California) limit of 40 ng/J for NOx and carbon monoxide emissions were measured at less than 50 dppm.

Aleksandr S. Kushch; Steven M. Skinner; Richard Brennan; Pedro A. Sarmiento

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

1992 CBECS User-Needs Study  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

HEATERS ..... 4 5. WITH INSTANTANEOUS HEATERS AT POINT OF USE (NO HOT WATER STORAGE TANKS) ... 5 6. OTHER TYPE OF DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ... 6 SPECIFY...

370

Dual Tank Fuel System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

Wagner, Richard William (Albion, NY); Burkhard, James Frank (Churchville, NY); Dauer, Kenneth John (Avon, NY)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters June 14, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. What does this mean for me? Estimate the annual operating costs and compare several water heaters to determine whether it is worth investing in a more efficient

372

Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980, but its thermal solar and storage systems received achiller. A 30 m heat storage tank solar decouples heatfacility with thermal storage and solar- assisted HVAC for

Mammoli, Andrea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

River Protection Project (RPP) Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal Mission Technical Baseline Summary Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is one of the several documents prepared by Lockheed Martin Hanford Corp. to support the U. S. Department of Energy's Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal mission at Hanford. The Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal mission includes the programs necessary to support tank waste retrieval; waste feed, delivery, storage, and disposal of immobilized waste; and closure of the tank farms.

DOVALLE, O.R.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the US Jeff Maguire 4/30/13 Outline * Why HPWHs? * US Water Heating Market * Overview of HPWHs * Model Description * Results o HPWH Performance o Energy Savings Potential o Breakeven Cost 2 Heat Pump Water Heaters Save $300 a year over standard electric? Save $100 a year over standard gas? Heat Pump Electric Gas 3 Questions about HPWHs * Are HPWHs a good replacement for typical gas and electric storage water heaters? o In different locations across the country? o In conditioned/unconditioned space? o Source energy savings?

375

Tankless Water Heaters: Do They Really Work?  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tankless Water Heaters: Do They Tankless Water Heaters: Do They Really Work? Center for Energy and Environment, NorthernSTAR, Ben Schoenbauer Context * Domestic Water Heating is the next big residential energy in efficiency. - Space heating loads are being reduced - Largest peak load in almost all homes is water heating - Annual water heating load is larger than annual space heating load in many homes - Most DHW equipment is inefficiency 50-60% Technical Approach * TWHs and condensing TWHs have significant energy savings potential - Do these ratings relate to real world performance? - How do TWHs compare to standard water heaters? - What performance/install issues do they have? * 10 home 26 water heater alternating mode field study was conducted Recommended Guidance * In situations where economics are

376

Heater head for a Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A heater head is described for a compound Stirling engine modules, each including a displacer cylinder coaxially aligned with the displacer cylinder of the other of the engine modules, a displacer piston mounted for reciprocation in the displacer cylinder.

Darooka, D.K.

1988-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

377

Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

378

Heat Pump Water Heaters Demonstration Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heat Pump Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Demonstration Project Building America Stakeholder Meeting Ron Domitrovic Ammi Amarnath 3/1/2012 Austin, TX 2 © 2011 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. HPWH Field Demonstration: Research Objectives * Assess heat pump water heater technology by measuring efficiency. * Provide credible data on the performance and reliability of heat pump water heaters. * Assess user satisfaction in a residential setting. 3 © 2011 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. Demonstration Host Utilities Target: 40 Units per Utility Installed and Potential Sites by Climate Zone Source: Department of Energy (DOE), Building America climate regions 4 © 2011 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. Installation Locations-Southern Company Region

379

Varying properties along lengths of temperature limited heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes an elongated heater in an opening in the formation. The elongated heater includes two or more portions along the length of the heater that have different power outputs. At least one portion of the elongated heater includes at least one temperature limited portion with at least one selected temperature at which the portion provides a reduced heat output. The heater is configured to provide heat to the formation with the different power outputs. The heater is configured so that the heater heats one or more portions of the formation at one or more selected heating rates.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Ginestra, Jean Charles (Richmond, TX)

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hot water tank for use with a combination of solar energy and heat-pump desuperheating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water heater or system is described which includes a hot water tank having disposed therein a movable baffle to function as a barrier between the incoming volume of cold water entering the tank and the volume of heated water entering the tank which is heated by the circulation of the cold water through a solar collector and/or a desuperheater of a heat pump so as to optimize the manner in which heat is imparted to the water in accordance to the demand on the water heater or system. A supplemental heater is also provided and it is connected so as to supplement the heating of the water in the event that the solar collector and/or desuperheater cannot impart all of the desired heat input into the water.

Andrews, J.W.

1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Diesel particulate filter with zoned resistive heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A diesel particulate filter assembly comprises a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a heater assembly. The DPF filters a particulate from exhaust produced by an engine. The heater assembly has a first metallic layer that is applied to the DPF, a resistive layer that is applied to the first metallic layer, and a second metallic layer that is applied to the resistive layer. The second metallic layer is etched to form a plurality of zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

Reducing NOx in Fired Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6, 2000 Reducing NOx in Fired Heaters Air Pollution Control and Boilers Keeping the environment clean Presented by Ashutosh Garg Furnace Improvements Low cost solutions for fired heaters Trace compounds ? Nitric oxides ? Carbon monoxide ? Sulfur... it is essential to estimate accurately baseline NOx emissions. ? This will establish each units current compliance status. ? Emissions ? Current excess air level ? Carbon monoxide ? Combustibles ? NOx corrected to 3% 02 314 ESL-IE-00-04-46 Proceedings...

Garg, A.

