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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Posters Monte Carlo Simulation of Longwave Fluxes Through Broken...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Posters Monte Carlo Simulation of Longwave Fluxes Through Broken Scattering Cloud Fields E. E. Takara and R. G. Ellingson University of Maryland College Park, Maryland To...

2

A 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic J. Francis and J. Secora Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract Downwelling longwave fluxes (DLFs) over the Arctic surface have been generated from 22.5 years of radiances and retrievals from the TIROS (television and infrared observation satellite) operational vertical sounder (TOVS). The flux retrieval algorithm has been validated and improved using surface- based radiation and cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, and from the Surface Heat Balance of the Arctic (SHEBA) field program (1997-98) in the Beaufort Sea. The DLF product is presented on a 100 x

3

A 20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux at the Arctic Surface from TOVS Satellite Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux 20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux at the Arctic Surface from TOVS Satellite Data J. Francis Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey A. Schweiger Polar Science Center University of Washington Seattle, Washington J. Key National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service Madison, Wisconsin Introduction This paper summarizes the progress of a study under way to generate a 20-year dataset of surface downwelling longwave flux (DLF) retrievals from satellite data over the Arctic Ocean. We will produce daily fields between late 1979 and late 1998 on a grid with a spatial resolution of 100 km x 100 km 2 north of 60°N. Surface measurements from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) and the

4

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MaCarthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MacArthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MacArthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Technical Sessions A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Study of Longwave Radiation A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models R. G. Ellingson F. Baer Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 Introduction the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere. Nature of Longwave Problems Longwave radiation quantities-radiances, fluxes and heating rates-are usually calculated in GCM models as the cloud amount weighted average of the values for clear and homogeneous cloud conditions. For example, the downward flux at the surface, F, may be written as

8

ARM - Measurement - Sensible heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSensible heat flux govMeasurementsSensible heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sensible heat flux The time rate of flow for the energy transferred from a warm or hot surface to whatever is touching it, typically air. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

9

ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsLatent heat flux govMeasurementsLatent heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Latent heat flux The time rate of flow for the specific enthalpy difference between two phases of a substance at the same temperature, typically water. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

10

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

11

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of building integrated photovoltaics on microclimateof a building's integrated-photovoltaics on heating a n dgaps for building- integrated photovoltaics, Solar Energy

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Heat flux limiting sleeves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat limiting tubular sleeve extending over only a portion of a tube having a generally uniform outside diameter, the sleeve being open on both ends, having one end thereof larger in diameter than the other end thereof and having a wall thickness which decreases in the same direction as the diameter of the sleeve decreases so that the heat transfer through the sleeve and tube is less adjacent the large diameter end of the sleeve than adjacent the other end thereof.

Harris, William G. (Tampa, FL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Heat flux solarimeter  

SciTech Connect

The solarimeter presented in this work is easy to assemble. It is calibrated and its performance is validated by means of Hottel's method. Finally, the curves obtained with this solarimeter are compared to the ones obtained with a commercial solarimeter. This device is based on the evaluation of the heat flow in a metal rod. In consequence, measurements are not affected by ambient temperature variations. On the other hand, there is a linear relationship between the temperatures measured at the rod ends and the incident radiation, as can be concluded both from the theory of its operation and the calibration lines obtained. The results obtained from the global irradiance measurements in the area of Los Polvorines (Buenos Aires Province), together with a preliminary evaluation of the solarimeter's response time, are presented in this work. (author)

Sartarelli, A.; Vera, S.; Cyrulies, E. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Echarri, R. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Samson, I. [INTEC (Instituto Tecnologico Santo Domingo), Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

15

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA); Doman, Marvin J. (McKeesport, PA); Wilson, Edward C. (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Effect of Diurnal Sea Surface Temperature Warming on Climatological Air–Sea Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diurnal sea surface warming affects the fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and upwelling longwave radiation. Diurnal warming most typically reaches maximum values of 3°C, although very localized events may reach 7°–8°C. ...

Clayson, Carol Anne

18

Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing Freshwater flux Latent heat flux Longwave radiation Satellite remote sensing Sea surface flux estimation Sensible heat flux Shortwave radiation Surface wind fields 2 #12;Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat

Yu, Lisan

19

Heat flux dynamics in dissipative cascaded systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the dynamics of heat flux in the thermalization process of a pair of identical quantum system that interact dissipatively with a reservoir in a {\\it cascaded} fashion. Despite the open dynamics of the bipartite system S is globally Lindbladian, one of the subsystems "sees" the reservoir in a state modified by the interaction with the other subsystem and hence it undergoes a non-Markovian dynamics. As a consequence, the heat flow exhibits a non-exponential time behaviour which can greatly deviate from the case where each party is independently coupled to the reservoir. We investigate both thermal and correlated initial states of $S$ and show that the presence of correlations at the beginning can considerably affect the heat flux rate. We carry out our study in two paradigmatic cases -- a pair of harmonic oscillators with a reservoir of bosonic modes and two qubits with a reservoir of fermionic modes -- and compare the corresponding behaviours. In the case of qubits and for initial thermal states, we find that the trace distance discord is at any time interpretable as the correlated contribution to the total heat flux.

Salvatore Lorenzo; Alessandro Farace; Francesco Ciccarello; G. Massimo Palma; Vittorio Giovannetti

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

Surface heat fluxes in the Western Equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimates of the components of the surface heat flux in the Western Equatorial Pacific Ocean are presented for a 22-day period, ... found that the net heat flux into the ocean over the 22-day period is not...

N. C. Wells

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ARM - Measurement - Longwave narrowband radiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Send Measurement : Longwave narrowband radiance The rate at which radiant energy in the longwave portion of the spectrum is emitted in narrow wavelength bands in a...

22

High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design for cooling using a novel V-shaped shunt configuration with bulk TE elements achieving high area packing fractions

23

Transient critical heat flux and blowdown heat-transfer studies  

SciTech Connect

Objective of this study is to give a best-estimate prediction of transient critical heat flux (CHF) during reactor transients and hypothetical accidents. To accomplish this task, a predictional method has been developed. Basically it involves the thermal-hydraulic calculation of the heated core with boundary conditions supplied from experimental measurements. CHF predictions were based on the instantaneous ''local-conditions'' hypothesis, and eight correlations (consisting of round-tube, rod-bundle, and transient correlations) were tested against most recent blowdown heat-transfer test data obtained in major US facilities. The prediction results are summarized in a table in which both CISE and Biasi correlations are found to be capable of predicting the early CHF of approx. 1 s. The Griffith-Zuber correlation is credited for its prediction of the delay CHF that occurs in a more tranquil state with slowly decaying mass velocity. In many instances, the early CHF can be well correlated by the x = 1.0 criterion; this is certainly indicative of an annular-flow dryout-type crisis. The delay CHF occurred at near or above 80% void fraction, and the success of the modified Zuber pool-boiling correlation suggests that this CHF is caused by flooding and pool-boiling type hydrodynamic crisis.

Leung, J.C.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric longwave radiation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 1995, Dallas, TX. (56.12) THE GREENHOUSEEFFECT VISUALIZER Summary: to greenhouse effect is provided by subtracting the top of the atmosphere longwave radiation flux...

25

Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

26

High flux heat transfer in a target environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High flux heat transfer in a target environment T. Davenne High Power Targets Group Rutherford Valid for: Consider turbulent heat transfer in a 1.5mm diameter pipe ­ Dittus Boelter correlation Achenbach correlation for heat transfer in a packed bed of spheres Max power density for a sphere

McDonald, Kirk

27

Technical Sessions Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Over Contrasting Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Over Contrasting Surfaces R. L. Coulter J. D. Shannon T. J. Martin Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 In a multilaboratory field study held near Boardman in northeastern Oregon in June 1991 and described in greater detail elsewhere (Doran et al. 1991), various properties of the surface and lower atmospheric boundary layer over heavily irrigated cropland and adjacent desert steppe were investigated. The locale was selected because its disparate characteristics over various spatial scales stress the ability of general circulation models (GCMs) to describe lower boundary conditions, particularly across the discontinuity between desert (in which turbulent flux of heat must be primarily as sensible heat) and large irrigated tracts (in which turbulent flux of latent heat should be the larger term).

28

Thermal response of a flat heat pipe sandwich structure to a localized heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal foam wick and distilled water as the working fluid. Heat was applied via a propane torch and radiative heat transfer. A novel method was developed to estimate experimentally, the heat flux distribution rights reserved. Keywords: Flat heat pipe; Thermal spreader; Heat transfer; Evaporator; Condenser 1

Wadley, Haydn

29

MERLOT: a model for flow and heat transfer through porous media for high heat flux applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MERLOT: a model for flow and heat transfer through porous media for high heat flux applications A Abstract Fusion power plant studies have found helium to be an attractive coolant based on its safety tend to provide modest heat transfer performance due to their inherently low heat capacity and heat

Raffray, A. René

30

Figure 5. Net radiation of the study area on June 21, 2003 ESTIMATION OF HEAT FLUXES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of incoming solar radiation and long-wave radiation emitted from the atmosphere to land surface and from chimneys etc. In addition anthropogenic sensible heat contributes to increased surface temperature. However this influence is sufficiently small compared to the solar radiation under clear skies during

Hall, Sharon J.

31

Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

32

Heat Conduction with Flux Condition on a Free Patch  

SciTech Connect

A new free boundary or free patch problem for the heat equation is presented. In the problem a nonlinear heat flux condition is prescribed on a free portion of the boundary, the patch, the position of which depends on the solution. The existence of a weak solution is established using the theory of set-valued pseudo monotone operators.

Kuttler, Kenneth L. [Department of Mathematics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)], E-mail: klkuttler@math.byu.edu; Shillor, Meir [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309 (United States)], E-mail: shillor@oakland.edu

2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT FLUX FROM A REACTING THERMITE SPRAY  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors can not survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite spray conditions are reported. Results indicate that this newly developed energetic material heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability.

Eric Nixon; Michelle Pantoya

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Coupled flow and heat transfer in viscoelastic fluid with Cattaneo–Christov heat flux model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This letter presents a research for coupled flow and heat transfer of an upper-convected Maxwell fluid above a stretching plate with velocity slip boundary. Unlike most classical works, the new heat flux model, which is recently proposed by Christov, is employed. Analytical solutions are obtained by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The effects of elasticity number, slip coefficient, the relaxation time of the heat flux and the Prandtl number on velocity and temperature fields are analyzed. A comparison of Fourier’s Law and the Cattaneo–Christov heat flux model is also presented.

Shihao Han; Liancun Zheng; Chunrui Li; Xinxin Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

Robert J. Goldston

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

36

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada Introduction A single-column model (SCM) is used to examine the sensitivity of basic quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameter- izations of clouds and cloud microphysics. The SCM was run at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites using forcing data derived from forecast products. The forecast

37

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

Noel, B.W.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

38

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Long-Term Evolution of Anthropogenic Heat Fluxes into a Subsurface Urban Heat Island  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we develop an analytical heat flux model to investigate possible drivers such as increased ground surface temperatures (GSTs) at artificial surfaces and heat losses from basements of buildings, sewage systems, subsurface district heating networks, and reinjection of thermal wastewater. ... Although only 41 of the original wells in 1977 could be used for measurements in 2011, both measurement campaigns yield representative regional GWT distributions because of the homogeneous distribution of the wells within the study area (Figure 1). ...

Kathrin Menberg; Philipp Blum; Axel Schaffitel; Peter Bayer

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

Method of fission heat flux determination from experimental data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

Paxton, Frank A. (Schenectady, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Global Climatology of Outgoing Longwave Spectral Cloud Radiative Effect and Associated Effective Cloud Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Longwave (LW) spectral flux and cloud radiative effect (CRE) are important for understanding the earth’s radiation budget and cloud–radiation interaction. Here, the authors extend their previous algorithms to collocated Atmospheric Infrared ...

Xianglei Huang; Xiuhong Chen; Gerald L. Potter; Lazaros Oreopoulos; Jason N. S. Cole; Dongmin Lee; Norman G. Loeb

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Global patterns of landatmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat, and sensible heat derived from eddy covariance,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NEE), latent energy (LE), and sensible heat (H) based on remote sensing indices, climateGlobal patterns of landatmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat, and sensible heat derived

Chen, Jiquan

43

Sensitivity of Cenozoic Antarctic ice sheet variations to geothermal heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensitivity of Cenozoic Antarctic ice sheet variations to geothermal heat flux David Pollard a sheet to geothermal heat flux is investigated, using a coupled climate­ice sheet model with various prescribed values and patterns of geothermal heat flux. The sudden growth of major ice across the Eocene

44

Mean and Variability of Air-Sea Heat Fluxes in the Indian Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-sea heat Fluxes) Project: blended product planned activity: daily, 1º-grid, mid 1950's ­ present currently available: daily, 1º-grid, 1988-2003 #12;OAFlux (Objectively Analyzed Air-sea Heat Fluxes) For the GlobalMean and Variability of Air-Sea Heat Fluxes in the Indian Ocean Lisan Yu Woods Hole Oceanographic

Yu, Lisan

45

ARM - Measurement - Longwave broadband downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Longwave broadband downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy, at wavelengths longer than approximately 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments BSRN : Baseline Solar Radiation Network BRS : Broadband Radiometer Station CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems

46

Scaling and profiles of heat flux during partial detachment in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

The authors examine the scaling of the peak divertor heat flux and total divertor plate power in partially detached divertor (PDD) discharges in DIII-D, as a function of input power and radiated power. The peak divertor heat flux in the attached plasma increases linearly with input power, but saturates in the detached cases. The total divertor plate power remains linear with input power in both the attached and detached plasmas. This is consistent with the fact that the heat flux peak is reduced from the attached case but other areas receive increased radiant heating from the detached plasma. The divertor plate radiant heating is linear with input power because the total radiated power from the entire plasma is a linear function of input power in both attached and detached plasma. In the private flux region, radiated heat flux absorbed on the target plate calculated from bolometer data is enough to account for the measured plate heating. Approximately half of the overall plate heating power in detached plasma is due to absorbed radiation. By mapping the divertor heat flux before and during the PDD to flux coordinates, and comparing with a flux mapping of inserted bolometer and tangential TV data, they have verified that the radiated power is emitted from the same flux surfaces on which heat flux is reduced.

Lasnier, C.J.; Hill, D.N.; Allen, S.L.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Porter, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Leonard, A.W.; Petrie, T.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Watkins, J.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ARM - Measurement - Longwave spectral radiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spectral radiance spectral radiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Longwave spectral radiance The rate at which the spectrally resolved radiant energy in the longwave portion of the spectrum is emitted in a particular direction per unit area perpendicular to the direction of radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer ASSIST : Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral

48

Estimation of turbulent surface heat fluxes using sequences of remotely sensed land surface temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluxes of heat and moisture at the land-surface play a significant role in the climate system. These fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and influence the characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (e.g. ...

Bateni, Sayed Mohyeddin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infrared sensing devices.

Duncan, R.V.

1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

50

Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

Duncan, Robert V. (Tijeras, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Experimental investigation and model validation of the heat flux profile in a 300 MW CFB boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, systematic experimental investigation on the heat flux distribution inside the furnace of a 300 MW CFB boiler was presented. Detailed experimental setup and measurement techniques were presented and a finite element method approach was applied to determine the heat flux. The heat flux profile on the rear wall along the horizontal direction shows a significant imbalance at different boiler loads. As a result of the non-uniform layout of the heating surfaces, which is the essential reason, as well as the imbalance and deviation of the temperature field, solid suspension density and solid flow rate, the central section of the furnace possesses higher heat flux distribution compared to the side sections. The heat flux is also found to increase with the increasing boiler load and decrease as the height increases. Heat flux near the roof, where the solid suspension density is rather small, is found to decrease remarkably revealing less heat absorption in this area. In addition, an empirical model of heat transfer coefficient is revised using the average data at different boiler loads. A mechanism heat transfer model based on the membrane water-wall configuration is proposed and validated with the heat flux profile obtained from the measurement. The model provides good accuracy for correlating 85% of the data within ± 10%.

Ruiqing Zhang; Hairui Yang; Nan Hu; Junfu Lu; Yuxin Wu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Influence of circumferential solar heat flux distribution on the heat transfer coefficients of linear Fresnel collector absorber tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The absorber tubes of solar thermal collectors have enormous influence on the performance of the solar collector systems. In this numerical study, the influence of circumferential uniform and non-uniform solar heat flux distributions on the internal and overall heat transfer coefficients of the absorber tubes of a linear Fresnel solar collector was investigated. A 3D steady-state numerical simulation was implemented based on ANSYS Fluent code version 14. The non-uniform solar heat flux distribution was modelled as a sinusoidal function of the concentrated solar heat flux incident on the circumference of the absorber tube. The k–? model was employed to simulate the turbulent flow of the heat transfer fluid through the absorber tube. The tube-wall heat conduction and the convective and irradiative heat losses to the surroundings were also considered in the model. The average internal and overall heat transfer coefficients were determined for the sinusoidal circumferential non-uniform heat flux distribution span of 160°, 180°, 200° and 240°, and the 360° span of circumferential uniform heat flux for 10 m long absorber tubes of different inner diameters and wall thicknesses with thermal conductivity of 16.27 W/mK between the Reynolds number range of 4000 and 210,000 based on the inlet temperature. The results showed that the average internal heat transfer coefficients for the 360° span of circumferential uniform heat flux with different concentration ratios on absorber tubes of the same inner diameters, wall thicknesses and thermal conductivity were approximately the same, but the average overall heat transfer coefficient increased with the increase in the concentration ratios of the uniform heat flux incident on the tubes. Also, the average internal heat transfer coefficient for the absorber tube with a 360° span of uniform heat flux was approximately the same as that of the absorber tubes with the sinusoidal circumferential non-uniform heat flux span of 160°, 180°, 200° and 240° for the heat flux of the same concentration ratio, but the average overall heat transfer coefficient for the uniform heat flux case was higher than that of the non-uniform flux distributions. The average axial local internal heat transfer coefficient for the 360° span of uniform heat flux distribution on a 10 m long absorber tube was slightly higher than that of the 160°, 200° and 240° span of non-uniform flux distributions at the Reynolds number of 4 000. The average internal and overall heat transfer coefficients for four absorber tubes of different inner diameters and wall thicknesses and thermal conductivity of 16.27 W/mK with 200° span of circumferential non-uniform flux were found to increase with the decrease in the inner-wall diameter of the absorber tubes. The numerical results showed good agreement with the Nusselt number experimental correlations for fully developed turbulent flow available in the literature.

Izuchukwu F. Okafor; Jaco Dirker; Josua P. Meyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Divertor heat flux reduction by D sub 2 injection in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

D{sub 2} gas injected into ELMing H-mode discharges in DIII-D reduced total integrated heat flux to the divertor by {approximately}2{times} and peak heat flux by {approximately}5{times}, with only modest degradation to plasma stored energy. Steady gas injection without particle pumping results in eventual degradation in stored energy. The initial reduction in peak heat flux at the divertor tiles may be primarily due to the increase in radiated power from the X-point/divertor region. The eventual formation of a high density region near the X-point appears to play a role in momentum (and energy) transfer from the flux surfaces near the outboard strike point to flux surfaces farther out into the scrapeoff. This may also contribute to further reduction in peak heat flux.

Petrie, T.W.; Groebner, R.J.; Leonard, A.W.; Lippmann, S.I.; Mahdavi, A.M.; West, W.P. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Buchenauer, D.; Campbell, R.B. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)); Hill, D.N.; Allen, S.L.; Futch, A.H.; Resink, M.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Klepper, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Divertor heat flux reduction by D{sub 2} injection in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

D{sub 2} gas injected into ELMing H-mode discharges in DIII-D reduced total integrated heat flux to the divertor by {approximately}2{times} and peak heat flux by {approximately}5{times}, with only modest degradation to plasma stored energy. Steady gas injection without particle pumping results in eventual degradation in stored energy. The initial reduction in peak heat flux at the divertor tiles may be primarily due to the increase in radiated power from the X-point/divertor region. The eventual formation of a high density region near the X-point appears to play a role in momentum (and energy) transfer from the flux surfaces near the outboard strike point to flux surfaces farther out into the scrapeoff. This may also contribute to further reduction in peak heat flux.

Petrie, T.W.; Groebner, R.J.; Leonard, A.W.; Lippmann, S.I.; Mahdavi, A.M.; West, W.P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Buchenauer, D.; Campbell, R.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Hill, D.N.; Allen, S.L.; Futch, A.H.; Resink, M.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Klepper, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

Cook, David

56

Third law of thermodynamics in the presence of a heat flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following a maximum entropy formalism, we study a one-dimensional crystal under a heat flux. We obtain the phonon distribution function and evaluate the nonequilibrium temperature, the specific heat, and the entropy as functions of the internal energy and the heat flux, in both the quantum and the classical limits. Some analogies between the behavior of equilibrium systems at low absolute temperature and nonequilibrium steady states under high values of the heat flux are shown, which point to a possible generalization of the third law in nonequilibrium situations.

J. Camacho

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Convective currents in nucleate pool boiling and their effects on the heat flux from varying diameter flat plate heating elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation was conducred to amine the effects of convection currents in nucleate oool boil ing and to determine the changes in critical heat flux caused by varying the diameter of horizontal flat olate heating surfaces. Freon 113 (Trichlorotrifluoroethane... by high energy costs and thc need to economize in industrial heat transfer applications . I'nucleate boiling is a very efficient neans of heat transfer because of the large sur ace areas involved in vaporization of the bulk fluid. as bubbles form...

Morford, Peter Stephen

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Countercurrent flow limited (CCFL) heat flux in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) fuel element  

SciTech Connect

The countercurrent flow (CCF) performance in the fuel element region of the HFIR is examined experimentally and theoretically. The fuel element consists of two concentric annuli filled with aluminum clad fuel plates of 1.27 mm thickness separated by 1.27 mm flow channels. The plates are curved as they go radially outward to accomplish constant flow channel width and constant metal-to-coolant ratio. A full-scale HFIR fuel element mock-up is studied in an adiabatic air-water CCF experiment. A review of CCF models for narrow channels is presented along with the treatment of CCFs in system of parallel channels. The experimental results are related to the existing models and a mechanistic model for the annular'' CCF in a narrow channel is developed that captures the data trends well. The results of the experiment are used to calculate the CCFL heat flux of the HFIR fuel assembly. It was determined that the HFIR fuel assembly can reject 0.62 Mw of thermal power in the CCFL situation. 31 refs., 17 figs.

Ruggles, A.E.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Isentropic Slopes, Downgradient Eddy Fluxes, and the Extratropical Atmospheric Circulation Response to Tropical Tropospheric Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Tropical Tropospheric Heating AMY H. BUTLER NOAA/NWS/NCEP/Climate Prediction Center, Camp Springs, Maryland of the midlatitude jets and their associated eddy fluxes of heat and potential vorticity (PV). Experiments run latent heating and thus locally enhanced warming in the tropical troposphere. Here the authors provide

60

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Cassia County, Idaho (1974-1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Cassia County, Idaho (1974-1976) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Basin and Range Province; Cassia County Idaho; economic geology; exploration; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; heat flow; heat flux; Idaho; North America; Raft River basin; south-central Idaho; surveys; temperature; thermal conductivity; United States; USGS Author(s): Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer, M.H. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1986 Document Number: Unavailable

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61

Heat flux characteristics in an atmospheric double arc argon plasma jet  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the axial evolution of heat flux excited by a double arc argon plasma jet impinging on a flat plate is determined, while the nonstationary behavior of the heat flux is investigated by combined means of the fast Fourier transform, Wigner distribution, and short-time Fourier transform. Two frequency groups (<1 and 2-10 kHz) are identified in both the Fourier spectrum and the time-frequency distributions, which suggest that the nature of fluctuations in the heat flux is strongly associated with the dynamic behavior of the plasma arc and the engulfment of ambient air into different plasma jet regions.

Tu Xin; Yu Liang; Yan Jianhua; Cen Kefa [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Cheron, Bruno [UMR 6614 CNRS CORIA, Saint Etienne du Rouvray 76801 (France)

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

62

Designing, testing, and analyzing coupled, flux transformer heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of identical effective length, this research shows that sufficient heat can be transferred across the system to work effectively in situations where the single heat pie will fail to operate. The thermal resistance in the condenser and evaporator sections need...

Renzi, Kimberly Irene

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Heat transfer to non-Newtonian power-law fluid past a continuously moving porous flat plate with heat flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis of heat transfer to the non-Newtonian power-law fluid flow past a continuously moving flat porous plate in presence of suction/injection with heat flux has been presented. We have obtained...n...=1 a...

B. P. Jadhav; B. B. Waghmode

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Surface energy budget over the South Pole and turbulent heat fluxes as a function of an empirical bulk Richardson number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface energy budget over the South Pole and turbulent heat fluxes as a function of an empirical in the monthly mean surface energy budget and to investigate the behavior of turbulent heat fluxes under stable and one as the residual of the surface energy budget (i.e., subsurface heat fluxes minus net radiation

Walden, Von P.

65

Heat fluxes at the Earth's surface and coremantle boundary since Pangea formation and their implications for the geomagnetic superchrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat fluxes at the Earth's surface and core­mantle boundary since Pangea formation Editor: Y. Ricard Keywords: mantle convection heat flux supercontinent Pangea magnetic polarity reversals The Earth's surface and core­mantle boundary (CMB) heat fluxes are controlled by mantle convection and have

Zhong, Shijie

66

TURBULENT HEAT FLUXES ABOVE A SUBURBAN RESERVOIR – A CASE STUDY FROM GERMANY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the objective of quantifying turbulent sensible (QH) and latent (QE) heat fluxes above a suburban reservoir, a micro-meteorological turbulence measurement campaign using the eddy-covariance technique was carried out between June and November ...

Anja Goldbach; Wilhelm Kuttler

67

Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared Long-Wave Infrared Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Long-Wave Infrared Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map characteristic minerals associated with hot springs/mineral deposits Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Map surface temperatures Dictionary.png Long-Wave Infrared: Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) refers to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the 8 to 15 µm wavelength range. LWIR surveys are sometimes referred to as "thermal imaging" and can be used to identify relatively warm features

68

Estimating air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum through global ocean data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum through global ocean data assimilation of surface flux adjustments made to the initial NCEP re-analysis-1 products. During the state estimation the boundary current regions, they are consistent with known large-scale deficiencies in the NCEP products

69

Saturation levels of heat-flux- and fast-electron-driven ion-acoustic-wave turbulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Saturation levels of ion-acoustic-wave turbulence driven by a heat-flux and a suprathermal electron current have been calculated on the basis of perturbed-orbit theory. The levels are found to be lower than those commonly estimated from simple trapping arguments and too low to explain the thermal-flux inhibition observed in many laser-plasma experiments.

