National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for heat content relative

  1. Fermilab Today - Related Content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Content Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO Classifieds Director's Corner Physics in a Nutshell Frontier Science Result Tip of the Week...

  2. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr...

  3. Heat exchanger and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D.; McKellar, Michael G.

    2015-12-22

    Heat exchangers include a housing having an inlet and an outlet and forming a portion of a transition chamber. A heating member may form another portion of the transition chamber. The heating member includes a first end having a first opening and a second end having a second opening larger than the first opening. Methods of conveying a fluid include supplying a first fluid into a transition chamber of a heat exchanger, supplying a second fluid into the transition chamber, and altering a state of a portion of the first fluid with the second fluid. Methods of sublimating solid particles include conveying a first fluid comprising a material in a solid state into a transition chamber, heating the material to a gaseous state by directing a second fluid through a heating member and mixing the first fluid and the second fluid.

  4. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,056 1,055 1,057 1,043 983 983 983 983 983 983 983 983 2014 947 946 947 947 947 947 951 978 990 968 974 962 2015 968 954 947 959 990 1,005 1,011 965 989 996 996 997 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  5. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,014 1,015 1,016 1,015 1,014 1,015 1,016 1,019 1,017 1,016 1,017 1,017 2014 1,018 1,018 1,018 1,018 1,021 1,022 1,023 1,023 1,027 1,026 1,026 1,025 2015 1,025 1,026 1,025 1,026 1,028 1,031 1,030 1,028 1,029 1,028 1,026 1,027 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  6. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,050 1,049 1,046 1,048 1,041 1,049 1,058 1,054 1,065 1,064 1,067 1,057 2014 1,052 1,048 1,048 1,051 1,045 1,049 1,063 1,065 1,062 1,063 1,063 1,064 2015 1,061 1,061 1,062 1,051 1,055 1,055 1,044 1,044 1,043 1,051 1,051 1,049 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  7. District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (BTU per Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,030 1,025 1,021 1,014 1,014 1,025 1,034 1,037 1,043 1,041 1,047 1,048 2014 1,041 1,035 1,031 1,038 1,035 1,038 1,038 1,038 1,039 1,041 1,044 1,043 2015 1,045 1,047 1,046 1,044 1,044 1,040 1,037 1,036 1,035 1,045 1,039 1,044 - = No Data Reported; --