383

Selecting a New Water Heater | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Selecting a New Water Heater Selecting a New Water Heater Selecting a New Water Heater August 29, 2012 - 7:30pm Addthis Water heater testing facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water heater testing facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When selecting a new water heater for your home, choose a water heating system that will not only provide enough hot water but also that will do so energy efficiently, saving you money. This includes considering the different types of water heaters available and determining the right size and fuel source for your home. Check out the Energy Saver 101: Water Heating infographic to learn more about the different types of water heaters and how to select the right model for your home. Types of Water Heaters It's a good idea to know the different types of water heaters available

384

Chemical composition of Hanford Tank SY-102  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of the radioactive waste, both current and future, stored in double-shell and single-shell tanks at the Hanford sites. One major program element in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal using the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. In support of this program, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a conceptual process flow sheet which will remediate the entire contents of a selected double-shelled underground waste tank, including supernatant and sludge, into forms that allow storage and final disposal in a safe, cost-effective and environmentally sound manner. The specific tank selected for remediation is 241-SY-102 located in the 200 West Area. As part of the flow sheet development effort, the composition of the tank was defined and documented. This database was built by examining the history of liquid waste transfers to the tank and by performing careful analysis of all of the analytical data that have been gathered during the tank`s lifetime. In order to more completely understand the variances in analytical results, material and charge balances were done to help define the chemistry of the various components in the tank. This methodology of defining the tank composition and the final results are documented in this report.

Birnbaum, E.; Agnew, S.; Jarvinen, G.; Yarbro, S.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Safety criteria for organic watch list tanks at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews the hazards associated with the storage of organic complexant salts in Hanford Site high-level waste single- shell tanks. The results of this analysis were used to categorize tank wastes as safe, unconditionally safe, or unsafe. Sufficient data were available to categorize 67 tanks; 63 tanks were categorized as safe, and four tanks were categorized as conditionally safe. No tanks were categorized as unsafe. The remaining 82 SSTs lack sufficient data to be categorized.Historic tank data and an analysis of variance model were used to prioritize the remaining tanks for characterization.

Meacham, J.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

387

Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the National Hydrogen Storage Project. For compressed hydrogen, lightweight composite tanks with high pressure ratings (10,000 psi) and conformability are being developed. For...

388

Feed tank transfer requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1998-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

389

Light duty utility arm deployment in Hanford tank T-106  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An existing gap in the technology for the remediation of underground waste storage tanks filled by the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. On September 27 and 30, 1996, the LDUA System was deployed in underground storage tank T-106 at Hanford. The system performed successfully, satisfying all objectives of the in-tank operational test (hot test); performing close-up video inspection of features of tank dome, risers, and wall; and grasping and repositioning in-tank debris. The successful completion of hot testing at Hanford means that areas of tank structure and waste surface that were previously inaccessible are now within reach of remote tools for inspection, waste analysis, and small-scale retrieval. The LDUA System has become a new addition to the arsenal of technologies being applied to solve tank waste remediation challenges.

Kiebel, G.R.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

EIS-0189: Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), Richland, WA (Programmatic)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental impact statement evaluates the Department of Energy (DOE)'s, in cooperation with the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), decisions on how to properly manage and dispose of Hanford Site tank waste and encapsulated cesium and strontium to reduce existing and potential future risk to the public, Site workers, and the environment. The waste includes radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste currently stored in 177 underground storage tanks, approximately 60 other smaller active and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs), and additional Site waste likely to be added to the tank waste, which is part of the tank farm system. In addition, DOE proposes to manage and dispose of approximately 1,930 cesium and strontium capsules that are by-products of tank waste. The tank waste and capsules are located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

391

Redesigning experimental equipment for determining peak pressure in a simulated tank car transfer line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When liquids are transported from storage tanks to tank cars, improper order of valve openings can cause pressure surges in the transfer line. To model this phenomenon and predict the peak pressures in such a transfer line, ...

Diaz, Richard A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 3:03pm Addthis Illustration of a tankless coil water heater. The heater is box-shaped, and has two pipes sticking out one end: one a cold water inlet, and one a hot water outlet. These pipes lead into the heater to a cylindrical coil called a heat exchanger. Long tubes surrounding the heat exchanger are labeled the heated water jacket. At the bottom of the box is a row of small flames, called the boiler heat source. Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use a home or building's space heating system to heat water as part of an integrated or combination water and space heating system. How Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Work A tankless coil water heater uses a heating coil or heat exchanger

393

Supplemental design requirements document, Multifunction Waste Tank Facility, Project W-236A. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) consists of four, nominal 1 million gallon, underground double-shell tanks, located in the 200-East area, and two tanks of the same capacity in the 200-West area. MWTF will provide environmentally safe storage capacity for wastes generated during remediation/retrieval activities of existing waste storage tanks. This document delineates in detail the information to be used for effective implementation of the Functional Design Criteria requirements.

Groth, B.D.

1995-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

394

High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Karthik Subramanian Bruce Wiersma November 2008 High Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting karthik.subramanian@srnl.doe.gov bruce.wiersma@srnl.doe.gov 2 Acknowledgements * Bruce Wiersma (SRNL) * Kayle Boomer (Hanford) * Michael T. Terry (Facilitator) * SRS - Liquid Waste Organization * Hanford Tank Farms * DOE-EM 3 Background * High level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks provide critical interim confinement for waste prior to processing and permanent disposal * Maintaining structural integrity (SI) of the tanks is a critical component of operations 4 Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 * Discuss the HLW tank integrity technology needs based upon the evolving waste processing and tank closure requirements along with its continued storage mission

395

Temperature limited heaters using phase transformation of ferromagnetic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Systems and methods for making heaters are described herein. At least one heater includes a ferromagnetic conductor and an electrical conductor. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the ferromagnetic conductor. The heater provides a first amount of heat at a lower temperature. The heater may provide a second reduced amount of heat when the heater reaches a selected temperature, or enters a selected temperature range, at which the ferromagnetic conductor undergoes a phase transformation.

Vitek, John Michael [Oak Ridge, TN; Brady, Michael Patrick [Oak Ridge, TN

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

396

MHD oxidant intermediate temperature ceramic heater study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of three types of directly fired ceramic heaters for preheating oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1144K was investigated. The three types of ceramic heaters are: (1) a fixed bed, periodic flow ceramic brick regenerative heater (2) a ceramic pebble regenerative heater. The heater design, performance and operating characteristics under conditions in which the particulate matter is not solidified are evaluated. A comparison and overall evaluation of the three types of ceramic heaters and temperature range determination at which the particulate matter in the MHD exhaust gas is estimated to be a dry powder are presented.

Carlson, A.W.; Chait, I.L.; Saari, D.P.; Marksberry, C.L.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Weaver, Phyllis C.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for May 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Double shell tank waste analysis plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste analysis plan for the double shell tanks. SD-WM-EV-053 is Superseding SD-WM-EV-057.This document provides the plan for obtaining information needed for the safe waste handling and storage of waste in the Double Shell Tank Systems. In Particular it addresses analysis necessary to manage waste according to Washington Administrative Code 173-303 and Title 40, parts 264 and 265 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

Mulkey, C.H.; Jones, J.M.