H. C. Barr and T. J. M. Boyd

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes  

SciTech Connect

The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

Spatially Distributed CO2, Sensible, and Latent Heat Fluxes Over the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spatially Distributed CO2, Sensible, and Latent Heat Fluxes Over the Spatially Distributed CO2, Sensible, and Latent Heat Fluxes Over the Southern Great Plains Berry, Joseph Carnegie Inst.of Washington Riley, William Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Biraud, Sebastien Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Torn, Margaret Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Fischer, Marc Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Category: Atmospheric State and Surface Vegetation strongly influences the spatial distribution of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes, and also impacts the ecosystem to atmosphere CO2 exchanges. We describe here a methodology to estimate surface energy fluxes and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of CO2 continuously over the Southern Great Plains, using (1) data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program in Oklahoma and Kansas; (2) meteorological forcing data from

72

Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C. [Dept. of Energy Systems Engineering, Seoul National Univ., 599 Gwanak-Ro, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Saturated critical heat flux in a multi-microchannel heat sink fed by a split flow system  

SciTech Connect

An extensive experimental campaign has been carried out for the measurement of saturated critical heat flux in a multi-microchannel copper heat sink. The heat sink was formed by 29 parallel channels that were 199 {mu}m wide and 756 {mu}m deep. In order to increase the critical heat flux and reduce the two-phase pressure drop, a split flow system was implemented with one central inlet at the middle of the channels and two outlets at either end. The base critical heat flux was measured using three HFC Refrigerants (R134a, R236fa and R245fa) for mass fluxes ranging from 250 to 1500 kg/m{sup 2} s, inlet subcoolings from -25 to -5 K and saturation temperatures from 20 to 50 C. The parametric effects of mass velocity, saturation temperature and inlet subcooling were investigated. The analysis showed that significantly higher CHF was obtainable with the split flow system (one inlet-two outlets) compared to the single inlet-single outlet system, providing also a much lower pressure drop. Notably several existing predictive methods matched the experimental data quite well and quantitatively predicted the benefit of higher CHF of the split flow. (author)

Mauro, A.W.; Toto, D. [Department of Energetics, Applied Thermofluidynamics and Air Conditioning Systems, FEDERICO II University, p.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Thome, J.R. [Laboratory of Heat and Mass Transfer (LTCM), Faculty of Engineering (STI), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 9, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland); Vanoli, G.P. [Engineering Department, Sannio University, Corso Garibaldi 107, Palazzo dell'Aquila Bosco Lucarelli, 82100 Benevento (Italy)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Flux Using Flush-Mounted Insert Temperature-Gradient Gages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method describes the measurement of the net heat flux normal to a surface using gages inserted flush with the surface. The geometry is the same as heat-flux gages covered by Test Method E 511, but the measurement principle is different. The gages covered by this standard all use a measurement of the temperature gradient normal to the surface to determine the heat that is exchanged to or from the surface. Although in a majority of cases the net heat flux is to the surface, the gages operate by the same principles for heat transfer in either direction. 1.2 This general test method is quite broad in its field of application, size and construction. Two different gage types that are commercially available are described in detail in later sections as examples. A summary of common heat-flux gages is given by Diller (1). Applications include both radiation and convection heat transfer. The gages used for aerospace applications are generally small (0.155 to 1.27 cm diameter), have a fast time response ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

High heat flux testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

High heat flux testing for the United States fusion power program is the primary mission of the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) located at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico. This facility, which is owned by the United States Department of Energy, has been in operation for over 17 years and has provided much of the high heat flux data used in the design and evaluation of plasma facing components for many of the world`s magnetic fusion, tokamak experiments. In addition to domestic tokamaks such as Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, components for international experiments like TEXTOR, Tore-Supra, and JET also have been tested at the PMTF. High heat flux testing spans a wide spectrum including thermal shock tests on passively cooled materials, thermal response and thermal fatigue tests on actively cooled components, critical heat flux-burnout tests, braze reliability tests and safety related tests. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the high heat flux testing capabilities at the PMTF and describe a few of the experiments performed over the last year.

Youchison, D.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Wold, L.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Two-Layer Baroclinic Eddy Heat Fluxes: Zonal Flows and Energy Balance ANDREW F. THOMPSON AND WILLIAM R. YOUNG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-Layer Baroclinic Eddy Heat Fluxes: Zonal Flows and Energy Balance ANDREW F. THOMPSON of these drag- less heat-flux parameterizations relies on the ability of to direct energy into zonal flows, California (Manuscript received 27 September 2006, in final form 13 December 2006) ABSTRACT The eddy heat

Young, William R.

77

Critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon on a downward facing curved surface  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a theoretical and experimental study of the boundary layer boiling and critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing curved heating surface, including both hemispherical and toroidal surfaces. A subscale boundary layer boiling (SBLB) test facility was developed to measure the spatial variation of the critical heat flux and observe the underlying mechanisms. Transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB facility under both saturated and subcooled conditions to obtain a complete database on the critical heat flux. To complement the experimental effort, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed from the conservation laws along with sound physical arguments. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel. Based upon the CHF model, a scaling law was established for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water. The scaling law, which compares favorably with all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes, can be used to predict the local CHF limits on large commercial-size vessels. This technical information represents one of the essential elements that is needed in assessing the efficacy of external cooling of core melt by cavity flooding as a severe accident management strategy. 83 figs., 3 tabs.

Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Theoretical and experimental estimation of limiting input heat flux for thermoelectric power generators with passive cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper focuses on theoretical and experimental analysis used to establish the limiting heat flux for passively cooled thermoelectric generators (TEG). 2 commercially available TEG’s further referred as type A and type B with different allowable hot side temperatures (150 °C and 250 °C respectively) were investigated in this research. The thermal resistance of TEG was experimentally verified against the manufacturer’s specifications and used for theoretical analysis in this paper. A theoretical model is presented to determine the maximum theoretical heat flux capacity of both the TEG’s. The conventional methods are used for cooling of TEG’s and actual limiting heat flux is experimentally established for various cold end cooling configurations namely bare plate, finned block and heat pipe with finned condenser. Experiments were performed on an indoor setup and outdoor setup to validate the results from the theoretical model. The outdoor test setup consist of a fresnel lens solar concentrator with manual two axis solar tracking system for varying the heat flux, whereas the indoor setup uses electric heating elements to vary the heat flux and a low speed wind tunnel blows the ambient air past the device to simulate the outdoor breezes. It was observed that bare plate cooling can achieve a maximum heat flux of 18,125 W/m2 for type A and 31,195 W/m2 for type B at ambient wind speed of 5 m/s while maintaining respective allowable temperature over the hot side of TEG’s. Fin geometry was optimised for the finned block cooling by using the fin length and fin gap optimisation model presented in this paper. It was observed that an optimum finned block cooling arrangement can reach a maximum heat flux of 26,067 W/m2 for type A and 52,251 W/m2 for type B TEG at ambient wind speed of 5 m/s of ambient wind speed. The heat pipe with finned condenser used for cooling can reach 40,375 W/m2 for type A TEG and 76,781 W/m2 for type B TEG.

Ashwin Date; Abhijit Date; Chris Dixon; Randeep Singh; Aliakbar Akbarzadeh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

Guercan, Oe. D.; Berionni, V.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Vermare, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, California 92093 (United States); Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kosuga, Y. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Spatial distribution of heat flux and fluctuations in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We numerically investigate the radial dependence of the velocity and temperature fluctuations and of the time-averaged heat flux j¯(r) in a cylindrical Rayleigh-Bénard cell with aspect ratio ?=1 for Rayleigh numbers Ra between 2×106 and 2×109 at a fixed Prandtl number Pr=5.2. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux close to the sidewall is larger than in the center and that, just as the global heat transport, it has an effective power law dependence on the Rayleigh number, j¯(r)?Ra?j(r). The scaling exponent ?j(r) decreases monotonically from 0.43 near the axis (r?0) to 0.29 close to the sidewalls (r?D/2). The effective exponents near the axis and the sidewall agree well with the measurements of Shang et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 244503 (2008)] and the predictions of Grossmann and Lohse [Phys. Fluids 16, 1070 (2004)]. Extrapolating our results to large Rayleigh number would imply a crossover at Ra?1015, where the heat flux near the axis would begin to dominate. In addition, we find that the local heat flux is more than twice as high at the location where warm or cold plumes go up or down than in plume depleted regions.

Rajaram Lakkaraju; Richard J. A. M. Stevens; Roberto Verzicco; Siegfried Grossmann; Andrea Prosperetti; Chao Sun; Detlef Lohse

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

New charged shear-free relativistic models with heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study shear-free spherically symmetric relativistic gravitating fluids with heat flow and electric charge. The solution to the Einstein-Maxwell system is governed by the generalised pressure isotropy condition which contains a contribution from the electric field. This condition is a highly nonlinear partial differential equation. We analyse this master equation using Lie's group theoretic approach. The Lie symmetry generators that leave the equation invariant are found. The first generator is independent of the electromagnetic field. The second generator depends critically on the form of the charge, which is determined explicitly in general. We provide exact solutions to the gravitational potentials using the symmetries admitted by the equation. Our new exact solutions contain earlier results without charge. We show that other charged solutions, related to the Lie symmetries, may be generated using the algorithm of Deng. This leads to new classes of charged Deng models which are generalisations of conformally flat metrics.

Y. Nyonyi; S. D. Maharaj; K. S. Govinder

2014-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

82

New charged shear-free relativistic models with heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study shear-free spherically symmetric relativistic gravitating fluids with heat flow and electric charge. The solution to the Einstein-Maxwell system is governed by the generalised pressure isotropy condition which contains a contribution from the electric field. This condition is a highly nonlinear partial differential equation. We analyse this master equation using Lie's group theoretic approach. The Lie symmetry generators that leave the equation invariant are found. The first generator is independent of the electromagnetic field. The second generator depends critically on the form of the charge, which is determined explicitly in general. We provide exact solutions to the gravitational potentials using the symmetries admitted by the equation. Our new exact solutions contain earlier results without charge. We show that other charged solutions, related to the Lie symmetries, may be generated using the algorithm of Deng. This leads to new classes of charged Deng models which are generalisations of conform...

Nyonyi, Y; Govinder, K S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Heat transfer to impacting drops and post critical heat flux dispersed flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat transfer to drops impacting on a hot surface is examined in context of dispersions of flowing, boiling fluids. The liquid contribution to heat transfer from a hot tube to a two-phase dispersion is formulated in terms ...

Kendall, Gail E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The deterioration in heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure and high heat fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At slightly supercritical pressure and in the neighborhood of the pseudo-critical temperature (defined as the temperature corresponding to the peak in specific heat at the operating pressure), the heat transfer coefficient ...

Shiralkar, B. S.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Total Meridional Heat Flux and Its Oceanic and Atmospheric Partition CARL WUNSCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model residual is done to permit calculation of a preliminary uncertainty estimate for the atmospheric the oceanic flux drops rapidly, but does not actually vanish until the oceanic surface area goes to zero The partitioning and fluctuations in the net poleward transport of heat (energy, actually enthalpy; see War- ren

Wunsch, Carl

86

First-wall heat-flux measurements during ELMing H-mode plasma  

SciTech Connect

In this report we present measurements of the diverter heat flux in DIII-D for ELMing H-mode and radiative diverter conditions. In previous work we have examined heat flux profiles in lower single-null diverted plasmas and measured the scaling of the peak heat flux with plasma current and beam power. One problem with those results was our lack of good power accounting. This situation has been improved to better than 80--90% accountability with the installation of new bolometer arrays, and the operation of the entire complement of 5 Infrared (IR) TV cameras using the DAPS (Digitizing Automated Processing System) video processing system for rapid inter-shot data analysis. We also have expanded the scope of our measurements to include a wider variety of plasma shapes (e.g., double-null diverters (DND), long and short single-null diverters (SND), and inside-limited plasmas), as well as more diverse discharge conditions. Double-null discharges are of particular interest because that shape has proven to yield the highest confinement (VH-mode) and beta of all DIII-D plasmas, so any future diverter modifications for DIII-D will have to support DND operation. In addition, the proposed TPX tokamak is being designed for double-null operation, and information on the magnitude and distribution of diverter heat flux is needed to support the engineering effort on that project. So far, we have measured the DND power sharing at the target plates and made preliminary tests of heat flux reduction by gas injection.

Lasnier, C.J.; Allen, S.L.; Hill, D.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Leonard, A.W.; Petrie, T.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

1994-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Inverse natural convection problem of estimating wall heat flux using a moving sensor  

SciTech Connect

Inverse heat transfer problems have many applications in various branch of science and engineering. Here, the inverse problem of determining heat flux at the bottom wall of a two-dimensional cavity from temperature measurement in the domain is considered. The Boussinesq equation is used to model the natural convection induced by the wall heat flux. The inverse natural convection problem is posed as a minimization problem of the performance function, which is the sum of square residuals between calculated and observed temperature, by means of a conjugate gradient method. Instead of employing several fixed sensors, a single sensor is used which is moving at a given frequency over the bottom wall. The present method solves the inverse natural convection problem accurately without a priori information about the unknown function to be estimated.

Park, H.M.; Chung, O.Y.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean, J. T., and L. Thompson (2006), Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L09604, doi:10.1029/2006GL025784. 1. Introduction [2

Thompson, LuAnne

89

A. Gershunov R. Roca Coupling of latent heat flux and the greenhouse effect by large-scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Gershunov Ã? R. Roca Coupling of latent heat flux and the greenhouse effect by large Abstract Coupled variability of the greenhouse effect (GH) and latent heat flux (LHF) over the tropical of convection) form regions of strong greenhouse effect in tropical convergence zones while subtropical high

90

Relationship between heat transfer intensity and absolute vorticity flux intensity in flat tube bank fin channels with Vortex Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heat transfer enhancement can be achieved through the secondary flow. It is found that absolute vorticity flux along the main flow can describe the secondary flow intensity and correspond to the heat transfer enhancement averaged in span wise direction. Investigations to verify this phenomenon are reported. The results show that there has a similar distribution for absolute vorticity flux in the main flow direction compared with that for span averaged Nusselt number. The conformance of Nusselt number and absolute vorticity flux shows that absolute vorticity flux can reflect the intensity of heat transfer produced by the secondary flow.

Ke-Wei Song; Liang-Bi Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Analysis of a multi-machine database on divertor heat flux  

SciTech Connect

A coordinated effort to measure divertor heat flux characteristics in fully attached, similarly shaped H-mode plasmas on C-Mod, DIII-D, and NSTX was carried out in 2010 in order to construct a predictive scaling relation applicable to next step devices including ITER, FNSF, and DEMO. Few published scaling laws are available and those that have been published were obtained under widely varying conditions and divertor geometries, leading to conflicting predictions for this critically important quantity. This study was designed to overcome these deficiencies. Analysis of the combined data set reveals that the primary dependence of the parallel heat flux width is robustly inverse with I-p, which all three tokamaks independently demonstrate. An improved Thomson scattering system on DIII-D has yielded very accurate scrape off layer (SOL) profile measurements from which tests of parallel transport models have been made. It is found that a flux-limited model agrees best with the data at all collisionalities, while a Spitzer resistivity model agrees at higher collisionality where it is more valid. The SOL profile measurements and divertor heat flux scaling are consistent with a heuristic drift based model as well as a critical gradient model.

Makowski, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Elder, J. D. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Gray, Travis K [ORNL; LaBombard, Brian [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Leonard, A. W. [General Atomics; Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Osborne, T. H. [General Atomics; Stangeby, P. C. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies; Terry, J. L. [MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA; Watkins, J. G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Heat Flux Analysis of a Reacting Thermite Spray Impingent on a Substrate  

SciTech Connect

Spray combustion from a thermite reaction is a new area of research relevant to localized energy generation applications, such as welding or cutting. In this study, we characterized the heat flux of combustion spray impinging on a target from a nozzle for three thermite mixtures. The reactions studied include aluminum (Al) with iron oxide (Fe2O3), Al with copper oxide (CuO), and Al with molybdenum oxide (MoO3). Several standoff distances (i.e., distance from the nozzle exit to the target) were analyzed. A fast response heat flux sensor was engineered for this purpose and is discussed in detail. Results correlated substrate damage to a threshold heat flux of 4550 W/cm2 for a fixed-nozzle configuration. Also, higher gas-generating thermites were shown to produce a widely dispersed spray and be less effective at imparting kinetic energy damage to a target. These results provide an understanding of the role of thermal and physical properties (i.e., such as heat of combustion, gas generation, and particle size) on thermite spray combustion performance measured by damaging a target substrate.

Eric S. Collins; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael A. Daniels; Daniel J. Prentice; Eric D. Steffler; Steven P. D'Arche

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie Title Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Fischer, Marc L., Margaret S. Torn, David P. Billesbach, Geoffrey Doyle, Brian Northup, and Sebastien C. Biraud Journal Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Volume 166-167 Pagination 169-174 Keywords Carbon exchange, eddy covariance, Fire, Grassland, Prairie, Water stress Abstract Drought and fire are common disturbances to grassland ecosystems. We report two years of eddy covariance ecosystem-atmosphere fluxes and biometric variables measured in nearby burned and unburned pastures in the US Southern Great Plains. Over the course of the experiment, annual precipitation (∼600 mm yr-1) was lower than the long term mean (∼860 mm yr-1). Soil moisture decreased from productive conditions in March 2005 dry, unproductive conditions during the growing season starting in March 2006. Just prior to the burn in early March 2005, burned and unburned pastures contained 520 ± 60 and 360 ± 40 g C m-2 of total above ground biomass (AGB) and litter, respectively. The fire removed approximately 200 g C m-2 of litter and biomass. In the 2005 growing season following the burn, maximum green AGB was 450 ± 60 and 270 ± 40 g C m-2, with corresponding cumulative annual net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) of -330 and -150 g C m-2 for the burned and unburned pastures, respectively. In contrast to NEE, cumulative mean sensible heat and water fluxes were approximately equal in both pastures during the growing season, suggesting either an increase in water use efficiency or a decrease in evaporation in the burned relative to the unburned pasture. In the 2006 growing season, dry conditions decreased carbon uptake and latent heat, and increased sensible heat fluxes. Peak AGB was reduced to 210 ± 30 g C m-2 and 140 ± 30 g C m-2 in the burned and unburned pastures, respectively, while NEE was near zero. These results suggest that the lack of precipitation was responsible for most of the interannual variation in carbon exchange for these un-irrigated prairie pastures.

94

Ultrahigh heat flux plasma-facing components for magnetic fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

Sandia and Ultramet partnered to design and test refractory metal plasma-facing components and heat exchangers for advanced, high-temperature power conversion systems. These devices consisted of high-temperature helium-to-helium and lithium-to-helium heat exchangers that operate with high efficiency due to the porous foam inserts used in the gas stream, which promote turbulence and provide extended surface area for enhanced convection. Single- and multi-channel helium panels and the Li-He heat exchanger were fabricated from either pure molybdenum, TZM, or tungsten. The design was carried out through an Ultramet subcontractor. The flow path was carefully tailored to minimize the pressure drop while maximizing the heat transfer. The single- and multi-channel helium panels were tested at Sandia's PMTF using an electron beam system and the closed helium flow loop. In 2006, a single-channel tungsten tube was successfully tested to an average heat flux of 14 MW/m{sup 2} with a localized peak of 22 MW/m{sup 2} along the axial centerline at the outer radius. Under this CRADA, multiple square-channel molybdenum components were successfully tested to heat flux levels approaching 8.5 MW/m{sup 2}. The three multi-channel prototypes experienced mechanical failure due to issues related to the design of the large unsupported span of the heated faceplates in combination with prototype material and braze selection. The Li-He heat exchanger was both designed and partially tested at the PMTF for helium and lithium flow.

Youchison, D. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Interactions Between the Daytime Mixed Layer and the Surface: Oklahoma Mesonet and EBBR Heat Fluxes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactions Between the Daytime Mixed Layer Interactions Between the Daytime Mixed Layer and the Surface: Oklahoma Mesonet and EBBR Heat Fluxes R. L. Coulter Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Introduction Surface layer estimates of surface sensible heat flux have been made at 10 - 14 locations within the Central Facility (CF) of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program site by using energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) stations located mostly in uncultivated areas. The advent of the Oklahoma Mesonet (OKM) with approximately 50 stations within the boundaries of the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site that measure a variety of meteorological parameters leads to the possibility of using the OKM to provide additional estimates of surface energy budget to augment

96

Further considerations of critical heat flux in saturated pool boiling during power transients  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we further evaluate our previously postulated transient CHF model. First, we verify the steady-state CHF model on which the transient model is based by using recent macrolayer-thickness data. We also include the effect of thermal storage in the heater that we previously neglected. The use of a simplified approach in the prediction of the instantaneous surface heat flux for given pwoer generation rates considerably improves the predictive capability of the transient critical heat-flux (CHF) model. Finally, we discuss the statistical vapor mass behavior during transient boiling and its effect on the transient CHF model. We show that the data scatter within a small range may be partially explained through such an approach.

Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Nelson, R.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Parallel heat flux and flow acceleration in open field line plasmas with magnetic trapping  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic field strength modulation in a tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) provides both flux expansion next to the divertor plates and magnetic trapping in a large portion of the SOL. Previously, we have focused on a flux expander with long mean-free-path, motivated by the high temperature and low density edge anticipated for an absorbing boundary enabled by liquid lithium surfaces. Here, the effects of magnetic trapping and a marginal collisionality on parallel heat flux and parallel flow acceleration are examined. The various transport mechanisms are captured by kinetic simulations in a simple but representative mirror-expander geometry. The observed parallel flow acceleration is interpreted and elucidated with a modified Chew-Goldberger-Low model that retains temperature anisotropy and finite collisionality.

Guo, Zehua; Tang, Xian-Zhu; McDevitt, Chris [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Elementary Heating Events - Magnetic Interactions Between Two Flux Sources. III Energy Considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The magnetic field plays a crucial role in heating the solar corona, but the exact energy release mechanism(s) is(are) still unknown. Here, we investigate in detail, the process of magnetic energy release in a situation where two initially independent flux systems are forced into each other. Work done by the foot point motions goes in to building a current sheet in which magnetic reconnection takes place. The scaling relations of the energy input and output are determined as functions of the driving velocity and the strength of fluxes in the independent flux systems. In particular, it is found that the energy injected into the system is proportional to the distance travelled not the rate of travel. Similarly, the rate of Joule dissipation is related to the distance travelled. Hence, rapidly driven foot points lead to bright, intense, but short-lived events, whilst slowly driven foot points produce weaker, but longer-lived brightenings. Integrated over the lifetime of the events both would produce the same heating if all other factors were the same. A strong overlying field has the affect of creating compact flux lobes from the sources. These appear to lead to a more rapid injection of energy, as well as a more rapid release of energy. Thus, the stronger the overlying field the more compact and more intense the heating. This means observers must know the rate of movement of the magnetic fragments involved in an events, as well as determine the strength and orientation of the surrounding field to be able to predict anything about the energy dissipated.

K. Galsgaard; C. E. Parnell

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

99

Using Narrow and Wide Field of View Instruments to Evaluate Longwave Parameterizations for Fair Weather Cumulus Cloud Fields  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Narrow and Wide Field of View Instruments to Using Narrow and Wide Field of View Instruments to Evaluate Longwave Parameterizations for Fair Weather Cumulus Cloud Fields E. E. Takara and R. G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction Full blown three-dimensional (3D) radiation calculations for broken cloud fields consume too much time and computing resources to be included in climate models. The 3D effects can be approximated by effective cloud fractions which reduce the three-dimensional calculation to an average of plane parallel solutions - a much easier problem. For broken cloud conditions, the longwave flux (F) can be written as the weighted average of clear and overcast fluxes: overcast e clear e F N )F N 1 ( F (1) F clear is the clear-sky flux; the flux that would occur if the broken cloud field was removed. F

100

Commissioning of the Korean High Heat Flux Test Facility by Using Electron Beam System for Plasma Facing Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Divertor and High-Heat-Flux Components / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Suk-Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Jae-Sung Yoon; Dong Won Lee; Duck-Hoi Kim; Seungyon Cho

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

OPTIMIZATION AND DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR HIGH FLUX MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS FOR LIQUID AND GASEOUS SINGLE-PHASE FLOW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orders of magnitude, especially for high heat flux devices. Using water and air as coolants, designs with the optimization tool are generalized and optimum configurations are illustrated on design charts. Physical trends

Müller, Norbert

102

Investigation of downward facing critical heat flux with water-based nanofluids for In-Vessel Retention applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Vessel Retention ("IVR") is a severe accident management strategy that is power limiting to the Westinghouse AP1000 due to critical heat flux ("CHF") at the outer surface of the reactor vessel. Increasing the CHF level ...

DeWitt, Gregory L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Critical Heat Flux -CHF in Liquid Metal in Presence of a Magnetic Field with Particular Reference to Fusion Reactor Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowledge of the critical heat flux q??crit is a cornerstone of reactor design fission, but as will demonstrate also in fusion reactors. This quantity cannot be deduced directly,...

F. J. Arias

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--Part I: effective thermal conductivity and background  

SciTech Connect

Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier’s law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as nonlinear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coeffcient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier’s law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or suffcient.

Massoudi, Mehrdad

2006-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

107

Clear Skies A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the...

108

Group solution for unsteady free-convection flow from a vertical moving plate subjected to constant heat flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of heat and mass transfer in an unsteady free-convection flow over a continuous moving vertical sheet in an ambient fluid is investigated for constant heat flux using the group theoretical method. The nonlinear coupled partial differential ... Keywords: 22E05, 35Q53, 54H15, Free convective flow, Group theoretic method, Prandtl number, Thermal boundary layer

M. Kassem

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ARM - Measurement - Longwave narrowband brightness temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

narrowband brightness temperature narrowband brightness temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Longwave narrowband brightness temperature A descriptive measure of radiation in terms of the temperature of a hypothetical black body emitting an identical amount of radiation in the same narrow band of wavelengths. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments IRT : Infrared Thermometer Field Campaign Instruments RAD-AIR : Airborne Radiometers

110

ARM - Measurement - Longwave narrowband upwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

narrowband upwelling irradiance narrowband upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Longwave narrowband upwelling irradiance The total radiant energy, in a narrow band of wavelengths longer than approximately 4 {mu}m, passing through a horizontal unit area in an upward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments OTTER : Twin Otter UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett Value-Added Products LBTM-MINNIS : Minnis Cloud Products Using LBTM Algorithm (Process)

111

Anisotropic dissipative effects on the buoyancy instability with background heat flux  

SciTech Connect

The linear buoyancy instability in magnetized plasmas is investigated in the presence of anisotropic resistivity and viscosity by taking into account the background heat flux. The magnetic field is assumed to be homogeneous and has both horizontal and vertical components. The heat is primarily transported along the magnetic force lines when the gyro radius is much less than the mean collision free path. The Hall term is examined first and shows a damping effect on the magnetothermal instability. The heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI) is then investigated by taking into account the parallel resistivity (PR), cross-field resistivity (CR), and the anisotropic viscosity. The general dispersion relation (DR) is derived and discussed in several special cases. We show that only the CR and viscosity exert effects on the DR in the first case. The critical condition for the occurrence of HBI is modified by the CR coupled with the viscosity and the value of the instability growth rate is diminished by them. The effects due to the PR (resp. viscosity) on the HBI are examined next. The PR (resp. viscosity) is shown to alter not only the growth rate but also the instability criterion. There exists an unstable mode when the temperature decreases in the direction of gravity while this case is proven to be magnetothermally stable in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit. A new unstable mode is solely induced by the presence of PR (resp. viscosity). When the PR and CR are both taken into account, the resistivity is shown to induce a damping mode rather than an instability. Finally, considering the PR and viscosity simultaneously, it is found that a new unstable mode is excited when the PR is not equal to the viscosity, or else, dissipation effects do not alter the instability criterion and just cut down the growth rate.

Ren Haijun; Wu Zhengwei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Cao Jintao [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Wavelength (Angstroms) Flux (in arbitrary units) SN 1990N SN 1989B SN 1993O SN 1981B SN 1994D SN 1997ap Iron Peak Blends Ca II Si II & Co II Fe II & III Day -7 Day -5 Day -4 Day -2 ± 2 Day 0 Day +2 * -50 0 50 100 150 Observed days from peak Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 Observed R magnitude 27 26 25 24 Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 R band Ground-based I band HST I band (b) (c) (a) Pre-SN observation 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 log(cz) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 effective m B 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 redshift z Hamuy et al (A.J. 1996) Supernova Cosmology Project 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H = 50 km s -1 Mpc -1 ) No Big Bang 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 ! " z ~ 0 . 4 z = 0 . 8 3 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H=50 km/s/Mpc)

113

The Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) for estimation of turbulent heat fluxes Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(1), 8599 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, turbulent heat flux, evaporation, remote sensing Introduction The estimation of atmospheric turbulent fluxes because of the heterogeneity of land surfaces and the dynamic nature of heat transfer processes. Remote be represented by point measurements only. Methods using remote sensing information to estimate heat exchange

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

114

Facility for high-heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new high-heat flux testing (HHFT) facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon plasma arc lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can accommodate irradiated plasma facing component materials and sub-size mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW m?2, which are prototypic of fusion steady state heat flux conditions, over a heated area of 9 ? 12 and 1 ? 10 cm2, respectively. The use of PAL permits the heat source to be environmentally separated from the components of the test chamber, simplifying the design to accommodate safe testing of low-level irradiated articles and materials under high-heat flux. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing of tungsten samples are presented and discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this photon-based HHFT facility are compared to existing e-beam and particle beam facilities used for similar purposes.

