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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

Feng, Zhe

2

Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

Feng, Zhe

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

Power-system dynamic equivalents:coherency recognition via the rate of change of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.F.I.M.A. Indexing terms: Power systems and plant, Simulation, Time-varying parameters, Dynamic equivalents AbstractPower-system dynamic equivalents:coherency recognition via the rate of change of kinetic energy H of sections of a power system, its main drawback being the extensive computation times required to recognise

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

4

Heating Rate Profiles in Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years evidence has accumulated suggesting that the gas in galaxy clusters is heated by non-gravitational processes. Here we calculate the heating rates required to maintain a physically motived mass flow rate, in a sample of seven galaxy clusters. We employ the spectroscopic mass deposition rates as an observational input along with temperature and density data for each cluster. On energetic grounds we find that thermal conduction could provide the necessary heating for A2199, Perseus, A1795 and A478. However, the suppression factor, of the clasical Spitzer value, is a different function of radius for each cluster. Based on the observations of plasma bubbles we also calculate the duty cycles for each AGN, in the absence of thermal conduction, which can provide the required energy input. With the exception of Hydra-A it appears that each of the other AGNs in our sample require duty cycles of roughly $10^{6}-10^{7}$ yrs to provide their steady-state heating requirements. If these duty cycles are unrealistic, this may imply that many galaxy clusters must be heated by very powerful Hydra-A type events interspersed between more frequent smaller-scale outbursts. The suppression factors for the thermal conductivity required for combined heating by AGN and thermal conduction are generally acceptable. However, these suppression factors still require `fine-tuning` of the thermal conductivity as a function of radius. As a consequence of this work we present the AGN duty cycle as a cooling flow diagnostic.

Edward C. D. Pope; Georgi Pavlovski; Christian R. Kaiser; Hans Fangohr

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

5

Heat Release Rates | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Celland Contractors |DOCUMENT RELEASEHave0-1Heat Pump SystemHeat

6

Tables for solution of the heat-conduction equation with a time-dependent heating rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tables are presented for the solution of the transient onedimensional heat flow in a solid body of constant material properties with the heating rate at one boundary dependent on time. These tables allow convenient and ...

Bergles A. E.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Influence of Heat Transmission Mode on Heating Rates and on the Selection of Patches for Heating in a Mediterranean Lizard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

369 Influence of Heat Transmission Mode on Heating Rates and on the Selection of Patches for Heating in a Mediterranean Lizard Josabel Belliure* Luis M. Carrascal Department of Evolutionary Ecology´ Gutie´rrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain Accepted 6/6/02 ABSTRACT Heliothermy (heat gain by radiation

Carrascal, Luis M.

8

Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi-ion quantum logic gate fidelities. Two simplified techniques were developed for this purpose: one relies on Raman sideband detection implemented with a single laser source, while the second is even simpler and is based on time-resolved fluorescence detection during Doppler recooling. We applied these methods to determine heating rates in a microfrabricated surface-electrode trap made of gold on fused quartz, which traps ions 40 microns above its surface. Heating rates obtained from the two techniques were found to be in reasonable agreement. In addition, the trap gives rise to a heating rate of 300 plus or minus 30 per second for a motional frequency of 5.25 MHz, substantially below the trend observed in other traps.

Epstein, R J; Leibfried, D; Wesenberg, J H; Bollinger, J J; Amini, J M; Blakestad, R B; Britton, J; Home, J P; Itano, W M; Jost, J D; Knill, E; Langer, C; Ozeri, R; Shiga, N; Wineland, D J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Aspects of coal pyrogenation with high heating rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present paper describes the conversion of different rank coals into coke of required quality, influenced by heating rate variation. The study has been made for romanian coals and the imported coals too. Theoretical aspects of the coking process kinetics with special practical applications are shown. In Romania, classical coke making technology involves some theoretical and practical problems because of the local coal supply, weak in coking coals. Petrographical methods, as a complementary source of information for coking mechanisms understanding were used, for blends with high content of weakly coking coals. The results reveal the importance of rank and petrographical composition determinations for complex blends making. The paper continues previous studies of coke making kinetics, influenced by heating rate variation. On the basis of the relationship between coal charge composition and coke structure, including its use in the blast furnace, the influence of an increase in heating rate on the structure of the coke produced from different rank and petrographical composition coals, was studied. The heating rates ranged between 3 and 40 C/min. The structural changes produced during pyrogenation were more evident for the heating rates: 3, 6, 10 and 40 C/min. Table 2 reveals the optical aspects of coke matrix and inertinitic inclusions evolution, that is, the differences in structure arrangement by changing the plastic phase characteristics due to the increase in the heating rate.

Panaitescu, C.; Barca, F. [Politehnica Univ., Bucharest (Romania); Predeanu, G.; Albastroiu, P. [Metallurgical Research Inst., Bucharest (Romania)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Property:HeatRate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:PlugNumberOfArraProjectTypeTopic2GrossGen JumpRating Jump

11

Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate for dense plasmas in laser fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a theoretical analysis of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in the eikonal approximation. The present analysis is performed for a dense plasma using the screened electron-ion interaction potential for the ion charge state Z{sub i} = 1 and for both the weak and strong plasma screening cases. We have also compared the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) [M. Moll et al., New J. Phys. 14, 065010 (2012)] calculation. We find that the magnitudes of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate within the eikonal approximation (EA) are larger than the FBA values in the weak screening case (? = 0.03 a.u.) in a wide range of field strength for three different initial electron momenta (2, 3, and 4 a.u.). But for strong screening case (? = 0.3 a.u.), the heating rates predicted by the two approximations do not differ much after reaching their maximum values. Furthermore, the individual contribution of photoemission and photoabsorption processes to heating rate is analysed for both the weak and strong screening cases. We find that the single photoemission and photoabsorption rates are the same throughout the field strength while the multiphoton absorption process dominates over the multiphoton emission process beyond the field strength ? 410{sup 8} V/cm. The present study of the dependence of heating rate on the screening parameter ranging from 0.01 to 20 shows that whereas the heating rate predicted by the EA is greater than the FBA up to the screening parameter ? = 0.3 a.u., the two approximation methods yield results which are nearly identical beyond the above value.

Dey, R. [D-203, Samruddhi Residency, Motera, Ahmedabad-380009, Gujarat (India)] [D-203, Samruddhi Residency, Motera, Ahmedabad-380009, Gujarat (India); Roy, A. C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711202, West Bengal (India)] [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711202, West Bengal (India)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Cooling rate, heating rate, and aging effects in glassy water Nicolas Giovambattista,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be glassified by cooling using hyper- quenching techniques (i.e., with rates of the order of 105 K/s [8Cooling rate, heating rate, and aging effects in glassy water Nicolas Giovambattista,1 H. Eugene of water molecules during the process of generating a glass by cooling, and during the process

Sciortino, Francesco

13

Kinetics of silicide formation over a wide range of heating rates spanning six orders of magnitude  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kinetic processes involving intermediate phase formation are often assumed to follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence. This behavior is usually inferred from limited data over narrow temperature intervals, where the exponential dependence is generally fully satisfied. However, direct evidence over wide temperature intervals is experimentally challenging and data are scarce. Here, we report a study of silicide formation between a 12?nm film of palladium and 15?nm of amorphous silicon in a wide range of heating rates, spanning six orders of magnitude, from 0.1 to 10{sup 5?}K/s, or equivalently more than 300?K of variation in reaction temperature. The calorimetric traces exhibit several distinct exothermic events related to interdiffusion, nucleation of Pd{sub 2}Si, crystallization of amorphous silicon, and vertical growth of Pd{sub 2}Si. Interestingly, the thickness of the initial nucleation layer depends on the heating rate revealing enhanced mass diffusion at the fastest heating rates during the initial stages of the reaction. In spite of this, the formation of the silicide strictly follows an Arrhenius temperature dependence over the whole temperature interval explored. A kinetic model is used to fit the calorimetric data over the complete heating rate range. Calorimetry is complemented by structural analysis through transmission electron microscopy and both standard and in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

Molina-Ruiz, Manel; Lopeanda, Aitor F.; Gonzalez-Silveira, Marta; Garcia, Gemma; Clavaguera-Mora, Maria T. [Grup de Nanomaterials i Microsistemes, Departament de Fsica, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Peral, Inma [ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility, 08290 Cerdanyola del Valls (Spain); Rodrguez-Viejo, Javier, E-mail: javier.rodriguez@uab.cat [Grup de Nanomaterials i Microsistemes, Departament de Fsica, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); MATGAS Research Centre, UAB Campus, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

Horn, Kevin M.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Prediction of the heat release rate of wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for the heat release rate of wood during flaming combustion was developed during this research. It includes the effects of char shrinkage, multiple chemical components, adsorbed moisture, internal convective cooling and the variation of the thermophysical and thermochemical properties with temperature and the mass retention fraction of the char. It does not include char oxidation or diffusion of moisture and volatile pyrolysis products toward the rear surface. It calculates the time to ignition, mass burning rate, heat release rate, heat of combustion, heat of gasification and depth of char. An important part of this research was the determination of the thermochemical and thermophysical properties required by the model. An apparatus was developed for determining the kinetic parameters and the heat of combustion of the volatiles under conditions similar to those in the interior of a flaming slab of wood. Data were obtained on each of the four major chemical components present in Douglas fir. Thermal diffusivity measurements on Douglas fir and its char yielded an average value of 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} s{sup 2}/s which was nearly independent of temperature and mass retention fraction of the char for temperature sup to 500{degree}C and for mass-retention fractions above 0.30.

Parker, W.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

An assessment of the measurement equivalence of rating sources in a multisource feedback system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Tornow, 1993b; Funderburg & Levy, 1997). Supporters of 360-degree feedback systems believe that each rating source provides the ratee with unique information (e. g. , Hazucha, Hezlett, & Schneider, 1993), so high levels of agreement between rating... sources are not expected. However, 360-degree feedback systems have been criticized for the low levels of agreement between rating sources, as psychometric theory states that high levels of agreement between ratings 1'rom different raters are needed...

Sheehan, Mary Kathleen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Standby Rates for Combined Heat and Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in technology, low natural gas prices, and more flexible and positive attitudes in government and utilities are making distributed generation more viable. With more distributed generation, notably combined heat and power, comes an increase in the importance of standby rates, the cost of services utilities provide when customer generation is not operating or is insufficient to meet full load. This work looks at existing utility standby tariffs in five states. It uses these existing rates and terms to showcase practices that demonstrate a sound application of regulatory principles and ones that do not. The paper also addresses areas for improvement in standby rates.

Sedano, Richard [Regulatory Assistance Partnership; Selecky, James [Brubaker & Associates, Inc.; Iverson, Kathryn [Brubaker & Associates, Inc.; Al-Jabir, Ali [Brubaker & Associates, Inc.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Resistive Wall Heating of the Undulator in High Repetition Rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In next generation high repetition rate FELs, beam energy loss due to resistive wall wakefields will produce significant amount of heat. The heat load for a superconducting undulator (operating at low temperature), must be removed and will be expensive to remove. In this paper, we study this effect in an undulator proposed for a Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) at LBNL. We benchmark our calculations with measurements at the LCLS and carry out detailed parameter studies using beam from a start-to-end simulation. Our preliminarym results suggest that the heat load in the undulator is about 2 W/m or lower with an aperture size of 6 mm for nominal NGLS preliminary design parameters.

Qiang, J; Corlett, J; Emma, P; Wu, J

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

Comstock, Jennifer

20

Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

Comstock, Jennifer

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe370mcfarlane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe1mcfarlane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

23

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe1mcfarlane  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

24

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe370mcfarlane  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

25

Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions by Carl, Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions KTH Nuclear Reactor power is limited by a phenomenon called critical heat flux (CHF). It appears as a sudden detoriation

Haviland, David

26

Effect of Heating Rate on Glass Foaming: Transition to Bulk Foam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foaming of glass is an undesirable side effect of glass fining. According to a recent experimental study, the gas-phase volume in the melt heated at a constant rate dramatically increased with an increased rate of heating. This observation indicates that an increased rate of heating (a natural consequence of the increased processing rate experienced as a result of transition to oxy-fuel firing) may exert a substantial influence on glass foaming in advanced glass-melting furnaces. This paper attributes this effect to the change of mode of foam formation in response to an increased rate of heating.

Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A study of the volatile matter of coal as a function of the heating rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the volatile matter yields as a function of the heating rate was conducted. A suite of 21 coal and coke samples varying in rank from anthracitic to lignitic and heating rates from 10{degrees}C/min to about 450{degrees}C/min were used in the study. Heating rates up to 60{degrees}C per minute, which are typically used in ASTM Test Method 5142 (instrumental Proximate Analysis), were achieved in a macro thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) system. Heating rates of 50-200{degrees}C/min were obtained in a micro TGA system. All measurements were made in a nitrogen atmosphere. The results of the study illustrate the dependence of the volatile matter yield on the heating rate. For most coals and cokes the optimum heating rate for determining volatile matter values that agree with those obtained by ASTM Method D 3175 appears to be in the 100-150{degrees}C range.

Yanes, E.; Wilhite, D.; Riley, J.M. Jr. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Heat resistance and outgrowth of clostridium perfringens spores as affected by the type of heating medium, and heating and cooling rates in ground pork  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and cured ground pork (CGP) at 75C. The effect of the heating rate on HR, germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores in CGP was determined by increasing the temperature from 20 to 75C at a rate of 4, 8, and 12C/h prior to heating and holding at 75...

Marquez Gonzalez, Mayra

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report heating rate measurements in a microfabricated gold-on-sapphire surface electrode ion trap with trapping height of approximately 240 micron. Using the Doppler recooling method, we characterize the trap heating rates over an extended region of the trap. The noise spectral density of the trap falls in the range of noise spectra reported in ion traps at room temperature. We find that during the first months of operation the heating rates increase by approximately one order of magnitude. The increase in heating rates is largest in the ion loading region of the trap, providing a strong hint that surface contamination plays a major role for excessive heating rates. We discuss data found in the literature and possible relation of anomalous heating to sources of noise and dissipation in other systems, namely impurity atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces and amorphous dielectrics.

N. Daniilidis; S. Narayanan; S. A. Mller; R. Clark; T. E. Lee; P. J. Leek; A. Wallraff; St. Schulz; F. Schmidt-Kaler; H. Hffner

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Effect of Turbulence Fluctuations on Surface Heating Rate in Hypersonic Turbulent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Turbulence Fluctuations on Surface Heating Rate in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers) of reacting hypersonic turbulent boundary layers at conditions typical of reen- try vehicles. Surface heat in designing hypersonic vehicles is to predict aerothermo- dynamic heating. When the boundary layer

Martín, Pino

32

High pressure low heat rate phosphoric acid fuel cell stack  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high pressure phosphoric acid fuel cell stack assembly is described comprising: (a) a stack of fuel cells for producing electricity, the stack including cathode means, anode means, and heat exchange means; (b) means for delivering pressurized air to the cathode means; (c) means for delivering a hydrogen rich fuel gas to the anode means for electrochemically reacting with oxygen in the pressurized air to produce electricity and water; (d) first conduit means connected to the cathode means for exhausting a mixture of oxygen-depleted air and reaction water from the cathode means; (e) second conduit means connected to the first conduit means for delivering a water fog to the first conduit means for entrainment in the mixture of oxygen-depleted air and reaction water to form a two phase coolant having a gaseous air phase and an entrained water droplet phase; (f) means for circulating the coolant to the heat exchange means to cool the stack solely through vaporization of the water droplet phase in the heat exchange means whereby a mixed gas exhaust of air and water vapor is exhausted from the heat exchange means; and (g) means for heating the mixed gas exhaust and delivering the heated mixed gas exhaust at reformer reaction temperatures to an autothermal reformer in the stack assembly for autothermal reaction with a raw fuel to form the hydrogen rich fuel.

Wertheim, R.J.

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Nano-engineering the boiling surface for optimal heat transfer rate and critical heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects on pool boiling characteristics such as critical heat flux and the heat transfer coefficient of different surface characteristics such as surface wettability, roughness, morphology, and porosity are not well ...

Phillips, Bren Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Semilinear response for the heating rate of cold atoms in vibrating traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OFFPRINT Semilinear response for the heating rate of cold atoms in vibrating traps A. Stotland, D;Europhysics Letters (EPL) has a new online home at www.epljournal.org Take a look for the latest journal news.epljournal.org doi: 10.1209/0295-5075/86/10004 Semilinear response for the heating rate of cold atoms in vibrating

Cohen, Doron

35

Evidence for thermalization of surface-desorbed molecules at heating rates of 108  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence for thermalization of surface-desorbed molecules at heating rates of 108 K/s C. R of aniline-d7 from a single-crystal surface 0001 of sapphire Al2O3 at a heating rate on the order of 108 K/s was studied using pulsed infrared laser radiation for desorption and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization

Zare, Richard N.

36

Cloud properties and associated radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud properties and associated radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific James H set of atmospheric remote sensing instruments at sites around the world, including three radiative fluxes and heating rates. Maxima in cloud occurrence are found in the boundary layer and the upper

37

ELECTRIC CO-HEATING: A METHOD FOR EVALUATING SEASONAL HEATING EFFICIENCIES AND HEAT LOSS RATES IN DWELLINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and heating efficiency, inexpensive and practical diagnosti.c techniques are needed, such as pressuriza- tion, infrared

Modera, M.P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Dependency of Heat Transfer Rate on the Brinkman Number in Microchannels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat generation from electronics increases with the advent of high-density integrated circuit technology. To come up with the heat generation, microscale cooling has been thought as a promising technology. Prediction of heat transfer rate is crucial in design of microscale cooling device but is not clearly understood yet. This work proposes a new correlation between heat transfer rate and Brinkman number which is nondimensional number of viscosity, flow velocity and temperature. It is expected that the equation proposed by this work can be useful to design microchannel cooling device.

H. S. Park

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS surface. In 1997-1998, a large multi-agency effort made the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA with the ice pack in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for one year. Surface-based remote sensors generated

Shupe, Matthew

40

Investigation of the effects of heating rate on coking of shale during retorting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The retorting of oil shale distributes organic carbon among three possible products: the liquid product, the noncondensible product, and the residual carbon (coke). The production of coke is detrimental because of the economic effects caused by the loss of organic carbon to this relatively intractable carbon form. Two reference oil shales, a Mahogany zone, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation oil shale from Colorado and a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany oil shale from Kentucky, were studied to evaluate the conditions that affect coke production during retorting. The variable that was studied in these experiments was the heating rate during retorting because heating rate has been indicated to have a direct effect on coke production (Burnham and Clarkson 1980). The six heating rates investigated covered the range from 1 to 650/degree/C/h (1.8 to 1169/degree/F/h). The data collected during these experiments were evaluated statistically in order to identify trends. The data for the eastern reference oil shale indicated a decrease in coke formation with increases in the heating rate. The liquid and noncondensible product yields both increased with increasing heating rate. The distribution of products in relation to retort heating rate follows the model suggested by Burnham and Clarkson (1980). Coke production during the retorting of western reference oil shale was found to be constant in relation to heating rate. The liquid product yield increased with increasing heating rate but the trend could not be verified at the 95% confidence level. The coke production observed in these experiments does not follow the prediction of the model. This may indicate that coke formation occurs early in the retorting process and may be limited by the availability of organic materials that form coke. 6 refs., 10 tabs.

Guffey, F.D.; Hunter, D.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Gas temperature profiles at different flow rates and heating rates suffice to estimate kinetic parameters for fluidised bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental work on estimation kinetic parameters for combustion was conducted in a bench-scale fluidised bed (FB: 105x200mm). Combustion medium was obtained by using an electrical heater immersed into the bed. The ratio of heating rate (kJ/s) to molar flow rate of air (mol/s) regulated by a rheostat so that the heat of combustion (kJ/mol) can be synthetically obtained by an electrical power supply for relevant O{sub 2}-feedstock concentration (C{sub 0}). O{sub 2}-restriction ratio ({beta}) was defined by the ratio of O{sub 2}-feedstock concentration to O{sub 2}-air concentration (C{sub O{sub 2}-AIR}) at prevailing heating rates. Compressed air at further atmospheric pressure ({approx_equal}102.7kPa) entered the bed that was alumina particles (250{mu}m). Experiments were carried out at different gas flow rates and heating rates. FB was operated with a single charge of (1300g) particles for obtaining the T/T{sub 0} curves, and than C/C{sub 0} curves. The mathematical relationships between temperature (T) and conversion ratio (X) were expressed by combining total energy balance and mass balance in FB. Observed surface reaction rate constants (k{sub S}) was obtained from the combined balances and proposed model was also tested for these kinetic parameters (frequency factor: k{sub 0}, activation energy: E{sub A}, and reaction order: n) obtained from air temperature measurements. It was found that the model curves allow a good description of the experimental data. Thus, reaction rate for combustion was sufficiently expressed. (author)

Suyadal, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ankara University, 06100-Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Property:Heat Recovery Rating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:PlugNumberOfArraProjectTypeTopic2GrossGen JumpRating Jump to:

43

The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

Mamum, Md Abdullah A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A, [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Adderley, Philip A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in xenon clusters in the eikonal approximation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) heating rates in the eikonal approximation (EA). The present analysis is performed using the plasma-screened Rogers and Debye potentials for Xe clusters with two different charge states (6 and 10). We compare the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) and classical-simulation (CL-sim) (Moll et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 033303 (2012)) calculations for clusters in infrared light. Calculations have been performed for the field strength of 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} V/cm. We find that compared to the FBA and CL-sim methods, the IB heating rate in the EA is less sensitive to the choice of the two potentials considered here. The present EA calculation shows that the influence of the inner structure of atomic ion on the heating rate is more prominent for the smaller ion charge (Xe{sup 6+}). In the case of low laser field approximation based on the elastic transport cross sections, it is seen that in contrast to the FBA and classical methods, the heating rate predicted by the EA does not deviate much all over the range of mean kinetic energy of electrons (20-500 eV) considered here for both the charge states of xenon (Xe{sup 6+} and Xe{sup 10+}). Furthermore, for the Rogers potential, EA is found to be in closer agreement with the classical method than the FBA. We also compare the results of the IB heating rate using the present and low-field approximation approaches to the above three methods and observe that the magnitudes of the IB heating rate calculated in the low field approximation are, in general, higher than the corresponding values predicted by the present approach for both the electron-ion potentials.

Dey, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Roy, A. C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math, 711202 West Bengal (India)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Proceedings: 2003 EPRI Heat Rate Improvement Conference: January 28-30, 2003, Birmingham, AL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Every utility strives both to become a low-cost electricity producer and to meet the emission standards set by the Clean Air Act Amendment. In the early round of cost and emission reduction, most utilities opted to blend or switch to lower-cost fuels such as Powder River Basin coal and natural gas. Over the years, EPRI, industry vendors, and the utilities themselves have learned not only to reduce the difficulties encountered with fuel blending and switching, but also to improve plant heat rate with various cost-effective solutions. The 2003 Heat Rate Improvement Conference provided an opportunity for the industry to share its knowledge and experience.

None

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

Reedy, Wayne R. [Sentech, Inc.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Methodology for Calculating Cooling and Heating Energy-Imput-Ratio (EIR) From the Rated Seasonal Performance Efficiency (SEER or HSPF)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report provides the recommendations to calculate cooling and heating energy-input-ratio (EIR) for DOE-2 simulations excluding indoor fan energy, from the rated cooling and heating seasonal performance efficiency (i.e., SEER or HSPF) that does...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Heat-rate improvements obtained by retubing condensers with new, enhanced tube types  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant fuel savings can be achieved at power plants by retubing the condensers with enhanced tubes. Because of the higher overall heat-transfer coefficient, the exhaust steam is condensed at a lower pressure and the plant efficiency is therefore increased or plant heat rate is reduced. Only the spirally indented type of enhanced tube is currently being used in the U.S. and most other countries; however, different types of enhanced tubes have been proposed for power-plant condensers, each with their own set of attributes. This paper determines what attributes and their magnitudes of enhanced tubes lead to the most energy savings as measured by reduction of the plant heat rate. The particular attributes considered are the inside and outside enhancement levels, the inside efficiency index (inside enhancement level divided by pressure-drop increase), and the enhanced-tube fouling-rate multiplier. Two particular condensers were selected because all necessary information were known from previous heat-rate studies such as the condenser geometry, the circulating-water pump and system information, and the low-pressure turbine characteristics. These are {open_quotes}real-world{close_quotes} condensers and therefore the finding will be representative for many other condenser-retubing applications. However, the authors strongly recommend that an economic evaluation be performed at each site to determine the energy savings and payback time. This generic investigation showed that the outside enhancement level is the most important attribute, and a value of about 1.5 can lead to heat-rate savings of about 20 to 40 Btu/kW-hr. Increasing the inside enhancement is less effective because of the increased pressure drop that leads to a reduction of the coolant flow rate and velocity.

Rabas, T.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Taborek, J. [Consulting Services, Virginia Beach, VA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

7-106 A reversible heat pump is considered. The temperature of the source and the rate of heat transfer to the sink are to be determined.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7-39 7-106 A reversible heat pump is considered. The temperature of the source and the rate of heat transfer to the sink are to be determined. Assumptions The heat pump operates steadily. Analysis Combining.5¸ ¹ · ¨ © § ¸ ¸ ¹ · ¨ ¨ © § 1.6 1 1)K300( COP 1 1 maxHP, HL TT Based upon the definition of the heat pump coefficient

Bahrami, Majid

50

Development of an On-Line Expert System: Heat Rate Degradation Expert System Advisor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An on-line expert system for fossil-fueled power plants, the "Heat Rate Degradation Expert System Advisor," is being developed. This expert system will operate on a microcomputer and will interface with existing plant data acquisition and/or thermal...

Sopocy, D. M.; Henry, R. E.; Gehl, S.; Divakaruni, S. M.