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste.

WEISS, E.V.

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydrogen Tank Testing R&D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

04.29.2010 | Presented by Joe Wong, P.Eng. 04.29.2010 | Presented by Joe Wong, P.Eng. DOE Tank Safety Workshop Hydrogen Tank Safety Testing 1 POWERTECH - Hydrogen & CNG Services  Certification testing of individual high pressure components  Design Verification, Performance, End-of-Life testing of complete fuel systems  Design, construction, and operation of Hydrogen Fill Stations  Safety Studies  Standards Development 2 PRESENTATION  Discuss CNG Field Performance Data  Discuss Safety Testing of Type 4 Tanks  Current work to support Codes & Standards Development 3 Storage Tank Technologies 4 basic types of tank designs  Type 1 - all metal  Type 2 - metal liner with hoop wrapped composite  Type 3 - metal liner with fully wrapped composite  Type 4 - Plastic liner with

402

Combined Systems with Tankless Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combined Systems with Tankless Water Heaters Combined Systems with Tankless Water Heaters Armin Rudd Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas 2 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas More builder's wanting to use gas-fired tankless water heaters, and with solar pre-heat  Endless hot water  Helps HERS Index  Space saving 2 3 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Problem with elevated TWH inlet temperature 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 5.5 6 Maximum Inlet Temperature (F) DHW flow rate (gpm) Maximum TWH inlet temperature to stay below 125 F delivered temperature, with 15 kBtu/h minimum firing rate Typical shower temperature 4 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting

403

Solar Water Heater Rebate | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar Water Heater Rebate Solar Water Heater Rebate Solar Water Heater Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State Hawaii Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Solar Water Heating: $1,000 upfront, or Residential Solar Water Heating Interest Loan Buy-Down: $1,000 Residential Solar Attic Fans: $50 Commercial: $250 per 12,000 Btu/hr derated capacity Provider Hawaii Energy Hawaii Energy, a third-party administered public benefits fund, provides incentives for energy efficiency and conservation to customers of the Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) and its subsidiaries, Maui Electric Company (MECO) and Hawaii Electric Light Company (HELCO). This incentive is available for installations on the islands of Oahu, Hawaii, Maui, Lanai and

404

Type I Tanks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I Tanks I Tanks * 12 Type I tanks were built between 1951-53 * 750,000 gallon capacity; 75 feet in diameter by 24 ½ feet high * Partial secondary containment with leak detection * Contain approximately 10 percent of the waste volume * 7 Type I tanks have leaked waste into the tank annulus; the amount of waste stored in these tanks is kept below the known leak sites that have appeared over the decades of

405

ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original intent of the contract, the focus remains on the RTIEE.

Rachel Landry

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive hydrogen storage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy, Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization ; Renewable Energy 2 Hydrogen Composite Tank...

407

Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HVAC and Water Heater HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research

408

Heat Pump Water Heater using Solid-State Energy Converters |...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Heat Pump Water Heater using Solid-State Energy Converters Heat Pump Water Heater using Solid-State Energy Converters Sheetak will work on developing a full scale prototype of its...

409

Design, Stress Analysis and Operating Experience in Feedwater Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of feedwater heaters has a direct bearing on the thermal efficiency of the plant. A typical feedwater heater may have three distinct regions of heat transfer, namely desuperheating, condensing and subcooling zones. The design...

Singh, K. P.; Libs, T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right Water Heater Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The TVA energy right Water Heater Plan promotes the installation of high efficiency water heaters in homes and small businesses. TVA provides a $50 incentive to local power companies for each...

411

TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right Water Heater Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right Water Heater Plan promotes the installation of high efficiency water heaters in homes and small businesses. TVA provides a $50 incentive to local...

412

Making Water Heaters More Efficient | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Heaters More Efficient Making Water Heaters More Efficient Jigar Shah 2013.11.13 As children, many of us grow up wanting to make some sort of lasting positive impact on...

413

UNIT NUMBER SWMU 133 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Storaae Tank  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

33 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Storaae Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately south of C-611 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: Unknown FUNCTION: Possible Diesel Storage...

414

Addendum to the corrective action plan for Underground Storage Tanks 1219-U, 1222-U, 2082-U, 2068-U at the Rust Garage Facility, Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1: Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID {number_sign}0-010117  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document represents an addendum to the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for underground storage tanks 1219-U, 2082-U, and 2068-U located at Buildings 9720-15 and 9754-1, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The site of the four underground storage tanks is commonly referred to as the Rust Garage Facility. The original CAP was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review in May 1992. During the time period after submission of the original CAP for the Rust Garage Facility, Y-12 Plant Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program personnel continued to evaluate improvements that would optimize resources and expedite the activities schedule presented in the original CAP. Based on these determinations, several revisions to the original corrective action process options for remediation of contaminated soils are proposed. The revised approach will involve excavation of the soils from the impacted areas, on-site thermal desorption of soil contaminants, and final disposition of the treated soils by backfilling into the subject site excavations. Based on evaluation of the corrective actions with regard to groundwater, remediation of groundwater under the Y-12 Plant CERCLA Program is proposed for the facility.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

NREL Evaluates Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones.