Adrian S Sabau; Evan K Ohriner; Jim Kiggans; David C Harper; Lance L Snead; Charles R Schaich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Modification of divertor heat and article flux profiles with applied 3D fields in NSTX H-mode plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Externally imposed non-axisymmetric magnetic perurbations are observed to alter divertor heat and particle flux profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The divertor profiles are foud to have a modust level of multiple local peaks, characteristic of strike poimt splitting or the "magnetis lob" structure, even before the application of the 3D fields in some (but not all) NSTX discharges. This is thought to be due to the intrinsic error fields. The applied 3D fields augmented the intrinsic strike point splitting, making the ampliture of local peaks, and valleys larger in the divertor profile and striations at the divertor surface brighter. The measured heat flux profile shows that the radial location and spacing of the strations are qualitativel consistent witth a vacuum field tracing calcultion. 3D field application did not change the peak divertor heat and particle fluxes at the toroidal location of measurement. Spatial characteristics of the observed patterns are also reported in the paper.

Ahn, Joon-Wook [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Canik, John [ORNL; Soukhanovskii, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Battaglia, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Investigating the use of nanofluids to improve high heat flux cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal performance of high heat flux components in a fusion reactor could be enhanced significantly by the use of nanofluid coolants, suspensions of a liquid with low concentrations of solid nanoparticles. However, before they are considered viable for fusion, the long-term behaviour of nanofluids must be investigated. This paper reports an experiment which is being prepared to provide data on nanofluid stability, settling and erosion in a HyperVapotron device. Procedures are demonstrated for nanofluid synthesis and quality assessment, and the fluid sample analysis methods are described. The end results from this long-running experiment are expected to allow an initial assessment of the suitability of nanofluids as coolants in a fusion reactor.

Barrett, T R; Flinders, K; Sergis, A; Hardalupas, Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Secondary electron emission and the bifurcation of the heat flux to the targets in fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The presence of secondary electron emission (SEE) from plasma facing components in fusion devices can result in a strong localization of the heat flux from plasma to the wall and subsequent wall erosion. Usually, the impact of the SEE is considered assuming the Maxwellian distribution of the electrons coming to the surface. As a result, the SEE coefficient only depends on the temperature of primary electrons. However, the tail of primary electron distribution function in the scrape off layer (SOL) of fusion devices can be far from Maxwellian due to preferential loss of fast electrons. Consequently, it is shown that the SEE coefficient will depend on the wall potential and multiple solutions can be possible corresponding to different regimes of plasma flow to the wall: with and without SEE effects. This effect can cause two-slope electron temperature profiles in the SOL, which are often seen in experiments.

Lee, Wonjae; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I. [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Oxidation and Volatilization from Tungsten Brush High Heat Flux Armor During High Temperature Steam Exposure  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten brush accommodates thermal stresses and high heat flux in fusion reactor components such as plasma facing surfaces or armor. However, inherently higher surface areas are introduced with the brush design. We have tested a specific design of tungsten brush in steam between 500 and 1100°C. Hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization rates were determined to address fusion safety issues. The brush prepared from 3.2-mm diameter welding rods had a packing density of 85 percent. We found that both hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush, fixtured to represent a unit within a larger component, were less than projections based upon the total integrated surface area (TSA). Steam access and the escape of hydrogen and volatile oxide from void spaces within the brush are restricted compared to specimens with more direct diffusion pathways to the test environment. Hydrogen generation rates from restrained specimens based on normal surface area (NSA) remain about five times higher than rates based on total surface areas from specimens with direct steam access. Volatilization rates from restrained specimens based upon normal surface area (NSA) were only 50 percent higher than our historic cumulative maximum flux plot (CMFP) for tungsten. This study has shown that hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush do not scale according to predictions with previously determined rates, but in fact, with higher packing density could approach those from flat surfaces.

Smolik, Galen Richard; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Petti, David Andrew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.  

SciTech Connect

Experiments conducted in high-performance 1.0-1.2 MA 6 MW NBI-heated H-mode plasmas with a high flux expansion radiative divertor in NSTX demonstrate that significant divertor peak heat flux reduction and access to detachment may be facilitated naturally in a highly-shaped spherical torus (ST) configuration. Improved plasma performance with high {beta}{sub p} = 15-25%, a high bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} = 45-50%, longer plasma pulses, and an H-mode regime with smaller ELMs has been achieved in the lower single null configuration with higher-end elongation 2.2-2.4 and triangularity 0.6-0.8. Divertor peak heat fluxes were reduced from 6-12 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-2 MW/m{sup 2} in ELMy H-mode discharges using high magnetic flux expansion and partial detachment of the outer strike point at several D{sub 2} injection rates, while good core confinement and pedestal characteristics were maintained. The partially detached divertor regime was characterized by a 30-60% increase in divertor plasma radiation, a peak heat flux reduction by up to 70%, measured in a 10 cm radial zone, a five-fold increase in divertor neutral pressure, and a significant volume recombination rate increase.

Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D; Menard, J; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, R E; Bush, C; Kaita, R

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

120

Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps  

SciTech Connect

A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL] [ORNL; Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL] [ORNL; Harper, David C [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL] [ORNL; Schaich, Charles Ross [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Thermal properties for the thermal-hydraulics analyses of the BR2 maximum nominal heat flux.  

SciTech Connect

This memo describes the assumptions and references used in determining the thermal properties for the various materials used in the BR2 HEU (93% enriched in {sup 235}U) to LEU (19.75% enriched in {sup 235}U) conversion feasibility analysis. More specifically, this memo focuses on the materials contained within the pressure vessel (PV), i.e., the materials that are most relevant to the study of impact of the change of fuel from HEU to LEU. This section is regrouping all of the thermal property tables. Section 2 provides a summary of the thermal properties in form of tables while the following sections present the justification of these values. Section 3 presents a brief background on the approach used to evaluate the thermal properties of the dispersion fuel meat and specific heat capacity. Sections 4 to 7 discuss the material properties for the following materials: (i) aluminum, (ii) dispersion fuel meat (UAlx-Al and U-7Mo-Al), (iii) beryllium, and (iv) stainless steel. Section 8 discusses the impact of irradiation on material properties. Section 9 summarizes the material properties for typical operating temperatures. Appendix A elaborates on how to calculate dispersed phase's volume fraction. Appendix B shows the evolution of the BR2 maximum heat flux with burnup.

Dionne, B.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G. L. (Nuclear Engineering Division) [Nuclear Engineering Division

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Next: effect of eddies on the Hadley circulation We talked about ways to incorporate eddy heat fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next: effect of eddies on the Hadley circulation We talked about ways to incorporate eddy heat ¡ An eddy-driven Hadley cell model #12;Effect of eddy fluxes Compare the dry dynamical core model run axisymmetrically versus with eddies ¡ Hadley cell is significantly stronger with eddies ¡ Suggests eddies

Frierson, Dargan

123

Pressure tensor and heat flux vector for inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids under the influence of three-body forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pressure tensor and heat flux vector for inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids under the influence of three-body forces Junfang Zhang and B. D. Todd* Centre for Molecular Simulation, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn Victoria 3122, Australia Received 11 September 2003; published 31 March

124

Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.] [eds.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and latent heat fluxes and therefore the ground temperature, Tg. Evaporation, E, for each grid cell temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area. S. Grossman-Clarke1, J.A. Zehnder2, and W) satellite images [2]. The data were upscaled to a 30-second grid and used to augment and correct

Hall, Sharon J.

126

Latent Heat Flux and Canopy Conductance Based on Penman–Monteith, Priestley–Taylor Equation, and Bouchet’s Complementary Hypothesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method is presented to analytically resolve the terrestrial latent heat flux (?E) and conductances (boundary layer gB and surface gS) using net radiation (RN), ground heat flux (G), air temperature (Ta), and relative humidity (RH). This ...

Kaniska Mallick; Andrew Jarvis; Joshua B. Fisher; Kevin P. Tu; Eva Boegh; Dev Niyogi

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Measurements of net radiation, ground heat flux and surface temperature in an urban canyon  

SciTech Connect

The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect data to increase our knowledge of dispersion in urban areas. Air motions in and around urban areas are very complicated due to the influence of urban structures on both mechanical and thermal forcing. During JU2003, meteorological instruments were deployed at various locations throughout the urban area to characterize the processes that influence dispersion. Some of the instruments were deployed to characterize urban phenomena, such as boundary layer development. In addition, particular sites were chosen for more concentrated measurements to investigate physical processes in more detail. One such site was an urban street canyon on Park Avenue between Broadway and Robinson Avenues in downtown Oklahoma City. The urban canyon study was designed to examine the processes that control dispersion within, into and out of the urban canyon. Several towers were deployed in the Park Avenue block, with multiple levels on each tower for observing the wind using sonic anemometers. Infrared thermometers, net radiometers and ground heat flux plates were deployed on two of the towers midway in the canyon to study the thermodynamic effects and to estimate the surface energy balance. We present results from the surface energy balance observations.

Gouveia, F J; Leach, M J; Shinn, J H

2003-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

Convective heat transfer enhancement of laminar flow of latent functionally thermal fluid in a circular tube with constant heat flux: internal heat source model and its application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the convective heat transfer enhancement mechanism of latent heat functionally thermal fluid. By using the proposed internal heat source model, the influence of each factor affecting the heat

Yinping Zhang; Xianxu Hu; Qing Hao; Xin Wang

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

One specific goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in General Circulation Models (GCMs) under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our project was geared to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems associated with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem --longwave radiation. The primary long-term project objectives were to: (1) develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations for clear and cloudy conditions, and (2) determine how the longwave radiative forcing with an improved algorithm contributes relatively in a GCM when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and convection. The approach has been to build upon existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We focused on comparing calculations from a set of models with operationally observed data for clear, overcast and broken cloud conditions. The differences found through the comparisons and physical insights have been used to develop new models, most of which have been tested with new data. Our initial GCM studies used existing GCMs to study the climate model-radiation sensitivity problem. Although this portion of our initial plans was curtailed midway through the project, we anticipate that the eventual outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and from our better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the model equilibrium climate, how improvements in climate prediction using this algorithm can be achieved.

Robert G. Ellingson

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Clouds M. Ovtchinnikov and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma R. F. Cahalan National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico R. G. Ellingson and E. E.Takara Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction We are concerned with three-dimensional (3D) effects of longwave (LW) radiative transfer (RT) through inhomogeneous clouds. In cloud models, LW RT is typically calculated under the independent

131

A comparison of cloudiness measures derived from longwave measurements and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A comparison of cloudiness measures derived from longwave measurements and A comparison of cloudiness measures derived from longwave measurements and shortwave sky imagers Takara, Ezra Florida State University Ellingson, Robert Florida State University Ma, Yingtao University of Maryland Category: Cloud Properties In the longwave, two measures of cloudiness for single layer clouds are the probability of clear line of sight (PCLoS) and the effective cloud fraction. As the name states, the PCLoS is the probability of a clear line of sight through a broken cloud field. The effectivecloud fraction is the fraction of the sky that is taken up by the clouds; this includes the portion blocked by the cloud sides as well as the fraction taken up by the cloud bases. The effective cloud fraction can be derived from measurements or from the PCLoS. Here the PCLoS obtained from the shortwave-based Total

132

The role of parallel heat transport in the relation between upstream scrape-off layer widths and target heat flux width in H-mode plasmas of NSTX.  

SciTech Connect

The physics of parallel heat transport was tested in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) and S. M. Kaye, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S168 (2005)] tokamak by comparing the upstream electron temperature (T{sub e}) and density (n{sub e}) profiles measured by the mid-plane reciprocating probe to the heat flux (q{sub {perpendicular}}) profile at the divertor plate measured by an infrared (IR) camera. It is found that electron conduction explains the near SOL width data reasonably well while the far SOL, which is in the sheath limited regime, requires an ion heat flux profile broader than the electron one to be consistent with the experimental data. The measured plasma parameters indicate that the SOL energy transport should be in the conduction-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} (radial distance from the separatrix location) < 2-3 cm. The SOL energy transport should transition to the sheath-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm. The T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and q{sub {perpendicular}} profiles are better described by an offset exponential function instead of a simple exponential. The conventional relation between mid plane electron temperature decay length ({lambda}{sub Te}) and target heat flux decay length ({lambda}{sub q}) is {lambda}{sub Te} = 7/2{lambda}{sub q}, whereas the newly-derived relation, assuming offset exponential functional forms, implies {lambda}{sub Te} = (2-2.5){lambda}{sub q}. The measured values of {lambda}{sub Te}/{lambda}{sub q} differ from the new prediction by 25-30%. The measured {lambda}{sub q} values in the far SOL (R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm) are 9-10cm, while the expected values are 2.7 < {lambda}{sub q} < 4.9 cm (for sheath-limited regime). We propose that the ion heat flux profile is substantially broader than the electron heat flux profile as an explanation for this discrepancy in the far SOL.

Ahn, J W; Boedo, J A; Maingi, R; Soukhanovskii, V A

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

133

An analysis of pavement heat flux to optimize the1 water efficiency of a pavement-watering method2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of pavement heat flux to optimize the1 water efficiency of a pavement-watering method2 Martin HENDEL1,2,3* , Morgane COLOMBERT2 , Youssef DIAB2,4 , Laurent ROYON3 3 1 Paris City Hall, Water.hendel@paris.fr)8 9 Preprint version. Uploaded on May 12th , 2014.10 Abstract: Pavement-watering as a technique

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

134

Critical heat flux predictions based on the BODYFIT-2PE computer code and Columbia University CHF correlation. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

The BODYFIT-2PE (Boundary-Fitted Coordinate, 2-Phase Flow with Partially Elliptic) computer code has been developed and was employed to simulate the critical heat flux experiment in a General Electric 3 x 3 rod bundle by using a CHF correlation recently developed at Columbia University under EPRI sponsorship. CHF predictions are important in analyzing rod bundle performance in nuclear reactor operation. The results of the BODYFIT calculations compared favorably with the experimental measurements.

Chen, B.C.J.; Chien, T.H.; Sha, W.T.; Kim, J.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Heat transfer and pressure drop data for high heat flux densities to water at high subcritical pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Local surface ooeffioients of heat t-ansfer, overall pressure drop data and mean friction factor are presented for heat flamms up to 3.52106 BtuAr ft2 for water flowing in a nickel tabe isder the following conditions: mass ...

Rohsenow, Warren M.

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

About the conditions of suppression of turbulence effects on the poloidal fluxes in thoroidal plasmas in the presence of RF heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasmas in the presence of RF heating N. Pometescu University of Craiova, Association EURATOM of the poloidal particle and heat fluxes in the thoroidal plasmas due to electrostatic turbulence in the presence of external Radio Frequency heating. The effects of the electrostatic turbulence contain two terms. One

137

The atmosphere absorbs part of the outgoing longwave energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intersecting Earth is S0 R2 · The global surface area of Earth is 4R2 · Divide the total energy rate, where R is the radius of the Earth Solar Radiation · The total energy rate for solar radiation7/20/10 1 The atmosphere absorbs part of the outgoing longwave energy Incoming solar radiation

Russell, Lynn

138

Momentum and heat fluxes in a turbulent air flow over a wet, smooth boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are negligible in directions other than those normal to the boundary surface. Such equa? tions were first employed by Boussinesq (5* 6). For turbulent flow, he suggested the equatiisns, ? IS ^7/ (momentum flux)/ - U and ^ =. Kh (beat flux) where KM and c... of a pre? cision potentiometer. Continuous, uniform water supply to the test surface was achieved by a distilled water supply system composed of glass bottles and copper tubing arranged to supply water at any required rate without attention from...

Rice, Warren

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

139

Natural convection in high heat flux tanks at the Hanford Waste Site / [by] Mark van der Helm and Mujid S. Kazimi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was carried out on the potential for natural convection and the effect of natural convection in a High Heat Flux Tank, Tank 241-C-106, at the Hanford Reservation. To determine the existence of natural convection, ...

Van der Helm, Mark Johan, 1972-

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Finite difference analysis of mass transfer effects on flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical plate in dissipative fluid and constant heat flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A finite-difference solution to the flow past an impulsively started infinite vertical plate is derived by assuming 1) presence of species concentration like water vapour, CO2 etc. and 2) constant heat flux at th...

J. N. Das; S. N. Ray; Prof. Dr. V. M. Soundalgekar

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Definition: Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Long-Wave Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Long-Wave Infrared Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) refers to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the 8 to 15 µm wavelength range. LWIR surveys are sometimes referred to as "thermal imaging" and can be used to identify relatively warm features such as hot springs, fumaroles, and snow melt. LWIR can also be used to map the distribution of certain minerals related to hydrothermal alterations.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ Katherine Young,Timothy Reber,Kermit Witherbee. 2012. Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei. In: Proceedings of the Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal

142

Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Multi-scale Control and Enhancement of Reactor Boiling Heat Flux by Reagents and Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

The phenomenological characterization of the use of non-invasive and passive techniques to enhance the boiling heat transfer in water has been carried out in this extended study. It provides fundamental enhanced heat transfer data for nucleate boiling and discusses the associated physics with the aim of addressing future and next-generation reactor thermal-hydraulic management. It essentially addresses the hypothesis that in phase-change processes during boiling, the primary mechanisms can be related to the liquid-vapor interfacial tension and surface wetting at the solidliquid interface. These interfacial characteristics can be significantly altered and decoupled by introducing small quantities of additives in water, such as surface-active polymers, surfactants, and nanoparticles. The changes are fundamentally caused at a molecular-scale by the relative bulk molecular dynamics and adsorption-desorption of the additive at the liquid-vapor interface, and its physisorption and electrokinetics at the liquid-solid interface. At the micro-scale, the transient transport mechanisms at the solid-liquid-vapor interface during nucleation and bubblegrowth can be attributed to thin-film spreading, surface-micro-cavity activation, and micro-layer evaporation. Furthermore at the macro-scale, the heat transport is in turn governed by the bubble growth and distribution, macro-layer heat transfer, bubble dynamics (bubble coalescence, collapse, break-up, and translation), and liquid rheology. Some of these behaviors and processes are measured and characterized in this study, the outcomes of which advance the concomitant fundamental physics, as well as provide insights for developing control strategies for the molecular-scale manipulation of interfacial tension and surface wetting in boiling by means of polymeric reagents, surfactants, and other soluble surface-active additives.

R.M. Manglik; A. Athavale; D.S. Kalaikadal; A. Deodhar; U. Verma

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

144

An experimental study of external reactor vessel cooling strategy on the critical heat flux using the graphene oxide nano-fluid  

SciTech Connect

External reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR) of corium as a key severe accident management strategy can be achieved by flooding the reactor cavity during a severe accident. In this accident mitigation strategy, the decay heat removal capability depends on whether the imposed heat flux exceeds critical heat flux (CHF). To provide sufficient cooling for high-power reactors such as APR1400, there have been some R and D efforts to use the reactor vessel with micro-porous coating and nano-fluids boiling-induced coating. The dispersion stability of graphene-oxide nano-fluid in the chemical conditions of flooding water that includes boric acid, lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) was checked in terms of surface charge or zeta potential before the CHF experiments. Results showed that graphene-oxide nano-fluids were very stable under ERVC environment. The critical heat flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel external wall was measured using the small scale two-dimensional slide test section. The radius of the curvature is 0.1 m. The dimension of each part in the facility simulated the APR-1400. The heater was designed to produce the different heat flux. The magnitude of heat flux follows the one of the APR-1400 when the severe accident occurred. All tests were conducted under inlet subcooling 10 K. Graphene-oxide nano-fluids (concentration: 10 -4 V%) enhanced CHF limits up to about 20% at mass flux 50 kg/m{sup 2}s and 100 kg/m{sup 2}s in comparison with the results of the distilled water at same test condition. (authors)

Park, S. D.; Lee, S. W.; Kang, S.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Bang, I. C. [Ulsan National Inst. of Science and Technology UNIST, 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulasn Metropolitan City 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

Lowe, K.T.

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

A satellite view of the radiative impact of clouds on surface downward fluxes in the Tibetan Plateau  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using thirteen years of satellite observations for the Tibetan Plateau, we investigate and quantify the sensitivities (or partial derivatives) of daytime surface downward shortwave and longwave fluxes with respect to changes in cloud cover and ...

C. M. Naud; I. Rangwala; M. Xu; J. R. Miller

147

Multi-dimensional Longwave Forcing of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems  

SciTech Connect

The importance of multi-dimensional (MD) longwave radiative effects on cloud dynamics is evaluated in a large eddy simulation (LES) framework employing multi-dimensional radiative transfer (Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinate Method —SHDOM). Simulations are performed for a case of unbroken, marine boundary layer stratocumulus and a broken field of trade cumulus. “Snapshot” calculations of MD and IPA (independent pixel approximation —1D) radiative transfer applied to LES cloud fields show that the total radiative forcing changes only slightly, although the MD effects significantly modify the spatial structure of the radiative forcing. Simulations of each cloud type employing MD and IPA radiative transfer, however, differ little. For the solid cloud case, relative to using IPA, the MD simulation exhibits a slight reduction in entrainment rate and boundary layer TKE relative to the IPA simulation. This reduction is consistent with both the slight decrease in net radiative forcing and a negative correlation between local vertical velocity and radiative forcing, which implies a damping of boundary layer eddies. Snapshot calculations of the broken cloud case suggest a slight increase in radiative cooling, though few systematic differences are noted in the interactive simulations. We attribute this result to the fact that radiative cooling is a relatively minor contribution to the total energetics. For the cloud systems in this study, the use of IPA longwave radiative transfer is sufficiently accurate to capture the dynamical behavior of BL clouds. Further investigations are required in order to generalize this conclusion for other cloud types and longer time integrations. 1

Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Y. L.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Davis, Anthony B; Evans, K. F.; Ellingson, Robert G.

2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

148

Higher dimensional charged shear-free relativistic models with heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyse shear-free spherically symmetric relativistic models of gravitating fluids with heat flow and electric charge defined on higher dimensional manifolds. The solution to the Einstein-Maxwell system is governed by the pressure isotropy condition which depends on the spacetime dimension. We study this highly nonlinear partial differential equation using Lie's group theoretic approach. The Lie symmetry generators that leave the equation invariant are determined. We provide exact solutions to the gravitational potentials using the first symmetry admitted by the equation. Our new exact solutions contain the earlier results for the four-dimensional case. Using the other Lie generators, we are able to provide solutions to the gravitational potentials or reduce the order of the master equation to a first order nonlinear differential equation. We derive the temperature transport equation in higher dimensions and find expressions for the causal and Eckart temperatures showing their explicit dependance on the dimension. We analyse a particular solution, obtained via group techniques, to show its physical applicability.

Y. Nyonyi; S. D. Maharaj; K. S. Govinder

2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

Numerical investigation of edge plasma phenomena in an enhanced D-alpha discharge at Alcator C-Mod: Parallel heat flux and quasi-coherent edge oscillations  

SciTech Connect

Reduced-model scrape-off layer turbulence (SOLT) simulations of an enhanced D-alpha (EDA) H-mode shot observed in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak were conducted to compare with observed variations in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) width of the parallel heat flux profile. In particular, the role of the competition between sheath- and conduction-limited parallel heat fluxes in determining that width was studied for the turbulent SOL plasma that emerged from the simulations. The SOL width decreases with increasing input power and with increasing separatrix temperature in both the experiment and the simulation, consistent with the strong temperature dependence of the parallel heat flux in balance with the perpendicular transport by turbulence and blobs. The particularly strong temperature dependence observed in the case analyzed is attributed to the fact that these simulations produce SOL plasmas which are in the conduction-limited regime for the parallel heat flux. A persistent quasi-coherent (QC) mode dominates the SOLT simulations and bears considerable resemblance to the QC mode observed in C-Mod EDA operation. The SOLT QC mode consists of nonlinearly saturated wave-fronts located just inside the separatrix that are convected poloidally by the mean flow, continuously transporting particles and energy and intermittently emitting blobs into the SOL.

Russell, D. A.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Ave., P-5, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks  

SciTech Connect

A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

Balick, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gillespie, Alan [UN. WASHINGTON; French, Andrew [USDA-ARS; Danilina, Iryna [UN. WASHINGTON

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Numerical prediction of heat-flux to massive calorimeters engulfed in regulatory fires with the cask analysis fire environment (CAFE) model  

SciTech Connect

Recent observations show that the thermal boundary conditions within large-scale fires are significantly affected by the presence of thermally massive objects. These objects cool the soot and gas near their surfaces, and these effects reduce the incoming radiant heat-flux to values lower than the levels expected from simple {sigma}T{sub fire}{sup 4} models. They also affect the flow and temperature fields in the fire far from their surfaces. The Cask Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to provide an enhanced fire boundary condition for the design of radioactive material packages. CAFE is a set of computer subroutines that use computational fluid mechanics methods to predict convective heat transfer and mixing. It also includes models for fuel and oxygen transport, chemical reaction, and participating-media radiation heat transfer. This code uses two-dimensional computational models so that it has reasonably short turnaround times on standard workstations and is well suited for design and risk studies. In this paper, CAFE is coupled with a commercial finite-element program to model a large cylindrical calorimeter fully engulfed in a pool fire. The time-dependent heat-flux to the calorimeter and the calorimeter surface temperature are determined for several locations around the calorimeter circumference. The variation of heat-flux with location is determined for calorimeters with different diameters and wall thickness, and the observed effects discussed.

KOSKI,JORMAN A.; SUO-ANTITLA,AHTI; KRAMER,M. ALEX; GREINER,MILES

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

Experimental results with cryogenically cooled, thin, silicon crystal x-ray monochromators on high-heat-flux beamlines  

SciTech Connect

A novel, silicon crystal monochromator has been designed and tested for use on undulator and focused wiggler beamlines at third-generation synchrotron sources. The crystal utilizes a thin, partially transmitting diffracting element fabricated within a liquid-nitrogen cooled, monolithic block of silicon. This report summarizes the results from performance tests conducted at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) using a focused wiggler beam and at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) on an undulator beamline. These experiments indicate that a cryogenic crystal can handle the very high power and power density x-ray beams of modem synchrotrons with sub-arcsec thermal broadening of the rocking curve. The peak power density absorbed on the surface of the crystal at the ESRF exceeded go W/mm{sup 2} with an absorbed power of 166 W, this takes into account the spreading of the beam due to the Bragg angle of 11.4{degrees}. At the APS, the peak heat flux incident on the crystal was 1.5 W/mA/mm{sup 2} with a power of 6.1 W/mA for a 2.0 H x 2.5 V mm{sup 2} beam at an undulator gap of 11.1 mm and stored current up to 96 mA.

Rogers, C.S.; Mills, D.M.; Lee, W.K.; Fernandez, P.B.; Graber, T.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Validation/Uncertainty Quantification for Large Eddy Simulations of the heat flux in the Tangentially Fired Oxy-Coal Alstom Boiler Simulation Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task is to produce predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for the heat flux in commercial-scale, tangentially fired, oxy-coal boilers. Validation data came from the Alstom Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF) for tangentially fired, oxy-coal operation. This task brings together experimental data collected under Alstom’s DOE project for measuring oxy-firing performance parameters in the BSF with this University of Utah project for large eddy simulation (LES) and validation/uncertainty quantification (V/UQ). The Utah work includes V/UQ with measurements in the single-burner facility where advanced strategies for O2 injection can be more easily controlled and data more easily obtained. Highlights of the work include: • Simulations of Alstom’s 15 megawatt (MW) BSF, exploring the uncertainty in thermal boundary conditions. A V/UQ analysis showed consistency between experimental results and simulation results, identifying uncertainty bounds on the quantities of interest for this system (Subtask 9.1) • A simulation study of the University of Utah’s oxy-fuel combustor (OFC) focused on heat flux (Subtask 9.2). A V/UQ analysis was used to show consistency between experimental and simulation results. • Measurement of heat flux and temperature with new optical diagnostic techniques and comparison with conventional measurements (Subtask 9.3). Various optical diagnostics systems were created to provide experimental data to the simulation team. The final configuration utilized a mid-wave infrared (MWIR) camera to measure heat flux and temperature, which was synchronized with a high-speed, visible camera to utilize two-color pyrometry to measure temperature and soot concentration. • Collection of heat flux and temperature measurements in the University of Utah’s OFC for use is subtasks 9.2 and 9.3 (Subtask 9.4). Several replicates were carried to better assess the experimental error. Experiments were specifically designed for the generation of high-fidelity data from a turbulent oxy-coal flame for the validation of oxy-coal simulation models. Experiments were also conducted on the OFC to determine heat flux profiles using advanced strategies for O2 injection. This is important when considering retrofit of advanced O2 injection in retrofit configurations.