51

RIS-M-2185 CALCULATION OF HEAT RATING AND BURN-UP FOR TEST FUEL PINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RIS-M-2185 CALCULATION OF HEAT RATING AND BURN-UP FOR TEST FUEL PINS IRRADIATED IN DR3 C. Bagger of fuel pins irradiated in HP1 rigs. The calculations are carried out rather detailed, especially of the data. INIS Descriptors . BURN-UP, CALORIMETRY, COMPUTER CALCULATIONS, DR-3, FISSION, FUEL ASSEMBLIES

52

Ph.D. Recipients listed by recipient. 1 1937 Ablard, James Elbert D.Sc. Advisor: J. C. Warner Equivalent conductance, dissociation constants and heats of dissociation of triethylamine in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equivalent conductance, dissociation constants and heats of dissociation of triethylamine in alcohol-water decomposition of molecular hydrogen as a source of hydrogen atoms in chemical kinetics 1977 Aksoy, Mark Ph Synthesis, boron-11 shift assignments and correlations for halogenated decaboranes, carboranes

Kurnikova, Maria

53

Melting processes of oligomeric ? and ? isotactic polypropylene crystals at ultrafast heating rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The melting behaviors of ? (stable) and ? (metastable) isotactic polypropylene (iPP) crystals at ultrafast heating rates are simulated with atomistic molecular dynamics method. Quantitative information about the melting processes of ?- and ?-iPP crystals at atomistic level is achieved. The result shows that the melting process starts from the interfaces of lamellar crystal through random dislocation of iPP chains along the perpendicular direction of lamellar crystal structure. In the melting process, the lamellar crystal gradually expands but the corresponding thickness decreases. The analysis shows that the system expansion lags behind the crystallinity decreasing and the lagging extents for ?- and ?-iPP are significantly different. The apparent melting points of ?- and ?-iPP crystals rise with the increase of the heating rate and lamellar crystal thickness. The apparent melting point of ?-iPP crystal is always higher than that of ?-iPP at differently heating rates. Applying the Gibbs-Thomson rule and the scaling property of the melting kinetics, the equilibrium melting points of perfect ?- and ?-iPP crystals are finally predicted and it shows a good agreement with experimental result.

Ji, Xiaojing [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)] [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); He, Xuehao, E-mail: xhhe@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: scjiang@tju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Jiang, Shichun, E-mail: xhhe@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: scjiang@tju.edu.cn [School of Material, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)] [School of Material, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Trade-offs between NO{sub x} heat rate and opacity at Morgantown Unit 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In work carried out at Morgantown Unit 2, PEPCO and Lehigh University developed techniques for optimizing the operation of an ABB-CE LNCFS III low NO{sub x} firing system. Because of marginal ESP capacity, the ability to reduce NO{sub x} is limited by opacity excursions at this unit. Using a parametric boiler testing approach, and guided by neural network techniques for analysis of the data, control settings were identified which minimize the full load heat rate as a function of the target NO{sub x} level, subject to a stack opacity constraint.

D`Agostini, M.; Walsh, R.; Eskenazi, D.; Levy, E. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Electric field noise above surfaces: a model for heating rate scaling law in ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model for the scaling laws of the electric field noise spectral density as a function of the distance, $d$, above a conducting surface. Our analytical approach models the patch potentials by introducing a correlation length, $\\zeta$, of the electric potential on the surface. The predicted scaling laws are in excellent agreement with two different classes of experiments (cold trapped ions and cantilevers), that span at least four orders of magnitude of $d$. According to this model, heating rate in miniature ion traps could be greatly reduced by proper material engineering.

Romain Dubessy; Thomas Coudreau; Luca Guidoni

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP 1bbhrpripbe1mcfarlane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

57

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP 1bbhrpripbe1mcfarlane  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

58

Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

The impact of equivalence ratio oscillations on combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combustion dynamics of propane-air flames are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, atmospheric inlet temperature, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We modify the location of the fuel injector to examine the impact of equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame on the combustion dynamics. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat-release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When the fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame is steady and the combustion dynamics are controlled only by flame-vortex interactions. In this case, different dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. When the fuel is injected close to the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame exhibits oscillations. In the presence of equivalence ratio oscillations, the measured sound pressure level is significant across the entire range of lean mean equivalence ratios even if the equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame are out-of-phase with the pressure oscillations. The combustion dynamics are governed primarily by the flame-vortex interactions, while the equivalence ratio oscillations have secondary effects. The equivalence ratio oscillations could generate variations in the combustion dynamics in each cycle under some operating conditions, destabilize the flame at the entire range of the lean equivalence ratios, and increase the value of the mean equivalence ratio at the lean blowout limit. (author)

Murat Altay, H.; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Heat transfer rates for filmwise, dropwise, and superhydrophobic condensation on silicon substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condensation, a two-phase heat transfer processes, is commonly utilized in industrial systems. Condensation heat transfer can be optimized by using surfaces in which dropwise condensation (DWC) occurs, and even further ...

Hery, Travis M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Estimation of Rate of Heat Release by Means of Oxygen Consumption Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat release of combustible wall linings during full-scale room fire tests, William Parker, Huggett to the release of heat, the combustion process consumes oxygen. As part of his work on the ASTM E 84 tunnel test released per unit mass of material consumed (i.e., the specific heat of combustion), varied greatly

Womeldorf, Carole

63

forth through the heat exchangers, thereby phasing the rates at which heat is absorbed and rejected from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conditions Charge Pressure (psia) Firing Rate (KBTUH) Frequency (Hz) Power Piston Stroke (in.) Displacer the earlier analysis; these results are shown in Fig. 4. Working Fluid Charge Pressure (psia) Power Level (k was measured as the total enthalpy gain of the refrigerant across the compres- sor. Table 2 shows the range

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

64

SISGR - In situ characterization and modeling of formation reactions under extreme heating rates in nanostructured multilayer foils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials subjected to extreme conditions, such as very rapid heating, behave differently than materials under more ordinary conditions. In this program we examined the effect of rapid heating on solid-state chemical reactions in metallic materials. One primary goal was to develop experimental techniques capable of observing these reactions, which can occur at heating rates in excess of one million degrees Celsius per second. One approach that we used is x-ray diffraction performed using microfocused x-ray beams and very fast x-ray detectors. A second approach is the use of a pulsed electron source for dynamic transmission electron microscopy. With these techniques we were able to observe how the heating rate affects the chemical reaction, from which we were able to discern general principles about how these reactions proceed. A second thrust of this program was to develop computational tools to help us understand and predict the reactions. From atomic-scale simulations were learned about the interdiffusion between different metals at high heating rates, and about how new crystalline phases form. A second class of computational models allow us to predict the shape of the reaction front that occurs in these materials, and to connect our understanding of interdiffusion from the atomistic simulations to measurements made in the laboratory. Both the experimental and computational techniques developed in this program are expected to be broadly applicable to a wider range of scientific problems than the intermetallic solid-state reactions studied here. For example, we have already begun using the x-ray techniques to study how materials respond to mechanical deformation at very high rates.

Hufnagel, Todd C.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

Roberts Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Heat Transfer Modeling and Use of Distributed Temperature Measurements to Predict Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. .......................................... 53 Figure 21 Rate simulation for the same case as Fig. 20. ............................................... 54 Figure 22 Buildup charts for the same case as in Fig. 10. ............................................. 54 Figure 23 Pareto chart... ................................................................................ 10 CHAPTER III MODEL DEVELOPMENT .................................................................... 12 Introduction .................................................................................................................. 12 Steady...

Hashmi, Gibran Mushtaq

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

67

In-Cylinder Mechanisms of PCI Heat-Release Rate Control by Fuel Reactivity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Improving Fan System PerformanceIn situIn

68

The Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate of Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Purity Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grain boundary chromium carbides improve the resistance of nickel based alloys to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). However, in weld heat affected zones (HAZ's), thermal cycles from fusion welding can solutionize beneficial grain boundary carbides, produce locally high residual stresses and strains, and promote PWSCC. The present research investigates the crack growth rate of an A600 HAZ as a function of test temperature. The A600 HAZ was fabricated by building up a gas-tungsten-arc-weld deposit of EN82H filler metal onto a mill-annealed A600 plate. Fracture mechanics based, stress corrosion crack growth rate testing was performed in high purity water between 600 F and 680 F at an initial stress intensity factor of 40 ksi {radical}in and at a constant electrochemical potential. The HAZ samples exhibited significant SCC, entirely within the HAZ at all temperatures tested. While the HAZ samples showed the same temperature dependence for SCC as the base material (HAZ: 29.8 {+-} 11.2{sub 95%} kcal/mol vs A600 Base: 35.3 {+-} 2.58{sub 95%} kcal/mol), the crack growth rates were {approx} 30X faster than the A600 base material tested at the same conditions. The increased crack growth rates of the HAZ is attributed to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and to increased plastic strain in the HAZ as compared to the unaffected base material.

George A. Young; Nathan Lewis

2003-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

69

Causal equivalence of frames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Major Subject: Mathematics August 2005 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Texas A&M University Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of TROY LEE HENDERSON, IV by A Dissertation CAUSAL EQUIVALENCE... to the Office of Graduate Studies of TROY LEE HENDERSON, IV by A Dissertation CAUSAL EQUIVALENCE OF FRAMES iii ABSTRACT Causal Equivalence of Frames. (August 2005) Troy Lee Henderson, IV, B.S., The University of Alabama; M.A., The University of Alabama Chair...

Henderson, Troy Lee, IV

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Neutron dose equivalent meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Hsu, Hsiao-Hua (Los Alamos, NM); Casson, William H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kleck, Jeffrey H. (Menlo Park, CA); Beverding, Anthony (Foster City, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fuel-disruption experiments under high-ramp-rate heating conditions. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report presents the preliminary results and analysis of the High Ramp Rate fuel-disruption experiment series. These experiments were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the timing and mode of fuel disruption during the prompt-burst phase of a loss-of-flow accident. High-speed cinematography was used to observe the timing and mode of the fuel disruption in a stack of five fuel pellets. Of the four experiments discussed, one used fresh mixed-oxide fuel, and three used irradiated mixed-oxide fuel. Analysis of the experiments indicates that in all cases, the observed disruption occurred well before fuel-vapor pressure was high enough to cause the disruption. The disruption appeared as a rapid spray-like expansion and occurred near the onset of fuel melting in the irradiated-fuel experiments and near the time of complete fuel melting in the fresh-fuel experiment. This early occurrence of fuel disruption is significant because it can potentially lower the work-energy release resulting from a prompt-burst disassembly accident.

Wright, S.A.; Worledge, D.H.; Cano, G.L.; Mast, P.K.; Briscoe, F.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Partial fuel stratification to control HCCI heat release rates : fuel composition and other factors affecting pre-ignition reactions of two-stage ignition fuels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion with fully premixed charge is severely limited at high-load operation due to the rapid pressure-rise rates (PRR) which can lead to engine knock and potential engine damage. Recent studies have shown that two-stage ignition fuels possess a significant potential to reduce the combustion heat release rate, thus enabling higher load without knock.

Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.; Cannella, William (Chevron USA Inc.); Yang, Yi; Dronniou, Nicolas

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

What is Wind Chill Temperature? It is the temperature it "feels like" outside and is based on the rate of heat loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is Wind Chill Temperature? It is the temperature it "feels like" outside and is based on the rate of heat loss from exposed skin caused by the effects of wind and cold. As the wind increases, the body is cooled at a faster rate causing the skin temperature to drop. Wind Chill does not impact

74

Estimating Equivalency of Explosives Through A Thermochemical Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cheetah thermochemical computer code provides an accurate method for estimating the TNT equivalency of any explosive, evaluated either with respect to peak pressure or the quasi-static pressure at long time in a confined volume. Cheetah calculates the detonation energy and heat of combustion for virtually any explosive (pure or formulation). Comparing the detonation energy for an explosive with that of TNT allows estimation of the TNT equivalency with respect to peak pressure, while comparison of the heat of combustion allows estimation of TNT equivalency with respect to quasi-static pressure. We discuss the methodology, present results for many explosives, and show comparisons with equivalency data from other sources.

Maienschein, J L

2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

75

Heating, Current Drive, Operations and Diagnostics Issues Understand implications of reduced repetition rate, is it adequate for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heating, Current Drive, Operations and Diagnostics Issues Operations · Understand implications of ECRH to improve startup. Heating · ICRF is the base line heating system, compare with NBI and ECRH withstand the anticipated heat loads? Diagnostics · Capability of beam diagnostics for J(r), E(r), etc

76

Equivalence Principle and Clocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

String theory suggests the existence of gravitational-strength scalar fields ("dilaton" and "moduli") whose couplings to matter violate the equivalence principle. This provides a new motivation for high-precision clock experiments, as well as a generic theoretical framework for analyzing their significance.

T. Damour

1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

Free products, Orbit Equivalence and Measure Equivalence Rigidity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free products, Orbit Equivalence and Measure Equivalence Rigidity Aur´elien Alvarez and Damien Gaboriau February 18, 2009 Abstract We study the analogue in orbit equivalence of free product decomposition and free indecomposability for countable groups. We introduce the (orbit equivalence invariant

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

78

Joule Equivalent of Electrical Energy by Dr. James E. Parks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joule Equivalent of Electrical Energy by Dr. James E. Parks Department of Physics and Astronomy 401 The objectives of this experiment are: (1) to understand the equivalence of electrical energy and heat energy, (2) to learn techniques of calorimetry, (3) to learn how to measure electrical energy, and (4) to measure

Tennessee, University of

79

Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

Wen, J

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions R. J. Epstein,* S. Seidelin, D. Leibfried, J. H. Wesenberg, J. J. Bollinger, J. M. Amini, R. B. Blakestad, J. Britton,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions R. J. Epstein,* S. Seidelin, D. Leibfried, J. H. Wesenberg, J. J. Bollinger, J. M. Amini, R. B. Blakestad, J. Britton, J. P. Home, W. M have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Heat transfer to a fluid flowing in an annulus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ii I ~ DIMENSIONS AND SYMBOLS o ~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ I II e INTRODUCTION AND THEORY ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 3 IXI e APPARATUS AND PROCEDURES ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 7 XV o RESULTS ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ 17 V, DXSCUSSION OF RESULTS... of times 0 Prandtl nnnber~ e~& dimensionless initial temperature oi' surfaoe and fluids% D equivalent diameter& Di g~ L Q - volume flow rate~ L3/T V~ mass velooity, FT/L3 6 mass floe rate~ FT/L IMTRODUCTIOR AND THEORY This thesis comprises heat tz...

Logan, Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

SAPONIFICATION EQUIVALENT OF DASAMULA TAILA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT: Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings.

R. B. Saxena

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, December 20-March 19, 1982. Second quarterly report on the effect of rapid heating rate on coal nitrogen and sulfur release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser pyrolysis technique is applied to the investigation of the effects of heating rate on release of coal-bound sulfur and nitrogen. An experimental system characterization and calibration has been completed. A detailed documentation was prepared describing the 3-color pyrometer and the data analysis technique. The coal particle feed system has been calibrated to provide accurate mass flow rate at pre-selected particle velocities. The first batch of samples submitted for chemical analysis will be used for the determination of kinetics parameters at a high heating rate (approximately equal to 10/sup 6/ K/s). The coal used presently is a Montana Rosebud. Two other coals are available; one is ILL No. 6 (through EERC) which will need to be pulverized and the second is a Pitt. hv-A (through KVB). It was confirmed that sieve and drag size distribution of coal differ significantly, and that particle shape effects may be significant in the modelling of particle dynamics.

Gat, N.

1982-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

84

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

85

Assessment of Uncertainty in Cloud Radiative Effects and Heating Rates through Retrieval Algorithm Differences: Analysis using 3-years of ARM data at Darwin, Australia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground-based radar and lidar observations obtained at the Department of Energys Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Programs Tropical Western Pacific site located in Darwin, Australia are used to retrieve ice cloud properties in anvil and cirrus clouds. Cloud microphysical properties derived from four different retrieval algorithms (two radar-lidar and two radar only algorithms) are compared by examining mean profiles and probability density functions of effective radius (Re), ice water content (IWC), extinction, ice number concentration, ice crystal fall speed, and vertical air velocity. Retrieval algorithm uncertainty is quantified using radiative flux closure exercises. The effect of uncertainty in retrieved quantities on the cloud radiative effect and radiative heating rates are presented. Our analysis shows that IWC compares well among algorithms, but Re shows significant discrepancies, which is attributed primarily to assumptions of particle shape. Uncertainty in Re and IWC translates into sometimes-large differences in cloud radiative effect (CRE) though the majority of cases have a CRE difference of roughly 10 W m-2 on average. These differences, which we believe are primarily driven by the uncertainty in Re, can cause up to 2 K/day difference in the radiative heating rates between algorithms.

Comstock, Jennifer M.; Protat, Alain; McFarlane, Sally A.; Delanoe, Julien; Deng, Min

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

Fluid Bed Waste Heat Boiler Operating Experience in Dirty Gas Streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on an aluminium melting furnace at the ALCOA Massena Integrated Aluminum Works in upstate New York. Waste heat from an aluminum melting furnace is captured for general plant use for the first time in this plant. It is accomplished with advanced fluid bed heat... recovery that typically can save energy equivalent to 40% of the furnace firing rate. Previous attempts to recovery energy conven tionally on this type of furnace were unsuccessful due to fouling. The resolution of this fouling problem by using...

Kreeger, A. H.

87

Equivalent Neutrinos, Light WIMPs, and the Chimera of Dark Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to conventional wisdom, in the standard model (SM) of particle physics and cosmology the effective number of neutrinos is Neff=3 (more precisely, 3.046). In extensions of the standard model allowing for the presence of DeltaNnu equivalent neutrinos (or dark radiation), Neff is generally >3. The canonical results are reconsidered here, revealing that a measurement of Neff>3 can be consistent with DeltaNnu=0 (dark radiation without dark radiation). Conversely, a measurement consistent with Neff=3 is not inconsistent with the presence of dark radiation (DeltaNnu>0). In particular, if there is a light WIMP that annihilates to photons after the SM neutrinos have decoupled, the photons are heated beyond their usual heating from e+- annihilation, reducing the late time ratio of neutrino and photon temperatures (and number densities), leading to Neff3 even in the absence of equivalent neutrinos or dark radiation. A measurement of Neff>3 is thus no guarantee of the presence of equivalent neutrinos or dark radiation. In the presence of light WIMPs and/or equivalent neutrinos there are degeneracies among the light WIMP mass and its nature (fermion or boson, as well as its couplings to neutrinos or photons), the number and nature (fermion or boson) of the equivalent neutrinos, and their decoupling temperature (the strength of their interactions with the SM particles). There's more to a measurement of Neff than meets the eye.

Gary Steigman

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

88

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARMnumberDoppler ARM Data

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - as-operated heat loss Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

((svsv: Kylteknik): Kylteknik) 424503 E424503 E 20102010 88 --rzrz 8.8. Heat pumps, heat pipes,Heat pumps, heat pipes, Summary: heat transfer capacity and rate...

90

Statistically Equivalent Representative Volume Elements for Unidirectional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistically Equivalent Representative Volume Elements for Unidirectional Composite the statistically equivalent representative volume element (SERVE) are proposed for fiber-reinforced microstructures using a bilinear cohesive zone law. As introduced in the first article, a combination of statistical

Ghosh, Somnath

91

Equivalent Neutrinos, Light WIMPs, and the Chimera of Dark Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to conventional wisdom, in the standard model (SM) of particle physics and cosmology the effective number of neutrinos is Neff=3 (more precisely, 3.046). In extensions of the standard model allowing for the presence of DeltaNnu equivalent neutrinos (or dark radiation), Neff is generally >3. The canonical results are reconsidered here, revealing that a measurement of Neff>3 can be consistent with DeltaNnu=0 (dark radiation without dark radiation). Conversely, a measurement consistent with Neff=3 is not inconsistent with the presence of dark radiation (DeltaNnu>0). In particular, if there is a light WIMP that annihilates to photons after the SM neutrinos have decoupled, the photons are heated beyond their usual heating from e+- annihilation, reducing the late time ratio of neutrino and photon temperatures (and number densities), leading to Neff3 even in the absence of equivalent neutrinos or dark radiation. A measurement of Neff>3 is thus no guarantee of the presence of equivalent neutrinos or dark ra...

Steigman, Gary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

93

Geothermal heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the study is to demonstrate the viability of geothermal heating projects in energy and economic terms and to provide nomograms from which an initial estimate may be made without having to use data-processing facilities. The effect of flow rate and temperature of the geothermal water on drilling and on the network, and the effect of climate on the type of housing are considered.

Aureille, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A correlated K-distribution model of the heating rates for H[sub 2]O and a molecular mixture in the 0-2500 cm[sup [minus]1] wavelength region in the atmosphere between 0 and 60 km  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For this report a prototype infrared radiative transfer model using a correlated k-distribution technique to calculate the transmission between atmospheric levels has been used to calculate the radiative fluxes and heating rates for H[sub 2]O and a mixture of the major molecular absorbers in the atmosphere between 0 and 60 km. The mixture consists of H[sub 2]O, CO[sub 2], O[sub 3], CH[sub 4], and N[sub 2]O. The wave number range considered is 0-2500 cm[sup [minus]1]. The use of the k-distribution method allows 25 cm[sup [minus]1] wave number bins to produce fluxes and heating rates which are within ten percent of the results of detailed line by line calculations.

Grossman, A S; Grant, K E

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

95

ME 519: THEORY OF HEAT TRANSFER Instructor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ME 519: THEORY OF HEAT TRANSFER Fall 2014 Instructor: Class time: Classroom: Office Hours: Prof Tuesday 4­5pm or by appointment Class description This course will cover the fundamentals of heat transfer. An introductory course in heat transfer (ME 419 or equivalent) is pre-requisite. Grading 20% Homework 25% Exam 1

Lin, Xi

96

Equivalence of Convex Problem Geometry and Computational ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equivalence of Convex Problem Geometry and Computational Complexity in the Separation Oracle Model?. Robert M. Freundand Jorge Vera. January 2009.

2009-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Dynamical ensembles equivalence in fluid mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissipative Euler and Navier Stokes equations are discussed with the aim of proposing several experiments apt to test the equivalence of dynamical ensembles and the chaotic hypothesis.

Giovanni Gallavotti

1996-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

98

Snow water equivalent estimation using blackbox optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 7, 2011 ... Abstract: Accurate measurements of snow water equivalent (SWE) is an important factor in managing water resources for hydroelectric power...

Stphane Alarie

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Heat transfer via dropwise condensation on hydrophobic microstructured surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dropwise condensation has the potential to greatly increase heat transfer rates. Heat transfer coefficients by dropwise condensation and film condensation on microstructured silicon chips were compared. Heat transfer ...

Ruleman, Karlen E. (Karlen Elizabeth)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Heat strain and heat stress for workers wearing protective suits at a hazardous waste site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the effects of heat stress when full body protective suits are worn, heart rates, oral temperatures and environmental parameters were measured for five unacclimatized male workers (25-33 years of age) who performed sampling activities during hazardous waste clean-up operations. The protective ensembles included laminated PVC-Tyvec chemical resistant hood suits with rubber boots, gloves, full facepiece dual cartridge respirators and hard hats. For comparison, measurements also were performed when the men worked at a similar level of activity while they wore ordinary work clothes. A comparison of the heart rates for the men working with and without suits indicated that wearing the suits imposed a heat stress equivalent to adding 6/sup 0/ to 11/sup 0/C (11/sup 0/ to 20/sup 0/F) to the ambient WBGT index. A similar result was obtained by calculating the WBGT in the microclimate inside the suits and comparing it to the ambient WBGT. These results indicate the following: 1) there exists a significant risk of heat injury during hazardous waste work when full body protective clothing is worn, and 2) threshold limit values for heat stress established by the ACGIH must be lowered substantially before extending them to cover workers under these conditions.

Paull, J.M.; Rosenthal, F.S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Remarks on statistical errors in equivalent widths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equivalent width measurements for rapid line variability in atomic spectral lines are degraded by increasing error bars with shorter exposure times. We derive an expression for the error of the line equivalent width $\\sigma(W_\\lambda)$ with respect to pure photon noise statistics and provide a correction value for previous calculations.

Klaus Vollmann; Thomas Eversberg

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

102

TRANSPARENT HEAT MIRRORS FOR PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heating purposes. BACKGROUND The reduction of heat transfer rates by the use of thermal infraredheating applications should become available on the marketplace. Due to their high reflectivity to thermal infrared

Selkowitz, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Latent heat models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latent heat models were developed to calculate heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels for two cases: (1) heating with a condensable fluid flowing through coils and jackets; (2) vacuum reflux cooling with an overhead condenser. In either case the mathematical treatment, based on macroscopic balances, requires no iterative schemes. In addition to providing heat-transfer coefficients, the models predict flow rates of service fluid through the coils and jackets, estimate the percentage of heat transfer due to latent heat, and compute reflux rates.

Kumpinsky, E. [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States)] [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Energy Conservation Project Evaluation by Investment Equivalents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using discounted cash flow techniques, a new parameter for the quick economic evaluation of energy conservation ideas is calculated. The meaning of the calculated value, an 'Investment Equivalent of Energy Saving', is: 'The maximum amount...

Larson, R. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Refining the Proof of Planar Equivalence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline a full non-perturbative proof of planar (large-N) equivalence between bosonic correlators in a theory with Majorana fermions in the adjoint representation and one with Dirac fermions in the two-index (anti)symmetric representation. In a particular case (one flavor), this reduces to our previous result - planar equivalence between super-Yang--Mills theory and a non-supersymmetric ``orientifold field theory.'' The latter theory becomes one-flavor massless QCD at N=3.