Not Available

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial gas water heaters, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

417

Tanks Focus Area annual report FY2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation effort with tanks containing hazardous and radioactive waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials. With some 90 million gallons of waste in the form of solid, sludge, liquid, and gas stored in 287 tanks across the DOE complex, containing approximately 650 million curies, radioactive waste storage tank remediation is the nation's highest cleanup priority. Differing waste types and unique technical issues require specialized science and technology to achieve tank cleanup in an environmentally acceptable manner. Some of the waste has been stored for over 50 years in tanks that have exceeded their design lives. The challenge is to characterize and maintain these contents in a safe condition and continue to remediate and close each tank to minimize the risks of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. In 1994, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) created a group of integrated, multiorganizational teams focusing on specific areas of the EM cleanup mission. These teams have evolved into five focus areas managed within EM's Office of Science and Technology (OST): Tanks Focus Area (TFA); Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area; Nuclear Materials Focus Area; Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area; and Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Application of infrared imaging in ferrocyanide tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the feasibility of using infrared imaging techniques and scanning equipment to detect potential hot spots within ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. A hot spot is defined as a volumetric region within a waste tank with an excessively warm temperature that is generated by radioactive isotopes. The thermal image of a hot spot was modeled by computer. this model determined the image an IR system must detect. Laboratory and field tests of the imaging system are described, and conclusions based on laboratory and field data are presented. The report shows that infrared imaging is capable of detecting hot spots in ferrocyanide waste tanks with depths of up to 3.94 m (155 in.). The infrared imaging system is a useful technology for initial evaluation and assessment of hot spots in the majority of ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The system will not allow an exact hot spot and temperature determination, but it will provide the necessary information to determine the worst-case hot spot detected in temperature patterns. Ferrocyanide tanks are one type of storage tank on the Watch List. These tanks are identified as priority 1 Hanford Site Tank farm Safety Issues.

Morris, K.L.; Mailhot, R.B. Jr.; McLaren, J.M.; Morris, K.L.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

419

Appendix E: Underground Storage Annual Site Environmental Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix E: Underground Storage Tank Data #12;Annual Site Environmental Report Appendix E identification service Contents Status ( ) date to Corrective action Tank Out-of- assessment number date regulatory Installation Capacity Preliminary date (gallons) investigation Environmental agency Petroleum USTs

Pennycook, Steve

420

LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) of Parabolic Trough CSP: Materials Inventory and Embodied GHG Emissions from Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline Thermal Storage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Burkhardt, J.; Turchi, C.; Decker, T.; Kutscher, C.

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stayed constant. Total Energy Use Global Warming Potential1. Total Energy Use: Northern California Global Warming2. Total Energy Use: Southern California Global Warming

Lu, Alison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tubesheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tubesheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tubesheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch therebetween. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Johnson, F. Thomas (Baldwin Boro, PA); Orr, Richard S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BY-104  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This characterization report summarizes the available information on the historical uses, current status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste contained in underground storage tank 241-BY-104. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09. Tank 241-BY-104 is one of 12 single-shell tanks located in the BY-Tank Farm in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Tank 241-BY-104 entered service in the first quarter of 1950 with a transfer of metal waste from an unknown source. Through cascading, the tank was full of metal waste by the second quarter of 1951. The waste was sluiced in the second quarter of 1954. Uranium recovery (tributyl phosphate) waste was sent from tank 241-BY-107 during the second quarter of 1955 and from tank 241-BY-110 during the third quarter of 1955. Most of this waste was sent to a crib during the fourth quarter of 1955. During the third and fourth quarters of 1956 and the second and third quarters of 1957, the tank received waste from the in-plant ferrocyanide scavenging process (PFeCN2) from tanks 241-BY-106, -107, -108, and -110. This waste type is predicted to compose the bottom layer of waste currently in the tank. The tank received PUREX cladding waste (CWP) periodically from 1961 to 1968. Ion-exchange waste from cesium recovery operations was received from tank 241-BX-104 during the second and third quarters of 1968. Tank 241-BY-104 received evaporator bottoms waste from the in-tank solidification process that was conducted in the BY-Tank Farm 0247from tanks 241 -BY- 109 and 241 -BY- 1 12 from 1970 to 1974. The upper portion of tank waste is predicted to be composed of BY saltcake. Tank 241-BY-104 was declared inactive in 1977. Waste was saltwell pumped from the tank during the third quarter of 1982 and the fourth quarter of 1985. Table ES-1 and Figure ES-1 describe tank 241-BY-104 and its status. The tank has an operating capacity of 2,869 kL and presently contains an estimated 1,234 kL of noncomplexed waste. Of this total volume, 568 kL are estimated to be sludge and 666 kL are estimated to be saltcake. The Hanlon values are not used because they are inconsistent with waste surface level measurements, and they will not be updated until the tank level stabilizes and the new surface photos are taken. This report summarizes the collection and analysis of two rotary-mode core samples obtained in October and November 1995 and reported in the Final Report for Tank 241-BY-104, Rotary Mode Cores 116 and 117. Cores 116 and 117 were obtained from risers 5 and IIA, respectively. The sampling event was performed to satisfy the requirements listed in the following documents: Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective , Data Requirements for the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue Developed through the Data Quality Objective Process, Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Fuel Rich Tank Safety Issue, Test Plan for Samples from Hanford Waste Tanks 241-BY-103, BY-104, BY-105, BY-106, BY-108, BY-110, YY-103, U-105, U-107, U-108, and U-109.

Benar, C.J.

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

424

Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and treat the waste remaining in 177 underground storage tanks; store the high-level radioactive waste (HLW); dispose of the low-activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford Site...

425

FAFCO Ice Storage test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. FAFCO provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The FAFCO ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank fully, storing from 150 to 200 ton-h. However, the charging rate showed significant variations during the latter portion of the charge cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate and tank state of charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend on both charge and discharge conditions. This report describes FAFCO system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. While the test results reported here are accurate for the prototype 1990 FAFCO Model 200, currently available FAFCO models incorporate significant design enhancements beyond the Model 200. At least one major modification was instituted as a direct result of the ISTF tests. Such design improvements were one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

Stovall, T.K.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single-phase model. The modeling results show that the flow patterns driven by four pump operation satisfy the solid suspension requirement, and the average solid concentration at the plane of the transfer pump inlet is about 12% higher than the tank average concentrations for the 70 inch tank level and about the same as the tank average value for the 29 inch liquid level. When one of the four pumps is not operated, the flow patterns are satisfied with the minimum suspension velocity criterion. However, the solid concentration near the tank bottom is increased by about 30%, although the average solid concentrations near the transfer pump inlet have about the same value as the four-pump baseline results. The flow pattern results show that although the two-pump case satisfies the minimum velocity requirement to suspend the sludge particles, it provides the marginal mixing results for the heavier or larger insoluble materials such as MST and KTPB particles. The results demonstrated that when more than one jet are aiming at the same position of the mixing tank domain, inefficient flow patterns are provided due to the highly localized momentum dissipation, resulting in inactive suspension zone. Thus, after completion of the indexed solids suspension, pump rotations are recommended to avoid producing the nonuniform flow patterns. It is noted that when tank liquid level is reduced from the highest level of 70 inches to the minimum level of 29 inches for a given number of operating pumps, the solid mixing efficiency becomes better since the ratio of the pump power to the mixing volume becomes larger. These results are consistent with the literature results.