Smith, P.J.; Eddings, E.G.; Ring, T.; Thornock, J.; Draper, T.; Isaac, B.; Rezeai, D.; Toth, P.; Wu, Y.; Kelly, K.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t y (2009). 11. Pacific Gas &Electric, Go Solar California:California Solar Initiative (2008). A consumer's guide toprograms such as the California Solar Initiative (CSI) to

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

d b y t h e a n g l e d solar panel F i g u r e 62: C a l cK l e i s s l , C h a i r Solar panels were mounted w i t hthe optimal angles for solar panels [9], i n this study both

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Long-Wave Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Long-Wave Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Long-Wave Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (1968-1971) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Long-Wave Infrared Activity Date 1968 - 1971 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fumarolic and hot springs activity Notes 8- to 14-micrometer IR imagery has value in delineating the typical arcuate structural patterns References Koenig, J.B.; Gawarecki, S.J.; Austin, C.F. (1 February 1972) Remote sensing survey of the Coso geothermal area, Inyo county, California. Technical publication 1968--1971 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Long-Wave_Infrared_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1968-1971)&oldid=473747"

157

Graphene-based long-wave infrared TM surface plasmon modulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe theoretically a new long-wave infrared optical modulator based on the characteristics of TM surface plasmons in graphene. Calculations made using a finite-? random-phase...

Andersen, David R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

An Experimental Study of Upward and Downward Flow of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in a Straight Pipe Heat Exchanger with Constant Wall Heat Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental analysis was conducted on a single circular tube heat exchanger using supercritical carbon dioxide as the working fluid. The heat exchanger was operated in two different orientations: vertically upward and downward. The experimental...

Umrigar, Eric Dara

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Optimal heliostat aiming strategy for uniform distribution of heat flux on the receiver of a solar power tower plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Temperature distribution on the receiver surface of a solar power tower plant is of great importance. High temperature gradients may lead to local hot spots and consequently failure of the receiver. The temperature distribution can be controlled by defining several aiming points on the receiver surface and adjusting the heliostats accordingly. In this paper, a new optimization algorithm which works based on the principles of genetic algorithm is developed to find the optimal flux distribution on the receiver surface. The objective is to minimize the standard deviation of the flux density distribution by changing the aiming points of individual heliostats. Flux distribution of each heliostat is found by using the HFLCAL model [1], which is validated against experimental data. The results show that after employing the new algorithm the maximum flux density is reduced by an order of magnitude. The effects of number of aiming points and size of the aiming surface on the flux density distribution are investigated in detail.

Saeb M. Besarati; D. Yogi Goswami; Elias K. Stefanakos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Experimental investigations of uncovered-bundle heat transfer and two-phase mixture-level swell under high-pressure low heat-flux conditions. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported from a series of uncovered-bundle heat transfer and mixture-level swell tests. Experimental testing was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF). The THTF is an electrically heated bundle test loop configured to produce conditions similar to those in a small-break loss-of-coolant accident. The objective of heat transfer testing was to acquire heat transfer coefficients and fluid conditions in a partially uncovered bundle. Testing was performed in a quasi-steady-state mode with the heated core 30 to 40% uncovered. Linear heat rates varied from 0.32 to 2.22 kW/m.rod (0.1 to 0.68 kW/ft.rod). Under these conditions peak clad temperatures in excess of 1050 K (1430/sup 0/F) were observed, and total heat transfer coefficients ranged from 0.0045 to 0.037 W/cm/sup 2/.K (8 to 65 Btu/h.ft/sup 2/./sup 0/F). Spacer grids were observed to enhance heat transfer at, and downstream of, the grid. Radiation heat transfer was calculated to account for as much as 65% of total heat transfer in low-flow tests.

Anklam, T. M.; Miller, R. J.; White, M. D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Heat Flux Calculation and Problem of Flaking of Boron Carbide Coatings on the Faraday Screen of the ICRH Antennas During Tore Supra High Power, Long Pulse Operation  

SciTech Connect

Reliable and repetitive high power and long pulse tokamak operation is strongly dependant of the ability to secure the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). In Tore Supra, a network of 7 infrared (IR) video cameras is routinely used to prevent PFCs overheating and damage in selected regions. Real time feedback control and offline analysis are essential for basic protection and understanding of abnormal thermal events. One important limitation detected by the IR real time feed-back loop during high power RF operation (injected power of 9.5 MW over 26 s and 12 MW over 10 s have been achieved respectively in 2006 and 2008) is due to the interaction between fast ions which increase the power flux density and flaking of the boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen box of the ICRH antennas. An IR-based experimental procedure is proposed in order to detect new flakes during plasma operation. The thermal response of the B4C coating is studied with and without flaking during plasma operation. The experimental heat flux deposited by fast ion losses on the Faraday screen is calculated for high (3.8 T) and low magnetic field (2 T) during high RF power operation (with fundamental hydrogen minority and second harmonic ICRH heating schemes respectively). The paper addresses both thermal science issues applied to machine protection and limitation due to fast ions issues during high RF power, long pulse operation. Safety margin to critical heat flux and number of fatigue cycles under heat load are presented in the paper.

Corre, Y. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Lipa, M. [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France] [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France; Agarici, G. [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona, Spain] [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona, Spain; Basiuk, V. [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France] [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France; Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Courtois, X. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Dumont, R. J. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Ekedahl, A. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM)] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Gardarein, J. L. [University of Aix, Marseille, France] [University of Aix, Marseille, France; Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL] [ORNL; Martin, V. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM)] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Moncada, V. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Portafaix, C. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Rigollet, F. [University of Aix, Marseille, France] [University of Aix, Marseille, France; Tawizgant, R. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Travere, J. M. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Valliez, K. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France] [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

PROJECT SUMMARY Longwave Radiation Processes and Surface Energy Budget on the Antarctic Plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A-1 PROJECT SUMMARY Longwave Radiation Processes and Surface Energy Budget on the Antarctic Plateau on several projects: near-surface atmospheric temperature profiles, radiosonde performance at low images, and improvement of calibration procedures for interferometers. In the proposed work, analyses

Walden, Von P.

163

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight-path laser absorption measurements [14]­[16], in-situ visible and near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectral

Lawrence, Rick L.

164

Experimental investigations of two-phase mixture level swell and axial void fraction distribution under high pressure, low heat flux conditions in rod bundle geometry  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data is reported from a series of quasi-steady-state two-phase mixture level swell and void fraction distribution tests. Testing was performed at ORNL in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility - a large electrically heated test loop configured to produce conditions similar to those expected in a small break loss of coolant accident. Pressure was varied from 2.7 to 8.2 MPa and linear power ranged from 0.33 to 1.95 kW/m. Mixture swell was observed to vary linearly with the total volumetric vapor generation rate over the power range of primary interest in small break analysis. Void fraction data was fit by a drift-flux model and both the drift-velocity and concentration parameter were observed to decrease with increasing pressure.

Anklam, T.M.; White, M.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Analytic theory of L{yields}H transition, barrier structure, and hysteresis for a simple model of coupled particle and heat fluxes  

SciTech Connect

The two-field (pressure/density) model for the L{yields}H transition is extended and analyzed qualitatively. In its original form the model is ambiguous as to the location of the transition within the range of bistability of particle and thermal fluxes. Here, the model is regularized by including (i) hyperdiffusion, (ii) time dependence, and (iii) curvature of the pressure profile. The regularizations (i)-(ii) agree and indicate that the Maxwell rule for the forward and back transition applies, as opposed to the maximum flux forward and minimum flux backward transition rules (which yields hysteresis) as suggested previously. Regarding (i)-(ii), simple models suggest that for a pressure gradient driven electric field shear bifurcation, the basic scale of the pedestal is inexorably tied to the particle fueling depth, which normally is the neutral penetration depth. There is no hysteresis predicted by the local model of transport suppression. However, the effect of pressure profile curvature (iii) changes these results substantially. When it dominates, the curvature effect reduces the transition threshold to the lower end of the range of heating power, which falls within the phase coexistence region for both forward and back transitions. This softens the transition threshold requirements. In this limit, the model with pressure curvature also predicts transitions which occur in regimes of flat density and driven exclusively by the temperature gradient. This allows the pedestal to extend beyond the fueling depth, and also allows some decoupling of density and pressure profiles. In a parameter range where the pressure curvature is less important the transition occurs somewhere between the above two limits.

Malkov, M. A.; Diamond, P. H. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Minimum entropy generation due to heat transfer and fluid friction in a parabolic trough receiver with non-uniform heat flux at different rim angles and concentration ratios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, Monte Carlo ray-tracing and computational fluid dynamics are used to numerically investigate the minimum entropy generation due to heat transfer and fluid friction in a parabolic trough receiver. The analysis was carried out for rim angles in the range 40°–120°, concentration ratios in the range 57–143, Reynolds numbers in the range 1.02 × 104–1.36 × 106 and fluid temperatures in the range 350–650 K. Results show existence of an optimal Reynolds number at any given combination of fluid temperature, concentration ratio and rim angle for which the total entropy generation is a minimum. The total entropy generation was found to increase as the rim angle reduced, concentration ratio increased and fluid temperature reduced. The high entropy generation rates at low rim angles are mainly due to high peak temperatures in the absorber tube at these low rim angles.

Aggrey Mwesigye; Tunde Bello-Ochende; Josua P. Meyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson Joseph A for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson,a Joseph A. Shaw,a Rick Lawrence,b Paul W. Nugent,a Laura M of these calibrated imagers is imaging of vegetation for CO2 gas leak detection. During a four-week period

Shaw, Joseph A.

169

Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices  

SciTech Connect

The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Intercomparison of Sensible Heat Flux from Large Aperture Scintillometer and Eddy Covariance Methods: Field Experiment over a Homogeneous Semi-arid Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of satellite remote sensing sensible heat-?ux estimates dueremote sensing algorithms. A typical approach identi?es spectral bands particularly sensitive to surface heat ?

Zeweldi, Dawit A.; Gebremichael, Mekonnen; Wang, Junming; Sammis, Theodore; Kleissl, Jan; Miller, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hollow Core Fiber Optics for Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

The development and testing of hollow core glass waveguides (i.e., fiber optics) for use in Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) spectroscopy systems is described. LWIR fiber optics are a key enabling technology needed to improve the utility and effectiveness of trace chemical detection systems based in the 8 to 12 micron region. This paper focuses on recent developments in hollow waveguide technology geared specifically for LWIR spectroscopy, including a reduction in both the length dependent loss and the bending loss while maintaining relatively high beam quality. Results will be presented from tests conducted with a Quantum Cascade Laser.

Kriesel, J.M.; Gat, N.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, J. A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

An experimental study on heat transfer from a horizontal heated circular cylinder enhanced by water spray.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A series of experiments were conducted to investigate the heat transfer which occurs with a heated, constant heat flux, horizontal, single circular cylinder is exposed… (more)

Chau, Man Hei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Multi-Dimensional Effects in Longwave Radiative Forcing of PBL Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Dimensional Effects in Longwave Radiative Forcing of PBL Clouds D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma M. Ovtchinnikov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico R. F. Cahalan National Aeronautic and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland E. E. Takara and R. G. Ellingson Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida 1. Introduction Numerical cloud models nearly universally employ one-dimensional (1D) treatments of radiative transfer (RT). Radiative transfer is typically implemented as a 2- or 4-stream approximation to the

174

Horizontal internal-tide fluxes support elevated phytoplankton productivity over the inner continental shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The semidiurnal internal-tide energy flux was onshore over1 Cross-shelf internal-tide energy (J e ), heat (J q ),coherent with the internal-tide energy flux and heat flux (

Lucas, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

Fischer, M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Section 69  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

few tenths of a degree cooler than the temperature a few millimeters below it because of heat loss by sensible and latent heat fluxes as well as outgoing longwave radiative fluxes...

177

Effect of Hyperthermia (45°C) on Calcium Flux in Chinese Hamster Ovary HA-1 Fibroblasts and Its Potential Role in Cytotoxicity and Heat Resistance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...little further increase (Fig. IB). These effects displayed a similar dose-effect relation ship to the heat-induced increase in 45Ca2'f...general membrane integrity, we investigated the effect of hyperthermia on externally bound Ca2+ as...

Mary Ann Stevenson; Stuart K. Calderwood; and George M. Hahn

1987-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Analysis of the behavior of an experimental absorption heat transformer for water purification for different mass flux rates in the generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, first and second laws of thermodynamics have been used to analyse the performance of an experimental absorption heat transformer for water purification. Irreversibilities, coefficients of performance (COP) and exergy coefficients of performance (ECOP) were determined as function of the mass flow of hot water supplied to the generator and as function of the overall thermal specific energy consumption (OSTEC) parameter defined in this paper. The results showed that the system irreversibilities increase meanwhile the coefficients of performance and the exergy coefficient of performance decrease with an increment of the mass flow of hot water supplied to the generator. Also it was shown that the system performance is better when the production of purified water increases due to the increment of the heat recycled to the generator and evaporator.

Armando Huicochea; Wilfrido Rivera; Hiram Martínez; Javier Siqueiros; Erasmo Cadenas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Sampling Activity Date - 2008 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09082006 to 10242006) by the eddy...

180

Flow and heat transfer in porous micro heat sink for thermal management of high power LEDs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel porous micro heat sink system is presented for thermal management of high power LEDs, which has high heat transport capability. The operational principle and heat transfer characteristics of porous micro heat sink are analyzed. Numerical model ... Keywords: Heat dissipation, High heat flux, High power LEDs, Porous media, Porous micro heat sink

Z. M. Wan; J. Liu; K. L. Su; X. H. Hu; S. S. M

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Boundary mixing and nutrient fluxes in Mono Lake, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

we inferred that most heat flux occurred due to boundary mixing at the base of the pycnocline ..... squares fit of the power spectral densities of the temperature-.

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

182

Ultra-Trace Chemical Sensing with Long-Wave Infrared Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopic Sensors  

SciTech Connect

The infrared sensors task of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project (Task B of Project PL211) is focused on the science and technology of remote and in-situ spectroscopic chemical sensors for detecting proliferation and coun-tering terrorism. Missions to be addressed by remote chemical sensor development in-clude detecting proliferation of nuclear or chemical weapons, and providing warning of terrorist use of chemical weapons. Missions to be addressed by in-situ chemical sensor development include countering terrorism by screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons, or chemical weapons residues, and mapping contaminated areas. The science and technology is also relevant to chemical weapons defense, air operations support, monitoring emissions from chemi-cal weapons destruction or industrial activities, law enforcement, medical diagnostics, and other applications. Sensors for most of these missions will require extreme chemical sensitivity and selectiv-ity because the signature chemicals of importance are expected to be present in low con-centrations or have low vapor pressures, and the ambient air is likely to contain pollutants or other chemicals with interfering spectra. Cavity-enhanced chemical sensors (CES) that draw air samples into optical cavities for laser-based interrogation of their chemical content promise real-time, in-situ chemical detection with extreme sensitivity to specified target molecules and superb immunity to spectral interference and other sources of noise. PNNL is developing CES based on quantum cascade (QC) lasers that operate in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR - 3 to 5 microns) and long-wave infrared (LWIR - 8 to 14 mi-crons), and CES based on telecommunications lasers operating in the short-wave infrared (SWIR - 1 to 2 microns). All three spectral regions are promising because smaller mo-lecular absorption cross sections in the SWIR are offset by the superior performance, ma-turity, and robustness of SWIR lasers, detectors, and other components, while the reverse is true for the MWIR and LWIR bands. PNNL's research activities include identification of signature chemicals and quantification of their spectroscopy, exploration of novel sensing techniques, and experimental sensor system construction and testing. In FY02, experimental QC laser systems developed with DARPA funding were used to explore continuous-wave (cw) CES in various forms culminating in the NICE-OHMS technique [1-3] discussed below. In FY02 PNNL also built an SWIR sensor to validate utility of the SWIR spectral region for chemical sensing, and explore the science and engineering of CES in field environments. The remainder of this report is devoted to PNNL's LWIR CES research. During FY02 PNNL explored the performance and limitations of several detection tech-niques in the LWIR including direct cavity-enhanced absorption, cavity-dithered phase-sensitive detection and resonant sideband cavity-enhanced detection. This latter tech-nique is also known as NICE-OHMS, which stands for Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectroscopy. This technique, pioneered in the near infra-red (NIR) by Dr J. Hall and coworkers at the University of Colorado, is one of the most sensitive spectroscopic techniques currently known. In this report, the first demonstra-tion of this technique in the LWIR is presented.

Taubman, Matthew S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Williams, Richard M.; Schultz, John F.

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

Plume heat flow is much lower than CMB heat flow Eric Mittelstaedt a,*, Paul J. Tackley a,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to follow a power-law size distribution, estimated a plume heat flux as high as 35% of surface heat fluxPlume heat flow is much lower than CMB heat flow Eric Mittelstaedt a,*, Paul J. Tackley a, of the heat conducted across the CMB. Here this assumption is explored using numerical convection models

Tackley, Paul J.

184

Heat fluxes in Tampa Bay, Florida.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Meyers et al. (2007) Tampa Bay Model produces water level and three-dimensional current and salinity fields for Tampa Bay. It is capable of computing… (more)

Sopkin, Kristin L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere ocean heat Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of ACC oceanic... heat flux Total heat flux at 900 m: 4.7 to 7.5 kWm2. Implies 0.3 PW heat loss to atmosphere south... 12;Mechanisms: ... Source: Gille, Sarah T. - Scripps...

186

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

Gas Phase Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in the long-wave IR using Quartz Tuning Forks and Amplitude Modulated Quantum Cascade Lasers  

SciTech Connect

A paper to accompany a 20 minute talk about the progress of a DARPA funded project called LPAS. ABSTRACT: We demonstrate the performance of a novel long-wave infrared photoacoustic laser absorbance spectrometer for gas-phase species using an amplitude modulated (AM) quantum cascade (QC) laser and a quartz tuning fork microphone. Photoacoustic signal was generated by focusing the output of a Fabry-Perot QC laser operating at 8.41 micron between the legs of a quartz tuning fork which served as a transducer for the transient acoustic pressure wave. The QC laser was modulated at the resonant frequency of the tuning fork (32.8 kHz). This sensor was calibrated using the infrared absorber Freon-134a by performing a simultanious absorption measurement using a 35 cm absorption cell. The NEAS of this instrument was determined to be 2 x 10^-8 W cm^-1 /Hz^1/2 and the fundamental sensitivity of this technique is limited by the noise floor of the tuning fork itself.

Wojcik, Michael D.; Phillips, Mark C.; Cannon, Bret D.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Proceedings of HT'03 2003 Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of HT'03 2003 Summer Heat Transfer Conference July 21­23, 2003, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA HT2003-47016 A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR HEAT FLUX DETERMINATION D.G. Walker Department of Mechanical@vt.edu ABSTRACT A new method for estimating heat fluxes from heating rate measurements and an approach to measure

Walker, D. Greg

189

Pulse flux measuring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

Riggan, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Improved ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data D. R. Doelling and M. M. Khaiyer Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction The radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is a quantity of fundamental importance to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Thus, it is necessary to measure the radiation budget components, broadband shortwave albedo and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), as accurately as possible. Measurement of OLR over the ARM surface sites has only been possible since the advent of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES; Wielicki et al. 1998) in 1998. Prior to

191

Micro and nanostructured surfaces for enhanced phase change heat transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-phase microchannel heat sinks are of significant interest for thermal management applications, where the latent heat of vaporization offers an efficient method to dissipate large heat fluxes in a compact device. However, ...

Chu, Kuang-Han, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

On meridional transports of heat and freshwater in the pacific ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the Pacific Ocean estimates of meridional heat and freshwater transport ... to multi-annual mean conditions. Concerning the Pacific heat transport, a southward directed flux across...

Prof. Dr. S. Hastenrath

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Metrological tool for the characterization of flame fronts based on the coupling of heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

° flame inclination angle due to wind [ ]th i W theoretical radiative heat flux received by the ith target

Boyer, Edmond

194

Are ghost surfaces and quadratic-flux-minimizing surfaces the same?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 2 2 10 || parallel diffusion dominates perpendicular diffusio solved numerically on grid 2 2 heat, 1 Nov 2009, Atlanta, GA, USA ( ) -10 || ||heat transport is anisotropic: 0 with / =10 if nested flux

Hudson, Stuart

195

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

196

Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Enhanced heat transfer for thermionic power modules  

SciTech Connect

The thermionic power module is capable of operating at very high heat fluxes, which in turn serve to reduce capital costs. The most efficient operation also requires uniform heat fluxes. The development of enhanced heat transfer systems is required to meet the demand for high heat fluxes (>20 w/cm/sup 2/) at high temperatures (>1500K) which advanced thermionic power modules place upon combustion systems. Energy transfer from the hot combustion gases may take place by convection, radiation, or a combination of radiation and convection. Enhanced convective heat transfer with a jet impingement system has been demonstrated in a thermionic converter. The recently-developed cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer system has also been applied to a thermionic converter. By comparing the jet impingement and cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer systems, an appropriate system may be selected for utilization in advanced thermionic power modules. Results are reported.

Johnson, D.C.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

Frandsen, Jannette B.

200

NACP Site-Model and Aggregated Flux Data Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site-Model and Aggregated Flux Data Published Site-Model and Aggregated Flux Data Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of a data set from the North American Carbon Program (NACP): NACP Site: Terrestrial Biosphere Model and Aggregated Flux Data in Standard Format . Data set prepared by D.M. Ricciuto, K. Schaefer, P.E. Thornton, K. Davis, R.B. Cook, Shishi Liu, R. Anderson, M.A. Arain, I. Baker, J.M. Chen, M. Dietze, R. Grant, C. Izaurralde, A.K. Jain, A.W. King, C. Kucharik, Shuguang Liu, E. Lokupitiya, Y. Luo, C. Peng, B. Poulter, D. Price, W. Riley, A. Sahoo, H. Tian, C. Tonitto, and H. Verbeeck. This data set provides standardized output variables for gross primary productivity (GPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), leaf area index (LAI), ecosystem respiration (Re), latent heat flux (LE), and sensible heat flux (H) from 24

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

202

Formation of a flux core spheromak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An alternate design for compact tori specifically of the spheromak type is studied. In this design the ‘‘flux core spheromak’’ [Nucl. Fusion 29 219 (1989)] the externally imposed bias field links the confinement region of closed flux surfaces. The advantages of this configuration are: (i) it enjoys greater stability to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes particularly the tilt and shift; (ii) it has a poloidal divertor and an amount of poloidal flux separating the closed flux surface region from the walls; and (iii) it might be sustained by helicity injection. Results are presented showing the dependence of the geometry on the distribution of bias flux on the conducting walls and showing the optimization of the 2?D formation scheme to minimize the contact of the plasma with coils electrodes and walls. This last topic involves taking advantage of current sheet formation and subsequent tearing as in formation of the MS spheromak [Phys. Fluids 28 3154 (1985)]. The parameters which can be varied to produce this favorable formation scheme via tearing rather than a formation that proceeds off the reversal coils are explored. In addition it is found that there is strong viscous heating of the ions in this early reconnection phase.

John M. Finn; Parvez N. Guzdar

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop  

SciTech Connect

The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF BOILING HEAT CONVECTION IN A FRACTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF BOILING HEAT CONVECTION IN A FRACTURE A REPORT SUBMITTED between heat conduction and heat convection with boiling flow in a rock fracture. An experimental coefficient. This coefficient is the proportionality factor between the heat flux to a fracture surface

Stanford University

205

Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they loose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field which is estimated as decay index (n). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are therefore good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by the comparison of observed filament heights with...

Filippov, Boris; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Uddin, Wahab

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Geothermal Heat Pumps- Heating Mode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In winter, fluid passing through this vertical, closed loop system is warmed by the heat of the earth; this heat is then transferred to the building.

207

Acoustic emission from magnetic flux tubes in the solar network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the excitation of waves in the magnetic network of the Sun due to footpoint motions of a magnetic flux tube. We consider motions that typically mimic granular buffeting and vortex flows and implement them as driving motions at the base of the flux tube. The driving motions generates various MHD modes within the flux tube and acoustic waves in the ambient medium. The response of the upper atmosphere to the underlying photospheric motion and the role of the flux tube in channeling the waves is investigated. We compute the acoustic energy flux in the various wave modes across different boundary layers defined by the plasma and magnetic field parameters and examine the observational implications for chromospheric and coronal heating.

Vigeesh, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Reduced-Order Model of a Chevron Plate Heat Exchanger for Rapid Thermal Management by Using Thermo-Chemical Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat flux demands for electronics cooling applications are quickly approaching the limits of conventional thermal management systems. To meet the demand of next generation electronics, a means for rejecting high heat fluxes at low temperatures...

Niedbalski, Nicholas

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

209

Design of a flux buffer based on the flux shuttle  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the design considerations for a flux buffer based on the flux-shuttle concept. Particular attention is given to the issues of flux popping, stability of operation and saturation levels for a large input. Modulation techniques used in order to minimize 1/f noise, in addition to offsets are also analyzed. Advantages over conventional approaches using a SQUID for a flux buffer are discussed. Results of computer simulations are presented.

Gershenson, M. (Naval Coastal Systems Lab., Panama City, FL (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Modulation of near-field heat transfer between two gratings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study of near-field heat transfer between two uniaxial anisotropic planar structures. We investigate how the distance and relative orientation (with respect to their optical axes) between the objects affect the heat flux. In particular, we show that by changing the angle between the optical axes it is possible in certain cases to modulate the net heat flux up to 90% at room temperature, and discuss possible applications of such a strong effect.

Svend-Age Biehs; Felipe S. S. Rosa; Philippe Ben-Abdallah

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Effect of Inaccuracies in Weather-Ship Data on Bulk-Derived Estimates of Flux, Stability and Sea-Surface Roughness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analytical error analysis (or sensitivity study) is performed for the momentum, heat, and humidity flux estimates made from weather-ship observations by using the bulk flux method. Bulk-derived stability and roughness errors are also examined. ...

Theodore V. Blanc

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

High flux compact neutron generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Flux Compact Neutron Generators ‡ J. Reijonen §,1 , T-Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at thevoltage feed through of the generator is shown in Fig. 4.

Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Flux, Volume 1, Issue 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

&24; Table of Contents flux a publication of the national high magnetic field laboratory PG. 3 ... What is Flux? An introduction to our new publication. PG. 4 ... How Magnet...

214

ASME Journal of Heat Transfer Vol. 121(3), pp.646-652, 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;3 Introduction Buoyancy-induced convective fluid flow with and without phase change heat transfer1 ASME Journal of Heat Transfer Vol. 121(3), pp.646-652, 1999 Variations of Buoyancy-Induced Mass-change heat transfer in a vertical porous tube heated at a constant heat flux. Experiments were carried out

Zhao, Tianshou

215

Thermosolutal convection from a discrete heat and solute source in a vertical porous annulus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the fluid flow and heat and mass transfer rates. The porous annulus is subject to heat and mass fluxes from, buoyancy ratio and radius ratio are investigated on the flow patterns, and heat and mass transfer rates and the rates of heat and mass transfer strongly depend on the location of the heat and solute source. Further

Lopez, John M.