A. Armoni; M. Shifman; G. Veneziano

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Accelerating classical charges and the equivalence principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare the behavior of a charged particle in a gravitational field and empty space. We resolve the apparent conflict between the Lorentz-Dirac equation and Larmor's formula of radiation by noting that the former describes an electron that is itself accelerated by an electromagnetic field. If instead, a hypothetical particle is considered that is accelerated by a non-electromagnetic force, Larmor's formula is found to be consistent with the accelerating particle's equation of motion. We consider the consequences concerning the equivalence principle and find that it is indeed violated if one demands that the same electromagnetic field be present in both the gravitational and accelerating cases; however, if one allows for the external electromagnetic fields to be different, the validity of the equivalence principle is restored. In either case, the basic idea behind the equivalence principle, which leads to a geometrized theory of gravity, remains unaffected.

Viktor T. Toth

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

On the equivalence of nonadiabatic fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we show how an anisotropic fluid in the diffusion limit can be equivalent to an isotropic fluid in the streaming out limit, in spherical symmetry. For a particular equation of state this equivalence is total, from one fluid we can obtain the other and vice versa. A numerical master model is presented, based on a generic equation of state, in which only quantitative differences are displayed between both nonadiabatic fluids. From a deeper view, other difference between fluids is shown as an asymmetry that can be overcome if we consider the appropriate initial-boundary conditions. Equivalence in this context can be considered as a first order method of approximation to study dissipative fluids.

W. Barreto

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring 2014 1 Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a cylindrical nuclear fuel rod of length L and diameter df and the tube at a rate m , and the outer surface of the tube is well insulated. Heat generation occurs within. The specific heat of water pc , and the thermal conductivity of the fuel rod fk are constants. The system

Virginia Tech

110

11-14 An ideal vapor-compression refrigeration cycle with refrigerant-134a as the working fluid is considered. The rate of heat removal from the refrigerated space, the power input to the compressor, the rate of heat rejection to the environment,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for this air conditioner are to be sketched. The heat absorbed by the refrigerant, the work input of the air conditioner is 689.4 Btu/h3.412 W1 W Btu/h 16 Btu/h3.412 W1 SEERCOPR

Kostic, Milivoje M.

111

Experimental investigation of piston heat transfer under conventional diesel and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion regimes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The piston of a heavy-duty single-cylinder research engine was instrumented with 11 fast-response surface thermocouples, and a commercial wireless telemetry system was used to transmit the signals from the moving piston. The raw thermocouple data were processed using an inverse heat conduction method that included Tikhonov regularization to recover transient heat flux. By applying symmetry, the data were compiled to provide time-resolved spatial maps of the piston heat flux and surface temperature. A detailed comparison was made between conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion operations at matched conditions of load, speed, boost pressure, and combustion phasing. The integrated piston heat transfer was found to be 24% lower, and the mean surface temperature was 25 C lower for reactivity-controlled compression ignition operation as compared to conventional diesel combustion, in spite of the higher peak heat release rate. Lower integrated piston heat transfer for reactivity-controlled compression ignition was found over all the operating conditions tested. The results showed that increasing speed decreased the integrated heat transfer for conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition. The effect of the start of injection timing was found to strongly influence conventional diesel combustion heat flux, but had a negligible effect on reactivity-controlled compression ignition heat flux, even in the limit of near top dead center high-reactivity fuel injection timings. These results suggest that the role of the high-reactivity fuel injection does not significantly affect the thermal environment even though it is important for controlling the ignition timing and heat release rate shape. The integrated heat transfer and the dynamic surface heat flux were found to be insensitive to changes in boost pressure for both conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition. However, for reactivity-controlled compression ignition, the mean surface temperature increased with changes in boost suggesting that equivalence ratio affects steady-state heat transfer.

Splitter, Derek A [ORNL; Hendricks, Terry Lee [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Ghandhi, Jaal B [University of Wisconsin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Computational equivalence between quantum Turing machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational equivalence between quantum Turing machines and quantum circuit families Christian Westergaard 21st November 2005 Contents 1 The quantum Turing machine model 5 1.1 Basics of quantum Turing machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2 Projections on the quantum state space

Møller, Jesper Michael

113

Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit Conversion Factors Quantity Equivalent Values Mass 1 kg = 1000 g = 0.001 metric ton = 2·R 10.73 psia·ft3 lbmol·R 62.36 liter·torr mol·K 0.7302 ft3·atm lbmol·R Temperature Conversions: T

Ashurst, W. Robert

114

An Introduction to Decidability of DPDA Equivalence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Edinburgh email: cps@dcs.ed.ac.uk 1 Introduction The DPDA equivalence problem was posed in 1966 produced a different proof of decidability that is essentially a simplification of S´enizergues's proof [14, the tableau proof system uses conditional proof rules that involve distances between premises. Essentially

Stirling, Colin

115

An Introduction to Decidability of DPDA Equivalence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Edinburgh email: cps@dcs.ed.ac.uk 1 Introduction The DPDA equivalence problem was posed in 1966 produced a di#erent proof of decidability that is essentially a simplification of S??enizergues's proof [14, the tableau proof system uses conditional proof rules that involve distances between premises. Essentially

Stirling, Colin

116

Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with Prandtl number ({sigma}) about 6, was confined in a cell which had a square cross section of 7.3 cm x 7.3 cm and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10{sup 5} < Ra < 5 x 10{sup 8} and Taylor numbers 0 < Ta < 5 x 10{sup 9}. We show the variation of normalized heat transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate {Omega}{sub D}, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range 10{sup 7} to about 10{sup 9} is roughly 0.29 with a Ro dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra{sup 1/5} + b Ra{sup 1/3} . The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power law scaling. The overall impact of rotation on heat transport in turbulent convection is assessed.

Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Yuanming [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Equivalency-processing parallel photonic integrated circuit EP3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equivalency-processing parallel photonic integrated circuit EP3 IC : equivalence search module present an optoelectronic module called the equivalency-processing parallel photonic integrated circuit EP3 IC that is created specifically to implement high-speed parallel equivalence searches i

Louri, Ahmed

118

Einstein's Apple: His First Principle of Equivalence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After a historical discussion of Einstein's 1907 principle of equivalence, a homogeneous gravitational field in Minkowski spacetime is constructed. It is pointed out that the reference frames in gravitational theory can be understood as spaces with a flat connection and torsion defined through teleparallelism. This kind of torsion was introduced by Einstein in 1928. The concept of torsion is discussed through simple examples and some historical observations.

Engelbert L. Schucking; Eugene J. Surowitz

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

119

Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Hysteresis Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed a literature review and found that many equivalent circuit models of hysteresis motors in use today are incorrect. The model by Miyairi and Kataoka (1965) is the correct one. We extended the model by transforming it to quadrature coordinates, amenable to circuit or digital simulation. 'Hunting' is an oscillatory phenomenon often observed in hysteresis motors. While several works have attempted to model the phenomenon with some partial success, we present a new complete model that predicts hunting from first principles.

Nitao, J J; Scharlemann, E T; Kirkendall, B A

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

On the equivalence theorem for integrable systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the equivalence theorem for integrable systems using two formulations of the Alday-Arutyunov-Frolov model. We show that the S-matrix is invariant under the field transformation which reduces the non-linear Dirac brackets of one formulation into the standard commutation relations in the second formulation. We also explain how to perform the direct diagonalization of the transformed Hamiltonian by constructing the states corresponding to self-adjoint extensions.

A. Melikyan; E. Pereira; V. O. Rivelles

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Near-field heat transfer between a nanoparticle and a rough surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we focus on the surface roughness correction to the near-field radiative heat transfer between a nanoparticle and a material with a rough surface utilizing a direct perturbation theory up to second order in the surface profile. We discuss the different distance regimes for the local density of states above the rough material and the heat flux analytically and numerically. We show that the heat transfer rate is larger than that corresponding to a flat surface at short distances. At larger distances it can become smaller due to surface polariton scattering by the rough surface. For distances much smaller than the correlation length of the surface profile, we show that the results converge to a proximity approximation, whereas in the opposite limit the rough surface can be replaced by an equivalent surface layer.

Svend-Age Biehs; Jean-Jacques Greffet

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

Heat storage with CREDA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle of operation of ETS or Electric Thermal Storage is discussed in this book. As can be seen by the diagram presented, heating elements buried deep within the core are energized during off-peak periods or periods of lower cost energy. These elements charge the core to a per-determined level, then during the on-peak periods when the cost of electricity is higher or demand is higher, the heat is extracted from the core. The author discusses how this technology has progressed to the ETS equipment of today; this being the finer control of charging rates and extraction of heat from the core.

Beal, T. (Fostoria Industries, Fostoria, OH (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Rate...

124

STUDY OF FROST GROWTH ON HEAT EXCHANGERS USED AS OUTDOOR COILS IN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDY OF FROST GROWTH ON HEAT EXCHANGERS USED AS OUTDOOR COILS IN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS OF FROST GROWTH ON HEAT EXCHANGERS USED AS OUTDOOR COILS IN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.5.3 Air Side Heat Transfer Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.5.4 Fluid Side Heat

125

AKS systems and Lepage equivalent problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The integrable systems known as "AKS systems" admit a natural formulation in terms of a Hamiltonian picture. The Lagrangian side of these systems are far less known; a version in these terms can be found in a work of Feher et al. The purpose of these notes in to provide a novel description of AKS systems in terms of a variational problem different from the usual in mechanics. Additionally, and using techniques borrowed from an article of M. Gotay, it was possible to build the Hamiltonian side of this variational problem, allowing us to establish the equivalence with the usual approach to these integrable systems.

Santiago Capriotti

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

126

Heat release rate markers for premixed combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1075. [21] Report: Hydrogen from Coal Program: Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan for the period 2008 through 2016. U.S. Department of Energy, 2008. [22] Report: Wabash River Coal Gasification re-powering Project: A DOE Assesment. U.S. Department... of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, 2002. [23] O. Maustard, Report: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, An Overview of Coal based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Technology, 2005. [24] R...

Nikolaou, Zacharias M.; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 .2004The AtmosphericHomologous

128

A Comparative Heat Transfer Examination of Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) With and Without Phase Change Materials (PCMs) Using a Dynamic Wall Simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transferring approximately the same amount of heat regardless of the fact that one panel was outfitted with PCM. Equivalent Thermal Resistance Thermal resistance is the resistance to heat flow through a material caused by a temperature difference across.... Therefore, the "q T & ? values at any point in time during heating up or cooling down processes were referred to as equivalent thermal resistance, R e Figure 14 shows the equivalent thermal resistances estimated during the heating up and cooling...

Medina, M.; Zhu, D.

129

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

130

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

131

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

132

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

133

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

134

Creep Prediction Using The Non-Linear Strain Energy Equivalence Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creep Prediction Using The Non-Linear Strain Energy Equivalence Theory Jennifer K. Lynch, Ph Theory, a semi-empirical model, is utilized to predict long- term creep from short-term compressive-axial compression are performed at strain rates of 3 and 0.03 %/minute to predict creep behavior and stress

135

On the equivalence of economic lot scheduling and switched production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the equivalence of economic lot scheduling and switched production systems K.G.M. Jacobs from switched production systems are applied to the economic lot schedul- ing problem: i) A feedback-entrant production scheduling where parts arrive into the manufacturing system with certain (random) arrival rates

Armbruster, Dieter

136

PSNC Energy (Gas)- Green Building Rate Discount  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This discounted rate is available to commercial customers whose building meets the U.S. Green Building Councils Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification or equivalent. To...

137

Gauge equivalence in stationary radiative transport through media ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability of the Gauge Equivalent Classes in Inverse. Stationary Transport. Stephen McDowall , Plamen Stefanov , and Alexandru. Tamasan.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

138

Heating system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A heating system utilizing solar panels and buried ground conduits to collect and store heat which is delivered to a heatpump heat exchanger. A heat-distribution fluid continuously circulates through a ground circuit to transfer heat from the ground to the heat exchanger. The ground circuit includes a length of buried ground conduit, a pump, a check valve and the heat exchanger. A solar circuit, including a solar panel and a second pump, is connected in parallel with the check valve so that the distribution fluid transfers solar heat to the heat exchanger for utilization and to the ground conduit for storage when the second pump is energized. A thermostatically instrumented control system energizes the second pump only when the temperature differential between the solar panel inlet and outlet temperatures exceeds a predetermined value and the ground temperature is less than a predetermined value. Consequently, the distribution fluid flows through the solar panel only when the panel is capable of supplying significant heat to the remainder of the system without causing excessive drying of the ground.

Nishman, P.J.

1983-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

The equivalence principle in classical mechanics and quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss our understanding of the equivalence principle in both classical mechanics and quantum mechanics. We show that not only does the equivalence principle hold for the trajectories of quantum particles in a background gravitational field, but also that it is only because of this that the equivalence principle is even to be expected to hold for classical particles at all.

Philip D. Mannheim

2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Non-Equivalence of Empirically Equivalent Theories: The Case of Hidden Variables in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the postulation of the existence of the neutrino by Pauli to save the conservation of energy and momentum laws? In this paper, I will take as a case study, the issue of choosing between standard quantum mechanics (also known of an empirically equivalent (at minimum) theory to OQM. In conclusion, I will argue that the thesis of notational

Chopra, Samir

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Application Study of a Single House Horizontal Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is imperative to get new heating systems into the market and implement rate structures with heat meters for the purpose of energy conservation and environmental protection. Based on analysis of current heating technology, this paper analyzes...

Hang, Y.; Ying, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

Metz, Philip D. (Rocky Point, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Heat Transfer of a Multiple Helical Coil Heat Exchanger Using a Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present study has focused on the use of coil heat exchangers (CHEs) with microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries to understand if CHEs can yield greater rates of heat transfer. An experimental study was conducted using a...

Gaskill, Travis

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

Heat collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Heat collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, M.A.

1981-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

Rate Schedules  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

147

Corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

acids biologically equivalent: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Complexity of Computer Computations, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York, on March 22, 1972. The equivalence problem is to determine the ......

149

Equivalent circuit modeling of hybrid electric vehicle drive train  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . Figure 3. 4. 6: The motor shaft at no load. Figure 3. 4. 7: Bond graph for the motor shaft. . . Figure 3. 4. 8: Equivalent circuit of the motor shaft. Figure 3. 5. 1: Concrete example: the elevator Figure 3. 5. 2: Electro-mechanical model... model of the elevator. Figure 3. 5. 8: Final equivalent circuit of the elevator. Figure 4. 1. 1: Mechanical model of a shaft. Figure 4. 1. 2: Equivalent circuit of the shaft. Figure 4. 1. 3: Mechanical model of a gearbox. Figure 4. 1. 4: Equivalent...

Routex, Jean-Yves

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

MEASUREMENT OF SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. The heat capacity of the Saltstone waste form is one of the important properties of Saltstone mixes that was last measured at SRNL in 1997. It is therefore important to develop a core competency for rapid and accurate analysis of the specific heat capacity of the Saltstone mixes in order to quantify the impact of compositional and operational variations on this property as part of the variability study. The heat capacity, coupled with the heat of hydration data obtained from isothermal calorimetry for a given Saltstone mix, can be used to predict the maximum temperature increase in the cells within the vaults of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The temperature increase controls the processing rate and the pour schedule. The maximum temperature is also important to the performance properties of the Saltstone. For example, in mass pours of concrete or grout of which Saltstone is an example, the maximum temperature increase and the maximum temperature difference (between the surface and the hottest location) are controlled to ensure durability of the product and prevent or limit the cracking caused by the thermal gradients produced during curing. This report details the development and implementation of a method for the measurement of the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes as well as the heat capacities of the cementitious materials of the premix and the simulated salt solutions used to batch the mixes. The developed method utilizes the TAM Air isothermal calorimeter and takes advantage of the sophisticated heat flow measurement capabilities of the instrument. Standards and reference materials were identified and used to validate the procedure and ensure accuracy of testing. Heat capacities of Saltstone mixes were {approx} 55% higher than the previous measurement of specific heat capacity on a reference Saltstone mix in 1997. Values of mixes prepared using Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment (DDA), Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) simulants and premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio were {approx} 1.95 J/g/{sup o}C and were equivalent within experimental error. The simple law of mixtures was used to predict the heat capacities of the Saltstone and the results were in excellent agreement with experimental data. This simple law of mixtures can therefore be used to predict the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes in those cases where measurements have not been made. The time dependence of the heat capacity is important as an input to the modeling of temperature increase in Saltstone vaults. The heat capacity of a mix of MCU and premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio was measured immediately after initial mixing and then periodically up to times greater than 100 days. Within experimental error, the heat capacity did not change with time. Therefore, the modeling is not complicated by requiring a time dependent function for specific heat capacity. The water to cementitious material (w/cm) ratio plays a key role in determining the value of the heat capacity. Both experimental and predictive values for SWPF mixes as function of the w/cm ratio were obtained and presented in this report. Predictions of the maximum temperatures of the Saltstone mixes were made using the heat of hydration data from previous isothermal measurements and the newly measured heat capacities for DDA, MCU and SWPF mixes. The maximum temperature increase ranged from 37 to 48 C for these mixes. The presence of aluminate at 0.33 M produced a temperature increase of 68 C which is close to the adiabatic temperature rise of 74 C observed by Steimke and Fowler in 1997 for a mix containing 0.35 M aluminate. Aluminum dissolution of the sludge will increase the aluminate in the DSS which in turn will result in a larger temperature increase in the Saltstone vaults during the curing p

Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

EQUIVALENCE RATIONNELLE, EQUIVALENCE NUM ERIQUE ET PRODUITS DE COURBES ELLIPTIQUES SUR UN CORPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

d´emontrer les th´eor`emes suivants : Th´eor`eme 1 (cf. th. 1.7). L'´equivalence rationnelle est ´egale `a l'´equivalen- ce num´erique (`a coefficients rationnels) sur X. Th´eor`eme 2 (cor. 3.10). Les conjectures de Lichtenbaum [32, §7] sont vraies pour X. Th´eor`eme 3 (th. 4.5). Pour tout ouvert U de X, les

152

AGN Heating through Cavities and Shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three comments are made on AGN heating of cooling flows. A simple physical argument is used to show that the enthalpy of a buoyant radio lobe is converted to heat in its wake. Thus, a significant part of ``cavity'' enthalpy is likely to end up as heat. Second, the properties of the repeated weak shocks in M87 are used to argue that they can plausibly prevent gas close to the AGN from cooling. As the most significant heating mechanism at work closest to the AGN, shock heating probably plays a critical role in the feedback mechanism. Third, results are presented from a survey of AGN heating rates in nearby giant elliptical galaxies. With inactive systems included, the overall AGN heating rate is reasonably well matched to the total cooling rate for the sample. Thus, intermittent AGN outbursts are energetically capable of preventing the hot atmospheres of these galaxies from cooling and forming stars.

P. E. J. Nulsen; C. Jones; W. R. Forman; L. P. David; B. R. McNamara; D. A. Rafferty; L. Birzan; M. W. Wise

2006-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

153

Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ livingPattern : Room ­? behaviour; setTemp : Room ­? num; heatSwitchOn, heatSwitchOff, userReset : simple

Day, Nancy

154

Heat exchanger for power generation equipment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger for a turbine is provided wherein the heat exchanger comprises a heat transfer cell comprising a sheet of material having two opposed ends and two opposed sides. In addition, a plurality of concavities are disposed on a surface portion of the sheet of material so as to cause hydrodynamic interactions and affect a heat transfer rate of the turbine between a fluid and the concavities when the fluid is disposed over the concavities.

Nirmalan, Nirm Velumylm; Bowman, Michael John

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Energy Rating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistent, accurate, and uniform ratings based on a single statewide rating scale Reasonable estimates of potential utility bill savings and reliable recommendations on cost-effective measures to improve energy efficiency Training and certification procedures for home raters and quality assurance procedures to promote accurate ratings and to protect consumers Labeling procedures that will meet the needs of home buyers, homeowners, renters, the real estate industry, and mortgage lenders with an interest in home energy ratings

Cabec Conference; Rashid Mir P. E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Heat Pipe Embedded AlSiC Plates for High Conductivity - Low CTE Heat Spreaders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat pipe embedded aluminum silicon carbide (AlSiC) plates are innovative heat spreaders that provide high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Since heat pipes are two phase devices, they demonstrate effective thermal conductivities ranging between 50,000 and 200,000 W/m-K, depending on the heat pipe length. Installing heat pipes into an AlSiC plate dramatically increases the plates effective thermal conductivity. AlSiC plates alone have a thermal conductivity of roughly 200 W/m-K and a CTE ranging from 7-12 ppm/ deg C, similar to that of silicon. An equivalent sized heat pipe embedded AlSiC plate has effective thermal conductivity ranging from 400 to 500 W/m-K and retains the CTE of AlSiC.

Johnson, Matthew (DOE/NNSA Kansas City Plant (United States)); Weyant, J.; Garner, S. (Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (Lancaster, PA (United States)); Occhionero, M. (CPS Technologies Corporation, Norton, MA (United States))

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

*can substitute CSE 131 or equivalent and ESE 101 or equivalent Updated June 2013 Mechanical Engineering Sample Curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*can substitute CSE 131 or equivalent and ESE 101 or equivalent Updated June 2013 Mechanical of Thermal Systems MEMS 412 3 Modeling Simulation and Control MEMS 4301 3 Structural Dynamics and Vibration MEMS 431 4 Intro to Circuits ESE 230 4 Engineering Ethics and Sustainability ENGR 4501 1 Engineering

Subramanian, Venkat

158

Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices.

Wilson, David Gordon (Winchester, MA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices.

Wilson, David Gordon

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

160

Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices. 11 figures.

Wilson, D.G.

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

R1S-M-2322 TABLE OF EXPOSURE RATE CONSTANTS AND DOSE EQUIVALENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in units of MeV/photon , (pen/p)air in cm2 /g gives r in R»m2 /Ci«h if the following conversion factors a point source . 4 5. DOSE BUILD-UP FACTORS 7 6. MASS ENERGY ABSORPTION COEFFICIENTS AND LINEAR

162

Sensors and Actuators A 132 (2006) 171181 A low-cost rate-grade nickel microgyroscope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the drive-mode to vibration amplitude above 10 m. The rate sensor demonstrates a noise-equivalent rate of 0. The gyroscope is hybrid connected to a CMOS capacitive interface circuit, and the hybrid system operation of magnitude at vacuum, which yields an estimated noise-equivalent rate better than 0.05 ( /s)/Hz1

Akin, Tayfun

163

Minimal universal quantum heat machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In traditional thermodynamics the Carnot cycle yields the ideal performance bound of heat engines and refrigerators. We propose and analyze a minimal model of a heat machine that can play a similar role in quantum regimes. The minimal model consists of a single two-level system with periodically modulated energy splitting that is permanently, weakly, coupled to two spectrally-separated heat baths at different temperatures. The equation of motion allows to compute the stationary power and heat currents in the machine consistently with the second-law of thermodynamics. This dual-purpose machine can act as either an engine or a refrigerator (heat pump) depending on the modulation rate. In both modes of operation the maximal Carnot efficiency is reached at zero power. We study the conditions for finite-time optimal performance for several variants of the model. Possible realizations of the model are discussed.

David Gelbwaser-Klimovsky; Robert Alicki; Gershon Kurizki

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Impact of Rate Design and Net Metering on the Bill Savings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Best Practices Website: eetd.lbl.goveaempreportslbnl-3276e.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentimpact-rate-design-and-net-m...

165

Proceedings of HT'03 2003 Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of HT'03 2003 Summer Heat Transfer Conference July 21­23, 2003, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA HT2003-47016 A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR HEAT FLUX DETERMINATION D.G. Walker Department of Mechanical@vt.edu ABSTRACT A new method for estimating heat fluxes from heating rate measurements and an approach to measure

Walker, D. Greg

166

Design, construction and implementation of spherical tissue equivalent proportional counter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used for medical and space activities whenever a combination of high and low LET (lineal energy transfer) radiations are present. With the frequency and duration of space activities increasing...

Perez Nunez, Delia Josefina

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Behavioral Model Equivalence Checking for Large Analog Mixed Signal Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is solved by interfacing a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) based optimizer with commercial circuit simulation tools, such as CADENCE SPECTRE. The proposed methodology is then applied for equivalence checking of a PLL as a test case and results...

Singh, Amandeep

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

On equivalence of thinning fluids used for hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper aims to answer the question: if and how non-Newtonian fluids may be compared in their mechanical action when used for hydraulic fracturing? By employing the modified formulation of the PKN problem we obtain its simple analytical solutions in the cases of perfectly plastic and Newtonian fluids. Since the results for shear thinning fluids are intermediate between those for these cases, the obtained equation for the fracture length suggests a criterion of the equivalence of various shear thinning fluids for the problem of hydraulic fractures. We assume fluids equivalent in their hydrofracturing action, when at a reference time they produce fractures of the same length. The equation for the fracture length translates the equivalence in terms of the hydraulic fracture length and treatment time into the equivalence in terms of the properties of a fracturing fluid (behavior and consistency indices). Analysis shows that the influence of the consistency and behavior indices on the fracture length, particle v...

Linkov, Alexander

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Development of design tool for statically equivalent deepwater mooring systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tests is the depth and spatial limitations in wave basins. It is therefore important to design and build equivalent mooring systems to ensure that the static properties (global restoring forces and global stiffness) of the prototype floater are matched...