Lee, S.

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right' Water Heater Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Right' Water Heater Program Right&#039; Water Heater Program TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right' Water Heater Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Utility Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Member utility water heater rebate programs can range from $25 to total cost. Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Efficient Water Heater: $50 from TVA Provider Tennessee Valley Authority The TVA energy right Water Heater Plan promotes the installation of high efficiency water heaters in homes and small businesses. TVA provides a $50 incentive to local power companies for each installation. Power Companies may pass these incentives on to customers. Customers should contact their local power company to see what programs are

428

Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1,500 Provider Rebates Burbank Water and Power is providing incentives for the purchase of solar water heaters. Incentives are only available to residential customers with electric water heaters. There is a limit of one solar water heater per year per property. Applicants must provide access to their residence for a pre-inspection to verify the existing use of an electric water heater. Customers must comply with all code and permit requirements. More

429

Advanced refinery process heater. Annual report, October 1983-September 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activity during the first year of this project has focused on the conceptual design of the prototype heater and on the development of a custom-designed Pyrocore ceramic fiber burner for the heater. Three different concepts for the prototype heater have been produced, one of them modeled after a vertical cylindrical design and the other two resembling box-type heaters. All three concepts take advantage of the Pyrocore burner's flameless characteristic to make the heater more compact. Concerning the development of the burners, two different geometries were considered. Subscale prototypes of each type of burner were fabricated and tested. The more successful burners used actively-cooled edges to maintain the integrity of the gas-tight seals. Work on this project in the second year will include the design and fabrication of the 10 MMBtu/hr prototype heater, using the most feasible heater and burner designs developed during the first year.

Schreiber, R.J.; Gotterba, J.A.; Minden, A.C.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Tank Farm Operations Surveillance Automation Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Operations Project Services identified the need to improve manual tank farm surveillance data collection, review, distribution and storage practices often referred to as Operator Rounds. This document provides the analysis in terms of feasibility to improve the manual data collection methods by using handheld computer units, barcode technology, a database for storage and acquisitions, associated software, and operational procedures to increase the efficiency of Operator Rounds associated with surveillance activities.

MARQUEZ, D.L.

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

431

Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Monitoring Field Evaluation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Monitoring Field Evaluation Jeff Maguire, Lieko Earle, and Chuck Booten National Renewable Energy Laboratory C.E. Hancock Mountain Energy Partnership Produced under direction of the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement CRD-05-168 and Task No WR49.3000. Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52234 October 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

432

Cryostat including heater to heat a target  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

1990-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

433

Tank characterization report: Tank 241-C-109  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-shell tank 241-C-109 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in September 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-109 were conducted to support the resolution of the ferrocyanide unreviewed safety question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and consent Order (Tri- Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. This report describes this analysis.

Simpson, B.C.; Borshiem, G.L.; Jensen, L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reduce the life-cycle costs and accelerate the cleanup of the Cold War environmental legacy www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 1 cleanup of the Cold War environmental legacy Shirley J. Olinger Associate Principal Deputy for Corporate Operations EMAB Presentation June 23, 2011 EM Priorities: Activities to maintain a safe, secure, and compliant posture in the EM complex Radioactive tank waste stabilization, treatment, and disposal Spent (used) nuclear fuel storage, receipt, and disposition "To-Go Life-Cycle Costs" ($185B - $218B as of the FY 2012 Request) Programmatic support activities* 10% Radioactive tank waste stabilization, treatment and disposal 38% Excess facilities decontamination and decommissioning

435

Title 18 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 78 Underground Storage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground Storage Tanks Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 18 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 78...

436

Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a survey they have initiated on solid state hydride tanks for hydrogen storage and other energy conversion applications. The IPHE (International Partnership for the Hydrogen...

437

SLUDGE BATCH 7 PREPARATION TANK 4 AND 12 CHARACTERIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 and HM sludge from Tank 12 were characterized in preparation for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) formulation in Tank 51. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 and Tank 12 were requested in separate Technical Assistance Requests (TAR). The Tank 4 samples were pulled on January 19, 2010 following slurry operations by F-Tank Farm. The Tank 12 samples were pulled on February 9, 2010 following slurry operations by H-Tank Farm. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 4 and two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 12 were received in the SRNL Shielded Cells. Each tank's samples were composited into clean 500 mL polyethylene storage bottles and weighed. The composited Tank 4 sample was 428.27 g and the composited Tank 12 sample was 502.15 g. As expected there are distinct compositional differences between Tank 4 and Tank 12 sludges. The Tank 12 slurry is much higher in Al, Hg, Mn, and Th, and much lower in Fe, Ni, S, and U than the Tank 4 slurry. The Tank 4 sludge definitely makes the more significant contribution of S to any sludge batch blend. This S, like that observed during SB6 washing, is best monitored by looking at the total S measured by digesting the sample and analyzing by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). Alternatively, one can measure the soluble S by ICP-AES and adjust the value upward by approximately 15% to have a pretty good estimate of the total S in the slurry. Soluble sulfate measurements by ion chromatography (IC) will be biased considerably lower than the actual total S, the difference being due to the non-sulfate soluble S and the undissolved S. Tank 12 sludge is enriched in U-235, and hence samples transferred into SRNL from the Tank Farm will need to be placed on the reportable special nuclear material inventory and tracked for total U per SRNL procedure requirements.

Bannochie, C.; Click, D.; Pareizs, J.

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

Septic Tanks (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A license from the Department of Environmental Quality is required for cleaning or pumping of septic tanks or holding tanks and disposing of sewage or septage. The rules for the license are...

439

Rehabilitating A Thermal Storage System Through Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplementary chiller (50 tons) was needed due to an under- sized storage tank and an under-sized chller. In 1995, the authors were asked to investigate the problems and provide possible solutions. The thermal storage system was subsequently rehabilitated... draws water from the bottom of the tank and sends the return water to the top of the tank. Valve V4 isolates the chiller from the building and the tank. In the charging mode (Figure 2b), valves V3 and V4 are open while valve V1 is 06 wcad closed...