216

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

217

Mixed Layer Lateral Eddy Fluxes Mediated by Air-Sea Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modulation of air–sea heat fluxes by geostrophic eddies due to the stirring of temperature at the sea surface is discussed and quantified. It is argued that the damping of eddy temperature variance by such air–sea ...

Shuckburgh, Emily

218

Measured and Parameterized Energy Fluxes Estimated for Atlantic Transects of R/V Polarstern  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sensible and latent heat fluxes were estimated from turbulence measurements gathered during several Atlantic Ocean transects of the research vessel (R/V) Polarstern. The inertial dissipation method was used to analyze the data. Resulting bulk ...

Karl Bumke; Michael Schlundt; John Kalisch; Andreas Macke; Henry Kleta

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

RECENT ADVANCES IN HEAT TRANSFER TO HELIUM 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

509 RECENT ADVANCES IN HEAT TRANSFER TO HELIUM 1 C. JOHANNES Service de Recherches Appliquées, L boiling, forced convection heat transfer. Relations between critical nucleate flux and some parameters confronted with the problem of calculating the heat transfer from the helium to the superconducting material

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

220

The Heat Budget of a Body of Water of Varying Volume  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

internal energy of the system is equal to the net flux of heat ... The internal energy is represented by the temperature .... unit time. The conversion factor is the.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Latent heat fluxes through nano-engineered porous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro- and nano-scale truss architectures provide mechanical strength, light weight, and breatheability in polymer barriers. Liquid evaporation and transport of resulting vapor through truss voids (pores) cools surfaces ...

Traum, Matthew J. (Matthew Jason), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) project was initiated to determine basic feasibility of designing, constructing, and installing in a host irradiation facility, an experimental vehicle that can replicate with reasonable fidelity the fast-flux test environment needed for fuels and materials irradiation testing for advanced reactor concepts. Originally called the Gas Test Loop (GTL) project, the activity included (1) determination of requirements that must be met for the GTL to be responsive to potential users, (2) a survey of nuclear facilities that may successfully host the GTL, (3) conceptualizing designs for hardware that can support the needed environments for neutron flux intensity and energy spectrum, atmosphere, flow, etc. needed by the experimenters, and (4) examining other aspects of such a system, such as waste generation and disposal, environmental concerns, needs for additional infrastructure, and requirements for interfacing with the host facility. A revised project plan included requesting an interim decision, termed CD-1A, that had objectives of' establishing the site for the project at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), deferring the CD 1 application, and authorizing a research program that would resolve the most pressing technical questions regarding GTL feasibility, including issues relating to the use of booster fuel in the ATR. Major research tasks were (1) hydraulic testing to establish flow conditions through the booster fuel, (2) mini-plate irradiation tests and post-irradiation examination to alleviate concerns over corrosion at the high heat fluxes planned, (3) development and demonstration of booster fuel fabrication techniques, and (4) a review of the impact of the GTL on the ATR safety basis. A revised cooling concept for the apparatus was conceptualized, which resulted in renaming the project to the BFFL. Before the subsequent CD-1 approval request could be made, a decision was made in April 2006 that further funding for the project would be suspended. Remaining funds have been used to prepare and irradiate mini-plates of the proposed booster fuel. The current baseline design is for a set of three test positions inside an in-pile tube with a thermal neutron absorber and heat sink made of aluminum mixed with hafnium. Operating the ATR at power levels needed to achieve the required fast flux will result in an estimated increase in ATR fuel consumption between 15 and 20% above present rates and a reduction in the time between fuel replacements. Preliminary safety analyses conducted have indicted safe operation of the ATR with the GTL under normal, abnormal, and postulated accident conditions. More comprehensive analyses are needed.

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Project Staff

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Radiative heating rate The heating rate due to the divergence of long and shortwave radiative flux. Categories Radiometric, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTSEDASSNDCLASS1 : Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS

224

Heat Transfer Coefficient Distribution in the Furnace of a 300MWe CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Properly understanding and calculating the distributions of heat flux and heat transfer coefficient (?) in the furnace is important in designing a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, especially with supercrit...

P. Zhang; J. F. Lu; H. R. Yang; J. S. Zhang…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09/08/2006 to 10/24/2006) by the eddy covariance (EC) technique at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill (HLTK), Mammoth Mountain, CA, a site with complex terrain and high, spatially heterogeneous CO2 emission rates. EC CO2 fluxes ranged from 218 to 3500 g m- 2 d- 1 (mean = 1346 g m- 2 d- 1). Using footprint modeling, EC CO2 fluxes were compared to CO2 fluxes measured by

226

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

227

Small break LOCA analysis of the ONRL high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect

A digital simulation program, HFIRSYS, was developed using MMS to analyze small break loss of coolant events in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor. The code evaluates the response of the primary reactor system including automatic controls actions resulting from breaks in auxiliary piping connected to the primary. The primary output of the code is the margin to the onset of nucleate boiling expressed as a ratio of heat flux which would cause boiling to the current hot channel heat flux. A description of the model, validation results and a sample transient are presented.

Wilson, T.L. Jr.; Cook, D.H.; Sozer, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Heat Stroke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stress, from exertion or hot environments, places stress, from exertion or hot environments, places workers at risk for illnesses such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Heat Stroke A condition that occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, and can cause death or permanent disability. Symptoms â–  High body temperature â–  Confusion â–  Loss of coordination â–  Hot, dry skin or profuse sweating â–  Throbbing headache â–  Seizures, coma First Aid â–  Request immediate medical assistance. â–  Move the worker to a cool, shaded area. â–  Remove excess clothing and apply cool water to their body. Heat Exhaustion The body's response to an excessive loss of water and salt, usually through sweating. Symptoms â–  Rapid heart beat â–  Heavy sweating â–  Extreme weakness or fatigue â– 

229

Materials Compatibility and Aging for Flux and Cleaner Combinations.  

SciTech Connect

A materials study of high reliability electronics cleaning is presented here. In Phase 1, mixed type substrates underwent a condensed contaminants application to view a worst- case scenario for unremoved flux with cleaning agent residue for parts in a silicone oil filled environment. In Phase 2, fluxes applied to copper coupons and to printed wiring boards underwent gentle cleaning then accelerated aging in air at 65% humidity and 30 O C. Both sets were aged for 4 weeks. Contaminants were no-clean (ORL0), water soluble (ORH1 liquid and ORH0 paste), and rosin (RMA; ROL0) fluxes. Defluxing agents were water, solvents, and engineered aqueous defluxers. In the first phase, coupons had flux applied and heated, then were placed in vials of oil with a small amount of cleaning agent and additional coupons. In the second phase, pairs of copper coupons and PWB were hand soldered by application of each flux, using tin-lead solder in a strip across the coupon or a set of test components on the PWB. One of each pair was cleaned in each cleaning agent, the first with a typical clean, and the second with a brief clean. Ionic contamination residue was measured before accelerated aging. After aging, substrates were removed and a visual record of coupon damage made, from which a subjective rank was applied for comparison between the various flux and defluxer combinations; more corrosion equated to higher rank. The ORH1 water soluble flux resulted in the highest ranking in both phases, the RMA flux the least. For the first phase, in which flux and defluxer remained on coupons, the aqueous defluxers led to worse corrosion. The vapor phase cleaning agents resulted in the highest ranking in the second phase, in which there was no physical cleaning. Further study of cleaning and rinsing parameters will be required.

Archuleta, Kim; Piatt, Rochelle

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Numerical Simulations of Bubble Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Pool Boiling--Including the Effects of Conjugate Conduction, Level of Gravity, and Noncondensable Gas Dissolved in the Liquid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow boiling. ” Journal of heat transfer, 124(4), 4. Basu,Dhir, V. K. (2005). “Wall heat flux partitioning duringdevelopment. ” Journal of Heat Transfer, 127(2), 5. Carey

Aktinol, Eduardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Heat Transfer -1 A satellite in space orbits the sun. The satellite can be approximated as a flat plate with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Transfer - 1 A satellite in space orbits the sun. The satellite can be approximated as a flat plate with dimensions and properties given below. (a) Calculate the solar heat flux (W/m2 is at a distance where the solar heat flux (as defined above) is 500 W/m2 , and the flat plate is oriented

Virginia Tech

232

Geographical Coincidence of High Heat Flow, High Seismicity, and Upwelling, with Hydrocarbon Deposits, Phosphorites, Evaporites, and Uranium Ores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sea and seismicity and geothermal heat flux. We suggest...upwelling caused by the geothermal heat (2), which brings...sedimentary rocks. High geothermal heat fluxes correlate...Lawrence River, as well as a fourth line along...Arizona, Montana, New Mexico, and Utah. Lignites...

L. M. Libby; W. F. Libby

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the Ecliptic is known...Helios, Ulysses, and Wind...covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind....

G. Le Chat; K. Issautier; N. Meyer-Vernet

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Heat Transfer to the Structure during the Fire   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The post-flashover Fire Test One of a furnished room in Dalmarnock provides a wealth of information including measurements in both the gas phase and on compartment boundaries (Chapter 3). Total heat fluxes at a number ...

Jowsey, Allan; Torero, Jose L; Lane, Barbara

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

Influence of Infrared Radiation on Attic Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

roof temperatures. It was found that a radiant barrier such as aluminum foil can reduce the heat flux significantly. Experimental results were compared to a Three-Region approximate solution developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL). The model...

Katipamula, S.; Turner, W. D.; Murphy, W. E.; O'Neal, D. L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Heat collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Heat collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, M.A.

1981-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

238

45 (2008-5) Adjoint-Based Shape Optimization of a Heat-Exchanger Passage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conduction is employed. The cost function is defined as a sum of pressure loss and heat transfer, Distribution of non-dimensional heat flux : (c) Initial shape, (d) 6th shape, (e) Cross section of the bottomF244 45 (2008-5) - 623 - Adjoint-Based Shape Optimization of a Heat-Exchanger Passage with Heat

Kasagi, Nobuhide

239

~) Pergamon Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer. Vol. 39, No. 13, pp. 2653-2662, 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the grinding process is presented in this paper. Heat transfer models for the abrasive grain, fluid. Lavine and Jen [4, 5] presented a model to simulate the heat transfer to the workpiece, wheel, and fluid or the convection heat transfer coefficient of the grinding fluid. They assumed that the heat flux into the work

Zhang, Yuwen

240

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING Ying He, Masahiro role in nucleate and transition boiling heat transfer at high heat flux. Many experiments have been in the numerical simulation of boiling heat transfer. In this study, based on the macrolayer evaporation model

Maruyama, Shigeo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE HEATING IN A TOROIDAL OCTUPOLE J. C. Sprott and J. D. Barter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE HEATING IN A TOROIDAL OCTUPOLE J. C. Sprott and J. D. Barter May 1976 at the ion cyclotron frequency (2.6 MHz) has been used to heat the ions from for a high neutral re flux are observed to accompany the heating. Ion cyclotron resonance heating

Sprott, Julien Clinton

242

Condensation heat transfer in square, triangular, and semi-circular mini-channels Melanie Derby a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condensation heat transfer in square, triangular, and semi-circular mini-channels Melanie Derby: Condensation Heat transfer Minichannel Channel shape Correlation a b s t r a c t Condensation heat transfer significant effects on the condensation process, even at lower mass fluxes, while saturation pressure, heat

Peles, Yoav

243

Heat transfer characteristics of laminar methane/air flame impinging normal to a cylindrical surface  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study has been conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics of methane/air laminar flames impinging normal to a cylindrical surface. Effects of variations in the values of Reynolds number (Re = 600-1300), equivalence ratio ({phi} = 0.8-1.3), dimensionless separation distance (H/d = 1-5), and burner diameter to cylinder diameter ratio (d/D = 0.0538-0.1076) have been investigated. Three important configurations, viz., flame inner reaction zone far away, just touching and intercepted by the impingement surface, were examined in detail. High stagnation point heat fluxes were obtained when tip of the flame inner reaction zone just touched the target surface. Stagnation point heat fluxes were either zero or negative when the inner reaction zone was intercepted by the impingement surface. An off-stagnation peak in heat flux was obtained at moderate separation distances above the flame tip. Both stagnation point and peak heat fluxes increased with Re when the inner reaction zone length was less than the separation distance. Heat fluxes in the wall-jet region were high at high Re. Maximum heat fluxes were obtained for initially fuel-rich mixture conditions due to entrainment of the surrounding air. Smaller burner diameters produced high heat flux at the stagnation region for fixed Reynolds number and opposite trends were seen in the wall-jet region. A secondary rise in stagnation point heat flux was obtained at larger separation distances. This secondary rise in heat flux was quite significant for larger burner diameters and at low flow rates. Correlations were developed for stagnation point heat flux. Results were also compared with flat plate under identical operating conditions. (author)

Chander, Subhash; Ray, Anjan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description This data product contains atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

245

The Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Las Vegas, Nevada Introduction We have used a single-column model (SCM) to examine the sensitivity of fundamental quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameterizations of clouds and cloud microphysics. When an SCM, which consists of one isolated column of a global atmospheric model, is forced with observational estimates of horizontal advection terms, the parameterizations within the SCM produce time-dependent fields which can be

246

SHOCKS AND THERMAL CONDUCTION FRONTS IN RETRACTING RECONNECTED FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

We present a model for plasma heating produced by time-dependent, spatially localized reconnection within a flare current sheet separating skewed magnetic fields. The reconnection creates flux tubes of new connectivity which subsequently retract at Alfvenic speeds from the reconnection site. Heating occurs in gas-dynamic shocks (GDSs) which develop inside these tubes. Here we present generalized thin flux tube equations for the dynamics of reconnected flux tubes, including pressure-driven parallel dynamics as well as temperature-dependent, anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity. The evolution of tubes embedded in a uniform, skewed magnetic field, following reconnection in a patch, is studied through numerical solutions of these equations, for solar coronal conditions. Even though viscosity and thermal conductivity are negligible in the quiet solar corona, the strong GDSs generated by compressing plasma inside reconnected flux tubes generate large velocity and temperature gradients along the tube, rendering the diffusive processes dominant. They determine the thickness of the shock that evolves up to a steady state value, although this condition may not be reached in the short times involved in a flare. For realistic solar coronal parameters, this steady state shock thickness might be as long as the entire flux tube. For strong shocks at low Prandtl numbers, typical of the solar corona, the GDS consists of an isothermal sub-shock where all the compression and cooling occur, preceded by a thermal front where the temperature increases and most of the heating occurs. We estimate the length of each of these sub-regions and the speed of their propagation.

Guidoni, S. E.; Longcope, D. W., E-mail: guidoni@physics.montana.ed [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Solar wind energy and momentum from the emergence of new small?scale flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent Hinode observations have shown the remarkably rapid reconfiguration of the Sun’s small?scale magnetic flux. On the size?scale of granules solar magnetic flux is reconfigured over only 10 minutes. On the larger scales of supergranules magnetic flux is continually and rapidly reconfigured over about a day. We discuss how the reconfiguration processes observed by Hinode TRACE and SOHO may be related. The emergence of new magnetic flux continually drives reconnection between smaller emerging loops and overlying closed or open fields. Ultimately the energy and momentum from this emerging flux is converted into kinetic energy to drive the solar wind and thermal conductive and radiative energy in closed loops. Thus we describe the relationship between emerging small?scale magnetic flux and the momentum and energy that drives the solar wind and heats the corona.

N. A. Schwadron

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

249

Flux, Vol. 1, Issue 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

&24; flux a publication of the national high magnetic field laboratory Introduction &24; In a weak economy, U.S. research funding tends to become more heavily weighted toward applied...

250

Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ livingPattern : Room ­? behaviour; setTemp : Room ­? num; heatSwitchOn, heatSwitchOff, userReset : simple

Day, Nancy

251

AOSC 621AOSC 621 Radiative Heating/CoolingRadiative Heating/Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Why drop off near sfc? 4 #12;Net flux Net flux: F = F+ - F- 1 2 F-(1) F+(1) F-(2) F+(2) Net energy at the top of the atmosphere is zero. Then we can write 1' ' )',( )'()0,()( 0 * dz dz zzdT zBzTBzF z z F F · The heating rate at z is defined as follows: )( )( d zdF zH net four termsofconsistwilland dz A

Li, Zhanqing

252

Plasmoids as magnetic flux ropes  

SciTech Connect

Observational constraints on the magnetic topology and orientation of plasmoids is examined using a magnetic field model. The authors develop a magnetic flux rope model to examine whether principal axis analysis (PAA) of magnetometer signatures from a single satellite pass is sufficient to determine the magnetic topology of plasmoids and if plasmoid observations are best explained by the flux rope, closed loop, or large-amplitude wave picture. Satellite data are simulated by extracting the magnetic field along a path through the model of a magnetic flux rope. They then examine the results using PAA. They find that the principal axis directions (and therefore the interpretation of structure orientation) is highly dependent on several parameters including the satellite trajectory through the structure. Because of this they conclude that PAA of magnetometer data from a single satellite pass is insufficient to differentiate between magnetic closed loop and flux rope models. They also compare the model results to ISEE 3 magnetometer data of plasmoid events in various coordinate frames including principal axis and geocentric solar magnetospheric. They find that previously identified plasmoid events that have been explained as closed loop structures can also be modeled as flux ropes. They also searched the literature for previously reported flux rope and closed loop plasmoid events to examine if these structures had any similarities and/or differences. The results of the modeling efforts and examination of both flux rope and plasmoid events lead them to favor the flux rope model of plasmoid formation, as it is better able to unify the observations of various magnetic structures observed by ISEE 3.

Moldwin, M.B.; Hughes, W.J. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

254

Heat Transfer Enhancement: Second Generation Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stant temperature difference or one-ninth the temp erature difference at a constant heat flux compared to plain tubes. 7.5 frn/em lin tube Atter flanening ltn tips Some manufacturers also employ tube-side en hancement for water flowing...

Bergles, A. E.; Webb, R. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Dt2boool2> Nora Heat Transfer Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dt2boool2> Nora Heat Transfer Correlations in Nuclear Reactor Safety Calculations VW CORRELATIONS IN NUCLEAR REACTOR SAFETY CALCULATIONS SAK-5 H. Abel-Larsen, Ris� A. J. T. J. A. K. Olsen.1. Critical heat flux 103 B4.2. Transition boiling 109 APPENDIX C. DISPERSED FLOW 129 CI. Droplet generation

256

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the Wilkins Ice Shelf collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content is rising rapidlyHigh-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1 conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

Gille, Sarah T.

257

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­27 sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

Gille, Sarah T.

258

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A-latitude surface fluxes will require close collaboration among meteorologists,33 oceanographers, ice physicists

Gille, Sarah T.

259

Thermality of the Hawking flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is the Hawking flux "thermal"? Unfortunately, the answer to this seemingly innocent question depends on a number of often unstated, but quite crucial, technical assumptions built into modern (mis-)interpretations of the word "thermal". The original 1850's notions of thermality --- based on classical thermodynamic reasoning applied to idealized "black bodies" or "lamp black surfaces" --- when supplemented by specific basic quantum ideas from the early 1900's, immediately led to the notion of the black-body spectrum, (the Planck-shaped spectrum), but "without" any specific assumptions or conclusions regarding correlations between the quanta. Many (not all) modern authors (often implicitly and unintentionally) add an extra, and quite unnecessary, assumption that there are no correlations in the black-body radiation; but such usage is profoundly ahistorical and dangerously misleading. Specifically, the Hawking flux from an evaporating black hole, (just like the radiation flux from a leaky furnace or a burning lump of coal), is only "approximately" Planck-shaped over a bounded frequency range. Standard physics (phase space and adiabaticity effects) explicitly bound the frequency range over which the Hawking flux is "approximately" Planck-shaped from both above and below --- the Hawking flux is certainly not exactly Planckian, and there is no compelling physics reason to assume the Hawking photons are uncorrelated.

Matt Visser

2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Reynolds, Gerald D. (Tijeras, NM); Steinfort, Terry D. (Tijeras, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Including radiative heat transfer and reaction quenching in modeling a Claus plant waste heat boiler  

SciTech Connect

Due to increasingly stringent sulfur emission regulations, improvements are necessary in the modified Claus process. A recently proposed model by Nasato et al. for the Claus plant waste heat boiler (WHB) is improved by including radiative heat transfer, which yields significant changes in the predicted heat flux and the temperature profile along the WHB tube, leading to a faster quenching of chemical reactions. For the WHB considered, radiation accounts for approximately 20% of the heat transferred by convection alone. More importantly, operating the WHB at a higher gas mass flux is shown to enhance reaction quenching, resulting in a doubling of the predicted hydrogen flow rate. This increase in hydrogen flow rate is sufficient to completely meet the hydrogen requirement of the H[sub 2]S recovery process considered, which would eliminate the need for a hydrogen plant.

Karan, K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Behie, L.A. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Finite ballooning angle effects on ion temperature gradient driven mode in gyrokinetic flux tube simulations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents effects of finite ballooning angles on linear ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven mode and associated heat and momentum flux in Gyrokinetic flux tube simulation GENE. It is found that zero ballooning angle is not always the one at which the linear growth rate is maximum. The ITG mode acquires a short wavelength (SW) branch (k{sub ?}?{sub i}?>?1) when growth rates maximized over all ballooning angles are considered. However, the SW branch disappears on reducing temperature gradient showing characteristics of zero ballooning angle SWITG in case of extremely high temperature gradient. Associated heat flux is even with respect to ballooning angle and maximizes at nonzero ballooning angle while the parallel momentum flux is odd with respect to the ballooning angle.

Singh, Rameswar, E-mail: rameswar.singh@lpp.polytechnique.fr [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Brunner, S. [CRPP, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [CRPP, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Characterisation of local ICRF heat loads on the JET ILW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating, enhanced heat-fluxes are commonly observed on some plasma facing components close to the antennas. Experiments have recently been carried out on JET with the new ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) to characterize the heat flux to the JET ICRF antennas. Using Infra-Red thermography and thermal models of the tiles, heat-fluxes were evaluated from the surface temperature increase during the RF phase of L-mode plasmas. The maximum observed heat-flux intensity was ~ 4.5 MW/m2 when operating with -{\\pi}/2 current drive strap phasing at power level of 2MW per antenna and with a 4 cm distance between the plasma and the outer limiters. Heat-fluxes are reduced when using dipole strap phasing. The fraction of ICRF power deposited on the antenna limiters or septa was in the range 2-10% for dipole phasing and 10-20% with +/-{\\pi}/2 phasing.

Jacquet, P; Colas, L; Arnoux, G; Bobkov, V; Corre, Y; Devaux, S; Gardarein, J-L; Gauthier, E; Graham, M; Lerche, E; Mayoral, M-L; Monakhov, I; Rimini, F; Sirinelli, A; Van Eester, D; contributors, JET EFDA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Geothermal district heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Ten district heating demonstration projects and their present status are described. The projects are Klamath County YMCA, Susanville District Heating, Klamath Falls District Heating, Reno Salem Plaza Condominium, El Centro Community Center Heating/Cooling, Haakon School and Business District Heating, St. Mary's Hospital, Diamond Ring Ranch, Pagosa Springs District Heating, and Boise District Heating.

Budney, G.S.; Childs, F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Beta ray flux measuring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Berry-Phase-Induced Heat Pumping and Its Impact on the Fluctuation Theorem Jie Ren (),1,2,* Peter Hanggi,2,3,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Berry-Phase-Induced Heat Pumping and Its Impact on the Fluctuation Theorem Jie Ren (),1,2,* Peter heat baths. We demonstrate that the pumped heat typically exhibits a Berry-phase effect in providing-dependent manipulations various molecular heat pumps have been proposed to efficiently control heat flux against thermal

Li, Baowen

269

Water and Space Heating Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the design and operation of the Trane Weathertron III Heat Pump Water Heating System and includes a comparison of features and performance to other domestic water heating systems. Domestic water is generally provided through...

Kessler, A. F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Open Magnetic Flux of the Sun. I. Transport by Reconnections with Coronal Loops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic field of the Sun includes a component that opens into and creates the heliospheric magnetic field, the so-called open magnetic flux of the Sun. Open flux is transported along the solar surface by random convective motions in the photosphere and also by reconnection with coronal loops and the subsequent displacement of the open field lines. A model is developed to describe the interactions through reconnection of open magnetic field lines and smaller coronal loops on the quiet Sun. The displacement of open field lines by reconnection with such loops can be described as a diffusive process, and the model yields the appropriate diffusion coefficient. The model also relates the total diffusive transport of open flux, as a result of reconnection with loops and random convective motions, to a basic solar parameter, the rate of emergence of magnetic flux per unit surface area. This in turn provides an explanation for the formation of coronal holes: accumulations of open flux. The diffusion process will tend to accumulate open flux into regions where the rate of emergence of new magnetic flux is a local minimum. It is also shown that the parameters used in this model are consistent with and can interrelate a variety of different observations. This work serves as the basis for subsequent papers in which the distribution of open magnetic flux on the Sun and its evolution during the solar cycle is determined, and the transport of open magnetic flux is related to the heating and acceleration of the solar wind.

L. A. Fisk

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

2, 10671085, 2005 Flux measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.50 m. The study site consisted of grass (10% of area), bean5 (15%), corn (15%) and rice (60 in the components of the surface energy balance and in CO2 flux. Results show that the pattern of energy parti- tion suddenly increased after thunderstorm events. We examined the energy budget closure and found

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

273

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Anthropogenic and Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Fluxes From Typical Land Uses in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensor (Apogee) to measure incoming solar radiation, a heat flux plate sensor installed on a nearby shingle roof, and a rain gauge. Raw 3-D wind data and data from the gas analyzers were recorded in binary format on a CR... photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensor (Apogee) to measure incoming solar radiation, a heat flux plate sensor installed on a nearby shingle roof, and a rain gauge. Raw 3-D wind data and data from the gas analyzers were recorded in binary format on a CR...

Werner, Nicholas D

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

275

Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

A. C. Hayes; Gerard Jungman

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Heat transfer and heat exchangers reference handbook  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with an understanding of the basic concepts of heat transfer and the operation of heat exchangers.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

278

Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source  

SciTech Connect

A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes {Gamma}{sub p}10{sup 23} m{sup -3} s{sup -1}, and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of {approx}10 MW/m{sup 2}. An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength |B| in the antenna region up to {approx}0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in He and 2.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial |B| profile.

Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

279

Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source  

SciTech Connect

A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Gamma(p) > 10(23) M-3 s(-1), and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of similar to 10 MW/m(2). An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength vertical bar B vertical bar in the antenna region up to similar to 0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3 x 10(19) M-3 in He and 2.5 x 10(19) m(-3) in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial vertical bar B vertical bar profile.

Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Sparks, Dennis O [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, Phillip J. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, P.J.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

282

Identifying the top of the tropical tropopause layer from vertical mass flux analysis and CALIPSO lidar cloud observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

defined as the level of zero net radiative heating, which occurs near 14.5­15 km [e.g., Folkins et al layer (TTL) by analyzing the vertical mass flux profile based on radiative transfer calculations will rise into the stratosphere. Thus convection has to transport air at least to the zero radiative heating

Hochberg, Michael

283

J1.15 PARAMETERIZING THE TURBULENT SURFACE FLUXES OVER SUMMER SEA ICE Edgar L Andreas1*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the surface heat budget for that year at several sites around the SHEBA ice camp (Andreas et al. 1999; Persson1 of 9 J1.15 PARAMETERIZING THE TURBULENT SURFACE FLUXES OVER SUMMER SEA ICE Edgar L Andreas1* , P to study the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) lasted for a year (Uttal et al. 2002). Our

Persson, Ola

284

Submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Emission measure distribution in loops impulsively heated at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Emission measure distribution in loops impulsively heated balance under the e#ects of steady heating, heat flux and radiative losses, with the magnetic field only by the evidence of sharply peaked emission measure distributions in active stars, and by the claims of isothermal

285

7th World Conference on Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i #12;ExHFT-7 7th World Conference on Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics Conference on Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics 28 June ­ 03 July 2009, Krakow environment of high surface and volumetric heating, intense radiation fluxes, strong 3-component magnetic

Abdou, Mohamed

286

Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in rotor-stator cavities with throughflow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in rotor-stator cavities with throughflow S in a rotor-stator cavity subjected to a superimposed throughflow with heat transfer. Nu- merical predictions field from the heat transfer process. The turbulent flux is approximated by a gradient hypothesis

Boyer, Edmond

287

Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions by Carl, Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions KTH Nuclear Reactor power is limited by a phenomenon called critical heat flux (CHF). It appears as a sudden detoriation

Haviland, David

288

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

Heat conduction in relativistic neutral gases revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The kinetic theory of dilute gases to first order in the gradients yields linear relations between forces and fluxes. The heat flux for the relativistic gas has been shown to be related not only to the temperature gradient but also to the density gradient in the representation where number density, temperature and hydrodynamic velocity are the independent state variables. In this work we show the calculation of the corresponding transport coefficients from the full Boltzmann equation and compare the magnitude of the relativistic correction.