Udoh, Ikpoto Enefiok

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Equivalent radii of antennas with noncircular cross section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1960 Ma]or Sub)ect: Electrical Engineering EQUIVALENT RADII OF ANTENNAS WITH NONCIRCULAR CROSS SECTION A Thesis By CHARLES WEN-HSUN SU Approved as to style and content by: (C airman of Conunittee) (Head of Department...EQUIVALENT RADII OF ANTENNAS WITH NONCIRCULAR CROSS SECTION A Thesis By CHARLES WEN-HSUN SU Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Su, Charles Wen-Hsun

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

NBSBR 84-2867 Test Procedures for Rating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NBSBR 84-2867 Test Procedures for Rating Residential Heating and Cooling Absorption Equipment U the heating mode. Both air-source and ground water source absorption heat pumps are considered, as well as air for estimating the heating and cooling seasonal performance and cost of operation of residential water chillers

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

172

Efficiency Ratings for the Daiken AC (Americas), Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency Ratings for the Daiken AC (Americas), Inc. Altherma Air-to-Water Source Heat Pump System is used to provide water heating, the EF for that separate water heater shall be used for performance Description Model No. Capacity (tons) Space Heating Space Cooling SEER Water Heating Efficiency

173

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Water and Space Heating Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the design and operation of the Trane Weathertron III Heat Pump Water Heating System and includes a comparison of features and performance to other domestic water heating systems. Domestic water is generally provided through...

Kessler, A. F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering...

Ruch, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (1): Flow Resistance and Energy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Given the schematic diagram of TDHT system, introducing the definition of equivalent fouling roughness height, and using the Niklaus...

Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, G.; Li, X.; Huang, L.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Heat Integration and Heat Recovery at a Large Chemical Manufacturing Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the hydrogenation process. The hydrogenation process uses a catalyst to react the purified phenol with hydrogen, forming a mixture of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. The reaction is exothermic and is cooled with water to control the rate of reaction... Process Heat Recovery The process heat recovery opportunity was identified in the hydrogenation process. The hydrogenation process contains an exothermic reaction which is cooled with water to control the rate of reaction. The heated water...

Togna, K .A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, P.J.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, Phillip J. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Dual source heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Segmented heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

Baldwin, Darryl Dean (Lafayette, IN); Willi, Martin Leo (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott Byron (Metamara, IL); Timmons, Kristine Ann (Chillicothe, IL)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of a compensation chamber for use in a multiple condenser loop heat pipe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of many electronic devices is presently limited by heat dissipation rates. One potential solution lies in high-performance air-cooled heat exchangers like PHUMP, the multiple condenser loop heat pipe presented ...

Roche, Nicholas Albert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Quantum Tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle with the STE-QUEST Space Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present in detail the scientific objectives in fundamental physics of the Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence Space Test (STE-QUEST) space mission. STE-QUEST was pre-selected by the European Space Agency together with four other missions for the cosmic vision M3 launch opportunity planned around 2024. It carries out tests of different aspects of the Einstein Equivalence Principle using atomic clocks, matter wave interferometry and long distance time/frequency links, providing fascinating science at the interface between quantum mechanics and gravitation that cannot be achieved, at that level of precision, in ground experiments. We especially emphasize the specific strong interest of performing equivalence principle tests in the quantum regime, i.e. using quantum atomic wave interferometry. Although STE-QUEST was finally not selected in early 2014 because of budgetary and technological reasons, its science case was very highly rated. Our aim is to expose that science to a large audience in order to allow future projects and proposals to take advantage of the STE-QUEST experience.

Brett Altschul; Quentin G. Bailey; Luc Blanchet; Kai Bongs; Philippe Bouyer; Luigi Cacciapuoti; Salvatore Capozziello; Naceur Gaaloul; Domenico Giulini; Jonas Hartwig; Luciano Iess; Philippe Jetzer; Arnaud Landragin; Ernst Rasel; Serge Reynaud; Stephan Schiller; Christian Schubert; Fiodor Sorrentino; Uwe Sterr; Jay D. Tasson; Guglielmo M. Tino; Philip Tuckey; Peter Wolf

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

185

Containment, Equivalence and Coreness from CSP to QCSP and beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) and its quantified extensions, whether without (QCSP) or with disjunction (QCSP_or), correspond naturally to the model checking problem for three increasingly stronger fragments of positive first-order logic. Their complexity is often studied when parameterised by a fixed model, the so-called template. It is a natural question to ask when two templates are equivalent, or more generally when one "contain" another, in the sense that a satisfied instance of the first will be necessarily satisfied in the second. One can also ask for a smallest possible equivalent template: this is known as the core for CSP. We recall and extend previous results on containment, equivalence and "coreness" for QCSP_or before initiating a preliminary study of cores for QCSP which we characterise for certain structures and which turns out to be more elusive.

Madelaine, Florent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Equivalence of History and Generator Epsilon-Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epsilon-machines are minimal, unifilar presentations of stationary stochastic processes. They were originally defined in the history machine sense, as hidden Markov models whose states are the equivalence classes of infinite pasts with the same probability distribution over futures. In analyzing synchronization, though, an alternative generator definition was given: unifilar, edge-emitting hidden Markov models with probabilistically distinct states. The key difference is that history epsilon-machines are defined by a process, whereas generator epsilon-machines define a process. We show here that these two definitions are equivalent in the finite-state case.

Nicholas F. Travers; James P. Crutchfield

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Lunar Laser Ranging Tests of the Equivalence Principle with the Earth and Moon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A primary objective of the Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) experiment is to provide precise observations of the lunar orbit that contribute to a wide range of science investigations. Time series of the highly accurate measurements of the distance between the Earth and Moon provide unique information used to determine whether, in accordance with the Equivalence Principle (EP), both of these celestial bodies are falling towards the Sun at the same rate, despite their different masses, compositions, and gravitational self-energies. Current LLR solutions give $(-1.0 \\pm 1.4) \\times 10^{-13}$ for any possible inequality in the ratios of the gravitational and inertial masses for the Earth and Moon, $\\Delta(M_G/M_I)$. This result, in combination with laboratory experiments on the weak equivalence principle, yields a strong equivalence principle (SEP) test of $\\Delta(M_G/M_I)_{\\tt SEP} = (-2.0 \\pm 2.0) \\times 10^{-13}$. Such an accurate result allows other tests of gravitational theories. The result of the SEP test translates into a value for the corresponding SEP violation parameter $\\eta$ of $(4.4 \\pm 4.5)\\times10^{-4}$, where $\\eta = 4\\beta -\\gamma -3$ and both $\\gamma$ and $\\beta$ are parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters. The PPN parameter $\\beta$ is determined to be $\\beta - 1 = (1.2 \\pm 1.1) \\times 10^{-4}$. Focusing on the tests of the EP, we discuss the existing data, and characterize the modeling and data analysis techniques. The robustness of the LLR solutions is demonstrated with several different approaches that are presented in the text. We emphasize that near-term improvements in the LLR ranging accuracy will further advance the research of relativistic gravity in the solar system, and, most notably, will continue to provide highly accurate tests of the Equivalence Principle.

James G. Williams; Slava G. Turyshev; Dale H. Boggs

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

188

Heating 7. 2 user's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

Childs, K.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Control of Nondeterministic Discrete Event Systems for Bisimulation Equivalence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a certain finite state space, namely the power set of Cartesian product of system and specification state.jiang@gm.com). Nondeterminism in plant model can arise from unmodeled dynamics or abstraction. A nondeterministic plant can have], ready-trace [4], simulation and bisimulation equivalences [29]. Also, the supervisors can

Kumar, Ratnesh

190

Easier way to calculate E fields Equivalent to Coulomb's law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lines enter as leave closed surface the net is zero = ·= dAE AdE cos rr #12;Flux Calculate fluxGauss' Law Easier way to calculate E fields ­ Gauss' Law Equivalent to Coulomb's law Use ·= AE rr Let A become small so flux becomes integral over Gaussian surface Flux is proportional to net

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

191

Equivalence Checking for Function Pipelining in Behavioral Synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on subtle design invariants. Function pipelining (a.k.a. system-level pipelining) is an important, correct-by-construction abstraction of function pipeline; thus, instead of developing pipelineEquivalence Checking for Function Pipelining in Behavioral Synthesis Kecheng Hao, Sandip Ray

Xie, Fei

192

AN ELECTRONIC EQUIVALENT SCHEME OF A JOSEPHSON JUNCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ELECTRONIC EQUIVALENT SCHEME OF A JOSEPHSON JUNCTION C. K. BAK Physics Laboratory I. A lot of phenomena observed in Josephson junctions are easily identified in the « equi- valent circuit ~. The lock range Ji corresponds to the supercurrent in a Josephson junction. The loop gain A(co) can

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

193

New Blind Signatures Equivalent to Factorization (Extended Abstract)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Blind Signatures Equivalent to Factorization (Extended Abstract) David Pointcheval Jacques Stern Abstract In this paper, we present new blind signature schemes based on the factorization problem. They are the first blind sig- nature schemes proved secure relatively to factorization. By security, we mean

Pointcheval, David

194

On the Equivalence of Constraint Satisfaction Francesca Rossi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their information content is essentially identical. In other words, it is only the information content of a CSP was visiting MCC. #12;Abstract A solution of a Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) is an assignment of values notion of equivalence. Two di erent algorithms, currently used for transforming any non-binary CSP

195

An ideal independent source as an equivalent 1-port  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a 1-port, not necessarily linear, with a dependent source, appearing at the port. The control of the source is entirely internal for the 1-port. If this source is a parallel voltage source, then the equivalent circuit is an ideal independent voltage source, and if it is a series current source, then the equivalent circuit is an ideal independent current source. (As usual, "ideal" source is defined as a source whose proposed function is independent of the load.) In the simple LTI case, these results can be obtained, respectively, by either taking RTh zero in the Thevenin equivalent, or taking RN infinite in the Norton equivalent; however the very fact that the final circuits do not include any linear elements indicates the possibility of generalization to nonlinear 1-ports. Some limitations on the circuit's structure (functional dependencies in it) are required, and the clearness of these limitations, i.e. clearness of the conditions for the 1-port to be an ideal source for any load, is the aesthetical point.

Emanuel Gluskin; Anatoly Patlakh

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

Multiple source heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Estimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-independent estimate of the total heat output of Cenozoic seafloor is 18.6 to 20.5 TW, which leads to a global output: Oceanic heat flow; Global heat budget; Subsidence rate 1. Introduction The total heat output of the EarthEstimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data Meng Wei , David

Sandwell, David T.

198

Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Industrial heat pumps - types and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Confusion about energy savings and economics is preventing many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps. The variety of heat pumps available and the lack of a standard rating system cause some of this confusion. The authors illustrate how a simple categorization based on coefficient of performance (COP) can compare the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps. After evaluating examples in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs, they compare heat pumps from the various categories on the basis of economics. 6 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Heat Pump for High School Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The heat pump system used for recycling and reusing waste heat in s high school bathroom was minutely analyzed in its coefficient of performance, onetime utilization ratio of energy, economic property and so on. The results showed that this system...

Huang, K.; Wang, H.; Zhou, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION HEATING IN TURBULENT SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperature of the gas in molecular clouds is a key determinant of the characteristic mass of star formation. Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is considered one of the most important heating mechanisms in weakly ionized molecular clouds. In this work, we study the AD heating rate using two-fluid turbulence simulations and compare it with the overall heating rate due to turbulent dissipation. We find that for observed molecular clouds, which typically have Alfven Mach numbers of {approx}1 and AD Reynolds numbers of {approx}20, about 70% of the total turbulent dissipation is in the form of AD heating. AD has an important effect on the length scale where energy is dissipated: when AD heating is strong, most of the energy in the cascade is removed by ion-neutral drift, with a comparatively small amount of energy making it down to small scales. We derive a relation for the AD heating rate that describes the results of our simulations to within a factor of two. Turbulent dissipation, including AD heating, is generally less important than cosmic-ray heating in molecular clouds, although there is substantial scatter in both.

Li, Pak Shing [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Myers, Andrew [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McKee, Christopher F., E-mail: psli@astron.berkeley.edu, E-mail: atmyers@berkeley.edu, E-mail: cmckee@berkeley.edu [Physics Department and Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership...

203

Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants...

204

Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low...

205

Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

206

Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Midland District Heating Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Midland,...

207

San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility San Bernardino District Heating Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating...

208

Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

209

On thermoelectric power conversion from heat re-circulating combustion systems F. J. Weinberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On thermoelectric power conversion from heat re-circulating combustion systems F. J. Weinberg for the Second Law heat engine cycles the maximum power that can be extracted is independent of layout Fax: 4420 7594 5604 Word count: 3750 Diags. equivalent: 1600 5350 #12;On thermoelectric power

210

The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectra and Pickup Ions on the Heating of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectra and Pickup Ions on the Heating of the Solar Wind C02101 (2010)], we have incorporated in the heating model the energy cascade rate based on Iroshnikov scale. Since in steady state, the heating rate is essentially the same as the energy cascade rate

Ng, Chung-Sang

211

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

Grossman, G.

1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

212

Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

Waterland, A. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Rate schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

215

Measurement of neutron dose equivalent outside and inside of the treatment vault of GRID therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rates at the treatment vault entrance (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}), and to study the secondary radiation to the patient in GRID therapy. The radiation activation on the grid was studied.Methods: A Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator was working at 18 MV mode with a grid manufactured by .decimal, Inc. The H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} were measured using an AnderssonBraun neutron REM meter, and a Geiger Mller counter. The radiation activation on the grid was measured after the irradiation with an ion chamber ?-ray survey meter. The secondary radiation dose equivalent to patient was evaluated by etched track detectors and OSL detectors on a RANDO{sup } phantom.Results: Within the measurement uncertainty, there is no significant difference between the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} with and without a grid. However, the neutron dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 35.3% lower than that without the grid when using the same field size and the same amount of monitor unit. The photon dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 44.9% lower. The measured average half-life of the radiation activation in the grid is 12.0 (0.9) min. The activation can be categorized into a fast decay component and a slow decay component with half-lives of 3.4 (1.6) min and 15.3 (4.0) min, respectively. There was no detectable radioactive contamination found on the surface of the grid through a wipe test.Conclusions: This work indicates that there is no significant change of the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} in GRID therapy, compared with a conventional external beam therapy. However, the neutron and scattered photon dose equivalent to the patient decrease dramatically with the grid and can be clinical irrelevant. Meanwhile, the users of a grid should be aware of the possible high dose to the radiation worker from the radiation activation on the surface of the grid. A delay in handling the grid after the beam delivery is suggested.

Wang, Xudong; Charlton, Michael A.; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony Y.; Li, Ying; Papanikolaou, Nikos [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)] [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Woven heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

Piscitella, R.R.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

217

Intergalactic dust and its photoelectric heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have examined the dust photoelectric heating in the intergalactic medium (IGM). The heating rate in a typical radiation field of the IGM is represented by $\\Gamma_{\\rm pe} = 1.2\\times10^{-34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-3}$ $({\\cal D}/10^{-4})(n_{\\rm H}/10^{-5} {\\rm cm^{-3}})^{4/3} (J_{\\rm L}/10^{-21} {\\rm erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} Hz^{-1} sr^{-1}})^{2/3} (T/10^4 {\\rm K})^{-1/6}$, where ${\\cal D}$ is the dust-to-gas mass ratio, $n_{\\rm H}$ is the hydrogen number density, $J_{\\rm L}$ is the mean intensity at the hydrogen Lyman limit of the background radiation, and $T$ is the gas temperature, if we assume the new X-ray photoelectric yield model by Weingartner et al. (2006) and the dust size distribution in the Milky Way by Mathis, Rumpl, & Nordsieck (1977). This heating rate dominates the HI and HeII photoionization heating rates when the hydrogen number density is less than $\\sim10^{-6}$ cm$^{-3}$ if ${\\cal D}=10^{-4}$ which is 1% of that in the Milky Way, although the heating rate is a factor of 2--4 smaller than that with the old yield model by Weingartner & Draine (2001). The grain size distribution is very important. If only large ($\\ge0.1$ $\\mu$m) grains exist in the IGM, the heating rate is reduced by a factor of $\\simeq5$. Since the dust heating is more efficient in a lower density medium relative to the photoionization heating, it may cause an inverted temperature--density relation in the low density IGM suggested by Bolton et al. (2008). Finally, we have found that the dust heating is not very important in the mean IGM before the cosmic reionization.

Akio K. Inoue; Hideyuki Kamaya

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

219

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

220

Towards Intelligent District Heating.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A district heating system consists of one or more production units supplying energy in the form of heated water through a distribution pipe network to (more)

Johansson, Christian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Winter Heating Fuels Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heating Fuels Update For: Congressional Briefings October 20, 2014 | Washington, DC By U.S. Energy Information Administration Winter Heating Fuels Update October 20, 2014 |...

222

Thermophoretic interaction of heat releasing particles Yu. Dolinskya)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermophoretic interaction of heat releasing particles Yu. Dolinskya) and T. Elperinb) Department investigates thermophoretic force acting at heat releasing absorbing particles near the interface between two of the thermophoretic force is proportional to the rate of heat release absorption by the particle, and its direction

Elperin, Tov

223

Derivation of Equivalent Continuous Dilution for Cyclic, Unsteady Driving Forces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article uses an analytical approach to determine the dilution of an unsteadily-generated solute in an unsteady solvent stream, under cyclic temporal boundary conditions. The goal is to find a simplified way of showing equivalence of such a process to a reference case where equivalent dilution is defined as a weighted average concentration. This derivation has direct applications to the ventilation of indoor spaces where indoor air quality and energy consumption cannot in general be simultaneously optimized. By solving the equation we can specify how much air we need to use in one ventilation pattern compared to another to obtain same indoor air quality. Because energy consumption is related to the amount of air exchanged by a ventilation system, the equation can be used as a first step to evaluate different ventilation patterns effect on the energy consumption. The use of the derived equation is demonstrated by representative cases of interest in both residential and non-residential buildings.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering; Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy conservation and equivalence principle in General Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generalized Stokes theorem (connecting integrals of dimensions 3 and 4) is formulated in a curved space-time in terms of paths in Minkowski space (forming Path Group). A covariant integral form of the conservation law for the energy-momentum of matter is then derived in General Relativity. It extends Einstein's equivalence principle on the energy conservation, since it formulates the conservation law for the energy-momentum of matter without explicit including the gravitational field in the formulation.

Michael B. Mensky

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Equivalence of topological and scattering approaches to quantum pumping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Schroedinger equation with a potential periodically varying in time is used to model adiabatic quantum pumps. The systems considered may be either infinitely extended and gapped or finite and connected to gapless leads. Correspondingly, two descriptions of the transported charge, one relating to a Chern number and the other to a scattering matrix, have been available for some time. Here we generalize the first one and establish its equivalence to the second.

G. Braeunlich; G. M. Graf; G. Ortelli

2009-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

226

americanus equivalent temperature: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gap filled with an indefinite metmaterial is considered using the suggested method. The giant enhancement of the transferred heat compared to the case of the empty gap is shown....

227

Cab Heating and Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

Damman, Dennis

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

COSMIC RAY HEATING OF THE WARM IONIZED MEDIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of line ratios in the Milky Way's warm ionized medium suggest that photoionization is not the only heating mechanism present. For the additional heating to explain the discrepancy, it would have to have a weaker dependence on the gas density than the cooling rate, {Lambda}n{sub e}{sup 2}. Reynolds et al. suggested turbulent dissipation or magnetic field reconnection as possible heating sources. We investigate here the viability of MHD-wave mediated cosmic ray heating as a supplemental heating source. This heating rate depends on the gas density only through its linear dependence on the Alfven speed, which goes as n{sub e}{sup -1/2}. We show that, scaled to appropriate values of cosmic ray energy density, cosmic ray heating can be significant. Furthermore, this heating is stable to perturbations. These results should also apply to warm ionized gas in other galaxies.

Wiener, Joshua; Peng Oh, S. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Zweibel, Ellen G. [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)] [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fragmentation of suddenly heated liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fragmentation of free liquids in Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors could determine the upper bound on reactor pulse rate. The x-ray ablated materials must cool and recondense to allow driver beam propagation. The increased surface area caused by fragmentation will enhance the cooling and condensation rates. Relaxation from the suddenly heated state will move a liquid into the negative pressure region under the liquid-vapor P-V dome. The lithium equation of state was used to demonstrate that neutron-induced vaporization uses only a minor fraction of the added heat, much less than would be required to drive the expansion. A 77% expansion of the lithium is required before the rapid vaporization process of spinodal decomposition could begin, and nucleation and growth are too slow to contribute to the expansion.

Blink, J.A.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Rotary magnetic heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

Kirol, L.D.

1987-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building...

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Direct fired heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Rotary magnetic heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

Kirol, Lance D. (Shelly, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Constructal multi-scale package of vertical channels with natural convection and maximal heat transfer density. CONSTRUCTAL DESIGN: THE GENERATION OF MULTI-SCALE HEAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer density. CONSTRUCTAL DESIGN: THE GENERATION OF MULTI-SCALE HEAT AND FLUID FLOW STRUCTURES-scale structures in natural convection with the objective of maximizing the heat transfer density, or the heat transfer rate per unit of volume§ . The flow volume is filled with vertical equidistant heated blades

Kihm, IconKenneth David

235

Thulium-170 heat source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, Carl E. (Pleasanton, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard (Livermore, CA); VanSant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Heat Treating Apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for heat treating a heat treatable material including a housing having an upper opening for receiving a heat treatable material at a first temperature, a lower opening, and a chamber therebetween for heating the heat treatable material to a second temperature higher than the first temperature as the heat treatable material moves through the chamber from the upper to the lower opening. A gas supply assembly is operatively engaged to the housing at the lower opening, and includes a source of gas, a gas delivery assembly for delivering the gas through a plurality of pathways into the housing in countercurrent flow to movement of the heat treatable material, whereby the heat treatable material passes through the lower opening at the second temperature, and a control assembly for controlling conditions within the chamber to enable the heat treatable material to reach the second temperature and pass through the lower opening at the second temperature as a heated material.

De Saro, Robert (Annandale, NJ); Bateman, Willis (Sutton Colfield, GB)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

Thermoelectric heat exchange element  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

Callas, James J. (Peoria, IL); Taher, Mahmoud A. (Peoria, IL)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Heat Integrate Heat Engines in Process Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of forcing a good fit between a heat engine and process T', H profiles extends the ideas of appropriate and inappropriate placement to give bet ter overall integration schemes [7] . The new 'and powerful representations of the thermodynamics of a process... HEAT INTEGRATE HEAT ENGINES IN PROCESS PLANTS E. Hindmarsh, D. Boland and D.W. Townsend TENSA Technology, Houston, Texas Shorter Version Appeared in Chemical Engineering Copyright McGraw Hill, 1985 ABSTRACT This paper presents a novel method...

Hindmarsh, E.; Boland, D.; Townsend, D. W.

239

Composite system in noncommutative space and the equivalence principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The motion of a composite system made of N particles is examined in a space with a canonical noncommutative algebra of coordinates. It is found that the coordinates of the center-of-mass position satisfy noncommutative algebra with effective parameter. Therefore, the upper bound of the parameter of noncommutativity is re-examined. We conclude that the weak equivalence principle is violated in the case of a non-uniform gravitational field and propose the condition for the recovery of this principle in noncommutative space. Furthermore, the same condition is derived from the independence of kinetic energy on the composition.

Kh. P. Gnatenko

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

System Modeling of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve the system performance of the GHP, modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated by using ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Software, which is used to predict steady-state heating and cooling performance of variable-speed vapor compression air-to-air heat pumps for a wide range of operational variables. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine, the SHR can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% in rated operating conditions.

Mahderekal, Isaac [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents discrete and continuum simulations of shock wave propagating through jointed media. The simulations were performed using the Lagrangian hydrocode GEODYN-L with joints treated explicitly using an advanced contact algorithm. They studied both isotropic and anisotropic joint representations. For an isotropically jointed geologic medium, the results show that the properties of the joints can be combined with the properties of the intact rock to develop an equivalent continuum model suitable for analyzing wave propagation through the jointed medium. For an anisotropically jointed geologic medium, they found it difficult to develop an equivalent continuum (EC) model that matches the response derived from mesoscopic simulation. They also performed simulations of wave propagation through jointed media. Two appraoches are suggested for modeling the rock mass. In one approach, jointed are modeled explicitly in a Lagrangian framework with appropriate contact algorithms used to track motion along the interfaces. In the other approach, the effect of joints is taken into account using a constitutive model derived from mesoscopic simulations.

Vorobiev, O; Antoun, T

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

242

Control system for fluid heated steam generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

243

Dynamics of heat transfer between nano systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a dynamical theory of heat transfer between two nano systems. In particular, we consider the resonant heat transfer between two nanoparticles due to the coupling of localized surface modes having a finite spectral width. We model the coupled nanosystem by two coupled quantum mechanical oscillators, each interacting with its own heat bath, and obtain a master equation for the dynamics of heat transfer. The damping rates in the master equation are related to the lifetimes of localized plasmons in the nanoparticles. We study the dynamics towards the steady state and establish connection with the standard theory of heat transfer in steady state. For strongly coupled nano particles we predict Rabi oscillations in the mean occupation number of surface plasmons in each nano particle.

Svend-Age Biehs; Girish S. Agarwal

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

244

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

Not Available

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

HEATING 7. 1 user's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATING is a FORTRAN program designed to solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three- dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heating generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-boundary or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General graybody radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING is variably dimensioned and utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution (for one-dimensional or two-dimensional problems), and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method (which for some circumstances allows a time step greater than the CEP stability criterion). The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

Childs, K.W.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Surface-induced heating of cold polar molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the rotational and vibrational heating of diatomic molecules placed near a surface at finite temperature on the basis of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics. The internal molecular evolution is governed by transition rates that depend on both temperature and position. Analytical and numerical methods are used to investigate the heating of several relevant molecules near various surfaces. We determine the critical distances at which the surface itself becomes the dominant source of heating and we investigate the transition between the long-range and short-range behaviour of the heating rates. A simple formula is presented that can be used to estimate the surface-induced heating rates of other molecules of interest. We also consider how the heating depends on the thickness and composition of the surface.