Liu, M.; Veteto, B.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Tank 241-TX-105 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-105.

Carpenter, B.C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Tank 241-T-111 tank characterization plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-111.

Homi, C.S.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emerging Technologies » Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Emerging Technologies » Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into carbon dioxide (CO2) heat pump water heaters. This project will employ innovative techniques to adapt water heating technology to meet U.S. market requirements, including specifications, cost, and performance targets. Carbon dioxide is a refrigerant with a global warming potential (GWP) of 1. The CO2 heat pump water heater research seeks to develop an improved life cycle climate performance compared to conventional refrigerants. For example, R134a, another type of refrigerant, has a GWP of 1,300. Project Description This project seeks to develop a CO2-based heat pump water heater (HPWH)

443

Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc - Residential Water Heater Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc - Residential Water Heater Rebate Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc - Residential Water Heater Rebate Program Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc - Residential Water Heater Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Free high efficiency water Heater; $200 installation fee Water heater and timer with normal installation: $2.50 credit for 10 years Timer only: $200 cash payment and $2.50 credit for 10 years New construction contract home: $250 Provider Aiken Electric Cooperative Aiken Electric Cooperative offers residential members rebates for installing high-efficiency electric water heaters and/or timers in their homes. Customers have four rebate options:

444

Coweta-Fayette EMC - Residential Solar Water Heater Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coweta-Fayette EMC - Residential Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Coweta-Fayette EMC - Residential Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (Georgia) Coweta-Fayette EMC - Residential Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State Georgia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Existing Homes Solar Water Heater: $750 New Homes Solar Water Heater: $1,250 - $1,500 Provider Coweta-Fayette Electric Membership Corporation Coweta-Fayette Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) provides electric and natural gas service to 58,000 customers in Georgia's Coweta, Fayette, Meriwether, Heard, Troop and Fulton counties. Currently, Coweta-Fayette EMC offers rebates on solar water heaters from $750 up to $1,500 as part of the Touchstone Energy Home Program. Solar

445

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: up to $275 Heat Pump Replacement: $400 Provider Rock Hill Utilities Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed above. If both the water heater and heat pump are purchased then the customer may qualify for the Great Rate program. The Great Rate program will add a 25% discount to a

446

Feed tank transfer requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1998-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

447

Multi-step heater deployment in a subsurface formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for installing a horizontal or inclined subsurface heater includes placing a heating section of a heater in a horizontal or inclined section of a wellbore with an installation tool. The tool is uncoupled from the heating section. A lead in section is mechanically and electrically coupled to the heating section of the heater. The lead-in section is located in an angled or vertical section of the wellbore.

Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

448

Insulated conductor temperature limited heater for subsurface heating coupled in a three-phase WYE configuration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes a first heater, a second heater, and a third heater placed in an opening in the subsurface formation. Each heater includes: an electrical conductor; an insulation layer at least partially surrounding the electrical conductor; and an electrically conductive sheath at least partially surrounding the insulation layer. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the sheath at a lower end portion of the heater. The lower end portion is the portion of the heater distal from a surface of the opening. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are electrically coupled at the lower end portions of the heaters. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are configured to be electrically coupled in a three-phase wye configuration.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

449

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability. Supplement 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove {sup 137}CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Analysis of field-test data from domestic solar-water heaters in the southern United States, period through September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The monitored performance data used here was gathered from 137 solar water heaters. All but 51 are located in Florida. The gathered data accumulated from weekly mailers consists of the following measurements: total gallons of hot water consumed; total kWh of electricity used; total hours the circulating pump operated; hot and cold water temperatures at the top; number of household members at home since last reading; tank thermostat setting and any changes to it; total number of hours that the tank's backup heating element had power available; and problems or comments concerning system operational status or component reliability and maintenance. The data analysis is described and results are presented. (MHR)

Jones, W.M.; Fenner, M.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Investigations in cool thermal storage: storage process optimization and glycol sensible storage enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

device in order to meet the utility's mandate. The first part of this study looks at the effects of adding propylene glycol to a static-water ice thermal storage tank, in the pursuit of increasing storage capacity. The effects of glycol addition...

Abraham, Michaela Marie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Advanced refinery process heater. Final report, (October 1983-September 1988)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype refinery process heater was designed, built and successfully tested, demonstrating the improvements available to heater design through the use of Zone-Controlled Pyrocore radiant gas burners. The 10 MMBtu/hr rated heater released 17 ppm NOx (corrected to 3% oxygen) under full load operation, the lowest NOx emissions technically and commercially achieved in this type of equipment without the use of post-combustion flue-gas processing. Operating with 400F combustion air preheat and a 500F process fluid outlet temperature, the heater achieved overall thermal efficiencies of 92.8% on a LHV basis due in part to the significantly improved performance of the radiant heat exchange section. The radiant burners used in the heater have been proven in performance and reliability, and have also been shown to be applicable to both new heater designs and retrofits into existing heaters. The improved radiant performance of the heater and the use of 'flameless' radiant burners eliminates tube burn-out failures in both the radiant and convective tube coils, further improving the reliability of equipment based on this design. Three separate U.S. Patents have been issued covering the heater design and the use of Zone-Controlled Pyrocore burners in this application.

Minden, A.C.; Buckley, G.G.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

NREL Develops Heat Pump Water Heater Simulation Model (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new simulation model helps researchers evaluate real-world impacts of heat pump water heaters in U.S. homes.

Hudon, K.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Slurry fired heater cold-flow modelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical work leading to the scale-up of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant slurry fired heater. The scale-up involved a theoretical model using empirical relations in the derivation, and employed variables such as flow conditions, liquid viscosity, and slug frequency. Such variables have been shown to affect the heat transfer characteristics ofthe system. The model assumes that, if all other variables remain constant, the heat transfer coefficient can be scaled up proportional to D/sup -2/3/ (D = inside diameter of the fired heater tube). All flow conditions, liquid viscosities, and pipe inclinations relevant to the demonstration plant have indicated a slug flow regime in the slurry fired heater. The annular and stratified flow regimes should be avoided to minimize the potential for excessive pipe erosion and to decrease temperature gradients along the pipe cross section leading to coking and thermal stresses, respectively. Cold-flow studies in 3- and 6.75-in.-inside-diameter (ID) pipes were conducted to determine the effect of scale-up on flow regime, slug frequency, and slug dimensions. The developed model assumes that conduction heat transfer occurs through the liquid film surrounding the gas slug and laminar convective heat transfer to the liquid slug. A weighted average of these two heat transfer mechanisms gives a value for the average pipe heat transfer coefficient. The cold-flow work showed a decrease in the observed slug frequency between the 3- and 6.75-ID pipes. Data on the ratio of gas to liquid slug length in the 6.75-in. pipe are not yet complete, but are expected to yield generally lower values than those obtained in the 3-in. pipe; this will probably affect the scale-up to demonstration plant conditions. 5 references, 15 figures, 7 tables.