A. L. Garcia-Perciante; A. R. Mendez

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Relating magnetic reconnection to coronal heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is clear that the solar corona is begin heated and that coronal magnetic fields undergo reconnection all the time. Here we attempt to show that these two facts are in fact related - i.e. coronal reconnection generates heat. This attempt must address the fact that topological change of field lines does not automatically generate heat. We present one case of flux emergence where we have measured the rate of coronal magnetic reconnection and the rate of energy dissipation in the corona. The ratio of these two, $P/\\dot{\\Phi}$, is a current comparable to the amount of current expected to flow along the boundary separating the emerged flux from the pre-existing flux overlying it. We can generalize this relation to the overall corona in quiet Sun or in active regions. Doing so yields estimates for the contribution to corona heating from magnetic reconnection. These estimated rates are comparable to the amount required to maintain the corona at its observed temperature.

Longcope, Dana W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Segmented heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

Baldwin, Darryl Dean (Lafayette, IN); Willi, Martin Leo (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott Byron (Metamara, IL); Timmons, Kristine Ann (Chillicothe, IL)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model and Observations During the Storm-Scale Observations Regional Measurement Program-Fronts Experiment Systems Test 1992 J. Dudhia and S. P. Oncley Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division Atmospheric Technology Division National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction Mesoscale model 5 (MM5) is being used as a data assimilation tool for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. There is a need to verify that the model physics is consistent with observations under a range of conditions. Surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum are a particular area of uncertainty in the model owing to their dependence on surface properties, some of which are time-dependent. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

293

Enhancement of pool boiling heat transfer with electrohydrodynamics and its fundamental study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and 10kV. To conduct this study, an existing low pressure pool boiling apparatus was modified and another high pressure apparatus was designed and built. The fluids were tested on the smooth tube at operating temperatures of 4'C and 20'C, and 19 fins... TWl Tvvo Heat flux of EHD enhancement of boiling (W/m ) Total heat flux with EHD at 10kV (W/m ) Total heat flux with no EHD (W/m ) Minimum cavity mouth radius (m) Rayleigh number Fluid temperature ('C) Pool Saturation temperature ('C) Tube...

Raghupathi, Sri Laxmi Priya

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Solar Glare and Flux Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SGFMT Home SGFMT Home Register Glare Analysis Solar Glare Hazard Analysis SGHAT 1.0 (old) Empirical Glare Analysis Analytical Glare Analysis PHLUX Mapping Reflectivity Calculator References Contact Us Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tools Measurement of reflected solar irradiance is receiving significant attention by industry, military, and government agencies to assess potential impacts of glint and glare from growing numbers of solar power installations around the world. In addition, characterization of the incident solar flux distribution on central receivers for concentrating solar power applications is important to monitor and maintain system performance. This website contains tools to evaluate solar glare and receiver irradiance. Register to access the tools Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

295

HEATING 7. 1 user's manual  

SciTech Connect

HEATING is a FORTRAN program designed to solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three- dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heating generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-boundary or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General graybody radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING is variably dimensioned and utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution (for one-dimensional or two-dimensional problems), and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method (which for some circumstances allows a time step greater than the CEP stability criterion). The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

Childs, K.W.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

HEATING AND COOLING PROTOSTELLAR DISKS  

SciTech Connect

We examine heating and cooling in protostellar disks using three-dimensional radiation-MHD calculations of a patch of the Solar nebula at 1 AU, employing the shearing-box and flux-limited radiation diffusion approximations. The disk atmosphere is ionized by stellar X-rays, well coupled to magnetic fields, and sustains a turbulent accretion flow driven by magnetorotational instability, while the interior is resistive and magnetically dead. The turbulent layers are heated by absorbing the light from the central star and by dissipating the magnetic fields. They are optically thin to their own radiation and cool inefficiently. The optically thick interior in contrast is heated only weakly, by re-emission from the atmosphere. The interior is colder than a classical viscous model and isothermal. The magnetic fields support an extended atmosphere that absorbs the starlight 1.5 times higher than the hydrostatic viscous model. The disk thickness thus measures not the internal temperature, but the magnetic field strength. Fluctuations in the fields move the starlight-absorbing surface up and down. The height ranges between 13% and 24% of the radius over timescales of several orbits, with implications for infrared variability. The fields are buoyant, so the accretion heating occurs higher in the atmosphere than the stresses. The heating is localized around current sheets, caused by magnetorotational instability at lower elevations and by Parker instability at higher elevations. Gas in the sheets is heated above the stellar irradiation temperature, even though accretion is much less than irradiation power when volume averaged. The hot optically thin current sheets might be detectable through their line emission.

Hirose, S. [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showamachi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan); Turner, N. J., E-mail: shirose@jamstec.go.jp, E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Thermal neutron flux contours from criticality event  

SciTech Connect

The generation of thermal neutron flux contours from a criticality event is demonstrated for an idealized building with a criticality event in one of the rooms. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code is used to calculate the thermal neutron flux.

Carter, L.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

High-flux solar photon processes  

SciTech Connect

This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Relaxation of spheromak configurations with open flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relaxation of several kink unstable equilibria with open flux representative of spheromaks sustained by dc helicity injection is studied by means of three-dimensional resistivemagnetohydrodynamic simulations. No external driving is applied but the initial conditions are chosen to reproduce the current profiles existing in a gun driven spheromak which has a high current density in the open flux region and a low current density in the closed flux region. The growth and nonlinear saturation of various unstable modes the dynamo action which converts toroidal flux into poloidal flux and the evolution of the ? profile ( ? = ? 0 J ? B / B 2 ) are studied. An initial condition is found which results in a dynamo that produces enough poloidal flux to compensate the resistive losses occurred during a characteristic time of the instability. The flux amplification factor around which this case oscillates is consistent with existing experimental data. During the relaxation the central open flux tube develops a helical distortion and the closed flux surfaces are destroyed. After the relaxation event close flux surfaces form again but the final profiles are not fully relaxed and the central open flux tube remains distorted. The effect of the Lundquist number on the evolution and its impact on the required level of fluctuations are evaluated. Finally the dynamics of the system for different current levels in the open flux region is studied.

Pablo Luis García-Martínez; Ricardo Farengo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Today's Material Gauss' Law and Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the contents of the box, the box must contain zero net electric charge. Slide 27-31 #12;Gauss' Law and Flux: · The Concept of Flux · Calculating Electric Flux · Symmetry · Gauss's Law · Using Gauss's Law · Conductors that the box must contain net positive electric charge. Slide 27-29 #12;© 2013 Pearson Education, Inc

Ashlock, Dan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Numerical analysis of vapor flow in a micro heat pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be modeled as a classical blowing and suction problem, i. e. ?(00) = v(00) = o ?(I, p) = v(L0) = 0 ?(x, 0) = ?(x, H) = 0 i(x, 0) = v(x), v(x, H) = -i'(x) 0&x&I. , (2. 6) v(x, 0) = 0, v(x, H) = 0 I. , &x&(L, +L, ) i(x, 0) = -v(x), v(x, H) = v(x) (L, +L... are considerably smoother and appear more reasonable Figure 5. 6 presents the velocity vector which is under q=40W/cm2, H=0. 003m uniform heat flux linear heat flux 0 00 0 O'I 0 02 0. 03 0. 04 0. 05 0 06 x(m) Fig. 5. 2 Heat flux distribution influence...

Liu, Xiaoqin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Scale and deposits in high-heat-rejection engines  

SciTech Connect

Scaling under conditions very similar to those of a heavy-duty diesel engine cooling system was investigated using a newly designed, versatile test stand. The parameters included flow rate, heat flux, hardness, along with bulk fluid temperatures. The hot surface temperature, a critical parameter, was also measured. Results were interpreted in terms of the conditions in the boundary layer at the hot surface. Critical values of flow rate and heat flux existed for scaling under experimental conditions. A quantitative relationship of scale with heat flux and hardness was observed. Deposits produced from testing of different types of commercial coolants, including phosphate based and nonphosphate bases, were measured and compared with results from simple beaker tests.

Chen, Y.S.; Kershisnik, E.I. [Dober Group, Glenwood, IL (United States); Hudgens, R.D. [Fleetguard, Inc., Cookeville, TN (United States); Corbeels, C.L.; Zehr, R.L. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Neutron imaging of alkali metal heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature heat pipes are two-phase, capillary driven heat transfer devices capable of passively providing high thermal fluxes. Such a device using a liquid-metal coolant can be used as a solution for successful thermal management on hypersonic flight vehicles. Imaging of the liquid-metal coolant inside will provide valuable information in characterizing the detailed heat and mass transport. Neutron imaging possesses an inherent advantage from the fact that neutrons penetrate the heat pipe metal walls with very little attenuation, but are significantly attenuated by the liquid metal contained inside. Using the BT-2 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, preliminary efforts have been conducted on a nickel-sodium heat pipe. The contrast between the attenuated beam and the background is calculated to be approximately 3%. This low contrast requires sacrifice in spatial or temporal resolution so efforts have since been concentrated on lithium (Li) which has a substantially larger neutron attenuation cross section. Using the CG-1D beam line at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the first neutron images of high-temperature molybdenum (Mo)-Li heat pipes have been achieved. The relatively high neutron cross section of Li allows for the visualization of the Li working fluid inside the heat pipes. The evaporator region of a gravity assisted cylindrical heat pipe prototype 25 cm long was imaged from start-up to steady state operation up to approximately 900 C. In each corner of the square bore inside, the capillary action raises the Li meniscus above the bulk Li pool in the evaporator region. As the operational temperature changes, the meniscus shapes and the bulk meniscus height also changes. Furthermore, a three-dimensional tomographic image is also reconstructed from the total of 128 projection images taken 1.4o apart in which the Li had already cooled and solidified.

Kihm, Ken [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kirchoff, Eric [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Golden, Matt [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rosenfeld, J. [Thermacore Inc.; Rawal, S. [Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company; Pratt, D. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Walker, Lakeisha MH [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Floatable solar heat modules  

SciTech Connect

A floating solar heat module for swimming pools comprises a solid surface for conducting heat from the sun's rays to the water and further includes a solid heat storage member for continual heating even during the night. A float is included to maintain the solar heat module on the surface of the pool. The solid heat storage medium is a rolled metal disk which is sandwiched between top and bottom heat conducting plates, the top plate receiving the heat of the sun's rays through a transparent top panel and the bottom plate transferring the heat conducted through the top plate and rolled disk to the water.

Ricks, J.W.

1981-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gap Filling and Quality Assessment of CO2 and Water Vapour Fluxes above an Urban Area with Radial Basis Function Neural Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical turbulent fluxes of water vapour, carbon dioxide, and sensible heat were measured from 16 August to the 28 September 2006 near the city centre of Münster in north-west Germany. In comparison to result...

A. Schmidt; T. Wrzesinsky; O. Klemm

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Heat conduction: hyperbolic self-similar shock-waves in solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytic solutions for cylindrical thermal waves in solid medium is given based on the nonlinear hyperbolic system of heat flux relaxation and energy conservation equations. The Fourier-Cattaneo phenomenological law is generalized where the relaxation time and heat propagation coefficient have a general power law temperature dependence. From such laws one cannot form a second order parabolic or telegraph-type equation. We consider the original non-linear hyperbolic system itself with the self-similar Ansatz for the temperature distribution and for the heat flux. As results continuous and shock-wave solutions are presented. For physical establishment numerous materials with various temperature dependent heat conduction coefficients are mentioned.

Imre Ferenc Barna; Robert Kersner

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

307

The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences  

SciTech Connect

Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured trace gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].

Baldocch, Dennis [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley,; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; KOTEEN, LAURIE [University of California, Berkeley; VARGAS, RODRIGO [Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE); Agarwal, D.A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Heat Pump for High School Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Renewable Energy Resources and a Greener Future Vol.VIII-12-1 Heat Pump for High School Bathroom Heat Recovery Kunrong Huang Hanqing Wang Xiangjiang Zhou Associate professor Professor Professor School...

Huang, K.; Wang, H.; Zhou, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

An experimental and theoretical study of radiative and conductive heat transfer in nongray semitransparent media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One dimensional temperature profiles and heat fluxes within a slab of molten glass were measured experimentally. The glass slab was contained in a platinum foil lined ceramic tray inside a high temperature furnace. An ...

Eryou, N. Dennis

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effects of heat and mass transfer on the kinetics of CO oxidation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

KMC simulation. The gas-phase boundary layer domain is described using the grid-based Crank-Nicolson method. At each time step, the heat and mass fluxes between two...

311

Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low...

312

Boise City Geothermal District Heating District Heating Low Temperatur...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boise City Geothermal District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Boise City Geothermal District Heating District Heating...

313

San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility San Bernardino District Heating Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating...

314

Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

315

Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

316

Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Midland District Heating Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Midland,...

317

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership...

318

Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation covers typical sources of waste heat from process heating equipment, characteristics of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power.

319

Guide to Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Heat Pumps Work Using a heat exchanger, a geothermal heat pump can move heat from one space to another. In summer, the geothermal heat pump extracts heat from a building...

320

RADIATIVE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the effect of solar visible and infrared radiation on electrons in the Sun's atmosphere using a Monte Carlo simulation of the wave-particle interaction and conclude that sunlight provides at least 40% and possibly all of the power required to heat the corona, with the exception of dense magnetic flux loops. The simulation uses a radiation waveform comprising 100 frequency components spanning the solar blackbody spectrum. Coronal electrons are heated in a stochastic manner by low coherence solar electromagnetic radiation. The wave 'coherence time' and 'coherence volume' for each component is determined from optical theory. The low coherence of solar radiation allows moving electrons to gain energy from the chaotic wave field which imparts multiple random velocity 'kicks' to these particles causing their velocity distribution to broaden or heat. Monte Carlo simulations of broadband solar radiative heating on ensembles of 1000 electrons show heating at per particle levels of 4.0 x 10{sup -21} to 4.0 x 10{sup -20} W, as compared with non-loop radiative loss rates of {approx}1 x 10{sup -20} W per electron. Since radiative losses comprise nearly all of the power losses in the corona, sunlight alone can explain the elevated temperatures in this region. The volume electron heating rate is proportional to density, and protons are assumed to be heated either by plasma waves or through collisions with electrons.

Moran, Thomas G., E-mail: moran@grace.nascom.nasa.gov [Physics Department, Catholic University of America, 200 Hannan Hall, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High flux photon beam monitor  

SciTech Connect

We have designed two photon beam position monitors for use on our x-ray storage ring beam lines. In both designs, a pair of tungsten blades, separated by a pre-determined gap, intercepts a small fraction of the incoming beam. Due to photoemission, an electrical signal is generated which is proportional to the amount of beam intercepted. The thermal load deposited in the blade is transferred by a heat pipe to a heat exchanger outside the vacuum chamber. A prototype monitor with gap adjustment capability was fabricated and tested at a uv beam line. The results show that the generated electrical signal is a good measurement of the photon beam position. In the following sections, design features and test results are discussed.

Mortazavi, P.; Woodle, M.; Rarback, H.; Shu, D.; Howells, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Woven heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

Piscitella, R.R.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

Clustering, fronts, and heat transfer in turbulent suspensions of heavy particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy inertial particles transported by a turbulent flow are shown to concentrate in the regions where an advected passive scalar, such as temperature, displays very strong front-like discontinuities. This novel effect is responsible for extremely high levels of fluctuations for the passive field sampled by the particles that impacts the heat fluxes exchanged between the particles and the surrounding fluid. Instantaneous and averaged heat fluxes are shown to follow strongly intermittent statistics and anomalous scaling laws.

Bec, Jeremie; Krstulovic, Giorgio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Towards Intelligent District Heating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A district heating system consists of one or more production units supplying energy in the form of heated water through a distribution pipe network to… (more)

Johansson, Christian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

326

ARM - Heat Index Calculations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Heat Index Calculations Heat Index is an index that combines air temperature and relative...

327

Category:Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling page? For detailed information on Gas Flux Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Gas Flux Sampling Add.png Add a new Gas Flux Sampling...

328

Metamaterial anisotropic flux concentrators and magnetic arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A metamaterial magnetic flux concentrator is investigated in detail in combination with a Halbach cylinder of infinite length. A general analytical solution to the field is determined and the magnetic figure of merit is determined for a Halbach cylinder with a flux concentrator. It is shown that an ideal flux concentrator will not change the figure of merit of a given magnet design, while the non-ideal will always lower it. The geometric parameters producing maximum figure of merit, i.e. the most efficient devices, are determined. The force and torque between two concentric Halbach cylinders with flux concentrators is determined and the maximum torque is found. Finally, the effect of non-ideal flux concentrators and the practical use of flux concentrators, as well as demagnetization issues, is discussed.

Bjørk, R; Bahl, C R H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Numerical investigation of the convection of heat-emitting liquid reactor materials taking stratification into account  

SciTech Connect

Convective heat transfer to a reactor vessel following core destruction is analyzed. Fuel fragment and structural materials are assumed to melt either mix uniformly or stratify. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved numerically with a rectangular coarse difference grid, neglecting the negligibly small contribution of the laminar boundary layer. Calculations for different levels of volume heat release showed that integral heat fluxes at the lateral and top surfaces of the melt are virtually independent of the convective flow scenario. However, the maximum heat flux on the lateral surface is approximately 1.5 times higher for the homogeneous case than for the stratified case. The higher heat flux could result in larger mechanical loads on the reactor vessel, requiring more cooling of the reactor vessel outer surface. 12 refs., 4 figs.

Likhanskii, V.V.; Loboiko, A.I.; Khoruzhii, O.V.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Evidence for Inhomogeneous Heating in the Solar Wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar wind observations and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are used to probe the nature of turbulence heating. In particular, the electron heat flux, electron temperature, and ion temperature in the solar wind are studied using ACE and Wind data. These heating diagnostics are also compared with MHD simulation estimates of the local dissipation density. Coherent structures, which are sources of inhomogeneity and intermittency in MHD turbulence, are found to be associated with enhancements in every heating-related diagnostic. This supports the hypothesis that significant inhomogeneous heating occurs in the solar wind, connected with current sheets that are dynamically generated by MHD turbulence. Indeed, a subset of these coherent current sheets might be candidates for magnetic reconnection. However, the specific kinetic mechanisms that heat and accelerate particles within these structures require further study.

K. T. Osman; W. H. Matthaeus; A. Greco; S. Servidio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Heat transfer research on supercritical water flow upward in tube  

SciTech Connect

The experimental research of heat transfer on supercritical water has been carried out on the supercritical water multipurpose test loop with a 7.6 mm upright tube. The experimental data of heat transfer is obtained. The experimental results of thermal-hydraulic parameters on flow and heat transfer of supercritical water show that: Heat transfer enhancement occurs when the fluid temperature reaches pseudo-critical point with low mass flow velocity, and peters out when the mass flow velocity increases. The heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number decrease with the heat flux or system pressure increases, and increase with the increasing of mass flow velocity. The wall temperature increases when the mass flow velocity decreases or the system pressure increases. (authors)

Li, H. B.; Yang, J. [China Nuclear Power Technology Research Inst., Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Gu, H. Y.; Zhao, M. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China); Lu, D. H.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Y. [China Nuclear Power Technology Research Inst., Shenzhen, Guangdong (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Rotary magnetic heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

Kirol, L.D.

1987-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thulium-170 heat source  

SciTech Connect

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, C.E.; Van Konynenburg, R.; VanSant, J.H.

1990-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

334

Thulium-170 heat source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, Carl E. (Pleasanton, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard (Livermore, CA); VanSant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Heat Treating Apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for heat treating a heat treatable material including a housing having an upper opening for receiving a heat treatable material at a first temperature, a lower opening, and a chamber therebetween for heating the heat treatable material to a second temperature higher than the first temperature as the heat treatable material moves through the chamber from the upper to the lower opening. A gas supply assembly is operatively engaged to the housing at the lower opening, and includes a source of gas, a gas delivery assembly for delivering the gas through a plurality of pathways into the housing in countercurrent flow to movement of the heat treatable material, whereby the heat treatable material passes through the lower opening at the second temperature, and a control assembly for controlling conditions within the chamber to enable the heat treatable material to reach the second temperature and pass through the lower opening at the second temperature as a heated material.

De Saro, Robert (Annandale, NJ); Bateman, Willis (Sutton Colfield, GB)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

336

Anisotropic turbulent model for solar coronal heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context : We present a self-consistent model of solar coronal heating, originally developed by Heyvaert & Priest (1992), in which we include the dynamical effect of the background magnetic field along a coronal structure by using exact results from wave MHD turbulence (Galtier et al. 2000). Aims : We evaluate the heating rate and the microturbulent velocity for comparison with observations in the quiet corona, active regions and also coronal holes. Methods :The coronal structures are assumed to be in a turbulent state maintained by the slow erratic motions of the magnetic footpoints. A description for the large-scale and the unresolved small-scale dynamics are given separately. From the latter, we compute exactly (or numerically for coronal holes) turbulent viscosites that are finally used in the former to close self-consistently the system and derive the heating flux expression. Results : We show that the heating rate and the turbulent velocity compare favorably with coronal observations. Conclusions : Although the Alfven wave turbulence regime is strongly anisotropic, and could reduce a priori the heating efficiency, it provides an unexpected satisfactory model of coronal heating for both magnetic loops and open magnetic field lines.

B. Bigot; S. Galtier; H. Politano

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

Thermoelectric heat exchange element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

Callas, James J. (Peoria, IL); Taher, Mahmoud A. (Peoria, IL)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

338

Heat Integrate Heat Engines in Process Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and refrigeration systems. In many instances these real heat engines may appear as a complex process consisting of flash vessels, heat exchangers, compressors, furnaces, etc. See Figure 18a, which shows a simplified diagram of a "steam Rankine cycle." How... and rejection profiles of the real machine. For example, the heat acceptance and re jection profiles for the steam Rankine cycle shown in Figure 18a have been drawn on T,H coordinates in Figure 18b. Thus providing we know the heat acceptance and rejection...

Hindmarsh, E.; Boland, D.; Townsend, D. W.

339

The Solar Wind Power from Magnetic Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of the fast, high-latitude solar wind throughout Ulysses' three orbits show that solar wind power correlates remarkably well with the Sun's total open magnetic flux. These observations support a recent model of the solar wind energy and particle sources, where magnetic flux emergence naturally leads to an energy flux proportional to the strength of the large-scale magnetic field. This model has also been shown to be consistent with X-ray observations of the Sun and a variety of other stars over 12 decades of magnetic flux. The observations reported here show that the Sun delivers ~600 kW Wb?1 to power the solar wind, and that this power to magnetic flux relation has been extremely stable over the last 15 years. Thus, the same law that governs energy released in the corona and from other stars also applies to the total energy in the solar wind.

N. A. Schwadron; D. J. McComas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ozone heating and the destabilization of traveling waves during summer  

SciTech Connect

The effects of ozone heating on the linear stability of lower stratospheric traveling waves of the summertime, extratropical circulation are examined. Based on coupled equations for the quasigeostrophic potential vorticity and ozone volume mixing ratio, it is shown that the diabatic heating arising from ozone advection can offset the damping due to Newtonian cooling, leading to wave amplification and significant changes in the structure and zonally rectified fluxes of the wave fields in both the lower stratosphere and troposphere. The vertical profile of the zonal mean wind plays a crucial role in determining whether the ozone heating destabilizes eastward and/or westward traveling disturbances.

Nathan, T.R.; Cordero, E.C.; Li, L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Wound tube heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Achieving high flux amplification in a gun-driven, flux-core spheromak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new means of operating flux-core spheromaks with possibly increased stability, confinement and pulse length is analysed by a resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. High amplification of the bias poloidal flux, required to minimize ohmic losses, is achieved by reducing the bias rapidly in a plasma formed at a lower amplification. The plasma separatrix is predicted to expand and incorporate the removed bias flux maintaining the total poloidal flux within the spheromak's flux-conserving wall. MHD energy on open magnetic field lines is reduced, reducing magnetic fluctuation levels. A means of experimental verification is suggested that may point the way to fusion-relevant spheromaks.

E.B. Hooper; D.N. Hill; H.S. McLean; C.A. Romero-Talamás; R.D. Wood

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems May 30, 2012 - 3:40pm Addthis Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar water heating systems use heat exchangers to transfer solar energy absorbed in solar collectors to the liquid or air used to heat water or a space. Heat exchangers can be made of steel, copper, bronze, stainless steel, aluminum, or cast iron. Solar heating systems usually use copper, because it is a good thermal conductor and has greater resistance to corrosion. Types of Heat Exchangers Solar water heating systems use three types of heat exchangers: Liquid-to-liquid A liquid-to-liquid heat exchanger uses a heat-transfer fluid that

345

Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation  

SciTech Connect

Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Geothermal Technologies Office focuses only on electricity generation. For additional information about geothermal heating and cooling and ground source heat pumps, please visit the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Buildings Technologies Office.

347

HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

Lenert, Andrej

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Residential heating oil price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 6.3 cents from a week ago to 2.91 per gallon. That's down 1.10 from a year ago, based on the...

349

Residential heating oil price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.5 cents from a week ago to 2.84 per gallon. That's down 1.22 from a year ago, based on the...

350

Residential heating oil price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.6 cents from a week ago to 2.97 per gallon. That's down 1.05 from a year ago, based on the...

351

Residential heating oil price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 3.6 cents from a week ago to 3.04 per gallon. That's down 99.4 cents from a year ago, based on the...

352

Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge

353

Nonlocal fluxes at a plasma sheath  

SciTech Connect

The particle and energy fluxes of electrons at the boundary of a plasma in contact with a perfectly absorbing plate are considered. In general, the fluxes are shown not to be determined by the plasma temperature and density at the plate but rather by a convolution of the plasma profiles in the vicinity of the plate. A simple empirical expression is proposed for the nonlocal fluxes, which approximately reproduces the results of a full kinetic calculation. The implications of this, to divertor plasmas near the neutralizer plate, are discussed.

Marchand, R.; Abou-Assaleh, Z.; Matte, J.P. (INRS-Energie, C. P. 1020, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2, Canada (CA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Berry-Phase induced Heat Pumping and its Impact on the Fluctuation Theorem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applying adiabatic, cyclic two parameter modulations we investigate quantum heat transfer across an anharmonic molecular junction contacted with two heat baths. We demonstrate that the pumped heat typically exhibits a Berry phase effect in providing an additional geometric contribution to heat flux. Remarkably, a robust fractional quantized geometric phonon response is identified as well. The presence of this geometric phase contribution in turn causes a breakdown of the fluctuation theorem of the Gallavotti-Cohen type for quantum heat transfer. This can be restored only if (i) the geometric phase contribution vanishes and if (ii) the cyclic protocol preserves the detailed balance symmetry.

Ren, Jie; Li, Baowen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

MA HEAT Loan Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents information on the success of Massachusetts's HEAT loan offerings and how the financing tool is funded.

356

Ductless Heat Pumps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Heaters Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales...