Stefan Yoshi Buhmann; M. R. Tarbutt; Stefan Scheel; E. A. Hinds

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

248

An examination of interference in waste solidification through measurement of heat signature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydration of cementing materials is accompanied by heat evolution which is closely related to their structure development. The presence of wastes usually interferes with the hydration of cementing materials. This study examined their interference in waste stabilization/solidification processes through the measurement of adiabatic heat evolution using a computerized Quadrel{trademark} system. Two cementitious materials, an alkali-activated blast furnace slag binder and an ASTM Type 1 Portland cement were used to solidify an electric arc furnace (EAF) dust, which has high concentrations of B, Cr, Hg, Pb, Ni and Zn. The EAF dust contents were 0, 30 and 60% by mass. Different mixing conditions were also examined. The interference of EAF dust with the hydration of cementing materials was described using several parameters derived from the heat evolution curves: equivalent initial time of setting (equivalent time at 20 C); total heat evolution at initial time of setting; equivalent final time of setting, total heat evolution at final time of setting and total heat evolution at equivalent time of 28 and 90 days. Experimental results indicated that the Quadrel{trademark} system was a useful tool to examine the interference in waste stabilization/solidification and to assist with the selection of cementing materials.

Shi, C.; Stegemann, J.; Caldwell, R. [Water Technology International Corp., Burlington, Ontario (Canada)] [Water Technology International Corp., Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A Common View on Strong, Uniform, and Other Notions of Equivalence in Answer-Set Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Logic programming under the answer-set semantics nowadays deals with numerous different notions of program equivalence. This is due to the fact that equivalence for substitution (known as strong equivalence) and ordinary equivalence are different concepts. The former holds, given programs P and Q, iff P can be faithfully replaced by Q within any context R, while the latter holds iff P and Q provide the same output, that is, they have the same answer sets. Notions in between strong and ordinary equivalence have been introduced as theoretical tools to compare incomplete programs and are defined by either restricting the syntactic structure of the considered context programs R or by bounding the set A of atoms allowed to occur in R (relativized equivalence).For the latter approach, different A yield properly different equivalence notions, in general. For the former approach, however, it turned out that any ``reasonable'' syntactic restriction to R coincides with either ordinary, strong, or uniform equivalence. I...

Woltran, Stefan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

RADIATIVE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of solar visible and infrared radiation on electrons in the Sun's atmosphere using a Monte Carlo simulation of the wave-particle interaction and conclude that sunlight provides at least 40% and possibly all of the power required to heat the corona, with the exception of dense magnetic flux loops. The simulation uses a radiation waveform comprising 100 frequency components spanning the solar blackbody spectrum. Coronal electrons are heated in a stochastic manner by low coherence solar electromagnetic radiation. The wave 'coherence time' and 'coherence volume' for each component is determined from optical theory. The low coherence of solar radiation allows moving electrons to gain energy from the chaotic wave field which imparts multiple random velocity 'kicks' to these particles causing their velocity distribution to broaden or heat. Monte Carlo simulations of broadband solar radiative heating on ensembles of 1000 electrons show heating at per particle levels of 4.0 x 10{sup -21} to 4.0 x 10{sup -20} W, as compared with non-loop radiative loss rates of {approx}1 x 10{sup -20} W per electron. Since radiative losses comprise nearly all of the power losses in the corona, sunlight alone can explain the elevated temperatures in this region. The volume electron heating rate is proportional to density, and protons are assumed to be heated either by plasma waves or through collisions with electrons.

Moran, Thomas G., E-mail: moran@grace.nascom.nasa.gov [Physics Department, Catholic University of America, 200 Hannan Hall, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Consolidated Electric Cooperative- Heat Pump and Water Heating Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Consolidated Electric Cooperative provides rebates to residential customers who install electric water heaters, dual-fuel heating system or geothermal heat pumps. A dual-fuel heating systems...

253

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

Lenert, Andrej

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Abrasion resistant heat pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

Ernst, Donald M. (Leola, PA)

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

256

MA HEAT Loan Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents information on the success of Massachusetts's HEAT loan offerings and how the financing tool is funded.

257

Abrasion resistant heat pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

Ernst, D.M.

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Solar heat receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

Using hydraulic equivalences to discriminate transport processes1 of volcanic flows1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G21942 Using hydraulic equivalences to discriminate transport processes1 of volcanic flows1 2 Alain of hydraulic equivalence, we determined that deposits resulted from a combination of suspended-12 load fallout between transport mechanisms, hydraulic18 equivalences have a general applicability in geophysical flows

Boyer, Edmond

260

Geodesic equivalence via integrability Peter Topalov y and Vladimir S. Matveev z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geodesic equivalence via integrability Peter Topalov #3;y and Vladimir S. Matveev z Keywords: Geodesically Equivalent Metrics, Projectively Equivalent Metrics, Integrable Systems, Levi-Civita Coordinates an orbital di#11;eomorphism be- tween two Hamiltonian systems, produces integrals of them. We treat geodesic

Matveev, Vladimir S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Adjoint-based method for supersonic aircraft design using equivalent area distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adjoint-based method for supersonic aircraft design using equivalent area distributions Francisco for the design of supersonic aircraft that must match a target equivalent area distribution at constant lift of an adjoint solver for the equivalent area distribution, and the shape design process of a trijet supersonic

Alonso, Juan J.

262

On the equivalence of state transformer semantics and predicate transformer semantics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the equivalence of state transformer semantics and predicate transformer semantics Dedicated and the author [13] have worked out the equivalence between state transformer semantics and predicate transformer the last section, where the equivalence of predicate and state transformer semantics is finally put

Keimel, Klaus

263

The Standard Model in Noncommutative Geometry and Morita equivalence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss some properties of the spectral triple $(A_F,H_F,D_F,J_F,\\gamma_F)$ describing the internal space in the noncommutative geometry approach to the Standard Model, with $A_F=\\mathbb{C}\\oplus\\mathbb{H}\\oplus M_3(\\mathbb{C})$. We show that, if we want $H_F$ to be a Morita equivalence bimodule between $A_F$ and the associated Clifford algebra, two terms must be added to the Dirac operator; we then study its relation with the orientability condition for a spectral triple. We also illustrate what changes if one considers a spectral triple with a degenerate representation, based on the complex algebra $B_F=\\mathbb{C}\\oplus M_2(\\mathbb{C})\\oplus M_3(\\mathbb{C})$.

Francesco D'Andrea; Ludwik Dabrowski

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Total effective dose equivalent associated with fixed uranium surface contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the technical basis for establishing a uranium fixed-contamination action level, a fixed uranium surface contamination level exceeding the total radioactivity values of Appendix D of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, part 835 (10CFR835), but below which the monitoring, posting, and control requirements for Radiological Areas are not required for the area of the contamination. An area of fixed uranium contamination between 1,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} and that level corresponding to an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 100 mrem requires only routine monitoring, posting to alert personnel of the contamination, and administrative control. The more extensive requirements for monitoring, posting, and control designated by 10CFR835 for Radiological Areas do not have to be applied for these intermediate fixed-contamination levels.

Bogard, J.S.; Hamm, R.N.; Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; England, C.A.; Swenson, D.E.; Brown, K.S.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

On the Equivalence Principle and Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consider an observer surrounded by a charged, conducting elevator (assume that the charge is isolated from the observer). In the presence of the external electric field the elevator will accelerate however, due to the screening effect, the observer will not be able to detect any electromagnetic field. According to the equivalence principle, the observer may identify the cause of the acceleration with the external gravitational field. However the elevator's motion is given by Lorentz-force equation. Therefore there should exist a metric, depending on electromagnetic potential, for which the geodesics coincide with the trajectories of the charged body in the electromagnetic field. We give a solution to this problem by finding such metric. In doing so one must impose a constraint on the electromagnetic field in a certain way. That constraint turns out to be achievable by marginal gauge transformations whose phase is closely related to the Hamilton-Jacobi function. Finally we show that for weak fields the Einstei...

Trzetrzelewski, Maciej

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Galilei covariance and Einstein's equivalence principle in quantum reference frames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The covariance of the Schr\\"odinger equation under Galilei boosts and the compatibility of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics with Einstein's equivalence principle have been constrained for so long to the existence of a superselection rule which would prevent a quantum particle to be found in superposition states of different masses. In a effort to avoid this expedient, thus allowing for nonrelativistic quantum mechanics to account for unstable particles, recent works have suggested that usual Galilean transformations are inconsistent with the nonrelativistic limit of the Lorentz transformation. Here we approach the issue in a fundamentally different way. Using a formalism of unitary transformations and employing quantum reference frames rather than immaterial coordinate systems, we show that the Schr\\"odinger equation, although form-variant, is fully compatible with the aforementioned principles of relativity.

S. T. Pereira; R. M. Angelo

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA); Wang, Yong (Richland, WA); Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Kennewick, WA)

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Wang, Yong; Wegeng, Robert S.; Gao, Yufei

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ammoniated salt heat pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermochemical heat pump/energy storage system using liquid ammoniate salts is described. The system, which can be used for space heating or cooling, provides energy storage for both functions. The bulk of the energy is stored as chemical energy and thus can be stored indefinitely. The system is well suited to use with a solar energy source or industrial waste heat.

Haas, W.R.; Jaeger, F.J.; Giordano, T.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Heat Transfer Guest Editorial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Heat Transfer Guest Editorial We are indeed delighted in bringing out this special issue was showcased in diverse areas such as traditional heat and mass transfer, lab-on-chip, sensors, biomedical applica- tions, micromixers, fuel cells, and microdevices. Selected papers in the field of heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

271

Acoustic Heating Peter Ulmschneider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanisms. 1. The acoustic heating theory Only a few years after Edlen's (1941) discovery that the solar acoustic wave radiation- · b. field acoustic wave Figure 1. Panel a: Acoustic heating in late-type stars: effective temperature TeJ f, gravity g and mixing length parameter fr. Panel b: Acoustic heating in early

Ulmschneider, Peter

272

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Pioneering Heat Pump Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: To install and monitor an innovative WaterFurnace geothermal system that is technologically advanced and evolving; To generate hot water heating from a heat pump that uses non-ozone depleting refrigerant CO2. To demonstrate the energy efficiency of this system ground source heat pump system.

274

Heat transfer rates in fixed bed catalytic reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the flare was properly made. The vent line was made from one-half inch pipe and extended several feet through a laboratory window. Pipe was permissible here since no pressure existed in the line. Gas Purifiers The construction of a gas purifier is shown... ........................................................................ 118 LIST OF FIGURES Pap1. FLOW SYSTEM............................................................. ............... 28 2. GAS PURIFIER.............................................................................. 32 3. DIFFERENTIAL REACTOR...

Levelton, Bruce Harding

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

ARM - Evaluation Product - Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) ARM

276

Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatchingState ofDr.

277

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluating theDepartmentSensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and

278

A corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Richlen, S.L.

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

280

Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPC ENABLE: ECM Summary ECMWear |Characteristics |and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Neutron behavior, reactor control, and reactor heat transfer. Volume four  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume four covers neutron behavior (neutron absorption, how big are nuclei, neutron slowing down, neutron losses, the self-sustaining reactor), reactor control (what is controlled in a reactor, controlling neutron population, is it easy to control a reactor, range of reactor control, what happens when the fuel burns up, controlling a PWR, controlling a BWR, inherent safety of reactors), and reactor heat transfer (heat generation in a nuclear reactor, how is heat removed from a reactor core, heat transfer rate, heat transfer properties of the reactor coolant).

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Magnetars as cooling neutron stars with internal heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study thermal structure and evolution of magnetars as cooling neutron stars with a phenomenological heat source in a spherical internal layer. We explore the location of this layer as well as the heating rate that could explain high observable thermal luminosities of magnetars and would be consistent with the energy budget of neutron stars. We conclude that the heat source should be located in an outer magnetar's crust, at densities rho heat intensity of the order of 1e20 erg/s/cm^3. Otherwise the heat energy is mainly emitted by neutrinos and cannot warm up the surface.

A. D. Kaminker; D. G. Yakovlev; A. Y. Potekhin; N. Shibazaki; P. S. Shternin; O. Y. Gnedin

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN); Perez-Blanco, Horacio (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Heat Transfer Operators Associated with Quantum Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Any quantum operation applied on a physical system is performed as a unitary transformation on a larger extended system. If the extension used is a heat bath in thermal equilibrium, the concomitant change in the state of the bath necessarily implies a heat exchange with it. The dependence of the average heat transferred to the bath on the initial state of the system can then be found from the expectation value of a hermitian operator, which is named as the heat transfer operator (HTO). The purpose of this article is the investigation of the relation between the HTOs and the associated quantum operations. Since, any given quantum operation on a system can be realized by different baths and unitaries, many different HTOs are possible for each quantum operation. On the other hand, there are also strong restrictions on the HTOs which arise from the unitarity of the transformations. The most important of these is the Landauer erasure principle. This article is concerned with the question of finding a complete set of restrictions on the HTOs that are associated with a given quantum operation. An answer to this question has been found only for a subset of quantum operations. For erasure operations, these characterizations are equivalent to the generalized Landauer erasure principle. For the case of generic quantum operations however, it appears that the HTOs obey further restrictions which cannot be obtained from the entropic restrictions of the generalized Landauer erasure principle.

. Aksak; S. Turgut

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Heat pump apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat pump apparatus including a compact arrangement of individual tubular reactors containing hydride-dehydride beds in opposite end sections, each pair of beds in each reactor being operable by sequential and coordinated treatment with a plurality of heat transfer fluids in a plurality of processing stages, and first and second valves located adjacent the reactor end sections with rotatable members having multiple ports and associated portions for separating the hydride beds at each of the end sections into groups and for simultaneously directing a plurality of heat transfer fluids to the different groups. As heat is being generated by a group of beds, others are being regenerated so that heat is continuously available for space heating. As each of the processing stages is completed for a hydride bed or group of beds, each valve member is rotated causing the heat transfer fluid for the heat processing stage to be directed to that bed or group of beds. Each of the end sections are arranged to form a closed perimeter and the valve member may be rotated repeatedly about the perimeter to provide a continuous operation. Both valves are driven by a common motor to provide a coordinated treatment of beds in the same reactors. The heat pump apparatus is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Horowitz, Jeffrey S. (Woodridge, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Active microchannel heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP W. D. C. Richards and W. L. Auxer General Electric Company Space Division King of Prussia, Pa. ABSTRACT A heat activated heat pump (HAHP for space heating since it directly utilizes the engine waste heat in addition to the energy obtained

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

288

Experimental Investigation of Forced Convection Heat Transfer of Nanofluids in a Microchannel using Temperature Nanosensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for performing the experimental measurements. TFT arrays were designed (which included design of photomask layout), microfabricated, packaged and assembled for testing with the experimental apparatus. Heat removal rates from the heated surface to the different...

Yu, Jiwon 1982-

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Program listing for heat-pump seasonal-performance model (SPM). [CNHSPM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer program CNHSPM is listed which predicts heat pump seasonal energy consumption (including defrost, cyclic degradation, and supplementary heat) using steady state rating point performance and binned weather data. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling Heat and Power (CCHP) systems are being installed atand heating loads. These CCHP systems can also act as backupgenerators. In all cases the CCHP systems are rated at a

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Violation of the Equivalence Principle in the light of the SNO and SK solar neutrino results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SNO result on charged current deuteron disintegration, the SuperKamiokande 1258-day data on electron scattering, and other solar neutrino results are used to revisit the model of neutrino oscillations driven by a violation of the equivalence principle. We use a chisq minimization technique to examine oscillation between the nu(e) and another active neutrino, both massless, and find that within the Standard Solar Model the fit to the SNO and SuperKamiokande spectra are moderately good while a very good fit is obtained when the absolute normalizations of the 8B and hep neutrino fluxes are allowed to vary. The best fit prefers large, but not maximal, mixing, essentially no hep neutrinos, and a 40% reduction in the 8B neutrino flux. The fit to the total rates from the different experiments is not encouraging but when the rates and spectra are considerd together the situation is much improved. We remark on the expectations of the VEP model for the neutral current measurements at SNO.

Amitava Raychaudhuri; Arunansu Sil

2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

292

Anisotropic turbulent model for solar coronal heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context : We present a self-consistent model of solar coronal heating, originally developed by Heyvaert & Priest (1992), in which we include the dynamical effect of the background magnetic field along a coronal structure by using exact results from wave MHD turbulence (Galtier et al. 2000). Aims : We evaluate the heating rate and the microturbulent velocity for comparison with observations in the quiet corona, active regions and also coronal holes. Methods :The coronal structures are assumed to be in a turbulent state maintained by the slow erratic motions of the magnetic footpoints. A description for the large-scale and the unresolved small-scale dynamics are given separately. From the latter, we compute exactly (or numerically for coronal holes) turbulent viscosites that are finally used in the former to close self-consistently the system and derive the heating flux expression. Results : We show that the heating rate and the turbulent velocity compare favorably with coronal observations. Conclusions : Although the Alfven wave turbulence regime is strongly anisotropic, and could reduce a priori the heating efficiency, it provides an unexpected satisfactory model of coronal heating for both magnetic loops and open magnetic field lines.

B. Bigot; S. Galtier; H. Politano

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Effects of slitted fins on the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a compact heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compact heat exchanger which consists of air-cooled aluminum fins and copper tubes circulating refrigerant has been used in a cooling system for a long time. There are two key parameters to be seriously considered for a design of the heat exchanger and its performance improvement. These are the heat transfer rate and pressure drop coefficient which varies with the change of the tube size, its arrangement and the fin configuration. In here, a numerical study was carried to understand the effect of the fin configuration on the heat transfer and pressure drop of the heat exchanger. The diameter and the arrangement of tubes were fixed but three different types of the fin configuration were used to see its effect on the heat transfer capacity and the static pressure drop. The calculation results were compared with that of a flat plate fin. From the comparison, it was found that the slitted fins have higher pressure drop; however, they have higher heat transfer rate. It means that the simpler of the fin configuration, the lower pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients are obtained. It is mainly due to the discretisation of the thermal boundary layer on the fin surface to maximize the heat transfer to air. The slitted sides of fins act like obstacles in the airflow path. From the experimental result, it was found that the same trend in the variation of the heat transfer rate and the pressure drop with the change of the fin configuration was obtained.

Kim, C.H.; Yun, J.Y. [LG Electronics Living System Research Lab., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Bypass valve and coolant flow controls for optimum temperatures in waste heat recovery systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Implementing an optimized waste heat recovery system includes calculating a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a heat exchanger of a waste heat recovery system, and predicting a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a material flowing through a channel of the waste heat recovery system. Upon determining the rate of change in the temperature of the material is predicted to be higher than the rate of change in the temperature of the heat exchanger, the optimized waste heat recovery system calculates a valve position and timing for the channel that is configurable for achieving a rate of material flow that is determined to produce and maintain a defined threshold temperature of the heat exchanger, and actuates the valve according to the calculated valve position and calculated timing.

Meisner, Gregory P

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

Compressor Selection and Equipment Sizing for Cold Climate Heat Pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to limit heating capacity degradation at -25 C (-13 F) ambient to 25%, compared to the nominal rating point capacity at 8.3 C (47 F), an extensive array of design and sizing options were investigated, based on fundamental equipment system modeling and building energy simulation. Sixteen equipment design options were evaluated in one commercial building and one residential building, respectively in seven cities. The energy simulation results were compared to three baseline cases: 100% electric resistance heating, a 9.6 HSPF single-speed heat pump unit, and 90% AFUE gas heating system. The general recommendation is that variable-speed compressors and tandem compressors, sized such that their rated heating capacity at a low speed matching the building design cooling load, are able to achieve the capacity goal at low ambient temperatures by over-speeding, for example, a home with a 3.0 ton design cooling load, a tandem heat pump could meet this cooling load running a single compressor, while running both compressors to meet heating load at low ambient temperatures in a cold climate. Energy savings and electric resistance heat reductions vary with building types, energy codes and climate zones. Oversizing a heat pump can result in larger energy saving in a less energy efficient building and colder regions due to reducing electric resistance heating. However, in a more energy-efficient building or for buildings in warmer climates, one has to consider balance between reduction of resistance heat and addition of cyclic loss.

Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Summer HeatSummer Heat Heat stress solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occur (then drink a lightly salted beverage like a sports drink). The water's temperature should be cool How should gardeners avoid becoming a safety threat to themselves and others when it's hot? Start to the heat. Become a weather watcher. Set up a small weather station (with a high/low thermom eter, rain

Liskiewicz, Maciej

297

Simulation of a High Efficiency Multi-bed Adsorption Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attaining high energy efficiency with adsorption heat pumps is challenging due to thermodynamic losses that occur when the sorbent beds are thermally cycled without effective heat recuperation. The multi-bed concept described here effectively transfers heat from beds being cooled to beds being heated, which enables high efficiency in thermally driven heat pumps. A simplified lumped-parameter model and detailed finite element analysis are used to simulate the performance of an ammonia-carbon sorption compressor, which is used to project the overall heat pump coefficient of performance. The effects of bed geometry and number of beds on system performance are explored, and the majority of the performance benefit is obtained with four beds. Results indicate that a COP of 1.24 based on heat input is feasible at AHRI standard test conditions for residential HVAC equipment. When compared on a basis of primary energy input, performance equivalent to SEER 13 or 14 are theoretically attainable with this system.

TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Humble, Paul H.; Sweeney, J. B.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

Swenson, Paul F. (Shaker Heights, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaven, FL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

1983-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ground Source Heat Pump Sub-Slab Heat Exchange Loop Performance in a Cold Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a cold-climate project that examines an alternative approach to ground source heat pump (GSHP) ground loop design. The innovative ground loop design is an attempt to reduce the installed cost of the ground loop heat exchange portion of the system by containing the entire ground loop within the excavated location beneath the basement slab. Prior to the installation and operation of the sub-slab heat exchanger, energy modeling using TRNSYS software and concurrent design efforts were performed to determine the size and orientation of the system. One key parameter in the design is the installation of the GSHP in a low-load home, which considerably reduces the needed capacity of the ground loop heat exchanger. This report analyzes data from two cooling seasons and one heating season. Upon completion of the monitoring phase, measurements revealed that the initial TRNSYS simulated horizontal sub-slab ground loop heat exchanger fluid temperatures and heat transfer rates differed from the measured values. To determine the cause of this discrepancy, an updated model was developed utilizing a new TRNSYS subroutine for simulating sub-slab heat exchangers. Measurements of fluid temperature, soil temperature, and heat transfer were used to validate the updated model.

Mittereder, N.; Poerschke, A.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Including radiative heat transfer and reaction quenching in modeling a Claus plant waste heat boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to increasingly stringent sulfur emission regulations, improvements are necessary in the modified Claus process. A recently proposed model by Nasato et al. for the Claus plant waste heat boiler (WHB) is improved by including radiative heat transfer, which yields significant changes in the predicted heat flux and the temperature profile along the WHB tube, leading to a faster quenching of chemical reactions. For the WHB considered, radiation accounts for approximately 20% of the heat transferred by convection alone. More importantly, operating the WHB at a higher gas mass flux is shown to enhance reaction quenching, resulting in a doubling of the predicted hydrogen flow rate. This increase in hydrogen flow rate is sufficient to completely meet the hydrogen requirement of the H[sub 2]S recovery process considered, which would eliminate the need for a hydrogen plant.

Karan, K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Behie, L.A. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Policies supporting Heat Pump Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policies supporting Heat Pump Technologies in Canada IEA Heat Pump Workshop London, UK November 13 in the world, with an average of 16,995 kilowatt-hours per annum. #12;Canada's Context for Heat Pumps Impacts avenues: Ground source heat pumps for cold climates (heating and cooling) Reversible air source heat

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

303

Optical Anisotropy of Schwarzschild Metric within Equivalent Medium Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is has been long known that the curved space in the presence of gravitation can be described as a non-homogeneous anisotropic medium in flat geometry with different constitutive equations. In this article, we show that the eigenpolarizations of such medium can be exactly solved, leading to a pseudo-isotropic description of curved vacuum with two refractive index eigenvalues having opposite signs, which correspond to forward and backward travel in time. We conclude that for a rotating universe, time-reversal symmetry is broken. We also demonstrate the applicability of this method to Schwarzschild metric and derive exact forms of refractive index. We derive the subtle optical anisotropy of space around a spherically symmetric, non-rotating and uncharged blackhole in the form of an elegant closed form expression, and show that the refractive index in such a pseudo-isotropic system would be a function of coordinates as well as the direction of propagation. Corrections arising from such anisotropy in the bending of light are shown and a simplified system of equations for ray-tracing in the equivalent medium of Schwarzschild metric is found.

Sina Khorasani; Bizhan Rashidian

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fluidized bed heat treating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems for heat treating materials are presented. The systems typically involve a fluidized bed that contains granulated heat treating material. In some embodiments a fluid, such as an inert gas, is flowed through the granulated heat treating medium, which homogenizes the temperature of the heat treating medium. In some embodiments the fluid may be heated in a heating vessel and flowed into the process chamber where the fluid is then flowed through the granulated heat treating medium. In some embodiments the heat treating material may be liquid or granulated heat treating material and the heat treating material may be circulated through a heating vessel into a process chamber where the heat treating material contacts the material to be heat treated. Microwave energy may be used to provide the source of heat for heat treating systems.