Moujaes, S.F.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with ultra low-NO{sub X} burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

high octane fuels being considered as possible path forward Storing high octane ethanol blended fuels will require careful consideration of material compatibility issues...

457

Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Hanford Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Hanford Site Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Hanford Site November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A composite image comprised of dozens of photos taken inside C-110 provides a rare panoramic view of the tank interior. Portions of the tank floor and the FoldTrack waste-retrieval system are clearly visible. A composite image comprised of dozens of photos taken inside C-110 provides a rare panoramic view of the tank interior. Portions of the tank floor and the FoldTrack waste-retrieval system are clearly visible. Operators use multiple technologies to remove waste from underground storage tank RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Office of River Protection and its tank farm contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), recently

458

Design demonstrations for category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or replacement tank systems with secondary containment; Category B -- Existing tank systems with secondary containment; Category C -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment; Category D -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. The design demonstration for each tank is presented.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

RECENT PROGRESS IN DOE WASTE TANK CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The USDOE complex currently has over 330 underground storage tanks that have been used to process and store radioactive waste generated from the production of weapons materials. These tanks contain over 380 million liters of high-level and low-level radioactive waste. The waste consists of radioactively contaminated sludge, supernate, salt cake or calcine. Most of the waste exists at four USDOE locations, the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the West Valley Demonstration Project. A summary of the DOE tank closure activities was first issued in 2001. Since then, regulatory changes have taken place that affect some of the sites and considerable progress has been made in closing tanks. This paper presents an overview of the current regulatory changes and drivers and a summary of the progress in tank closures at the various sites over the intervening six years. A number of areas are addressed including closure strategies, characterization of bulk waste and residual heel material, waste removal technologies for bulk waste, heel residuals and annuli, tank fill materials, closure system modeling and performance assessment programs, lessons learned, and external reviews.

Langton, C

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The Safe Storage Study for Autocatalytic Reactive Chemicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) report, Improving Reactive Hazard Management, there are 37 out of 167 accidents, which occurred in a storage tank or a storage area. This fact demonstrates that thermal runaway...

Liu, Lijun

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heater storage tank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

High-Pressure Tube Trailers and Tanks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Berry Berry Salvador M. Aceves Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (925) 422-0864 saceves@LLNL.GOV DOE Delivery Tech Team Presentation Chicago, Illinois February 8, 2005 Inexpensive delivery of compressed hydrogen with ambient temperature or cryogenic compatible vessels * Pressure vessel research at LLNL Conformable (continuous fiber and replicants) Cryo-compressed * Overview of delivery options * The thermodynamics of compressed and cryo-compressed hydrogen storage * Proposed analysis activities * Conclusions Outline We are investigating two techniques for reduced bending stress: continuous fiber vessels and vessels made of replicants Conformable tanks require internal stiffeners (ribs) to efficiently support the pressure and minimize bending stresses Spherical and cylindrical tanks

462

Potential for criticality in Hanford tanks resulting from retrieval of tank waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential during retrieval operations for segregation and concentration of fissile material to result in a criticality. The sluicing retrieval of C-106 sludge to AY-102 and the operation of mixer pumps in SY-102 are examined in some detail. These two tanks (C-106, SY-102) were selected because of the near term plans for retrieval of these tanks and their high plutonium inventories relative to other tanks. Although all underground storage tanks are subcritical by a wide margin if assumed to be uniform in composition, the possibility retrieval operations could preferentially segregate the plutonium and locally concentrate it sufficiently to result in criticality was a concern. This report examines the potential for this segregation to occur.

Whyatt, G.A.; Sterne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Vapor characterization of Tank 241-C-103  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program has developed, in cooperation with Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory, the equipment and expertise to characterize gases and vapors in the high-level radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. This capability has been demonstrated by the characterization of the tank 241-C-103 headspace. This tank headspace is the first, and for many reasons is expected to be the most problematic, that will be characterized (Osborne 1992). Results from the most recent and comprehensive sampling event, sample job 7B, are presented for the purpose of providing scientific bases for resolution of vapor issues associated with tank 241-C-103. This report is based on the work of Clauss et al. 1994, Jenkins et al. 1994, Ligotke et al. 1994, Mahon et al. 1994, and Rasmussen and Einfeld 1994. No attempt has been made in this report to evaluate the implications of the data presented, such as the potential impact of headspace gases and vapors to tank farm workers health. That and other issues will be addressed elsewhere. Key to the resolution of worker health issues is the quantitation of compounds of toxicological concern. The Toxicology Review Panel, a panel of Pacific Northwest Laboratory experts in various areas, of toxicology, has chosen 19 previously identified compounds as being of potential toxicological concern. During sample job 7B, the sampling and analytical methodology was validated for this preliminary list of compounds of toxicological concern. Validation was performed according to guidance provided by the Tank Vapor Conference Committee, a group of analytical chemists from academic institutions and national laboratories assembled and commissioned by the Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program.

Huckaby, J.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Story, M.S. [Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc. Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage On the one hand, hydrogen's great asset as a renewable energy carrier is that it is storable and transportable. On the other hand, its very low natural density requires storage volumes that are impractical for vehicles and many other uses. Current practice is to compress the gas in pressurized tanks, but this still provides only limited driving range for vehicles and is bulkier than desirable for other uses as well. Liquefying the hydrogen more than doubles the fuel density, but uses up substantial amounts of energy to lower the temperature sufficiently (-253°C at atmospheric pressure), requires expensive insulated tanks to maintain that temperature, and still falls short of desired driving range. One possible way to store hydrogen at higher density is in the spaces within the crystalline

465

Georgia Power- Residential Solar and Heat Pump Water Heater Rebate (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Georgia Power customers may be eligible for rebates up to $250 each toward the installation costs of a 50 gallon or greater solar water heater or heat pump water heater. The solar water heater or...