357

Heat Pump Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Heaters Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales...

358

Solar heat receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

359

Electric resistive space heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost of heating residential buildings using electricity is compared to the cost employing gas or oil. (AIP)

David Bodansky

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Heat Transfer Reduction Across the Walls of Refrigerated Van Trailers by the Application of Phase Change Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The technology was tested in similar days in terms of temperature and solar insolation. The relevant variables that were monitored were the heat flux across the walls of the simulators and temperatures, including surface and indoor air temperatures. Other...

Ahmed, Mashud

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

40Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At Ruapehu Volcano, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 40Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At Ruapehu Volcano, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We have determined precise eruption ages for andesites from Ruapehu volcano in the Tongariro Volcanic Centre of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) using 40Ar/39Ar furnace step-heating of separated groundmass concentrates. The plateau ages indicate several eruptive pulses near 200, 134, 45, 22 and <15 ka and, based on our and previous field mapping confirm the lavas of the Te Herenga Formation as the oldest exposed part of the

362

Influence of process on flux pinning for MTG SmBa2Cu3Oy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two SmBa2Cu3Oy samples (Sm1 and Sm3) with different processes were fabricated by the melt-textured growth method to study the effect of heat treatment and argon atmosphere on flux pinning. Magnetic measurement shows that Sm1 is of lower transition temperature, lower irreversibility field and more pronounced second peak effect. But Sm3 has higher Tc, higher Hirr and less pronounced SP. It was found that the flux pinning of SM1 is stranger than that of SM3 in wide range of temperature. It evidences that the irreversibility field and critical current density are independent of each other. Discussion of flux pinning and the effect of Ar and 211 is made.

X. Leng; H. Luo; Y. Liu; S.Y. Ding; L. Xiao; H.T. Reng; Y.L. Jiao; M.H. Zheng

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Heat Transfer Guest Editorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Heat Transfer Guest Editorial We are indeed delighted in bringing out this special issue was showcased in diverse areas such as traditional heat and mass transfer, lab-on-chip, sensors, biomedical applica- tions, micromixers, fuel cells, and microdevices. Selected papers in the field of heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

365

Acoustic Heating Peter Ulmschneider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Heating Peter Ulmschneider lnstitut fiir Theoretische Astrophysik der Universitat waves are a viable and prevalent heating mechanism both in early- and in late-type stars. Acoustic heating appears to be a dominant mechanism for situations where magnetic fields are weak or absent

Ulmschneider, Peter

366

Ammoniated salt heat pump  

SciTech Connect

A thermochemical heat pump/energy storage system using liquid ammoniate salts is described. The system, which can be used for space heating or cooling, provides energy storage for both functions. The bulk of the energy is stored as chemical energy and thus can be stored indefinitely. The system is well suited to use with a solar energy source or industrial waste heat.

Haas, W.R.; Jaeger, F.J.; Giordano, T.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Pioneering Heat Pump Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project objectives: To install and monitor an innovative WaterFurnace geothermal system that is technologically advanced and evolving; To generate hot water heating from a heat pump that uses non-ozone depleting refrigerant CO2. To demonstrate the energy efficiency of this system ground source heat pump system.

368

Home Heating | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Home Heating Everything you need to know about home heating, including how heating systems work, the different types on the market and proper maintenance. Read more Thermostats...

369

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Energy Saver Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water heating costs....

370

A statistical analysis of avalanching heat transport in stationary enhanced core confinement regimes  

SciTech Connect

We present a statistical analysis of heat transport in stationary enhanced confinement regimes obtained from flux-driven gyrofluid simulations. The probability density functions of heat flux in improved confinement regimes, characterized by the Nusselt number, show significant deviation from Gaussian, with a markedly fat tail, implying the existence of heat avalanches. Two types of avalanching transport are found to be relevant to stationary states, depending on the degree of turbulence suppression. In the weakly suppressed regime, heat avalanches occur in the form of quasi-periodic (QP) heat pulses. Collisional relaxation of zonal flow is likely to be the origin of these QP heat pulses. This phenomenon is similar to transient limit cycle oscillations observed prior to edge pedestal formation in recent experiments. On the other hand, a spectral analysis of heat flux in the strongly suppressed regime shows the emergence of a 1/f (f is the frequency) band, suggesting the presence of self-organized criticality (SOC)-like episodic heat avalanches. This episodic 1/f heat avalanches have a long temporal correlation and constitute the dominant transport process in this regime.

Tokunaga, S.; Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, 52, Yeoeun-dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, 52, Yeoeun-dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Exergy of boson and fermion fluxes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particles with zero and non-zero rest mass are considered in both the classical and ultra-relativistic limits. Relationships that may be used for both fermions and bosons are derived. The exergy flux of free particles involves an efficiency-like factor affecting the energy flux. This factor contains the ambient temperature and the effective particle flux temperature and it is generally different from both the usual Carnot factor and the Petela factor appearing in the exergy of blackbody radiation fluxes, respectively. Some particular cases considered here show that free Fermi particles carry less available work than Bose particles and that the classical approximation yields higher values of the efficiency-like factors than the ultra-relativistic assumption.

Viorel Badescu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Muon Fluxes From Dark Matter Annihilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the muon flux from annihilation of the dark matter in the core of the Sun, in the core of the Earth and from cosmic diffuse neutrinos produced in dark matter annihilation in the halos. We consider model-independent direct neutrino production and secondary neutrino production from the decay of taus produced in the annihilation of dark matter. We illustrate how muon energy distribution from dark matter annihilation has a very different shape than muon flux from atmospheric neutrinos. We consider both the upward muon flux, when muons are created in the rock below the detector, and the contained flux when muons are created in the (ice) detector. We contrast our results to the ones previously obtained in the literature, illustrating the importance of properly treating muon propagation and energy loss. We comment on neutrino flavor dependence and their detection.

Arif Emre Erkoca; Mary Hall Reno; Ina Sarcevic

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Mark Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperatures, seasonal sea ice, and the remoteness of the regions all conspire to make observations difficult latitudes - the vertical exchanges of heat, momentum and material between the ocean, atmosphere and ice1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Research

Gille, Sarah T.

374

Micromorphic Balances and Source-flux Duality  

SciTech Connect

This is a further note on the (Gauss-Maxwell) force-flux construct proposed previously (Goddard, J. D., A note on Eringen's moment balances, Int. J. Eng. Sci., in the press, 2011). Motivated in part by its promise as a homogenization technique for constructing micromorphic continua, the present work is focused rather on some additional representations and on novel applications, such as the derivation of dissipative thermodynamic potentials from force-flux relations.

Goddard, J. D. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Soft pion emission from fat flux tubes  

SciTech Connect

The emission of pions from multiquark flux tubes is examined as an explanation of the soft pion puzzle. Although the soft pion spectra from the decay of fat flux tubes can account for some low {ital p}{sub {perpendicular}} enhancement, the dependence on the number of involved quarks is too weak to provide a plausible explanation of the observed enhancement in the pion spectrum at low transverse momenta.

Kusnezov, D.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (USA))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and past heating season. As you can see, prices have started the heating season, about 40 to 50 cents per gallon higher than last year at this time. The data presented are from EIA's State Heating Oil and Propane Program. We normally collect and publish this data twice a month, but given the low stocks and high prices, we started tracking the prices weekly. These data will also be used to determine the price trigger mechanism for the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. The data are published at a State and regional level on our web site. The slide is to give you some perspective of what is happening in these markets, since you probably will get a number of calls from local residents about their heating fuels bills

377

Active microchannel heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nanofluid heat capacities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Significant increases in the heat capacity of heat transfer fluids are needed not only to reduce the costs of liquid heating and cooling processes but also to bring clean energy producing technologies like concentrating solar power (CSP) to price parity with conventional energy generation. It has been postulated that nanofluids could have higher heat capacities than conventional fluids. In this work nano- and micron-sized particles were added to five base fluids (poly-? olefin mineral oil ethylene glycol a mixture of water and ethylene glycol and calcium nitrate tetrahydrate) and the resulting heat capacities were measured and compared with those of the neat base fluids and the weighted average of the heat capacities of the components. The particles used were inert metals and metal oxides that did not undergo any phase transitions over the temperature range studied. In the nanofluids studied here we found no increase in heat capacity upon the addition of the particles larger than the experimental error.

Anne K. Starace; Judith C. Gomez; Jun Wang; Sulolit Pradhan; Greg C. Glatzmaier

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A model for improvement of water heating heat exchanger designs for residential heat pump water heaters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heat pump water heaters are a promising technology to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. A key component is the water heating heat exchanger.… (more)

Weerawoot, Arunwattana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP W. D. C. Richards and W. L. Auxer General Electric Company Space Division King of Prussia, Pa. ABSTRACT A heat activated heat pump (HAHP for space heating since it directly utilizes the engine waste heat in addition to the energy obtained

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Control of Large-Scale Heat Transport by Small-Scale Mixing PAOLA CESSI, W. R. YOUNG, AND JEFF A. POLTON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of entropy production, mechanical energy balance, and heat trans- port. The flow is rapidly rotating- ports heat up the gradient of Ts(y); that is, the heat flux ( T, wT) is cooling where Ts(y) is a minimum

Young, William R.

382

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of...

383

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

384

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

385

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of...

386

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A...

387

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

388

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

389

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

390

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter Electric Machine R&D...

391

Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets - U Machine 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

392

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments with CO2. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments...

393

ARM - Measurement - Longwave broadband net irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Range Weather Forecasts Diagnostic Analyses ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model Data GMS : Geostationary Meteorological Satellite GOES :...

394

ARM - Measurement - Longwave broadband upwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) IRT : Infrared Thermometer MFRIRT : Multifilter Radiometer and Infrared Thermometer RAD : Radiation...

395

High Flux Isotope Reactor system RELAP5 input model  

SciTech Connect

A thermal-hydraulic computational model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been developed using the RELAP5 program. The purpose of the model is to provide a state-of-the art thermal-hydraulic simulation tool for analyzing selected hypothetical accident scenarios for a revised HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The model includes (1) a detailed representation of the reactor core and other vessel components, (2) three heat exchanger/pump cells, (3) pressurizing pumps and letdown valves, and (4) secondary coolant system (with less detail than the primary system). Data from HFIR operation, component tests, tests in facility mockups and the HFIR, HFIR specific experiments, and other pertinent experiments performed independent of HFIR were used to construct the model and validate it to the extent permitted by the data. The detailed version of the model has been used to simulate loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), while the abbreviated version has been developed for the operational transients that allow use of a less detailed nodalization. Analysis of station blackout with core long-term decay heat removal via natural convection has been performed using the core and vessel portions of the detailed model.

Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

Swenson, Paul F. (Shaker Heights, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaven, FL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Policies supporting Heat Pump Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policies supporting Heat Pump Technologies in Canada IEA Heat Pump Workshop London, UK November 13 in the world, with an average of 16,995 kilowatt-hours per annum. #12;Canada's Context for Heat Pumps Impacts avenues: Ground source heat pumps for cold climates (heating and cooling) Reversible air source heat

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

398

Fluidized bed heat treating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems for heat treating materials are presented. The systems typically involve a fluidized bed that contains granulated heat treating material. In some embodiments a fluid, such as an inert gas, is flowed through the granulated heat treating medium, which homogenizes the temperature of the heat treating medium. In some embodiments the fluid may be heated in a heating vessel and flowed into the process chamber where the fluid is then flowed through the granulated heat treating medium. In some embodiments the heat treating material may be liquid or granulated heat treating material and the heat treating material may be circulated through a heating vessel into a process chamber where the heat treating material contacts the material to be heat treated. Microwave energy may be used to provide the source of heat for heat treating systems.

Ripley, Edward B; Pfennigwerth, Glenn L

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

399

Flameless heat generator  

SciTech Connect

A heating device generates heat by working a liquid in a closed container with a rotating stack of finely perforate square plates and recovering the heat from the thus heated liquid. In one embodiment a stack of a multiplicity of flat square plates radially offset one from another is rotated in an oil bath in a container under an inner perforate non-rotating cover over which is a similar non-rotating cover that is imperforate. The thermal energy developed through the mechanical working of the liquid is transferred to the main liquid bath and is then removed, as for example, by circulating air or a liquid around the outside of the container with the thus heated air or liquid being used to heat a house or the like.

Leary, C. L.; Leary, G. C.

1983-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

400

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kablick III, G. P., University of Maryland Ellingson, R. G., Florida State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kablick III GP, RG Ellingson, EE Takara, and J Gu. 2011. "Longwave 3D benchmarks for inhomogeneous clouds and comparisons with approximate methods." Journal of Climate, 24, doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3752.1. The respective flux and heating rate errors (model-3DMC) for (a),(b) ATEX and (c),(d) GATE A. The error profiles in (a) and (c) are to be interpreted as ICA, solid lines; MRO, dashed lines; RO, dotted lines. (b) and (d) also show the differences between MRO and RO. The horizontal lines are the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Process for heating coal-oil slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

Braunlin, Walter A. (Spring, TX); Gorski, Alan (Lovington, NM); Jaehnig, Leo J. (New Orleans, LA); Moskal, Clifford J. (Oklahoma City, OK); Naylor, Joseph D. (Houston, TX); Parimi, Krishnia (Allison Park, PA); Ward, John V. (Arvada, CO)

1984-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

403

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Management Options Heat Management Options Industrial Process Heating Systems By Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi E-mail: athekdi@e3minc.com E3M, Inc. August 20, 2009 2 Source of Waste Heat in Industries * Steam Generation * Fluid Heating * Calcining * Drying * Heat Treating * Metal Heating * Metal and Non-metal Melting * Smelting, agglomeration etc. * Curing and Forming * Other Heating Waste heat is everywhere! Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc 3 Waste Heat Sources from Process Heating Equipment * Hot gases - combustion products - Temperature from 300 deg. F. to 3000 deg.F. * Radiation-Convection heat loss - From temperature source of 500 deg. F. to 2500 deg. F. * Sensible-latent heat in heated product - From temperature 400 deg. F. to 2200 deg. F. * Cooling water or other liquids - Temperature from 100 deg. F. to 180 deg. F.

404

Mechanical Compression Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MECHANICAL COMPRESSION HEAT PUMPS Thomas-L. Apaloo and K. Kawamura Mycom Corporation, Los Angeles, California J. Matsuda, Mayekawa Mfg. Co., Tokyo, Japan ABSTRACT Mechanical compression heat pumping is not new in industrial applications.... In fact, industry history suggests that the theoretical concept was developed before 1825. Heat pump manufacturers gained the support of consultants and end-users when the energy crisis hit this country in 1973. That interest, today, has been...

Apaloo, T. L.; Kawamura, K.; Matsuda, J.

405

Sorption heat engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a simple free energy generating device - driven by thermal cycling and based on alternating adsorption and desorption - that has not been explicitly recognized as heat engine the name sorption heat engine is proposed. The mechanism is generally applicable to the fields of physics, chemistry, geology, and possibly, if relevant to the origin of life, biology. Four kinds of sorption heat engines are distinguished depending on the occurrence of changes in composition of the adsorbent or adsorbate during the thermal cycle.

Muller, A W J; Muller, Anthonie W. J.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Combined Heat and Power  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

energy costs and 31 emissions while also providing more resilient and reliable electric power and thermal energy 1 . CHP 32 systems combine the production of heat (for both...

407

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

408

Solar Heating in Uppsala.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The housing corporation Uppsalahem has installed asolar heating system in the neighbourhood Haubitsen,which was renovated in 2011. This report examineshow much energy the solar… (more)

Blomqvist, Emelie; Häger, Klara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Solar heating in Colombia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report describes the process of a thesis implemented in Colombia concerning solar energy. The project was to install a self-circulating solar heating system,… (more)

Skytt, Johanna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Passive solar space heating  

SciTech Connect

An overview of passive solar space heating is presented indicating trends in design, new developments, performance measures, analytical design aids, and monitored building results.

Balcomb, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

available today." -American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy What is Combined Heat & Power (CHP)? Federal Utility Partnership Working Group May 7 - 8, 2014 Virginia...

413

Heat rejection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

Smith, Gregory C. (Richland, WA); Tokarz, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Parry, Jr., Harvey L. (Richland, WA); Braun, Daniel J. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Heat transfer dynamics  

SciTech Connect

As heat transfer technology increases in complexity, it becomes more difficult for those without thermal dynamics engineering training to choose between competitive heat transfer systems offered to meet their drying requirements. A step back to the basics of heat transfer can help professional managers and papermakers make informed decisions on alternative equipment and methods. The primary forms of heat and mass transfer are reviewed with emphasis on the basics, so a practical understanding of each is gained. Finally, the principles and benefits of generating infrared energy by combusting a gaseous hydrocarbon fuel are explained.

Smith, T.M. (Marsden, Inc., Pennsauken, NJ (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ListAtmospheric Heat Budget Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About...

416

Color Magnetic Flux Tubes in Dense QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QCD is expected to be in the color-flavor locking phase in high baryon density, which exhibits color superconductivity. The most fundamental topological objects in the color superconductor are non-Abelian vortices which are topologically stable color magnetic flux tubes. We present numerical solutions of the color magnetic flux tube for diverse choices of the coupling constants. We also analytically study its asymptotic profiles and find that they are different from the case of usual superconductors. We propose the width of color magnetic fluxes and find that it is larger than naive expectation of the Compton wave length of the massive gluon when the gluon mass is larger than the scalar mass.

Minoru Eto; Muneto Nitta

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

417

Color magnetic flux tubes in dense QCD  

SciTech Connect

QCD is expected to be in the color-flavor locking phase in high baryon density, which exhibits color superconductivity. The most fundamental topological objects in the color superconductor are non-Abelian vortices which are topologically stable color magnetic flux tubes. We present numerical solutions of the color magnetic flux tube for diverse choices of the coupling constants based on the Ginzburg-Landau Lagrangian. We also analytically study its asymptotic profiles and find that they are different from the case of usual superconductors. We propose the width of color magnetic fluxes and find that it is larger than naive expectation of the Compton wavelength of the massive gluon when the gluon mass is larger than the scalar mass.

Eto, Minoru [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Spatially resolved temperature and heat flux measurements for slow evaporating droplets heated by a microfabricated heater array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evaporation phenomenon of a liquid droplet was investigated by using microfabricated heaters. All 32 microheaters were designed to have the same resistance. Gold microheaters worked both as temperature indicators and as heaters. The first...

Paik, Sokwon

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

419

Turbulence characteristics of electron cyclotron and ohmic heated discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulence characteristics of electron cyclotron (EC) and ohmic heated (OH) discharges has been analyzed by electrostatic gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO [J. Candy, R.E. Waltz, Journal of Computational Physics 186, 545-581 (2003)] aiming to find insights into the effect of auxiliary heating on the transport. Trapped electron modes are found to be unstable in both OH and the EC heated scenarios. In the OH case the main drive is from the density gradient and in the EC case from the electron temperature gradient. The growth rates and particle fluxes exhibit qualitatively different scaling with the electron-to-ion temperature ratios in the two cases. This is mainly due to the fact that the dominant drives and the collisionalities are different. The inward flow velocity of impurities and the impurity diffusion coefficient decreases when applying EC heating, which leads to lower impurity peaking, consistently with experimental observations.

Pusztai, Istvan; Fulop, Tunde; Timchenko, Natalia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Characteristics of microinstabilities in electron cyclotron and ohmic heated discharges  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of microinstabilities in electron cyclotron (EC) and ohmic heated (OH) discharges in the T10 tokamak have been analyzed by linear electrostatic gyrokinetic simulations with gyro[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] aiming to find insights into the effect of auxiliary heating on the transport. Trapped electron modes are found to be unstable in both OH and the EC heated scenarios. In the OH case the main drive is from the density gradient and in the EC case from the electron temperature gradient. The growth rates and particle fluxes exhibit qualitatively different scaling with the electron-to-ion temperature ratios in the two cases. This is mainly due to the fact that the dominant drives and the collisionalities are different. The inward flow velocity of impurities and the impurity diffusion coefficient decreases when applying EC heating, which leads to lower impurity peaking, consistently with experimental observations.

Pusztai, I.; Moradi, S.; Fueloep, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology and Euratom-VR Association, Goeteborg (Sweden); Timchenko, N. [Institute of Tokamak Physics, NRC ''Kurchatov Institute,'' 123182, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Geothermal heat pumps are expensive to install but pay for themselves over time in reduced heating and cooling costs. Learn more about how geothermal heat pumps heat and cool buildings by concentrating the naturally existing heat contained within the earth -- a clean, reliable, and renewable source of energy. In moderate climates, heat pumps can be an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Several types of heat pumps are available, including air-source; geothermal; ductless, mini-split; and absorption heat pumps. Learn more about the different options and how to use your heat pump efficiently to save money and energy at home. Featured Heat Pump Systems A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar.

422

HEAT RECOVERY FROM WASTE WATER BY MEANS OF A RECUPERATIVE HEAT EXCHANGER AND A HEAT PUMP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The useful heat of warm waste water is generally transferred to cold water using a recuperative heat exchanger. Depending on its design, the heat exchanger is able to utilise up to 90% of the waste heat potential available. The electric energy needed to operate such a system is more than compensated for by an approximately 50-fold gain of useful heat. To increase substantially the waste heat potential available and the amount of heat recovered, the system for recuperative heat exchange can be complemented by a heat pump. Such a heat recovery system on the basis of waste water is being operated in a public indoor swimming pool. Here the recuperative heat exchanger accounts for about 60%, the heat pump for about 40% of the toal heat reclaimed. The system consumes only 1 kWh of electric energy to supply 8 kWh of useful heat. In this way the useful heat of 8 kWh is compensated for by the low consumption of primary energy of 2.8 kWh. Due to the installation of an automatic cleaning device, the heat transfer surfaces on the waste water side avoid deposits so that the troublesome maintenance work required in other cases on the heat exchangers is not required. KEYWORDS Shower drain water, recuperative heat recovery, heat recovery by means of a heat pump, combination of both types of heat recovery, automatic cleaning device for the heat exchangers, ratio of useful heat supply vs. electric energy consumption, economic consideration.

K. Biasin; F.D. Heidt

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Cross-cutting Research and Development Priorities Speaker(s): Sachin Nimbalkar Date: January 17, 2013 - 11:00am Location: 90-2063 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Aimee McKane Waste heat is generated from several industrial systems used in manufacturing. The waste heat sources are distributed throughout a plant. The largest source for most industries is exhaust / flue gases or heated air from heating systems. This includes the high temperature gases from burners in process heating, lower temperature gases from heat treat, dryers, and heaters, heat from heat exchangers, cooling liquids and gases etc. The previous studies and direct contact with the industry as well as equipment suppliers have shown that a large amount of waste heat is not

424

Turbulent heat transfer and friction in a segmental channel that simulates leading-edge cooling channels of modern turbine blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Steady state heat transfer experiments for three channel cross sections, ribbed curved wall-to-smooth flat wall heat flux ratio of 0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, and infinity, and mass flow rates corresponding to Reynolds numbers between 10 000 and 70 000...

Spence, Rodney Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................... 1,870 1,276 322 138 133 43.0 29.4 7.4 3.2 3.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 243 151 34 40 18 78.7 48.9 11.1 13.0 5.7 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 202 139 31 29 Q 54.8 37.6 8.5 7.9 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 300 240 31 21 7 42.5 34.1 4.4 3.0 1.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 250 182 40 11 Q 41.5 30.2 6.6 1.9 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 236 169 41 8 19 35.4 25.2 6.2 1.2 2.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 241 165 54 7 16 36.3 24.8 8.1 1.0 2.4 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 199 130 42 11 16 35.0 22.8 7.5 1.9 2.8 Over 500,000 ............................. 198

426

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ............................. 2,037 1,378 338 159 163 42.0 28.4 7.0 3.3 3.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 156 35 41 18 78.6 49.1 11.0 12.9 5.6 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 218 147 32 31 7 54.8 37.1 8.1 7.9 1.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 343 265 34 25 18 43.8 33.9 4.4 3.2 2.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 270 196 41 13 Q 40.9 29.7 6.3 2.0 2.9 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 269 186 45 13 24 35.8 24.8 6.0 1.8 3.2 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 267 182 56 10 19 35.4 24.1 7.4 1.3 2.6 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 204 134 43 11 17 34.7 22.7 7.3 1.8 2.9 Over 500,000 .............................

427

Steady response to heating: Gaussian heat source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ prescribed latent heating => "Matsuno-Gill model" Moisture equation for precipitation term ¡ Can make. of Equatorial Waves Filter out "background spectrum": ¡ Can see all different wave types! Especially Kelvin #12;Equatorial Waves Alternative theory for wave speed: ¡ Higher vertical mode structure causes phase

Frierson, Dargan

428

Proceedings of Heat Transfer 2003: ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Heat Transfer 2003: ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference Las Vegas, Nevada, USA July 21-23, 2003 HT2003-47449 HEAT TRANSFER FROM A MOVING AND EVAPORATING MENISCUS ON A HEATED SURFACE meniscus with complete evaporation of water without any meniscus break-up. The experimental heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

429

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Microchannel heat sink assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watertight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures. 13 figs.

Bonde, W.L.; Contolini, R.J.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

434

Heat Requirements of Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and Ventilating Engineers in a publication entitled “Recommendations for the Computation of Heat Requirements for Buildings” (Pp. iii+41. Is. 9d.) This comprises a section of the ... parts. That on temperature-rise and rates of change gives the recommended values applicable to buildings ranging alphabetically from aircraft sheds to warehouses. The design of heating and ventilating installations ...

1942-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

435

Conjugate heat transfer in channels with internal longitudinal corrugated fins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@~ and @?, i' or Various K; F = 0. 020 and L = 0. 215 . 3. 10 Local Surface Temperature versus B, ~ and Q? for ql and q2 Boundary Conditions; F = 0. 020 and L = 0. 215 3. 11 Local Surface Heat Flux versus +~ and Rq~ for Various 6; F = 0. 02 3. 12 Local... axis length of the channel. Ar ? Flow cross-sectional area in the calculation domain. Ay~ ? Flow cross-sectional area in the calculation domain when there is no fin. c ? Specific heat of the flowing fluid, D ? Height of the flow cross section. Ds...

Ackermann, J. Albert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

DINA simulations of TCV electron cyclotron heating discharges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on full tokamak discharge simulations in the TCV tokamak using the DINA code, of which a new open modular architecture version is presented. These new simulations include the effect of intense electron cyclotron heating, dissipated off-axis. The change in the plasma conductivity produces a time-varying plasma current profile, which in turn causes the plasma shape to relax in the almost constant vacuum quadrupole field. These simulations allow us to check on the diffusion of poloidal magnetic flux, as well as the modelling of the electron cyclotron heating.

V.E. Lukash; D. Raju; V.N. Dokouka; J.-Y. Favez; R.R. Khayrutdinov; J.B. Lister

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Solar heating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, James M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Concord, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part I: Control climate and flux adjustment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the initialization of an experiment to study the time-dependent response of a high-resolution global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to a gradual increase in carbon dioxide. The stability of the control integration with respect to climate drift is assessed, and aspects of the model climatology relevant to the simulation of climate change are discussed. The observed variation of oceanic temperature with latitude and depth is basically well simulated, although, in common with other ocean models, the main thermocline is too diffuse. Nevertheless, it is found that large heat and water flux adjustments must be added to the surface layer of the ocean in order to prevent the occurrence of unacceptable climate drift. The ocean model appears to achieve insufficient meridional heat transport, and this is supported by the pattern of the heat flux adjustment term, although errors in the simulated atmosphere-ocean heat flux also contribute to the latter. The application of the flux adjustments restricts climate drift during the 75-year control experiment. However, a gradual warming still occurs in the surface layers of the Southern Ocean because the flux adjustments are inserted as additive terms in this integration and cannot therefore be guaranteed to prevent climate drift completely. 68 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Murphy, J.M. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Sustainable heat extraction from abandoned mine tunnels: A numerical model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abandoned mines are often associated with enduring liabilities which involve significant costs for decades after the decommissioning of the mine. Using a decommissioned mine as a geothermal resource can offset the environmental costs by supplying green heat to the communities living in and around the mine area. In this paper a numerical assessment of geothermal heat extraction from underground mine workings using an open loop geothermal system is carried out. In this study our focus is on fully flooded mines where the heat flow from the rock mass to the mine cavities is dominantly controlled by conduction in the rock mass. The sustainable heat flux into the mine workings is assessed using a transient two-dimensional axisymmetric heat transfer model. Finite volume method is applied to solve the model and simulate the transient temperature fields in the rock mass and within the water (flowing through cavities). The model is capable of controlling the rate of heat extraction through continuous adjustment of the rate of water flow through the mine. Sustainable rate of heat extraction is calculated for seasonally varied heat loads and for different project life cycles. It is shown that with proper resource management each kilometre of a typical deep underground mine tunnel can produce about 150?kW of usable heat in a sustainable manner. The model is validated by comparing its results with other published models and realistic data available from Springhill mine Nova Scotia Canada. It is found that the sustainable heat extraction is controlled dominantly by virgin rock temperature thermal conductivity of the rock mass and seasonal heat load variations.