Ripley, Edward B; Pfennigwerth, Glenn L

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

305

Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

still com- monly used in home heating and smoking rates arefound exposure to coal home heating and ETS increase youngChildrens Health Coal Home Heating and Environmental

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Water-heating dehumidifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

309

The Interest Rate Conundrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flows and US Interest Rates, NBER Working Paper No 12560. [Working Paper # 2008 -03 The Interest Rate Conundrum Roger

Craine, Roger; Martin, Vance L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

Braunlin, Walter A. (Spring, TX); Gorski, Alan (Lovington, NM); Jaehnig, Leo J. (New Orleans, LA); Moskal, Clifford J. (Oklahoma City, OK); Naylor, Joseph D. (Houston, TX); Parimi, Krishnia (Allison Park, PA); Ward, John V. (Arvada, CO)

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

Measurement of neutron spectra for determining dose equivalent rates at the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Also, placement of the detector in a low flux neutron environment adjacent to the area to be characterized could be utilized. These recommendations are reasonable for measurements taken at commercial power plants in areas where personnel exposure... reactions in this region, He 3 10 proportional counters have been proposed by Brackenbush (Br84) to measure neutron spectra up to 1 MeV. The He detector is surrounded by a thermal neutron absorber to maximize the sensitivity at the low end...

Sanza, Bruce Jerome

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

Mechanical Compression Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECHANICAL COMPRESSION HEAT PUMPS Thomas-L. Apaloo and K. Kawamura Mycom Corporation, Los Angeles, California J. Matsuda, Mayekawa Mfg. Co., Tokyo, Japan ABSTRACT Mechanical compression heat pumping is not new in industrial applications.... In fact, industry history suggests that the theoretical concept was developed before 1825. Heat pump manufacturers gained the support of consultants and end-users when the energy crisis hit this country in 1973. That interest, today, has been...

Apaloo, T. L.; Kawamura, K.; Matsuda, J.

314

Heat storage duration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-tube Heat Exchangers with Winglets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with a circular tube and/or a delta-winglet pair. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.51 x 10-3 to 14.0 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 670 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of a circular tube, a delta-winglet pair, and a combination of a circular tube and a delta-winglet pair. Comparisons of local and average heat transfer distributions for the circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Overall mean finsurface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement associated with the deployment of the winglets with the circular cylinder. At the lowest Reynolds numbers (which correspond to the laminar operating conditions of existing geothermal air-cooled condensers), the enhancement level is nearly a factor of two. At higher Reynolds numbers, the enhancement level is close to 50%.

O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Solar Heating in Uppsala.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The housing corporation Uppsalahem has installed asolar heating system in the neighbourhood Haubitsen,which was renovated in 2011. This report examineshow much energy the solar (more)

Blomqvist, Emelie; Hger, Klara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Solar heating in Colombia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This report describes the process of a thesis implemented in Colombia concerning solar energy. The project was to install a self-circulating solar heating system, (more)

Skytt, Johanna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

319

Heat and mass exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

Heat and mass exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Heat rejection system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

Smith, Gregory C. (Richland, WA); Tokarz, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Parry, Jr., Harvey L. (Richland, WA); Braun, Daniel J. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Passive solar space heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of passive solar space heating is presented indicating trends in design, new developments, performance measures, analytical design aids, and monitored building results.

Balcomb, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Article published in Geothermics 47 (2013) 69-79 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geothermics.2013.02.005 1 Geothermal contribution to the energy mix of a heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.02.005 1 Geothermal contribution to the energy mix of a heating network when using Aquifer Thermal Energy and providing energy to a new low-temperature district heating network heating 7,500 housing-equivalents. Non-geothermal of this geothermal system to meet the load is studied in order to evaluate the time dependent energy mix

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

Haywood EMC- Residential Heat Pump and Weatherization Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Haywood EMC offers a low interest loan to their residential customers to finance the purchase of an energy efficient heat pump and certain weatherization measures. The current interest rate is 5%...

326

Union Power Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficient Heat Pump Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Union Power Cooperative offers low interest loans to help its residential customers finance new, energy-efficient heat pumps. Interest rates, currently at 9%, will be fixed for the term of the loan...

327

Energy effectiveness of simultaneous heat and mass exchange devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous heat and mass exchange devices such as cooling towers, humidifiers and dehumidifiers are widely used in the power generation, desalination, air conditioning, and refrigeration industries. For design and rating ...

Narayan, G. Prakash

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

QCD Jet Rates with the Inclusive Generalized kt Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive generating functions, valid to next-to-double logarithmic accuracy, for QCD jet rates according to the inclusive forms of the kt, Cambridge/Aachen and anti-kt algorithms, which are equivalent at this level of accuracy. We compare the analytical results with jet rates and average jet multiplicities from the SHERPA event generator, and study the transition between Poisson-like and staircase-like behaviour of jet ratios.

Erik Gerwick; Ben Gripaios; Steffen Schumann; Bryan Webber

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Heat transfer and film cooling with steam injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for both coolants was determined for similar blowing rates and was used as a basis for comparisons. Heat transfer coefficients were calcula- ted from the experimental data using a transient analysis. DEDICATION To my wife and family. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS... LIST OF TABLES PAGE TABLE 1 Variation in the Blowing Rate ------------ 55 TABLE 2 TABLE 3 Typical Air Film Cooling Effectiveness Data Typical Steam Film Cooling Effectiveness Data 62 62 1X LIST OF FIGURES PAGE Figure 1 Comparison of Heat...

Conklin, Gary Eugene

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DURABILITY OF VERY LOW CAPACITY PRESSURE ATOMIZED FUEL NOZZLES USED WITH LOW FIRING RATE RESIDENTIAL OIL BURNERS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), working for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has conducted a preliminary evaluation of the potential of very low fuel input capacity Simplex type pressure atomizing nozzles for use with oil burners designed for residential boilers, furnaces and water heaters. These nozzles under suitable conditions can be sufficiently reliable to enable new heating system designs. This would allow for the design of heating appliances that match the smaller load demands of energy efficient homes built with modern components and architectural systems designed to minimize energy use. When heating systems are installed with excessive capacity, oversized by three to four times the load, the result is a loss of up to ten percent as compared to the rated appliance efficiency. The use of low capacity nozzles in systems designed to closely match the load can thereby result in significant energy savings. BNL investigated the limitations of low flow rate nozzles and designed long-term experiments to see if ways could be determined that would be beneficial to long-term operation at low input capacities without failures. In order to maximize the potential for success the best possible industry practices available were employed. Low flow rate nozzles primarily fail by blockage or partial blockage of internal fuel flow passages inside the nozzle. To prevent any contaminants from entering the nozzle BNL investigated the geometry and critical dimensions and the current sate of the art of fuel filter design. Based on this investigation it was concluded that the best available filters should be more than capable of filtering contaminants from the fuel prior to entering the oil burner itself. This position was indeed validated based on the long-term trials conducted under this study no evidence resulted to change our position. It is highly recommended that these filters rated at 10 microns and with large filter capacity (surface area), should be used with all oil burner installations. The other possible failure mode had been attributed to fuel degradation and this became the main focus of the evaluation. The degradation of fuel usually occurs faster under higher temperature conditions. To preclude this as much as possible controls that provided for a post-purge of combustion airflow after burner shut down were selected. This provided a short period of time where the burner's combustion air blower continues to operate after the flame has gone out. This tends to cool the nozzle and in turn the fuel inside the small flow pathways inside the nozzle components. This study concludes that the use of low capacity nozzles is possible but only when the temperature and thermal mass environment of the combustion chamber result in a relatively ''cool'' condition. This was accomplished in one long-term experiment that essentially operated for a full heating season equivalent with no evidence of nozzle plugging or failure. The nozzle body surface temperature was kept at or below 150 F during the duration of the trial. On the other hand, a second system was studied that ended in a partial nozzle blockage and a system failure. In this ''hot environment'' system the nozzle body temperature reached 210 F. This occurred at close to a full heating season equivalent, yet it still would have resulted in a no-heat complaint by the homeowner.

MCDONALD,R.J.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during experimentation.

Mathur, Anoop [Terrafore Inc.] [Terrafore Inc.

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

Proceedings of Heat Transfer 2003: ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Heat Transfer 2003: ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference Las Vegas, Nevada, USA July 21-23, 2003 HT2003-47449 HEAT TRANSFER FROM A MOVING AND EVAPORATING MENISCUS ON A HEATED SURFACE meniscus with complete evaporation of water without any meniscus break-up. The experimental heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

334

IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS #12;ii IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS............................................................... 2 1.3. Overview of the Parameter Estimation Water-to-Water Heat Pump Model ........... 5 1

335

First university owned district heating system using biomass heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highlights First university owned district heating system using biomass heat Capacity: 15 MMBtu Main Campus District Heating Performance Avoided: 3500 tonnes of CO2 Particulate: less than 10 mg District Heating Goals To displace 85% of natural gas used for core campus heating. Fuel Bunker Sawmill

Northern British Columbia, University of

336

[Semantic equivalence of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the "Body Change Inventory"].  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

portugus do Body Change Inventory Semantic Equivalence ofof the Body Change Inventory Maria Elisa Caputo Ferreira 1tion of the Body Change Inventory: An assessment instrument

Conti, MA; Ferreira, ME; Amaral, AC; Hearst, N; Cords, TA; Scagliusi, FB

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microchannel heat sink assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watertight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures. 13 figs.

Bonde, W.L.; Contolini, R.J.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing natural gas, heat, water, sewerage, and street railway services to the public. The legislation addresses rates and services,...

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - accretion-driven coronal heating Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basic concept remains valid 12;Basic building blocks I: coronal... heating rate Hm temperature T 12;Mller, Peter ... Source: New Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for...

344

A measurement of the muon-induced neutron yield in lead at a depth of 2850 m water equivalent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from the measurement of the neutron production rate in lead by high energy cosmic-ray muons at a depth of 2850 m water equivalent (mean muon energy of 260 GeV). A tonne-scale highly segmented plastic scintillator detector was utilised to detect both the energy depositions from the traversing muons as well as the delayed radiative capture signals of the induced neutrons. Complementary Monte Carlo simulations reproduce well the distributions of muons and detected muon-induced neutrons. Absolute agreement between simulation and data is of the order of 25%. By comparing the measured and simulated neutron capture rates a neutron yield in pure lead of (5.78{sub ?0.28}{sup +0.21})10{sup ?3} neutrons/muon/(g/cm{sup 2}) has been obtained.

Reichhart, L.; Ghag, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh, UK and High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh, UK and High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom); Lindote, A.; Chepel, V.; DeViveiros, L.; Lopes, M. I.; Neves, F.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal)] [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Akimov, D. Yu.; Belov, V. A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Kobyakin, A. S.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Stekhanov, V. N. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Arajo, H. M.; Bewick, A.; Currie, A.; Horn, M. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)] [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); and others

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

345

Solar heating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, James M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Concord, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Improved solar heating systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

347

Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data, the synthetic fuel contained slightly less heat energy and fewer emissions. Test results obtained from adding different levels of a small amount of hydrogen into the intake manifold of a diesel-operated engine showed no effect on exhaust heat content. In other words, both synthetic fuel and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen may not have a significant enough effect on the amount of recoverable heat and its feasibility. An economic analysis computer program was developed on Visual Basic for Application in Microsoft Excel. The program was developed to be user friendly, to accept different levels of input data, and to expand for other heat recovery applications (i.e., power, desalination, etc.) by adding into the program the simulation subroutines of the desired applications. The developed program has been validated using experimental data.

Chuen-Sen Lin

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method and apparatus (vessel) for providing a heat transfer rate from a reaction chamber through a wall to a heat transfer chamber substantially matching a local heat transfer rate of a catalytic thermal chemical reaction. The key to the invention is a thermal distance defined on a cross sectional plane through the vessel inclusive of a heat transfer chamber, reaction chamber and a wall between the chambers. The cross sectional plane is perpendicular to a bulk flow direction of the reactant stream, and the thermal distance is a distance between a coolest position and a hottest position on the cross sectional plane. The thermal distance is of a length wherein the heat transfer rate from the reaction chamber to the heat transfer chamber substantially matches the local heat transfer rate.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Relating magnetic reconnection to coronal heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is clear that the solar corona is begin heated and that coronal magnetic fields undergo reconnection all the time. Here we attempt to show that these two facts are in fact related - i.e. coronal reconnection generates heat. This attempt must address the fact that topological change of field lines does not automatically generate heat. We present one case of flux emergence where we have measured the rate of coronal magnetic reconnection and the rate of energy dissipation in the corona. The ratio of these two, $P/\\dot{\\Phi}$, is a current comparable to the amount of current expected to flow along the boundary separating the emerged flux from the pre-existing flux overlying it. We can generalize this relation to the overall corona in quiet Sun or in active regions. Doing so yields estimates for the contribution to corona heating from magnetic reconnection. These estimated rates are comparable to the amount required to maintain the corona at its observed temperature.

Longcope, Dana W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Heat Balance Analysis to Validate the Heat Dissipation Rate of a Man-Made Lake as a Heat Rejection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power plants were originally designed to use convenient bodies of water and cooling towers due to unavailability of these sources. Though the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) has been pushing regulation that requires all new generation created...

Song, L.; Hayes, T.; Dawson, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

500F Absorption Heat Pump Under Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fluid. It is rated as chemically stable up to 595 0 C (Olin, 1982). There are many instances of industriAl use of this salt, for heat treatment as well as for heat transfer. An example of current interest is the Molten Salt Electric Experiment... and IN800 in Molten Nitrate Salts". Sandia Report, SAND08l-8210. Sandia National Laboratories, Al buquerque, New Mexico. Davidson, W. F., and Erickson, D. C. 198'6. "New High Temperature Absorbent for Abs 0 r pt ion He a t PUmps " . To be pu h 1...

Davidson, W. F.; Erickson, D. C.

352

Longitudinal variation of tides in the MLT region: 2. Relative effects of solar radiative and latent heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solar radiative and latent heating Xiaoli Zhang,1 Jeffrey M. Forbes,1 and Maura E. Hagan2 Received 11 study examines the relative importance of radiative heating and latent heating in accounting (GSWM) and new tidal heating rates derived from International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP

Forbes, Jeffrey

353

Heat-Of-Reaction Chemical Heat Pumps--Possible Configurations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-807. (5) K. Kesavan. The Use of Dissociating Gases As the Working Fluid in Thermodynamic Power Conversion Cycles, Ph.D. thesis. Carnegie-Mellon University, 1978, Ann Arbor, MI: University Microfilms International, 1978. 5. Heat amplifier with a gas...ABSTRACT Chemical heat pumps utilize working fluids which undergo reversible chemical changes. Mechanically driven reactive heat pump cycles or, alternatively, hl~a: driven heat pumps in which either heat engine or heat pump working fluid...

Kirol, L. D.

354

Integrating preconcentrator heat controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for controlling the electric resistance heating of a metallic chemical preconcentrator screen, for example, used in portable trace explosives detectors. The length of the heating time-period is automatically adjusted to compensate for any changes in the voltage driving the heating current across the screen, for example, due to gradual discharge or aging of a battery. The total deposited energy in the screen is proportional to the integral over time of the square of the voltage drop across the screen. Since the net temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, of the screen, from beginning to end of the heating pulse, is proportional to the total amount of heat energy deposited in the screen during the heating pulse, then this integral can be calculated in real-time and used to terminate the heating current when a pre-set target value has been reached; thereby providing a consistent and reliable screen temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, from pulse-to-pulse.

Bouchier, Francis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Arakaki, Lester H. (Edgewood, NM); Varley, Eric S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

355

Proceedings: Heat exchanger workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat transfer processes are of controlling importance in the operation of a thermal power plant. Heat exchangers are major cost items and are an important source of problems causing poor power plant availability and performance. A workshop to examine the improvements that can be made to heat exchangers was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) on June 10-11, 1986, in Palo Alto, California. This workshop was attended by 25 engineers and scientists representing EPRI-member utilities and EPRI consultants. A forum was provided for discussions related to the design, operation and maintenance of utility heat transfer equipment. The specific objectives were to identify research directions that could significantly improve heat exchanger performance, reliability and life cycle economics. Since there is a great diversity of utility heat transfer equipment in use, this workshop addressed two equipment categories: Boiler Feedwater Heaters (FWH) and Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG). The workshop was divided into the following panel sessions: functional design, mechanical design, operation, suggested research topics, and prioritization. Each panel session began with short presentations by experts on the subject and followed by discussions by the attendees. This report documents the proceedings of the workshop and contains recommendations of potentially valuable areas of research and development. 4 figs.

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Micro heat barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

Thermally conductive cementitious grout for geothermal heat pump systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermally conductive cement-sand grout for use with a geothermal heat pump system. The cement sand grout contains cement, silica sand, a superplasticizer, water and optionally bentonite. The present invention also includes a method of filling boreholes used for geothermal heat pump systems with the thermally conductive cement-sand grout. The cement-sand grout has improved thermal conductivity over neat cement and bentonite grouts, which allows shallower bore holes to be used to provide an equivalent heat transfer capacity. In addition, the cement-sand grouts of the present invention also provide improved bond strengths and decreased permeabilities. The cement-sand grouts can also contain blast furnace slag, fly ash, a thermoplastic air entraining agent, latex, a shrinkage reducing admixture, calcium oxide and combinations thereof.

Allan, Marita (Old Field, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Combined heat and power: How much carbon and energy can it save for manufacturers?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a September 1997 National Laboratory study for the US Department of Energy, the authors estimated the potential for reducing industrial energy consumption and carbon emissions using advanced technologies for combined heat and power (CHP) for the year 2010. In this paper the authors re-analyze the potential for CHP in manufacturing only. The authors also refine the assessment by more accurately estimating the average efficiency of industrial boilers most likely to be replaced by CHP. The authors do this with recent GRI estimates of the age distribution of industrial boilers and standard age-efficiency equations. The previous estimate was based on use of the best CHP technology available, such as the about-to-be commercialized industrial advanced turbine system (ATS). This estimate assumes the use of existing off-the-shelf CHP technologies. Data is now available with which to develop a more realistic suite of penetration rates for existing and new CHP technologies. However, potential variation in actions of state and federal electricity and environmental regulators introduces uncertainties in the use of existing and potential new CHP far greater than those in previous technology penetration estimates. This is, thus, the maximum cost-effective technical potential for the frozen technology case. The authors find that if manufacturers in 1994 had generated all their steam and electric needs with existing CHP technologies, they could have reduced carbon equivalent (carbon dioxide) emissions by up to 30 million metric tons of carbon equivalent (MtC) or nearly 20%. This result is consistent with carbon and energy savings found in other studies. For example, the aforementioned laboratory study found that just three CHP technologies, fuel cells, advanced turbines, and integrated combined cycle technologies, accounted for nearly 10% of the study's projected carbon savings of 400 MtC by 2010--enough to reduce projected US 2010 emissions to 1990 levels.

Kaarsberg, T.M.; Roop, J.M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility 6801 Industrial Road Springfield, VA Date: October 9, 2014 Time:...

360

City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperatur...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility City of Klamath...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effective Rate Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the FY Mid-Year Change 10012013 - 03312014 04012014 - 09302014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement 73,441,557...

362

Economic Options for Upgrading Waste Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are at least six major types of equipment that upgrade waste heat: (1) thermocompressor; (2) electric drive compressor heat pump; (3) absorption heat pump; (4) high temperature heat powered compressor heat pump; (5) reverse absorption heat...

Erickson, D. C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Molecular heat pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a novel molecular device that pumps heat against a thermal gradient. The system consists of a molecular element connecting two thermal reservoirs that are characterized by different spectral properties. The pumping action is achieved by applying an external force that periodically modulates molecular levels. This modulation affects periodic oscillations of the internal temperature of the molecule and the strength of its coupling to each reservoir resulting in a net heat flow in the desired direction. The heat flow is examined in the slow and fast modulation limits and for different modulation waveforms, thus making it possible to optimize the device performance.

Dvira Segal; Abraham Nitzan

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

364

Heat treatment furnace  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

365

Development of dual temperature ammines for heat pump latent heat storage application. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ammoniated Complex Compounds can be used as working fluids in space heating and cooling heat pumps and storage systems. This report describes the theoretical and experimental development of complex compound working fluids for a heat pump-storage system. A computerized data base was developed for the preliminary selection of candidate working fluids. The selected substances were experimentally investigated. Several concepts using two ammoniated complex compounds or one complex compound and the plain ligand were developed. A subscale prototype was built using the NaBr-n NH/sub 3/ complex and NH/sub 3/ as the ligand. Two heat exchanger designs were tested and compared in terms of optimum reaction rates. A computer simulation was written to predict the performance of a complex compound heat pump-storage system. The results were compared with a simulation of a conventional R22 heat pump cycle. The influence of additives in the NaBr-n NH/sub 3/ complex was investigated with respect to the adsorption and desprption rates.

Rockenfeller, U.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Heat pumps and under floor heating as a heating system for Finnish low-rise residential buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In bachelors thesis the study of under floor heating system with ground source heat pump for the heat transfers fluid heating is considered. The case (more)

Chuduk, Svetlana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Mechanically equivalent elastic-plastic deformations and the problem of plastic spin David J. Steigmann1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanically equivalent elastic-plastic deformations and the problem of plastic spin David J author to receive correspondence (steigman@me.berkeley.edu) Abstract: The problem of plastic spin is phrased in terms of a notion of mechanical equivalence among local relaxed configurations of an elastic/plastic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

368

Promotion of efficient heat pumps for heating (ProHeatPump)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Promotion of efficient heat pumps for heating (ProHeatPump) EIE/06/072 / S12.444283 Supplementary report: Heat pumps in Norway May 2009 Work Package 4: Policy context and measures Authors: Nils of the industry and markets in the ProHeatPump partner countries, and should provide useful comparisons

369

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the offset unit's solar panel, the hf formula (16) wasdrop below the angle unit's solar panel at night time. D u rfor both the units, the solar panel covered roof was a heat

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Composite heat damage assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of heat damage were determined on the residual mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of IM6/3501-6 laminates, and potential nondestructive techniques to detect and assess material heat damage were evaluated. About one thousand preconditioned specimens were exposed to elevated temperatures, then cooled to room temperature and tested in compression, flexure, interlaminar shear, shore-D hardness, weight loss, and change in thickness. Specimens experienced significant and irreversible reduction in their residual properties when exposed to temperatures exceeding the material upper service temperature of this material (350{degrees}F). The Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Laser-Pumped Fluorescence techniques were found to be capable of rapid, in-service, nondestructive detection and quantitation of heat damage in IM6/3501- 6. These techniques also have the potential applicability to detect and assess heat damage effects in other polymer matrix composites.

Janke, C.J.; Wachter, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Philpot, H.E. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Powell, G.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Solar Heating Contractor Licensing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan offers a solar heating contractor specialty license to individuals who have at least three years of experience installing solar equipment under the direction of a licensed solar contractor...

372

Passive solar heating analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book discusses about the design of solar heating systems. The terms and symbols are clearly defined. Step-by-step procedures are indicated. Worked examples are given with tables, graphs, appendixes.

Balcomb, J.D.; Jones, R.W.; Mc Farland, R.D.; Wray, W.O.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Wood Heating Fuel Exemption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute exempts from the state sales tax all wood or "refuse-derived" fuel used for heating purposes. The law does not make any distinctions about whether the qualified fuels are used for...

374

Calculation of Heating Values for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments.

Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Heat flux limiting sleeves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat limiting tubular sleeve extending over only a portion of a tube having a generally uniform outside diameter, the sleeve being open on both ends, having one end thereof larger in diameter than the other end thereof and having a wall thickness which decreases in the same direction as the diameter of the sleeve decreases so that the heat transfer through the sleeve and tube is less adjacent the large diameter end of the sleeve than adjacent the other end thereof.

Harris, William G. (Tampa, FL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change heat exchanger with Na as the heat exchanger coolant. In order to design a very efficient and effective heat exchanger one must optimize the design such that we have a high heat transfer and a lower pressure drop, but there is always a trade-off between them. Based on NGNP operational parameters, a heat exchanger analysis with the sodium phase change will be presented to show that the heat exchanger has the potential for highly effective heat transfer, within a small volume at reasonable cost.

Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Condensation heat transfer in square, triangular, and semi-circular mini-channels Melanie Derby a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180, United States b Department was the coolant. The heat transfer rate was obtained through a coolant-side energy balance. To obtain condensation. An energy balance on the fluid-to-fluid heat exchanger measured heat duty while sensors in two obstructed

Peles, Yoav

379

On the Effect of Porous Layers on Melting Heat Transfer in an Enclosure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Effect of Porous Layers on Melting Heat Transfer in an Enclosure E. A. Ellinger* and C. To enhance heat transfer, the porous layers are located in regions where the melting rates for a pure the porous layer and the pure fluid layer cause strong variations in heat transfer, melt convection

Beckermann, Christoph

380

Eric Moulton, Ferri Hassani, Pejman Nekoovaght Microwave-Assisted Heating in Rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eric Moulton, Ferri Hassani, Pejman Nekoovaght Microwave-Assisted Heating in Rock INTRODUCTION to expensive replacements. Expansive heating through microwaves breaks up the rock, which reduces the stress the mechanisms and parameters governing the heating rate of a material. Department of Mining and Materials

Barthelat, Francois

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Castor-1C spent fuel storage cask decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses of the Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear Services (GNS) CASTOR-1C cask used in a spent fuel storage demonstration performed at Preussen Elektra's Wurgassen nuclear power plant. The demonstration was performed between March 1982 and January 1984, and resulted in cask and fuel temperature data and cask exterior surface gamma-ray and neutron radiation dose rate measurements. The purpose of the analyses reported here was to evaluate decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding computer codes. The analyses consisted of (1) performing pre-look predictions (predictions performed before the analysts were provided the test data), (2) comparing ORIGEN2 (decay heat), COBRA-SFS and HYDRA (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) results to data, and (3) performing post-test analyses if appropriate. Even though two heat transfer codes were used to predict CASTOR-1C cask test data, no attempt was made to compare the two codes. The codes are being evaluated with other test data (single-assembly data and other cask data), and to compare the codes based on one set of data may be premature and lead to erroneous conclusions.