466

ELECTRICAL HEATERS FOR THERMO-MECHANICAL TESTS AT THE STRIPA MINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5.5 Dewatering Pump 6. ELECTRICAL HEATER CONTROL SYSTEMS 6.1water influx ABSTRACT Electrical heaters were installed atcanister) which houses the electrical heater elements; c. d.

Burleigh, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Solar pool heaters: The simplest use of active solar energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar pool heating is the most attractive solar water heating market today, because most pool heaters pay back their purchase price in lower utility bills in two to three years. This article describes why solar pool heaters are popular and their design, operation, and return on investment. 1 fig.

Sheinkopf, K. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

Not Available

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $600 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.01 per BTU output Provider Clay Electric Co-op Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) provides a rebate of $0.01 per BTU output to its residential members when they purchase qualified solar water heaters. This rebate is capped at 60,000 BTUs per system, or $600. Eligible solar water heaters can be either passive or active systems. The proposed solar system must meet Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) specifications and be installed by a contractor certified to install solar water heating

470

Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Swimming Pool Heaters Swimming Pool Heaters Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heaters May 29, 2012 - 1:49pm Addthis How a heat pump works. How a heat pump works. How They Work Heat pumps use electricity to capture heat and move it from one place to another. They don't generate heat. As the pool pump circulates the swimming pool's water, the water drawn from the pool passes through a filter and the heat pump heater. The heat pump heater has a fan that draws in the outside air and directs it over the evaporator coil. Liquid refrigerant within the evaporator coil absorbs the heat from the outside air and becomes a gas. The warm gas in the coil then passes through the compressor. The compressor increases the heat, creating a very hot gas that then passes through the condenser. The condenser transfers the heat from the hot gas to the cooler pool water circulating

471

Cost of Increased Energy Efficiency for Residential Water Heaters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost of Increased Energy Efficiency for Residential Water Heaters Cost of Increased Energy Efficiency for Residential Water Heaters Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Date: March 22, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn This presentation describes the analysis of the costs of increased energy efficiency for residential water heaters. Here, we focus on the cost and efficiency data for electric and gas-fired water heaters. This data formed the basis of the Technical Support Document for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Final Rule on Water Heaters. The engineering analysis uses computer simulation models to investigate the efficiency improvements due to design options and combinations thereof. The analysis covers four polyurethane foam insulation types based on non-ozone-depleting substances as blowing

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Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand Water Heater Basics Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is shown. Cold water flows in one end of a pipe, flows through and around several curved pipes over the heating elements, and out the other end as hot water. Beneath the heating unit, a typical sink setup is shown. The sink has two pipes coming out the bottom, one for the hot water line and one for the cold water line. Both pipes lead to the heating unit, which is installed in close proximity to the area of hot water use, and is connected to a power source (110 or 220 volts). Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as

473

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is shown. Cold water flows in one end of a pipe, flows through and around several curved pipes over the heating elements, and out the other end as hot water. Beneath the heating unit, a typical sink setup is shown. The sink has two pipes coming out the bottom, one for the hot water line and one for the cold water line. Both pipes lead to the heating unit, which is installed in close proximity to the area of hot water use, and is connected to a power source (110 or 220 volts). Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as

474

Clark Public Utilities - Solar Water Heater Rebate | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clark Public Utilities - Solar Water Heater Rebate Clark Public Utilities - Solar Water Heater Rebate Clark Public Utilities - Solar Water Heater Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $500 Provider Clark PUD Clark Public Utilities offers a rebate of $500 to customers who install a solar water heating system. Customers must own the residence or business where the solar water heating system is installed and must have an electric water heater. In addition, Clark Public Utilities offers a [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=WA29F&re=1&ee=1 loan program] for eligible solar water heater equipment. For additional information, call Energy Services at (360) 992-3355.

475

SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design - working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching.

VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

476

Solar Water Heater Roadmap Leads Path to Market Expansion (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative strategy to reduce installed cost of solar water heater systems can rival conventional natural gas water heaters in the marketplace.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, and PoolConservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, and Pool

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

A Mixed-Integer Linear Programming Model for Optimizing the Scheduling and Assignment of Tank Farm Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Mixed-Integer Linear Programming Model for Optimizing the Scheduling and Assignment of Tank) formulation for the Tank Farm Operation Problem (TFOP), which involves simultaneous scheduling of continuous multi-product processing lines and the assignment of dedicated storage tanks to finished products

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

479

Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

searc searc e er tra A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER - A Re h Institut of the Univ sity of Cen l Florida searc e er tra Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in Laboratory House Building America Technical Update 2013 ACI National Home Performance Conference April 29- 30 , 2013 Carlos J. Colon carlos@fsec.ucf.edu A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER - A Re h Institut of the Univ sity of Cen l Florida FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER - A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida Hot Water Systems (HWS) Laboratory FSEC Grounds, Florida (east coast) 2009 -Present (Currently fourth testing rotation) FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER - A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida

480

The effect of dilution on the gas retention behavior of Tank 241-SY- 103 waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-five of the 177 underground waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site have been placed on the Flammable Gas watch list. These 25 tanks, containing high-level waste generated during plutonium and uranium processing, have been identified as potentially capable of accumulating flammable gases above the lower flammability limit (Babad et al. 1991). In the case of Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103, it has been proposed that diluting the tank waste may mitigate this hazard (Hudson et al. 1995; Stewart et al. 1994). The effect of dilution on the ability of waste from Tank 241-SY-103 to accumulate gas was studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A similar study has been completed for waste from Tank 241-SY-101 (Bredt et al. 1995). Because of the additional waste-storage volume available in Tank 241-SY-103 and because the waste is assumed to be similar to that currently in Tank 241-SY-101, Tank 241-SY-103 became the target for a demonstration of passive mitigation through in-tank dilution. In 1994, plans for the in-tank dilution demonstration were deferred pending a decision on whether to pursue dilution as a mitigation strategy. However, because Tank 241-SY-103 is an early retrieval target, determination of how waste properties vary with dilution will still be required.

Bredt, P.R.; Tingey, S.M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z