S. A. Ghoreishi Madiseh; Mory M. Ghomshei; F. P. Hassani; F. Abbasy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Liquid Metal Pool With Bottom Heating and Top Cooling  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics with subcooled coolant to create engineering database for basic applications in a lead alloy cooled reactor. Tests are performed in the ALTOS (Applied Liquid-metal Thermal Operation Study) apparatus as part of MITHOS (Metal Integrated Thermo Hydrodynamic Operation System). A relationship is determined between the Nusselt number Nu and the Rayleigh number Ra in the liquid metal rectangular pool. Results are compared with correlations and experimental data in the literature. Given the similar Ra condition, the present test results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with top subcooling are found to be similar to those predicted by the existing correlations or experiments. The current test results are utilized to develop natural convection heat transfer correlations applicable to low Prandtl number Pr fluids that are heated from below and cooled by the external coolant above. Results from this study are slated to be used in designing BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System), a small lead cooled modular fast reactor for deployment at remote sites cycled with MOBIS (Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System) for electricity generation, tied with NAVIS (Naval Application Vessel Integral System) for ship propulsion, joined with THAIS (Thermochemical Hydrogen Acquisition Integral System) for hydrogen production, and coupled with DORIS (Desalination Optimized Reactor Integral System) for seawater desalination. Tests are performed with Wood's metal (Pb-Bi-Sn-Cd) filling a rectangular pool whose lower surface is heated and upper surface cooled by forced convection of water. The test section is 20 cm long, 11.3 cm high and 15 cm wide. The simulant has a melting temperature of 78 deg. C. The constant temperature and heat flux condition was realized for the bottom heating once the steady state had been met. The test parameters include the heated bottom surface temperature of the liquid metal pool, the input power to the bottom surface of the section, and the coolant temperature. (authors)

Lee, Il S.; Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Hwang, Jin S.; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National University, 599 Gwanangno, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Radiant Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiant Heating Radiant Heating Radiant Heating June 24, 2012 - 5:52pm Addthis In-wall radiant heating in a house under construction near Denver. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. In-wall radiant heating in a house under construction near Denver. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. Radiant heating systems supply heat directly to the floor or to panels in the wall or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer -- the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and objects in the room via infrared radiation. Radiant heating is the effect you feel when you can feel the warmth of a hot stovetop element from across the room. When radiant heating is located in the floor, it is often called radiant floor heating or simply floor heating.

442

Radiant Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiant Heating Radiant Heating Radiant Heating June 24, 2012 - 5:52pm Addthis In-wall radiant heating in a house under construction near Denver. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. In-wall radiant heating in a house under construction near Denver. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. Radiant heating systems supply heat directly to the floor or to panels in the wall or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer -- the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and objects in the room via infrared radiation. Radiant heating is the effect you feel when you can feel the warmth of a hot stovetop element from across the room. When radiant heating is located in the floor, it is often called radiant floor heating or simply floor heating.

443

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Piñon Ridge Property in western Montrose County, Colorado. The Piñon Ridge Mill includesURANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PI�ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Submitted To: Energy Fuels Resources Corporation 44 Union Boulevard, Suite 600 Lakewood, Colorado 80228

444

2, 181212, 2002 The flux of carbonyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, coal combustion, sulfur recovery, etc.), and is removed by terrestrial vegetation, soils, pho-25/181/ c European Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions The flux, 60054 Frankfurt am Main, Germany * now at Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany Received: 9

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

445

Muon Flux at the Geographical South Pole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The muon flux at the South-Pole was measured for five zenith angles, $0^{\\circ}$, $15^{\\circ}$, $35^{\\circ}$, $82.13^{\\circ}$ and $85.15^{\\circ}$ with a scintillator muon telescope incorporating ice Cherenkov tank detectors as the absorber. We compare the measurements with other data and with calculations.

X. Bai; T. K. Gaisser; A. Karle; K. Rawlins; G. M. Spiczak; Todor Stanev

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

446

6, 52515268, 2006 Turbulent fluxes over  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´exico, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico Received: 24 March 2006 ­ Accepted: 10 May 2006 ­ Published: 26 June 2006 wind speed conditions (up to 25 ms -1 ). The estimates of total momentum flux and turbulent kinetic energy can be represented very5 accurately (r2 =0.99, when data are binned every 1 ms-1 ) by empirical

Boyer, Edmond

447

Impulsive Flux Transfer Events and Solar Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......s-'. (v) Restoration of magneticfield...flux) into the system. To quotefrom...waves across the system. The impulsive...leadingto the restoration of the normal...state or in the power required to maintain...on the global system size), the...A., 1964. Handbook o f mathematicalfunctions......

A. Bratenahl; P. J. Baum

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Power Incorporated Flux Power Incorporated Jump to: navigation, search Name Flux Power Incorporated Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product California-based FLux Ppower was created in late-2009 to provide monitoring, diagnostics and charging technology aimed at extending the life of lithium-ion batteries. The company signed a supply deal with Wheego in January 2010. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Energy and Energy Flux in Planetary Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Energy and Energy Flux in Planetary Waves V. T. Buchwald The propagation...a thorough study of the energy of these waves in the plane approximation...case of divergent planetary waves, the total energy density being E = T + U...

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

High Performance Trays and Heat Exchangers in Heat Pumped Distillation Columns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND LIQUID now PATHS fOA IltO TltAYS I A number of engineering contractors and 1 operating companies have employed Union Carbide'\\s High Flux and Multiple Downcomer tray technolog~es to improve performance, decrease utilities and I lower operating costs... ? Fi,?'d as nll\\ximum within hf'l~ht n'!:-;tl'ie-tlon. The control scheme for a heat pump can be de signed to be no more complex than a conventional steam/cooling water system which relies on flow and level controllers to set the various column flow...

Wisz, M. W.; Antonelli, R.; Ragi, E. G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Superconducting ohmic heating solenoid concept for ISX-C  

SciTech Connect

The employment of a superconducting ohmic heating solenoid is presented for ISX-C based on currently available superconducting technology. The magnet is designed to be cryostable and to generate the required flux swing of 4.5 V/s while simultaneously meeting the limitations imposed by available space and structural interfacing to the torroidal coils. A novel spliceless pancake winding scheme is proposed which offers excellent cooling and completely supports the cable conductor throughout the winding.

Shen, S.S.; Brown, R.L.; Gray, W.H.; Lubell, M.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Relationship between Solar Wind and Coronal Heating: Scaling Laws from Solar X-Rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pevtsov et al. recently showed that the luminosity of solar and stellar X-rays from closed magnetic structures scales nearly linearly with magnetic flux over 12 decades. We show here that the total power available to accelerate the solar wind also scales linearly with magnetic flux, provided that its sources inject a roughly constant energy per particle prior to losses from heat conducted by electrons into radiation. Using a recently developed model of the solar wind energy source and particle source, we calculate the available solar wind power and convert it into an equivalent X-ray luminosity to explore whether the same process that drives solar wind may also power coronal heating. The quantitative results agree remarkably well with the Pevtsov et al. X-ray observations and with GOES X-ray observations over almost two solar cycles from 1985 to 2004. The model for the solar wind energy and particle source relies on the continual reconfiguration of the supergranular network through the emergence of small bipolar or more complex closed magnetic fields. This naturally leads to an energy flux proportional to field strength on large-scale field structures with field strengths larger than the emerging flux. We conclude that the sources of energy for the solar wind and coronal heating are linked, likely through the emergence of new magnetic flux that continually reconfigures large-scale solar magnetic fields and powers and heats the corona.

N. A. Schwadron; D. J. McComas; C. DeForest

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Process for reducing series resistance of solar-cell metal-contact systems with a soldering-flux etchant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a process for substantially reducing the series resistance of a solar cell having a thick film metal contact assembly thereon while simultaneously removing oxide coatings from the surface of the assembly prior to applying solder therewith. The process includes applying a flux to the contact assembly and heating the cell for a period of time sufficient to substantially remove the series resistance associated with the assembly by etching the assembly with the flux while simultaneously removing metal oxides from said surface of said assembly.

Coyle, R.T.; Barrett, J.M.

1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

454

Heat-Of-Reaction Chemical Heat Pumps--Possible Configurations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-807. (5) K. Kesavan. The Use of Dissociating Gases As the Working Fluid in Thermodynamic Power Conversion Cycles, Ph.D. thesis. Carnegie-Mellon University, 1978, Ann Arbor, MI: University Microfilms International, 1978. 5. Heat amplifier with a gas...ABSTRACT Chemical heat pumps utilize working fluids which undergo reversible chemical changes. Mechanically driven reactive heat pump cycles or, alternatively, hl~a: driven heat pumps in which either heat engine or heat pump working fluid...

Kirol, L. D.

455

Chemical heat pump cools as well as heats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical heat pump cools as well as heats ... Innovative heat pump uses methanol refrigerant, calcium chloride absorber to use and store solar energy for heating, air conditioning, hot water ... Though the EIC heat pump is similar in concept to other chemical heat pumps now being used or developed, it does offer a number of innovations, not the least of which are its novel refrigerant (methanol) and absorption medium (calcium chloride). ...

RON DAGANI

1980-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

456

Integrating preconcentrator heat controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for controlling the electric resistance heating of a metallic chemical preconcentrator screen, for example, used in portable trace explosives detectors. The length of the heating time-period is automatically adjusted to compensate for any changes in the voltage driving the heating current across the screen, for example, due to gradual discharge or aging of a battery. The total deposited energy in the screen is proportional to the integral over time of the square of the voltage drop across the screen. Since the net temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, of the screen, from beginning to end of the heating pulse, is proportional to the total amount of heat energy deposited in the screen during the heating pulse, then this integral can be calculated in real-time and used to terminate the heating current when a pre-set target value has been reached; thereby providing a consistent and reliable screen temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, from pulse-to-pulse.

Bouchier, Francis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Arakaki, Lester H. (Edgewood, NM); Varley, Eric S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

457

Poloidal variation of high-Z impurity density due to hydrogen minority ion cyclotron resonance heating on Alcator C-Mod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, strong, steady-state variations of molybdenum density within a flux surface are routinely observed in plasmas using hydrogen minority ion cyclotron resonant heating. In/out asymmetries, up to ...

Reinke, Matthew Logan

458

City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperatur...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Klamath Falls District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility City of Klamath...

459

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) More Documents & Publications PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - WEB Unclassified...

460

Sediment-water fluxes of mercury in Lavaca Bay, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The aqueous flux of inorganic Hg and monomethyl Hg from sediments to the water column was determined at several sites in Lavaca Bay, an estuary along the Texas Coast, historically impacted by Hg discharges. Diffusive fluxes were calculated at 15 sites using interstitial pore water gradients and compared to direct flux measurements obtained at two sites using benthic flux chambers. The diffusive flux of monomethyl mercury (MMHg), when modeled as a chloride species, varied over 3 orders /of magnitude from 0.2 to 1500 ng m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}. Diffusive fluxes determined at a single site revealed that MMHg fluxes varied seasonally; maximal fluxes occurred in late winter to early spring. Flux chamber deployments at an impacted site revealed t hat MMHg was the Hg species entering the water column from sediments and the flux was not in steady-state; there was a strong diurnal signal with most of the MMHg flux occurring during dark periods. The flux of inorganic Hg was smaller and not as easily discernible by this method. The MMHg flux during the dark period was about 6 times greater than the estimated diffusional flux for MMHgCl, suggesting that biological and/or chemical processes near the sediment-water interface were strongly mediating the sediment-water exchange of MMHg.

Gill, G.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States); Bloom, N.S. [Frontier Geosciences Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)] [Frontier Geosciences Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Cappellino, S. [Parametrix, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)] [Parametrix, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Driscoll, C.T. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Dobbs, C.; McShea, L. [Aluminum Co. of America, Point Comfort, TX (United States)] [Aluminum Co. of America, Point Comfort, TX (United States); Mason, R. [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.] [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.; Rudd, J.W.M. [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Freshwater Inst.] [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Freshwater Inst.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Heat treatment furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

Molecular heat pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel molecular device that pumps heat against a thermal gradient. The system consists of a molecular element connecting two thermal reservoirs that are characterized by different spectral properties. The pumping action is achieved by applying an external force that periodically modulates molecular levels. This modulation affects periodic oscillations of the internal temperature of the molecule and the strength of its coupling to each reservoir resulting in a net heat flow in the desired direction. The heat flow is examined in the slow and fast modulation limits and for different modulation waveforms, thus making it possible to optimize the device performance.

Dvira Segal; Abraham Nitzan

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

463

Heat storage with CREDA  

SciTech Connect

The principle of operation of ETS or Electric Thermal Storage is discussed in this book. As can be seen by the diagram presented, heating elements buried deep within the core are energized during off-peak periods or periods of lower cost energy. These elements charge the core to a per-determined level, then during the on-peak periods when the cost of electricity is higher or demand is higher, the heat is extracted from the core. The author discusses how this technology has progressed to the ETS equipment of today; this being the finer control of charging rates and extraction of heat from the core.

Beal, T. (Fostoria Industries, Fostoria, OH (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Heat pumps and under floor heating as a heating system for Finnish low-rise residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In bachelor’s thesis the study of under floor heating system with ground source heat pump for the heat transfers fluid heating is considered. The case… (more)

Chuduk, Svetlana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Profiles of heating in turbulent coronal magnetic loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context: The location of coronal heating in magnetic loops has been the subject of a long-lasting controversy: does it occur mostly at the loop footpoints, at the top, is it random, or is the average profile uniform? Aims: We try to address this question in model loops with MHD turbulence and a profile of density and/or magnetic field along the loop. Methods: We use the ShellAtm MHD turbulent heating model described in Buchlin & Velli (2006), with a static mass density stratification obtained by the HydRad model (Bradshaw & Mason 2003). This assumes the absence of any flow or heat conduction subsequent to the dynamic heating. Results: The average profile of heating is quasi-uniform, unless there is an expansion of the flux tube (non-uniform axial magnetic field) or the variation of the kinetic and magnetic diffusion coefficients with temperature is taken into account: in the first case the heating is enhanced at footpoints, whereas in the second case it is enhanced where the dominant diffusion coefficient is enhanced. Conclusions: These simulations shed light on the consequences on heating profiles of the complex interactions between physical effects involved in a non-uniform turbulent coronal loop.

E. Buchlin; P. J. Cargill; S. J. Bradshaw; M. Velli

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

466

Novel Power Electronics Three-Dimensional Heat Exchanger: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Electric drive systems for vehicle propulsion enable technologies critical to meeting challenges for energy, environmental, and economic security. Enabling cost-effective electric drive systems requires reductions in inverter power semiconductor area. As critical components of the electric drive system are made smaller, heat removal becomes an increasing challenge. In this paper, we demonstrate an integrated approach to the design of thermal management systems for power semiconductors that matches the passive thermal resistance of the packaging with the active convective cooling performance of the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger concept builds on existing semiconductor thermal management improvements described in literature and patents, which include improved bonded interface materials, direct cooling of the semiconductor packages, and double-sided cooling. The key difference in the described concept is the achievement of high heat transfer performance with less aggressive cooling techniques by optimizing the passive and active heat transfer paths. An extruded aluminum design was selected because of its lower tooling cost, higher performance, and scalability in comparison to cast aluminum. Results demonstrated a heat flux improvement of a factor of two, and a package heat density improvement over 30%, which achieved the thermal performance targets.

Bennion, K.; Cousineau, J.; Lustbader, J.; Narumanchi, S.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Domestic Heating and Thermal Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... DIGEST 133 of the Building Research Station, entitled "Domestic Heating and Thermal Insulation" (Pp. 7. London : H.M. Stationery Office, 1960. 4insulation, the standard of heating, the ventilation-rate and the length of the heating season ...

1960-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

468

2659 heat insulation [n] (2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

constr....(Protection against heat provided by heat-shielding materials in the outer walls of a building to prevent heat build-up in hot regions or in temperate climates during the summer. In tempera...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Heat Transfer and Convection Currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1965 research-article Heat Transfer and Convection Currents D. C...convection in a medium with internal heat generation is discussed semi-quantitatively...States English United Kingdom 1966 Heat transfer and convection currents Tozer D...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Heat and Sound Insulation Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Of the three heat transfer processes: heat conduction, convection and radiation, convectional heat transfer is reduced by fiber and foam insulation materials1, 2). Air circulation is prevented by compartmentalizi...

Dr. Andre Knop; Dr. Louis A. Pilato

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Residential heating oil prices decline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

heating oil prices decline The average retail price for home heating oil is 3.48 per gallon. That's down 4.5 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by...

472

Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.0.4 Radiance Radiance is the energy flux density per solid angle.[W/(m2 � steradian)] 6.0.5 Radiant Intensity Radiant intensity is the energy flux per solid angle [W/steradian] (radiometry) 6.0.6 Intensity Intensity)· ^Ndt (6.4) Intensity is again measured in [W/m2 ] 6.0.7 Fluence Fluence is radiant energy per area

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

473

Flow instabilities of magnetic flux tubes IV. Flux storage in the solar overshoot region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the effects of material flows on the dynamics of toroidal magnetic flux tubes located close to the base of the solar convection zone, initially within the overshoot region. The problem is to find the physical conditions in which magnetic flux can be stored for periods comparable to the dynamo amplification time, which is of the order of a few years. We carry out nonlinear numerical simulations to investigate the stability and dynamics of thin flux tubes subject to perpendicular and longitudinal flows. We compare the simulations with the results of simplified analytical approximations. We determine ranges of the flow parameters for which a linearly Parker-stable magnetic flux tube is stored in the middle of the overshoot region for a period comparable to the dynamo amplification time. The residence time for magnetic flux tubes with fluxes of 2x10^{21} Mx in the convective overshoot layer is comparable to the dynamo amplification time, provided that the average speed and the duration of the downflow...

Isik, Emre

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Advances in induction heating  

SciTech Connect

Electric induction heating, in situ, can distill (underground) high-heat-value (HHV) gas, coal tar, bitumen, and shale oil. This technique permits potentially lower cost exploitation of the solid fossil fuels: coal, oil shale, tar sand, and heavy oil. The products, when brought to the surface in gaseous form and processed, yield chemical feedstocks, natural gas, and petroleum. Residual coke can be converted, in situ, to low-heat-value (LHV) gas by a conventional water-gas process. LHV can be burned at the surface to generate electricity at low cost. The major cost of the installation will have been paid for by the HHV gas and tar distilled from the coal. There are 2 mechanisms of heating by electric induction. One uses displacement currents induced from an electric field. The other uses eddy currents induced by a magnetic field.

Not Available

1980-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

475

Solar Heating Contractor Licensing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Michigan offers a solar heating contractor specialty license to individuals who have at least three years of experience installing solar equipment under the direction of a licensed solar contractor...

476

Heating and cooling system  

SciTech Connect

Heating and cooling of dwelling houses and other confined spaces is facilitated by a system in which thermal energy is transported between an air heating and cooling system in the dwelling and a water heat storage sink or source, preferably in the form of a swimming pool or swimming pool and spa combination. Special reversing valve circuitry and the use of solar collectors and liquid-to-liquid heat exchangers on the liquid side of the system , and special air valves and air modules on the air side of the system, enhance the system's efficiency and make it practical in the sense that systems employing the invention can utilize existing craft skills and building financing arrangements and building codes, and the like, without major modification.

Krumhansl, M.U.

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

477

Solar heated swimming pool  

SciTech Connect

A swimming pool construction incorporating solar heating means to heat the pool water to a desired level. The pool includes a surrounding safety fence supported by a plurality of fence supports which are hollow and which include internal passageways. The pool water is passed through the pool support passageways whereupon it absorbs heat from the sidewalls of the fence supports, the surfaces of which have been heated by solar radiation. The fence supports can be made of plastic or other materials, but preferably are dark for improved absorptivity. The pool water can be passed serially through each of the fence supports and suitable thermostat control means can be provided to limit the water temperature increase.

Pettit, F.M.

1984-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

478

Electron Heat Transport Measured  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Transport Measured in a Stochastic Magnetic Field T. M. Biewer, * C. B. Forest, J. K. Anderson, G. Fiksel, B. Hudson, S. C. Prager, J. S. Sarff, and J. C. Wright...

479

Wood Heating Fuel Exemption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute exempts from the state sales tax all wood or "refuse-derived" fuel used for heating purposes. The law does not make any distinctions about whether the qualified fuels are used for...

480

Absorption Heat Pump Developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The implementation of both new thermodynamic cycles and new suitable fluids makes it possible to considerably widen the capacity to recover and upgrade low level heat contained particularly in industrial therm...

G. Cohen; A. Rojey

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heat flux longwave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Curling in the heat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... heat sensor, shown here, has been developed by Jim Gimzewski and colleagues at IBM Riis-chlikon specifically for studies of surface reactions . A spin-off of the scanning probe ...

David A. King

1994-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

482

Experimental investigation on heat transfer and frictional characteristics of vertical upward rifled tube in supercritical CFB boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water wall design is a key issue for supercritical Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler. On account of the good heat transfer performance, rifled tube is applied in the water wall design of a 600 MW supercritical CFB boiler in China. In order to investigate the heat transfer and frictional characteristics of the rifled tube with vertical upward flow, an in-depth experiment was conducted in the range of pressure from 12 to 30 MPa, mass flux from 230 to 1200 kg/(m2 s), and inner wall heat flux from 130 to 720 kW/m2. The wall temperature distribution and pressure drop in the rifled tube were obtained in the experiment. The normal, enhanced and deteriorated heat transfer characteristics were also captured. In this paper, the effects of pressure, inner wall heat flux and mass flux on heat transfer characteristics are analyzed, the heat transfer mechanism and the frictional resistance performance are discussed, and the corresponding empirical correlations are presented. The experimental results show that the rifled tube can effectively prevent the occurrence of Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) and keep the tube wall temperature in a permissible range under the operating condition of supercritical CFB boiler.

Dong Yang; Jie Pan; Chenn Q. Zhou; Xiaojing Zhu; Qincheng Bi; Tingkuan Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to cut your water heating bill. Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy...

484

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Surface Heat Flux Response to SST Anomalies: CCSM3.5+ vs Observation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Macrophysics · Update cloud fraction after macrophysics Reduce high-latitude LCA and land temperature biases Stratus · Overlap · In-cumulus LWC = In-stratus LWC · Non-overlap · In-cumulus LWC In-stratus LWC #12;LCA. CAM Macro LCA. CAM ­ Obs. LCA. Observation LCA. Revised ­ CAM The revised macrophysics exactly offsets

486

The tropical precipitation response to Andes topography and ocean heat fluxes in an aquaplanet model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This aquaplanet modeling study using AM2.1 examines how ocean energy transport and topography influence the location of tropical precipitation. Adding realistic Andes topography regionally displaces tropical rainfall from the equator into the ...

Elizabeth A. Maroon; Dargan M. W. Frierson; David S. Battisti

487

Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: Cluster observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies $f\\in[1,400]$ Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In $\\sim 10\\%$ of the selected data, we observe narrow-band, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The life time of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e. lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of the background turbulence, a slow wind, a relative...

Lacombe, Catherine; Matteini, Lorenzo; Santolik, Ondrej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole; Mangeney, Andre; de Conchy, Yvonne; Maksimovic, Milan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

High Heat Flux Test of the KO Standard Mockups for ITER First Wall Semi-Prototype  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ITER Systems / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

Suk-Kwon Kim et al.

489

Suppression of local heat flux in a turbulent magnetized intracluster medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching...strong magnetic field (magnetic mirrors; see Chandran Cowley 1998; Chandran...conduction modifies the classical Schwarzschild stability criterion in such a......

S. V. Komarov; E. M. Churazov; A. A. Schekochihin; J. A. ZuHone

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Dense plasma heating and Gbar shock formation by a high intensity flux of energetic electrons  

SciTech Connect

Process of shock ignition in inertial confinement fusion implies creation of a high pressure shock with a laser spike having intensity of the order of a few PW/cm{sup 2}. However, the collisional (Bremsstrahlung) absorption at these intensities is inefficient and a significant part of laser energy is converted in a stream of energetic electrons. The process of shock formation in a dense plasma by an intense electron beam is studied in this paper in a planar geometry. The energy deposition takes place in a fixed mass target layer with the areal density determined by the electron range. A self-similar isothermal rarefaction wave of a fixed mass describes the expanding plasma. Formation of a shock wave in the target under the pressure of expanding plasma is described. The efficiency of electron beam energy conversion into the shock wave energy depends on the fast electron energy and the pulse duration. The model is applied to the laser produced fast electrons. The fast electron energy transport could be the dominant mechanism of ablation pressure creation under the conditions of shock ignition. The shock wave pressure exceeding 1 Gbar during 200–300 ps can be generated with the electron pulse intensity in the range of 5–10 PW/cm{sup 2}. The conclusions of theoretical model are confirmed in numerical simulations with a radiation hydrodynamic code coupled with a fast electron transport module.

Ribeyre, X.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [University Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France)] [University Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); Gus'kov, S. [University Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France) [University Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53, Leninskii Prospect, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

491

An experimental investigation of critical heat flux in subcooled internal flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bubble and the wall may completely evaporate during the time required for the bubble to pass (Ueda and Kim, 1986). The length, Ls, and velocity, Us, of the bubble and the thickness, 5, of the liquid sublayer can be predicted by performing a stability... on the dispersion relation for stability of the vertical liquid-vapor interface between the moving vapor bubble and the liquid sublayer, and assumes that the effects of gravity are negligible and that the sublayer velocity is much smaller that the vapor velocity...

Shatto, Donald Patrick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

492

Estimation of heat and chemical fluxes from a seafloor hydrothermal vent field using radon measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... exists at about 200 m above the depth of the vent field12'13. Distinct excess radon levels have been observed at Endeavour both in vent water and in the effluent plume ... vent water and in the effluent plume up to 17 km from the ridge axis14.Radon is a chemically inert gas with a radioactive half life of 3.85 days. ...

N. D. Rosenberg; J. E. Lupton; D. Kadko; R. Collier; M. D. Lilley; H. Pak

1988-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

493

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conductivity; United States; USGS Authors Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer and M.H. Published Open-File Report - U. S. Geological...

494

FABRICATION AND TESTING OF A NONSTANDARD THIN-FILM HEAT FLUX SENSOR FOR POWER SYSTEM APPLICATIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Stirling convertors are being operated by NASA Glenn Research Center for many years to demonstrate a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) capable of providing reliable power… (more)

Wilson, Scott Dean

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Investigating and establishing limiting heat flux for passively cooled and solar concentrated thermoelectric power generation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermoelectric generators (TEG) working on the principle of Seebeck effect have gathered the attention during this period as a potential device that can generate electricity… (more)

Date, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Plasma-Sprayed Beryllium on Macro-Roughened Substrates for Fusion Reactor High Heat Flux Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of beryllium first wall (FW) plasma facing components for future magnetic confinement fusion experiments, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is a topic of great.....

Kendall J. Hollis; Brian D. Bartram; Manfred Roedig…

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

498