Rector, D.R.; McCann, R.A.; Jenquin, U.P.; Heeb, C.M.; Creer, J.M.; Wheeler, C.L.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Intrinsically irreversible heat engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat. 11 figs.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

383

Radial flow heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

Valenzuela, Javier (Hanover, NH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Intrinsically irreversible heat engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. the second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Convective heat flow probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

386

Intrinsically irreversible heat engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Radiative Heat Transfer between Neighboring Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The near-field interaction between two neighboring particles is known to produce enhanced radiative heat transfer. We advance in the understanding of this phenomenon by including the full electromagnetic particle response, heat exchange with the environment, and important radiative corrections both in the distance dependence of the fields and in the particle absorption coefficients. We find that crossed terms of electric and magnetic interactions dominate the transfer rate between gold and SiC particles, whereas radiative corrections reduce it by several orders of magnitude even at small separations. Radiation away from the dimer can be strongly suppressed or enhanced at low and high temperatures, respectively. These effects must be taken into account for an accurate description of radiative heat transfer in nanostructured environments.

Alejandro Manjavacas; F. Javier Garcia de Abajo

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

388

Heat capacity at the glass transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fundamental problem of glass transition is to explain the jump of heat capacity at the glass transition temperature $T_g$ without asserting the existence of a distinct solid glass phase. This problem is also common to other disordered systems, including spin glasses. We propose that if $T_g$ is defined as the temperature at which the liquid stops relaxing at the experimental time scale, the jump of heat capacity at $T_g$ follows as a necessary consequence due to the change of system's elastic, vibrational and thermal properties. In this picture, we discuss time-dependent effects of glass transition, and identify three distinct regimes of relaxation. Our approach explains widely observed logarithmic increase of $T_g$ with the quench rate and the correlation of heat capacity jump with liquid fragility.

Kostya Trachenko; Vadim Brazhkin

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

389

Value of solar thermal industrial process heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimated the value of solar thermal-generated industrial process heat (IPH) as a function of process heat temperature. The value of solar thermal energy is equal to the cost of producing energy from conventional fuels and equipment if the energy produced from either source provides an equal level of service. This requirement put the focus of this study on defining and characterizing conventional process heat equipment and fuels. Costs (values) were estimated for 17 different design points representing different combinations of conventional technologies, temperatures, and fuels. Costs were first estimated for median or representative conditions at each design point. The cost impact of capacity factor, efficiency, fuel escalation rate, and regional fuel price differences were then evaluated by varying each of these factors within credible ranges.

Brown, D.R.; Fassbender, L.L.; Chockie, A.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Quasi-linear heating and acceleration in bi-Maxwellian plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quasi-linear acceleration and heating rates are derived for drifting bi-Maxwellian distribution functions in a general nonrelativistic case for arbitrary wave vectors, propagation angles, and growth/damping rates. The heating rates in a proton-electron plasma due to ion-cyclotron/kinetic Alfvn and mirror waves for a wide range of wavelengths, directions of propagation, and growth or damping rates are explicitly computed.

Hellinger, Petr [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic)] [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic); Passot, Thierry; Sulem, Pierre-Louis [Universit de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [Universit de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Trvn?ek, Pavel M. [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic) [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic); Space Sciences Laboratory, University of Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Local Heat Transfer for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers using Oval Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with either a circular tube or an elliptical tube in crossflow. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.56 x 10-3 to 15.6 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 630 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. The elliptical tube had an aspect ratio of 3:1 and a/H equal to 4.33. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of circular and oval tubes and their relationship to the complex horseshoe vortex system that forms in the flow stagnation region. Fin surface stagnation-region Nusselt numbers are shown to be proportional to the square-root of Reynolds number.

O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating solar air collector PV-panel fannon-return valve DHW tank mantle cold waterhot water roof Solar Energy Centre Denmark Danish Technological Institute SEC-R-29 #12;Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating Søren ?stergaard Jensen

393

Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

Koplow, Jeffrey P. (San Ramon, CA)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

394

Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

Koplow, Jeffrey P

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

PERPENDICULAR ION HEATING BY REDUCED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent theoretical studies argue that the rate of stochastic ion heating in low-frequency Alfvn-wave turbulence is given by Q = c{sub 1}((?u){sup 3}/?)exp ( c{sub 2}/?), where ?u is the rms turbulent velocity at the scale of the ion gyroradius ?, ? = ?u/v{sub i}, v{sub i} is the perpendicular ion thermal speed, and c{sub 1} and c{sub 2} are dimensionless constants. We test this theoretical result by numerically simulating test particles interacting with strong reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) turbulence. The heating rates in our simulations are well fit by this formula. The best-fit values of c{sub 1} are ?1. The best-fit values of c{sub 2} decrease (i.e., stochastic heating becomes more effective) as the Reynolds number and the number of grid points in the RMHD simulations increase. As an example, in a 1024{sup 2} 256 RMHD simulation with a dissipation wavenumber of the order of the inverse ion gyroradius, we find c{sub 2} = 0.21. We show that stochastic heating is significantly stronger in strong RMHD turbulence than in a field of randomly phased Alfvn waves with the same power spectrum, because coherent structures in strong RMHD turbulence increase orbit stochasticity in the regions where ions are heated most strongly. We find that c{sub 1} increases by a factor of ?3 while c{sub 2} changes very little as the ion thermal speed increases from values <heating in the solar wind.

Xia, Qian; Perez, Jean C.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Quataert, Eliot, E-mail: qdy2@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: jeanc.perez@unh.edu, E-mail: eliot@astro.berkeley.edu [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, 601 Campbell Hall, The University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

An analytical method to calculate equivalent fields to irregular symmetric and asymmetric photon fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equivalent field is frequently used for central axis depth-dose calculations of rectangular- and irregular-shaped photon beams. As most of the proposed models to calculate the equivalent square field are dosimetry based, a simple physical-based method to calculate the equivalent square field size was used as the basis of this study. The table of the sides of the equivalent square or rectangular fields was constructed and then compared with the well-known tables by BJR and Venselaar, et al. with the average relative error percentage of 2.5 2.5% and 1.5 1.5%, respectively. To evaluate the accuracy of this method, the percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured for some special irregular symmetric and asymmetric treatment fields and their equivalent squares for Siemens Primus Plus linear accelerator for both energies, 6 and 18 MV. The mean relative differences of PDDs measurement for these fields and their equivalent square was approximately 1% or less. As a result, this method can be employed to calculate equivalent field not only for rectangular fields but also for any irregular symmetric or asymmetric field.

Tahmasebi Birgani, Mohamad J. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Golestan Hospital, JondiShapour University of Medical Science, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics, JondiShapour University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chegeni, Nahid, E-mail: nchegen@yahoo.com [Department of Medical Physics, JondiShapour University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabihzadeh, Mansoor; Hamzian, Nima [Department of Medical Physics, JondiShapour University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Subcooled Boiling Near a Heated Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency, and velocity are obtained in subcooled R-134a flowing over a heated flat plate near an unheated wall and compared to analytical predictions. The measurements were obtained for a fixed system pressure and mass flow rate (P = 2.4 MPa and w = 106 kg/hr) at various inlet liquid temperatures. During the experiments, electrical power was applied at a constant rate to one side of the test section. The local void fraction data, acquired with a hot-film anemometer probe, showed the existence of a significant peak near the heated wall and a smaller secondary peak near the unheated wall for the larger inlet subcoolings. Local vapor velocity data, taken with the hot-film probe and a laser Doppler velocimeter, showed broad maxima near the centerline between the heated and unheated plates. Significant temperature gradients near the heated wall were observed for large inlet subcooling. Bubble size data, inferred from measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency and vapor velocity, when combined with the measured bubble chord length distributions illustrate the transition from pure three dimensional spherical to two-dimensional planar bubble flow, the latter being initiated when the bubbles fill the gap between the plates. These various two-phase flow measurements were used for development of a multidimensional, four-field calculational method; comparisons of the data to the calculations show reasonable agreement.

T.A. Trabold; C.C. Maneri; P.F. Vassallo; D.M. Considine

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

398

Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attentuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power.

Condreva, Kenneth J. (1420 Fifth St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attenuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power. 4 figs.

Condreva, K.J.

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

400

System Modeling and Building Energy Simulations of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve the system performance of a gas engine driven heat pump (GHP) system, an analytical modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated with a detailed vapor compression heat pump system design model. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using the desiccant system the sensible heat ratio (SHR- sensible heat ratio) can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% at rated operating conditions. In addtion,using EnergyPlus, building energy simulations have been conducted to assess annual energy consumptions of GHP in sixteen US cities, and the performances are compared to a baseline unit, which has a electrically-driven air conditioner with the seasonal COP of 4.1 for space cooling and a gas funace with 90% fuel efficiency for space heating.

Mahderekal, Isaac [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Vineyard, Edward [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Joule Heating and Anomalous Resistivity in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent radioastronomical observations of Faraday rotation in the solar corona can be interpreted as evidence for coronal currents, with values as large as $2.5 \\times 10^9$ Amperes (Spangler 2007). These estimates of currents are used to develop a model for Joule heating in the corona. It is assumed that the currents are concentrated in thin current sheets, as suggested by theories of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The Spitzer result for the resistivity is adopted as a lower limit to the true resistivity. The calculated volumetric heating rate is compared with an independent theoretical estimate by Cranmer et al (2007). This latter estimate accounts for the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the corona at a heliocentric distance of several solar radii. Our calculated Joule heating rate is less than the Cranmer et al estimate by at least a factor of $3 \\times 10^5$. The currents inferred from the observations of Spangler (2007) are not relevant to coronal heating unless the true resistivity is enormously increased relative to the Spitzer value. However, the same model for turbulent current sheets used to calculate the heating rate also gives an electron drift speed which can be comparable to the electron thermal speed, and larger than the ion acoustic speed. It is therefore possible that the coronal current sheets are unstable to current-driven instabilities which produce high levels of waves, enhance the resistivity and thus the heating rate.

Steven R. Spangler

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

402

Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

Mehrdad Massoudi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Efficiency bounds for nonequilibrium heat engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the efficiency of thermal engines (either quantum or classical) working with a single heat reservoir like atmosphere. The engine first gets an energy intake, which can be done in arbitrary non-equilibrium way e.g. combustion of fuel. Then the engine performs the work and returns to the initial state. We distinguish two general classes of engines where the working body first equilibrates within itself and then performs the work (ergodic engine) or when it performs the work before equilibrating (non-ergodic engine). We show that in both cases the second law of thermodynamics limits their efficiency. For ergodic engines we find a rigorous upper bound for the efficiency, which is strictly smaller than the equivalent Carnot efficiency. I.e. the Carnot efficiency can be never achieved in single reservoir heat engines. For non-ergodic engines the efficiency can be higher and can exceed the equilibrium Carnot bound. By extending the fundamental thermodynamic relation to nonequilibrium processes, we find a rigorous thermodynamic bound for the efficiency of both ergodic and non-ergodic engines and show that it is given by the relative entropy of the non-equilibrium and initial equilibrium distributions.These results suggest a new general strategy for designing more efficient engines. We illustrate our ideas by using simple examples.

Pankaj Mehta; Anatoli Polkovnikov

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

Heat and Power Systems Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAT AND POWER SYSTEMS DESIGN H. D. Spriggs and J. V. Shah, Leesburg. VA ABSTRACT The selection of heat and power systems usually does not include a thorough analysis of the process heating. cooling and power requirements. In most cases..., these process requirements are accepted as specifications before heat and power systems are selected and designed. In t~is article we describe how Process Integration using Pinch Technology can be used to understand and achieve the minimum process heating...

Spriggs, H. D.; Shah, J. V.

405

Heat distribution ceramic processing method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-layered heat distributor system is provided for use in a microwave process. The multi-layered heat distributors includes a first inner layer of a high thermal conductivity heat distributor material, a middle insulating layer and an optional third insulating outer layer. The multi-layered heat distributor system is placed around the ceramic composition or article to be processed and located in a microwave heating system. Sufficient microwave energy is applied to provide a high density, unflawed ceramic product.

Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Entropy production rate in a flux-driven self-organizing system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Entropy production rate (EPR) is often effective to describe how a structure is self-organized in a nonequilibrium thermodynamic system. The 'minimum EPR principle' is widely applicable to characterizing self-organized structures, but is sometimes disproved by observations of 'maximum EPR states'. Here we delineate a dual relation between the minimum and maximum principles; the mathematical representation of the duality is given by a Legendre transformation. For explicit formulation, we consider heat transport in the boundary layer of fusion plasma [Z. Yoshida and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Plasmas 15, 032307 (2008)]. The mechanism of bifurcation and hysteresis (which are the determining characteristics of the so-called H-mode, a self-organized state of reduced thermal conduction) is explained by multiple tangent lines to a pleated graph of an appropriate thermodynamic potential. In the nonlinear regime, we have to generalize Onsager's dissipation function. The generalized function is no longer equivalent to EPR; then EPR ceases to be the determinant of the operating point, and may take either minimum or maximum values depending on how the system is driven.

Kawazura, Y.; Yoshida, Z. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

POST-SHOCK-REVIVAL EVOLUTION IN THE NEUTRINO-HEATING MECHANISM OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform experimental simulations with spherical symmetry and axisymmetry to understand the post-shock-revival evolution of core-collapse supernovae. Assuming that the stalled shock wave is relaunched by neutrino heating and employing the so-called light bulb approximation, we induce shock revival by raising the neutrino luminosity up to the critical value, which is determined by dynamical simulations. A 15 M{sub Sun} progenitor model is employed. We incorporate nuclear network calculations with a consistent equation of state in the simulations to account for the energy release by nuclear reactions and their feedback to hydrodynamics. Varying the shock-relaunch time rather arbitrarily, we investigate the ensuing long-term evolutions systematically, paying particular attention to the explosion energy and nucleosynthetic yields as a function of relaunch time, or equivalently, the accretion rate at shock revival. We study in detail how the diagnostic explosion energy approaches the asymptotic value and which physical processes contribute in what proportions to the explosion energy. Furthermore, we study the dependence of physical processes on the relaunch time and the dimension of dynamics. We find that the contribution of nuclear reactions to the explosion energy is comparable to or greater than that of neutrino heating. In particular, recombinations are dominant over burnings in the contributions of nuclear reactions. Interestingly, one-dimensional (1D) models studied in this paper cannot produce the appropriate explosion energy and nickel mass simultaneously; nickels are overproduced. This problem is resolved in 2D models if the shock is relaunched at 300-400 ms after the bounce.

Yamamoto, Yu; Yamada, Shoichi [Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 2659-2 Suya, Goshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan); Nagakura, Hiroki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Influence of viscous friction heating on the efficiency of columns operated under very high pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When columns packed with very fine particles are operated at high mobile phase velocities, the friction of the mobile phase percolating through the column bed generates heat. This heat dissipates along and across the column and axial and radial temperature gradients appear. The wall region of the column tends to be cooler than its center, and due to the influence of temperature on the mobile phase viscosity and on the equilibrium constant of analytes, the band velocity is not constant across the column. This radial heterogeneity of the temperature distribution across the column contributes to band broadening. This phenomenon was investigated assuming a cylindrically symmetrical column and using the general dispersion theory of Aris, which relates the height equivalent to the theoretical plate (HETP) contribution due to a radial heterogeneity of the column to the radial distribution of the linear velocities of a compound peak and to the radial distribution of its apparent dispersion coefficients in the column bed. The former is known from the temperature gradient across the column, the temperature dependencies of the mobile phase viscosity, and the retention factor of the compound. The latter is derived from the known expression of the transverse reduced HETP equation for the column. The values of the HETP calculated with the Aris model and a classical HETP equation were compared to those measured on a 2.1 x 50 mm Acquity BEH-C{sub 18} column, run at flow rates of 0.6, 0.95, 1.30, and 1.65 mL/min, with pure acetonitrile as the mobile phase and naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene as the retained compound. These two sets of data are in generally good agreement, although the experimental values of the HETP tend to increase faster with increasing mobile phase velocity than the calculated values.

Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Acoustical heat pumping engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

Air heating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

Primeau, John J. (19800 Seminole Rd., Euclid, OH 44117)

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Solar industrial process heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

Lumsdaine, E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Acoustical heat pumping engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

413

CONDENSATION As noted previously, heat energy imparted to water as it  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONDENSATION As noted previously, heat energy imparted to water as it evaporates is returned to liquid water as vapor condenses. During low tide, the rate of evaporation typically exceeds the rate of condensation, and it is this net rate of evapora- tion that we notice. At times, however, the rate of conden

Brody, James P.

414

The Solar Neutrino Problem in the Light of a Violation of the Equivalence Principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have found that long-wavelength neutrino oscillations induced by a tiny breakdown of the weak equivalence principle of general relativity can provide a viable solution to the solar neutrino problem.

A. M. Gago; H. Nunokawa; R. Zukanovich Funchal

2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

415

Understanding fractional equivalence and the differentiated effects on operations with fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study compared two representations for teaching fraction equivalence. It traced the implications of both representations on the student?s comprehension of fractions as well as their ability to perform operations with fractions...

Naiser, Emilie Ann

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

On the Expression Complexity of Equivalence and Isomorphism of Primitive Positive Formulas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and existential quantification. The class of primitive positive formulas includes­and is essentially equivalent to in the study of the constraint satisfaction problem (CSP), which can be defined #12;as the problem of deciding

Valeriote, Matt

417

On the Expression Complexity of Equivalence and Isomorphism of Primitive Positive Formulas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and existential quantification. The class of primitive positive formulas includes­and is essentially equivalent to in the study of the constraint satisfaction problem (CSP), which can be defined Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings

Valeriote, Matt

418

Spanish Translation of the Children's Hope Scale Using Quantitative Methods for Verifying Semantic Equivalence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract The purpose of this study was to translate the Children's Hope Scale (CHS) from English to Spanish using quantitative methods in order to verify semantic equivalence of the adapted measure. The study utilized bilingual, English and Spanish...

Frehe-Torres, Victoria Elena

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

*can substitute CSE 131 & ESE 101 or equivalent Updated September 2014 Mechanical Engineering Sample Curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics and Vibration MEMS 4310 3 Vibration and Machine Elements Lab MEMS 405 2 Intro to Circuits ESE 230*can substitute CSE 131 & ESE 101 or equivalent Updated September 2014 Mechanical Engineering

Subramanian, Venkat

420

*can substitute CSE 131 & ESE 101 or equivalent Updated May 2014 Mechanical Engineering Sample Curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Simulation and Control MEMS 4301 3 Structural Dynamics and Vibration MEMS 431 4 Intro to Circuits*can substitute CSE 131 & ESE 101 or equivalent Updated May 2014 Mechanical Engineering Sample

Subramanian, Venkat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A critical study of the equivalent circuits of three and four-winding transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-WINDIHO TBAHSFORHERS A Thesis Donald Ray Whitson Jung 1951 A CRITICAL STUDY OF THE EQUIVALENT CIRCUITS OP THREE AND FOUR-WINDING THANSFORNERS Donald Rap Nhitson A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Nechanical College of Texas.... FOREWORD In the critical study of the equivalent circuits of three and four- winding transformers there was no attempt made to develop any new trans- former theory. This thesis presents the theory of two general methods of approach to the problem...

Whitson, Donald Ray

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A note on the equivalence principle applicability to the general theory of relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we are talking about the equivalence of Einsteinian gravitational equations solutions to relativist accelerated frames. It was established that there is a uniformly accelerated frame. Such a frame is deformed as an acceleration result, but it is a stiff frame according to Born, i.e. its metric tensor does not depend on time. The frame is pseudo-Riemannian. It was proved that an uniformly accelerated frame is locally equivalent to the relevant solution of Einstein's gravitational equation.

V. B. Morozov

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

423

Quasi-stationary circuit relationships from electromagnetic theory with special emphasis on equivalence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUASI-STATIONARY CIRCUIT RELATIONSHIPS PROM ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON EQUIVALENCE A Dissertation By Woodrow W. Gandy ontent by Chairman of Committee QUASI-STATIONARY CIRCUIT RELATIONSHIPS FROM ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY... WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON EQUIVALENCE A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Major Subject: Electrical Engineering...

Gandy, Woodrow Wheeler

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

An Equivalent Network for Load-Flow Analysis of Power Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EQUIVALENT NETWORK FOR LOAD-FLOW ANALYSIS OF POWER SYSTEMS A Thesis by Meri on L. Johnson Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partihl fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1960 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering AN EQUIVALENT NETWORK FOR LOAD-FLOW ANALYSIS OF POWER SYSTEMS A Thesis By Merion L. Johnson Approv as to style a d content by (Chairman of Co ittee ) (Head of Department...

Johnson, Merion Luke

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Heat driven heat pump using paired ammoniated salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cycle for a heat driven heat pump using two salts CaCl/sup 2/.8NH/sup 3/, and ZnCl/sup 2/.4NH3 which may reversibly react with ammonia with the addition or evolution of heat. These salts were chosen so that both ammoniation processes occur at the same temperature so that the heat evolved may be used for comfort heating. The heat to drive the system need only be slightly hotter than 122 C. The low temperature source need only be slightly warmer than 0 C.

Dunlap, R.M.

1980-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

426

Knowing mathematics for teaching: a case study of teacher responses to students' errors and difficulties in teaching equivalent fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Student Errors and Difficulties (TRED) in teaching equivalent fractions with an eye on students cognitive gains as the assessment of teaching effects. This research used a qualitative paradigm. Classroom videos concerning equivalent fractions from six...

Ding, Meixia

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Experimental Research on Solar Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-reaching meaning of solving energy and environment problems if new type energy conservation and environment protection heating system ? solar assisted ground-source heat pump (SAGHP) heating system with a latent heat storage tank will be practical... was established at the laboratory of construction energy conservation in Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) in 2004. It added a latent heat storage tank in original SAGHP system. The schematic diagram of the system is shown in Figure 1. The experimental...

Han, Z.; Zheng, M.; Liu, W.; Wang, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approximately equivalent to the air film resistance of theresistances R and R2 in parallel The thermal masses in the space are estimated: c 1 , the thermal equivalent

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Myhill-Nerode Handout Definition. An equivalence relation E on strings is right invariant iff concatenating a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a right-invariant equivalence relation E (on , for a given ) of finite index. Let S be the (finite) set

Clarke, Edmund M.

432

Heating of Oil Well by Hot Water Circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When highly viscous oil is produced at low temperatures, large pressure drops will significantly decrease production rate. One of possible solutions to this problem is heating of oil well by hot water recycling. We construct and analyze a mathematical model of oil-well heating composed of three linear parabolic PDE coupled with one Volterra integral equation. Further on we construct numerical method for the model and present some simulation results.

Mladen Jurak; Zarko Prnic

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

433

Low Level Heat Recovery Through Heat Pumps and Vapor Recompression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intent of this paper is to examine the methods and economics of recovering low level heat through heat pumps and vapor recompression. Actual commercially available equipment is considered to determine the near-term and future economic viability...

Gilbert, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Heat Transfer Derivation of differential equations for heat transfer conduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) or kW *h or Btu. U is the change in stored energy, in units of kW *h (kWh) or Btu. qx is the heat conducted (heat flux) into the control volume at surface edge x, in units of kW/m2 or Btu/(h-ft2). qx volume is positive), in kW/m3 or Btu/(h-ft3) (a heat sink, heat drawn out of the volume, is negative

Veress, Alexander

435

IEA Annex 26: Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With increased concern about the impact of refrigerant leakage on global warming, a number of new supermarket refrigeration system configurations requiring significantly less refrigerant charge are being considered. In order to help promote the development of advanced systems and expand the knowledge base for energy-efficient supermarket technology, the International Energy Agency (IEA) established IEA Annex 26 (Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems) under the ''IEA Implementing Agreement on Heat Pumping Technologies''. Annex 26 focuses on demonstrating and documenting the energy saving and environmental benefits of advanced systems design for food refrigeration and space heating and cooling for supermarkets. Advanced in this context means systems that use less energy, require less refrigerant and produce lower refrigerant emissions. Stated another way, the goal is to identify supermarket refrigeration and HVAC technology options that reduce the total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of supermarkets by reducing both system energy use (increasing efficiency) and reducing total refrigerant charge. The Annex has five participating countries: Canada, Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The working program of the Annex has involved analytical and experimental investigation of several candidate system design approaches to determine their potential to reduce refrigerant usage and energy consumption. Advanced refrigeration system types investigated include the following: distributed compressor systems--small parallel compressor racks are located in close proximity to the food display cases they serve thus significantly shortening the connecting refrigerant line lengths; secondary loop systems--one or more central chillers are used to refrigerate a secondary coolant (e.g. brine, ice slurry, or CO2) that is pumped to the food display cases on the sales floor; self-contained display cases--each food display case has its own refrigeration unit; low-charge direct expansion--similar to conventional multiplex refrigeration systems but with improved controls to limit charge. Means to integrate store HVAC systems for space heating/cooling with the refrigeration system have been investigated as well. One approach is to use heat pumps to recover refrigeration waste heat and raise it to a sufficient level to provide for store heating needs. Another involves use of combined heating and power (CHP) or combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) systems to integrate the refrigeration, HVAC, and power services in stores. Other methods including direct recovery of refrigeration reject heat for space and water heating have also been examined.

Baxter, VAN

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

436

Neutrino heating of a shock wave within magnetorotational model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the magnetorotational model of a supernova explosion with core collapse, we investigate the significant processes of neutrino heating of the supernova shock. These processes should be taken into account in self-consistent modeling, since the neutrino heating mechanism is capable of increasing the explosion efficiency. We show that, even in the presence of a strong magnetic field in the shock formation region, the heating rate is determined with good accuracy by the absorption and emission of neutrinos in direct URCA processes. Moreover, the influence on them of a magnetic field is reduced to insignificant corrections.

A. A. Gvozdev; I. S. Ognev

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

437

Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Sensible heat models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transient models for sensible heat were developed to assess the thermal performance of agitated vessels with coils and jackets. Performance is quantified with the computation of heat-transfer coefficients by introducing vessel heating and cooling data into model equations. Of the two model categories studied, differential and macroscopic, the latter is preferred due to mathematical simplicity and lower sensitivity to experimental data variability.

Kumpinsky, E. [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States). Research and Development Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Heat engine Device that transforms heat into work.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and rocket engines are heat engines. So are steam engines and turbines #12;2 refrigerator Device that uses by steam turbines. Steam turbines, jet engines and rocket engines use a Brayton cycle #12;4 Steam turbines1 Heat engine Device that transforms heat into work. It requires two energy reservoirs at different

Winokur, Michael

439

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, Paul R. (Western Springs, IL); McLennan, George A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Heart Rate Artifact Suppression.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Motion artifact strongly corrupts heart rate measurements in current pulse oximetry systems. In many, almost any motion will greatly diminish the systems ability to extract (more)

Dickson, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Residential Solar Valuation Rates  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

443

Effective Rate Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

charges or credits associated with the creation, termination, or modification to any tariff, contract, or rate schedule accepted or approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory...

444

LCC Guidance Rates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

445

Geothermal Heat Pump Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) offers rebates of $3,000 for residential geothermal heat pump systems and up to $4,500 for non-residential geothermal heat pump systems. The residential...

446

Heat Pipes: An Industrial Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reviews the basics of heat pipe exchangers. Included are how they are constructed, how they operate, where they have application, and various aspects of evaluating a potential application. After discussing the technical aspects of heat...

Murray, F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

Dafft, T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Heat Pumps - Theory and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compressors (heat pumps) with actual applications in Monsanto. Guidelines for possible application areas are drawn from the analysis, and conclusions are drawn both about the usefulness of exergy analysis and about the heat pump application areas....

Altin, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and Thermal/Energy Sciences Naval Postgraduate School Monterey-track faculty position at the assistant professor level in the areas of Heat Transfer and Thermal/Fluid Sciences

450

Residential Solar Water Heating Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New Hampshire offers a rebate for residential solar water-heating systems and solar space-heating systems. The rebate is equal to $1,500 for systems with an annual estimated output of 5.5 MMBTU to...

451

Can You Afford Heat Recovery?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

many companies to venture into heat recovery projects without due consideration of the many factors involved. Many of these efforts have rendered less desirable results than expected. Heat recovery in the form of recuperation should be considered...

Foust, L. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Low Level Heat Recovery Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various...

O'Brien, W. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Heat transfer probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

454

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

455

Quantum heat engines and refrigerators: Continuous devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum thermodynamics supplies a consistent description of quantum heat engines and refrigerators up to the level of a single few level system coupled to the environment. Once the environment is split into three;a hot, cold and work reservoirs a heat engine can operate. The device converts the positive gain into power;where the gain is obtained from population inversion between the components of the device. Reversing the operation transforms the device into a quantum refrigerator. The quantum tricycle, a device connected by three external leads to three heat reservoirs is used as a template for engines and refrigerators. The equation of motion for the heat currents and power can be derived from first principle. Only a global description of the coupling of the device to the reservoirs is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Optimisation of the devices leads to a balanced set of parameters where the couplings to the three reservoirs are of the same order and the external driving field is in resonance. When analysing refrigerators special attention is devoted to a dynamical version of the third law of thermodynamics. Bounds on the rate of cooling when approaching the absolute zero are obtained by optimising the cooling current. At low temperature all refrigerators show universal behavior. Restrictions on the system imposed by the dynamical version of the third law are studied.

Ronnie Kosloff; Amikam Levy

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

456

Heat flux dynamics in dissipative cascaded systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the dynamics of heat flux in the thermalization process of a pair of identical quantum system that interact dissipatively with a reservoir in a {\\it cascaded} fashion. Despite the open dynamics of the bipartite system S is globally Lindbladian, one of the subsystems "sees" the reservoir in a state modified by the interaction with the other subsystem and hence it undergoes a non-Markovian dynamics. As a consequence, the heat flow exhibits a non-exponential time behaviour which can greatly deviate from the case where each party is independently coupled to the reservoir. We investigate both thermal and correlated initial states of $S$ and show that the presence of correlations at the beginning can considerably affect the heat flux rate. We carry out our study in two paradigmatic cases -- a pair of harmonic oscillators with a reservoir of bosonic modes and two qubits with a reservoir of fermionic modes -- and compare the corresponding behaviours. In the case of qubits and for initial thermal states, we find that the trace distance discord is at any time interpretable as the correlated contribution to the total heat flux.

Salvatore Lorenzo; Alessandro Farace; Francesco Ciccarello; G. Massimo Palma; Vittorio Giovannetti

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Microchannel Heat Exchangers with Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present study was to determine the performance of CO{sub 2} microchannel evaporators and gas coolers in operational conditions representing those of residential heat pumps. A set of breadboard prototype microchannel evaporators and gas coolers was developed and tested. The refrigerant in the heat exchangers followed a counter cross-flow path with respect to the airflow direction. The test conditions corresponded to the typical operating conditions of residential heat pumps. In addition, a second set of commercial microchannel evaporators and gas coolers was tested for a less comprehensive range of operating conditions. The test results were reduced and a comprehensive data analysis, including comparison with the previous studies in this field, was performed. Capacity and pressure drop of the evaporator and gas cooler for the range of parameters studied were analyzed and are documented in this report. A gas cooler performance prediction model based on non-dimensional parameters was also developed and results are discussed as well. In addition, in the present study, experiments were conducted to evaluate capacities and pressure drops for sub-critical CO{sub 2} flow boiling and transcritical CO{sub 2} gas cooling in microchannel heat exchangers. An extensive review of the literature failed to indicate any previous systematic study in this area, suggesting a lack of fundamental understanding of the phenomena and a lack of comprehensive data that would quantify the performance potential of CO{sub 2} microchannel heat exchangers for the application at hand. All experimental tests were successfully conducted with an energy balance within {+-}3%. The only exceptions to this were experiments at very low saturation temperatures (-23 C), where energy balances were as high as 10%. In the case of evaporators, it was found that a lower saturation temperature (especially when moisture condensation occurs) improves the overall heat transfer coefficient significantly. However, under such conditions, air side pressure drop also increases when moisture condensation occurs. An increase in airflow rate also increases the overall heat transfer coefficient. Air side pressure drop mainly depends on airflow rate. For the gas cooler, a significant portion of the heat transfer occurred in the first heat exchanger module on the refrigerant inlet side. The temperature and pressure of CO{sub 2} significantly affect the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics due to some important properties (such as specific heat, density, and viscosity). In the transcritical region, performance of CO{sub 2} strongly depends on the operating temperature and pressure. Semi-empirical models were developed for predictions of CO{sub 2} evaporator and gas cooler system capacities. The evaporator model introduced two new factors to account for the effects of air-side moisture condensate and refrigerant outlet superheat. The model agreed with the experimental results within {+-}13%. The gas cooler model, based on non-dimensional parameters, successfully predicted the experimental results within {+-}20%. Recommendations for future work on this project include redesigning headers and/or introducing flow mixers to avoid flow mal-distribution problems, devising new defrosting techniques, and improving numerical models. These recommendations are described in more detail at the end of this report.

Zhao, Y.; Ohadi, M.M.; Radermacher, R.

2001-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Industrial Heat Recovery - 1982  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

like: "Vertical, natural circulation boilers are intrinsically mbre reliable than horizontal, forced circula tion boilers.",4 and " it will be seen that horizontal tubes have much lower heat fluxes at burnout than do vertical ones, though...-steam density difference dia gram (Figure 1) has been presented repeat edly in order to indicate a significant density difference between the two phases (even close to the critical pressure) which induces natural circulation. However, this diagra...

Csathy, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Large Deviations in Stochastic Heat-Conduction Processes Provide a Gradient-Flow Structure for Heat Conduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider three one-dimensional continuous-time Markov processes on a lattice, each of which models the conduction of heat: the family of Brownian Energy Processes with parameter $m$, a Generalized Brownian Energy Process, and the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti process. The hydrodynamic limit of each of these three processes is a parabolic equation, the linear heat equation in the case of the BEP$(m)$ and the KMP, and a nonlinear heat equation for the GBEP($a$). We prove the hydrodynamic limit rigorously for the BEP$(m)$, and give a formal derivation for the GBEP($a$). We then formally derive the pathwise large-deviation rate functional for the empirical measure of the three processes. These rate functionals imply gradient-flow structures for the limiting linear and nonlinear heat equations. We contrast these gradient-flow structures with those for processes describing the diffusion of mass, most importantly the class of Wasserstein gradient-flow systems. The linear and nonlinear heat-equation gradient-flow structures are each driven by entropy terms of the form $-\\log \\rho$; they involve dissipation or mobility terms of order $\\rho^2$ for the linear heat equation, and a nonlinear function of $\\rho$ for the nonlinear heat equation.

Mark A. Peletier; Frank Redig; Kiamars Vafayi

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

460

Methanol-based heat pump for solar heating, cooling, and storage. Phase III. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of CH/sub 3/OH vapor with solid (pellet) CaCl/sub 2/ to form the solid phase compound CaCll/sub 2/ . 2CH/sub 3/OH can be used as the basis of a combined solar heat pump/thermal energy storage system. Such a system is capable of storing heat indefinitely at ambient temperature, and can be used for space and domestic hot water heating, and for air conditioning with forced air (dry) heat rejection. It combines all features required of a residential or commercial space conditioning system except for solar collection. A detailed thermal analysis shows that the coefficient of performance for heating is greater than 1.5, and for cooling, greater than 0.5. This has been confirmed by direct experimental measurement on an engineering development test unit (EDTU). The experimental rate of CH/sub 3/OH absorption is a strong function of the absorber-evaporator temperature difference. The minimum practical hourly rate, 0.10 moles CH/sub 3/OH per mole CaCl/sub 2/, was observed with the salt-bed heat transfer fluid at 40/sup 0/C and the CH/sub 3/OH evaporator at -15/sup 0/C. a detailed performance and economic analysis was carried out for a system operated in Washington, DC. With 25 square meters of evacuated tube solar collectors, the CaCl/sub 2/-CH/sub 3/OH chemical heat pump should be capable of meeting over 90% of the cooling load, 80% of the heating load, and 70% of the domestic hot water load with nonpurchased energy in a typical well-insulated single family residence, thus saving about $600 per year. In small-scale production, the installed cost of the system, including solar collectors and backup, is estimated to be about $10,000 greater than a conventional heating and cooling system, and a much lower cost should be possible in the longer term.

Offenhartz, P O'D; Rye, T V; Malsberger, R E; Schwartz, D

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Optimization of Heat Exchanger Cleaning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decrease models of the heat recovery decay. A mathematical comparison of mechanical and chemical cleaning of heat exchangers has identified the most significant parameters which affect the choice between the two methods. INTRODUCTION In most... can be somewhat mitigated by periodic chemical or mechanical cleaning of the exchanger surface, and by the addition of antifoul ants. The typical decay in heat recovery capabil ity due to fou 1i ng and restoration afte r heat exchanger cleaning...

Siegell, J. H.

462

[Waste water heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production capabilities for and field testing of the heat recovery system are described briefly. Drawings are included.

Not Available

1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste heat Pyroelectric energy3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Relaxor

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative, the geothermal heat pump system moves heat from the ground to a building (or from a building to the ground) through a series of flexible pipe "loops" containing water. This edition of Energy 101 explores the benefits Geothermal and the science behind how it all comes together.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Heat Pump Strategies and Payoffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After evaluating numerous waste heat sources and heat pump designs for energy recovery, we have become aware that a great deal of confusion exists about the economics of heat pumps. The purpose of this article is to present some simple formulas...

Gilbert, J. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Industrial Heat Pump Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with operating the evaporator. The open-cycle heat pump design uses an electrically driven centrifugal compressor to recover the latent heat of the water vapor generated by the evaporator. (Steam was the original heat source but is now only needed for start...

Wagner, J. R.; Brush, F. C.

470

5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/120 5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven ?bo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering / Värme Three heat transfer mechanisms Conduction Convection Radiation 2/120 Pic: B?88 ?bo Akademi University | Thermal and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland #12;3/120 5.1 Conductive heat transfer ?bo Akademi

Zevenhoven, Ron

471

Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

An energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative, the geothermal heat pump system moves heat from the ground to a building (or from a building to the ground) through a series of flexible pipe "loops" containing water. This edition of Energy 101 explores the benefits Geothermal and the science behind how it all comes together.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

472

Previous Power Rates (rates/current)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentations Presentations SortConferences PreviousRates

473

Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > FinancialPowerRates

474

Power Rates Announcements (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > FinancialPowerRates

475

Rates Meetings and Workshops (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

476

Research & Development Roadmap: Emerging Water Heating Technologies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Emerging Water Heating Technologies Research & Development Roadmap: Emerging Water Heating Technologies The Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap for Emerging Water Heating...

477

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High Mach number flight requires that the scramjet propulsion system operate at a relatively low static inlet pressure and a high inlet temperature. These two constraints can lead to extremely high temperatures in the combustor, yielding high densities of radical species and correspondingly poor chemical combustion efficiency. As the temperature drops in the nozzle expansion, recombination of these excess radicals can produce more product species, higher heat yield, and potentially more thrust. The extent to which the chemical efficiency can be enhanced in the nozzle expansion depends directly on the rate of the radical recombination reactions. A comprehensive assessment of the important chemical processes and an experimental validation of the critical rate parameters is therefore required if accurate predictions of scramjet performance are to be obtained. This report covers the identification of critical reactions, and the critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Oldenborg, R.C.; Harradine, D.M.; Loge, G.W.; Lyman, J.L.; Schott, G.L.; Winn, K.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Innovative Miniaturized Heat Pumps for Buildings: Modular Thermal Hub for Building Heating, Cooling and Water Heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: Georgia Tech is using innovative components and system design to develop a new type of absorption heat pump. Georgia Techs new heat pumps are energy efficient, use refrigerants that do not emit greenhouse gases, and can run on energy from combustion, waste heat, or solar energy. Georgia Tech is leveraging enhancements to heat and mass transfer technology possible in microscale passages and removing hurdles to the use of heat-activated heat pumps that have existed for more than a century. Use of microscale passages allows for miniaturization of systems that can be packed as monolithic full-system packages or discrete, distributed components enabling integration into a variety of residential and commercial buildings. Compared to conventional heat pumps, Georgia Techs design innovations will create an absorption heat pump that is much smaller, has higher energy efficiency, and can also be mass produced at a lower cost and assembly time.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Variational equivalence between Ginzburg-Landau, XY spin systems and screw dislocations energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce and discuss discrete two-dimensional models for XY spin systems and screw dislocations in crystals. We prove that, as the lattice spacing $\\e$ tends to zero, the relevant energies in these models behave like a free energy in the complex Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity, justifying in a rigorous mathematical language the analogies between screw dislocations in crystals and vortices in superconductors. To this purpose, we introduce a notion of asymptotic variational equivalence between families of functionals in the framework of $\\Gamma$-convergence. We then prove that, in several scaling regimes, the complex Ginzburg-Landau, the XY spin system and the screw dislocation energy functionals are variationally equivalent. Exploiting such an equivalence between dislocations and vortices, we can show new results concerning the asymptotic behavior of screw dislocations in the $|\\log\\e|^2$ energetic regime.

R. Alicandro; M. Cicalese; M. Ponsiglione

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat rate equivalents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

AOSC 621AOSC 621 Radiative Heating/CoolingRadiative Heating/Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Why drop off near sfc? 4 #12;Net flux Net flux: F = F+ - F- 1 2 F-(1) F+(1) F-(2) F+(2) Net energy at the top of the atmosphere is zero. Then we can write 1' ' )',( )'()0,()( 0 * dz dz zzdT zBzTBzF z z F F · The heating rate at z is defined as follows: )( )( d zdF zH net four termsofconsistwilland dz A

Li, Zhanqing

482

Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

Mather, James

483

Determination of heat transfer and friction characteristics of an adapted inclined louvered fin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of a fin-and-tube heat exchanger was performed. To this end a test rig was constructed to measure the heat transfer rate on the air and waterside of the heat exchanger. A wide range of Reynolds numbers on the airside was investigated. The resulting data was used to determine the convective heat transfer correlation (expressed using the Colburn factor) and the friction factor on the airside. The fin type used in the heat exchanger of this research is an adaptation of the standard inclined louvered type. A thorough error analysis was performed, to validate the results. (author)

T'Joen, C.; Steeman, H.-J.; Willockx, A.; De Paepe, M. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University-UGent, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Absorption-heat-pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

485

Abstract. Tailored porous media is a proposed method of achieving higher heat transfer coefficients while seeking to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. Tailored porous media is a proposed method of achieving higher heat transfer coefficients general porous flow model (MERLOT [1]). The Model of Energy- transfer Rate for fLow in Open transfer performance. The low heat capacities and low heat transfer coefficients, h, of gas coolants

Raffray, A. René

486

Two part condenser for varying the rate of condensing and related method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer apparatus, such as a condenser, is provided. The apparatus includes a first component with a first heat transfer element that has first component inlet and outlet ports through which a first fluid may pass. A second component is also included and likewise has a second heat transfer element with second component inlet and outlet ports to pass a second fluid. The first component has a body that can receive a third fluid for heat transfer with the first heat transfer element. The first and second components are releasably attachable with one another so that when attached both the first and second heat transfer elements effect heat transfer with the third fluid. Attachment and removal of the first and second components allows for the heat transfer rate of the apparatus to be varied. An associated method is also provided.

Dobos, James G. (North Augusta, SC)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

487

How many invariant polynomials are needed to decide local unitary equivalence of qubit states?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given L-qubit states with the fixed spectra of reduced one-qubit density matrices, we find a formula for the minimal number of invariant polynomials needed for solving local unitary (LU) equivalence problem, that is, problem of deciding if two states can be connected by local unitary operations. Interestingly, this number is not the same for every collection of the spectra. Some spectra require less polynomials to solve LU equivalence problem than others. The result is obtained using geometric methods, i.e., by calculating the dimensions of reduced spaces, stemming from the symplectic reduction procedure.

Maci??ek, Tomasz [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikw 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland) [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikw 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Ho?a 69, 00-681 Warszawa (Poland); Oszmaniec, Micha? [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikw 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikw 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Sawicki, Adam [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikw 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland) [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikw 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TW (United Kingdom)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

On the electromagnetic constitutive laws that are equivalent to spacetime metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The raising of both indices in the components of the Minkowski electromagnetic field strength 2-form to give the components of the electromagnetic excitation bivector field can be regarded as being equivalent to an electromagnetic constitutive law, as well as being defined by the components of the spacetime metric. This notion is clarified, and the nature of the equivalent dielectric tensors and magnetic permeability tensors that are defined by some common spacetime metrics is discussed. The relationship of the basic construction to effective metrics is discussed, and, in particular, the fact that this effective metric is more general than the Gordon metric.

D. H. Delphenich

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

489

Status of MICROSCOPE, a mission to test the Equivalence Principle in space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICROSCOPE is a French Space Agency mission that aims to test the Weak Equivalence Principle in space down to an accuracy of $10^{-15}$. This is two orders of magnitude better than the current constraints, which will allow us to test General Relativity as well as theories beyond General Relativity which predict a possible Weak Equivalence Principle violation below $10^{-13}$. In this communication, we describe the MICROSCOPE mission, its measurement principle and instrument, and we give an update on its status. After a successful instrument's commissioning, MICROSCOPE is on track for on-schedule launch, expected in 2016.

Berg, Joel; Rodrigues, Manuel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER ENVIRONMENT IN FIRE AND FURNACE TESTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PAKCAGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) sequential test of radioactive materials packages includes a thermal test to confirm the ability of the package to withstand a transportation fire event. The test specified by the regulations (10 CFR 71) consists of a 30 minute, all engulfing, hydrocarbon fuel fire, with an average flame temperature of at least 800 C. The requirements specify an average emissivity for the fire of at least 0.9, which implies an essentially black radiation environment. Alternate test which provide equivalent total heat input at the 800 C time averaged environmental temperature may also be employed. When alternate tests methods are employed, such as furnace or gaseous fuel fires, the equivalence of the radiation environment may require justification. The effects of furnace and open confinement fire environments are compared with the regulatory fire environment, including the effects of gases resulting from decomposition of package overpack materials. The results indicate that furnace tests can produce the required radiation heat transfer environment, i.e., equivalent to the postulated pool fire. An open enclosure, with transparent (low emissivity) fire does not produce an equivalent radiation environment.

Smith, A

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

Waste-heat recovery in batch processes using heat storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste-heat recovery in batch processes has been studied using the pinch-point method. The aim of the work has been to investigate theoretical and practical approaches to the design of heat-exchanger networks, including heat storage, for waste-heat recovery in batch processes. The study is limited to the incorporation of energy-storage systems based on fixed-temperature variable-mass stores. The background for preferring this to the alternatives (variable-temperature fixed-mass and constant-mass constant-temperature (latent-heat) stores) is given. It is shown that the maximum energy-saving targets as calculated by the pinch-point method (time average model, TAM) can be achieved by locating energy stores at either end of each process stream. This theoretically large number of heat-storage tanks (twice the number of process streams) can be reduced to just a few tanks. A simple procedure for determining a number of heat-storage tanks sufficient to achieve the maximum energy-saving targets as calculated by the pinch-point method is described. This procedure relies on combinatorial considerations, and could therefore be labeled the combinatorial method for incorporation of heat storage in heat-exchanger networks. Qualitative arguments justifying the procedure are presented. For simple systems, waste-heat recovery systems with only three heat-storage temperatures (a hot storage, a cold storage, and a heat store at the pinch temperature) often can achieve the maximum energy-saving targets. Through case studies, six of which are presented, it is found that a theoretically large number of heat-storage tanks (twice the number of process streams) can be reduced to just a few tanks. The description of these six cases is intended to be sufficiently detailed to serve as benchmark cases for development of alternative methods.

Stoltze, S.; Mikkelsen, J.; Lorentzen, B.; Petersen, P.M.; Qvale, B. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Lab. for Energetics

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Gelling by Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a simple model, a binary mixture of patchy particles, which has been designed to form a gel upon heating. Due to the specific nature of the particle interactions, notably the number and geometry of the patches as well as their interaction energies, the system is a fluid both at high and at low temperatures, whereas at intermediate temperatures the system forms a solid-like disordered open network structure, i.e. a gel. Using molecular dynamics we investigate the static and dynamic properties of this system.

Sandalo Roldan-Vargas; Frank Smallenburg; Walter Kob; Francesco Sciortino

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

493

Solar heated rotary kiln  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar heated rotary kiln utilized for decomposition of materials, such as zinc sulfate. The rotary kiln has an open end and is enclosed in a sealed container having a window positioned for directing solar energy into the open end of the kiln. The material to be decomposed is directed through the container into the kiln by a feed tube. The container is also provided with an outlet for exhaust gases and an outlet for spent solids, and rests on a tiltable base. The window may be cooled and kept clear of debris by coolant gases.

Shell, Pamela K. (Tracy, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Residential heating oil price  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter A B CAdministration (EIA)heating

495

Sandia National Laboratories: Heat Exchanger Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LabHeat Exchanger Development Heat Exchanger Development Planned Heat Exchanger Test Loop Capabilities Heat Exchanger 1 500 kW Heaters (Elec.) 500 kW Gas Cooler Unbalanced flows...

496

Billet Heating with the Homopolar Generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forging billets are presently brought from room temperature to forging temperature using one of three heating methods - indirect heating in a furnace, either fuel-fired or electric; direct electric resistance heating; or induction heating. Homopolar...

Weldon, W. F.; Keith, R. E.; Weldon, J. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Laser-based irradiation apparatus and method to measure the functional dose-rate response of semiconductor devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can measure the parametric or functional response of a semiconductor device to exposure to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light. Comparisons of dose-rate response from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. The dependence of these changes on equivalent dose-rate pulse intensity and/or duration can be measured with the apparatus. The synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into the device under test can be used to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure while exposing the device to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light.

Horn, Kevin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

498

On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

499

Emissions characteristics of modern oil heating equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 10 years there have been some very interesting developments in oil heating. These include higher static pressure burners, air atomizing nozzles, low firing rate nozzles, low heat loss combustion chambers and condensing boilers and furnaces. The current data base on the emissions characteristics of oil-fired residential heating equipment is based primarily on data taken in the 1970's. The objective of the work described in this report is to evaluate the effects of recent developments in oil-fired equipment on emissions. Detailed emissions measurements have been made on a number of currently available residential oil burners and whole systems selected to represent recent development trends. Some additional data was taken with equipment which is in the prototype stage. These units are a prevaporizing burner and a retention head burner modified with an air atomizing nozzle. Measurements include No{sub x}, smoke numbers, CO, gas phase hydrocarbon emissions and particulate mass emission rates. Emissions of smoke, CO and hydrocarbons were found to be significantly greater under cyclic operation for all burners tested. Generally, particulate emission rates were found to be 3 to 4 times greater in cyclic operation than in steady state. Air atomized burners were found to be capable of operation at much lower excess air levels than pressure atomized burners without producing significant amounts of smoke. As burner performance is improved, either through air atomization or prevaporization of the fuel, there appears to be a general trend towards producing CO at lower smoke levels as excess air is decreased. The criteria of adjusting burners for trace smoke may need to be abandoned for advanced burners and replaced with an adjustment for specific excess air levels. 17 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

Krajewski, R.; Celebi, Y.; Coughlan, R.; Butcher, T.; McDonald, R.J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Performance Optimization of an Irreversible Heat Pump with Variable-temperature Heat Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An irreversible cycle model of a heat pump operating between two variable-temperature heat reservoirs is established and used to analyze the performance of the heat pump affected by heat resistances, heat leakage and internal dissipation...

Huang, Y.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z