  8. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,032 1,030 1,033 1,040 1,051 1,056 1,057 1,058 1,037 1,032 1,033 2014 1,030 1,036 1,038 1,041 1,051 1,050 1,048 1,048 1,050 1,055 1,042 1,051 2015 1,046 1,044 1,051 1,059 1,059 1,070 1,073 1,069 1,076 1,069 1,060 1,051 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  9. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,016 1,015 1,016 1,015 1,016 1,015 1,016 1,016 1,017 1,017 1,018 1,018 2014 1,018 1,018 1,018 1,019 1,019 1,019 1,022 1,023 1,024 1,023 1,024 1,025 2015 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,024 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,024 1,024 1,023 1,023 1,023 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  10. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,018 1,025 1,011 1,022 1,028 1,024 1,032 1,028 1,030 1,030 1,026 1,024 2014 1,015 1,015 1,016 1,019 1,020 1,022 1,022 1,023 1,021 1,020 1,018 1,017 2015 1,017 1,026 1,029 1,026 1,049 1,027 1,027 1,026 1,026 1,028 1,027 1,026 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  11. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,025 1,029 1,029 1,030 1,031 1,030 1,030 1,027 1,028 1,032 1,033 1,032 2014 1,034 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,040 1,039 1,043 1,047 1,044 1,046 1,044 1,045 2015 1,045 1,047 1,047 1,051 1,054 1,060 1,059 1,059 1,058 1,058 1,057 1,056 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  12. U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,028 1,026 1,028 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,025 2010's 1,023 1,022 1,024 1,027 1,032 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  13. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,013 1,015 1,015 1,015 1,016 1,016 1,017 1,017 1,016 1,018 1,019 2014 1,017 1,016 1,018 1,021 1,028 1,025 1,029 1,029 1,031 1,034 1,037 1,038 2015 1,030 1,031 1,029 1,029 1,028 1,027 1,028 1,024 1,023 1,023 1,022 1,023 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  14. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,018 1,018 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,018 1,017 1,016 1,017 2014 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025 1,025 1,027 1,025 1,028 1,025 2015 1,033 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,044 1,039 1,040 1,042 1,039 1,037 1,035 1,031 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  15. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025 1,026 1,027 1,028 1,030 1,031 1,028 1,028 1,033 2014 1,029 1,024 1,026 1,028 1,031 1,037 1,034 1,036 1,038 1,022 1,017 1,019 2015 1,023 1,018 1,015 1,016 1,023 1,021 1,024 1,015 1,020 1,024 1,021 1,024 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  16. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,015 1,031 1,021 1,010 997 988 994 1,001 1,026 1,034 1,054 2014 1,048 1,036 1,030 1,022 1,006 993 984 996 1,005 1,019 1,046 1,039 2015 1,047 1,037 1,030 1,023 1,000 1,010 1,034 1,028 1,024 1,033 1,035 1,041 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  17. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,013 1,013 1,014 1,015 1,015 1,014 1,015 1,015 1,016 1,017 1,019 1,018 2014 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,022 1,020 1,021 1,021 1,023 1,024 2015 1,027 1,030 1,029 1,028 1,029 1,027 1,027 1,027 1,028 1,028 1,030 1,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  18. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,011 1,012 1,013 1,015 1,019 1,020 1,019 1,021 1,020 1,018 1,015 1,014 2014 1,016 1,017 1,019 1,019 1,023 1,023 1,025 1,030 1,028 1,027 1,025 1,029 2015 1,028 1,029 1,031 1,039 1,037 1,043 1,043 1,044 1,041 1,039 1,034 1,033 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,020 1,021 1,020 1,021 1,026 1,030 1,028 1,029 1,028 1,029 1,029 1,027 2014 1,031 1,027 1,033 1,034 1,038 1,042 1,042 1,051 1,046 1,040 1,038 1,040 2015 1,041 1,034 1,033 1,037 1,044 1,047 1,043 1,041 1,039 1,041 1,045 1,041 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  20. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,013 1,013 1,014 1,014 1,015 1,018 1,018 1,021 1,022 1,025 1,020 1,020 2014 1,019 1,014 1,019 1,026 1,030 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,035 1,033 1,035 1,034 2015 1,036 1,033 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,030 1,030 1,029 1,031 1,028 1,029 1,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  1. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,014 1,014 1,013 1,014 1,013 1,017 1,015 1,016 1,019 1,013 1,014 2014 1,013 1,013 1,014 1,014 1,011 1,016 1,016 1,018 1,017 1,018 1,017 1,017 2015 1,017 1,020 1,025 1,026 1,024 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,025 1,024 1,023 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,044 1,040 1,032 1,034 1,034 1,044 1,048 1,043 1,047 1,041 1,032 1,031 2014 1,034 1,030 1,030 1,027 1,032 1,030 1,038 1,036 1,040 1,031 1,026 1,030 2015 1,028 1,029 1,028 1,021 1,019 1,030 1,031 1,033 1,032 1,032 1,034 1,034 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  3. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,032 1,027 1,032 1,028 1,031 1,033 1,030 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,029 2014 1,029 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,033 1,030 1,031 1,039 1,023 1,016 1,025 1,027 2015 1,033 1,035 1,030 1,025 1,022 1,020 1,020 1,018 1,019 1,026 1,025 1,027 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  4. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,041 1,037 1,032 1,027 1,037 1,042 1,060 1,056 1,062 1,059 1,061 1,059 2014 1,053 1,048 1,045 1,049 1,047 1,052 1,051 1,051 1,049 1,052 1,057 1,057 2015 1,059 1,061 1,058 1,051 1,058 1,057 1,055 1,049 1,050 1,053 1,049 1,050 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  5. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,033 1,032 1,033 1,035 1,032 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,038 1,033 1,030 2014 1,035 1,032 1,031 1,030 1,030 1,031 1,030 1,029 1,029 1,028 1,029 1,028 2015 1,035 1,035 1,030 1,029 1,027 1,027 1,029 1,028 1,027 1,028 1,029 1,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  6. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,021 1,021 1,022 1,026 1,020 1,022 1,024 1,021 1,019 1,019 1,017 1,019 2014 1,019 1,021 1,021 1,017 1,020 1,019 1,015 1,028 1,022 1,023 1,026 1,029 2015 1,027 1,026 1,030 1,035 1,028 1,033 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,034 1,041 1,040 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  7. ,"New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  8. ,"Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  9. ,"Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  10. ,"Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  11. ,"Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  12. ,"California Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  13. ,"Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  14. ,"Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  15. ,"Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  16. ,"Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  17. ,"Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  18. ,"Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  19. ,"Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  20. ,"Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  1. ,"Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  2. ,"Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  3. ,"Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  4. ,"Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  5. ,"Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  6. ,"Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  7. ,"Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  8. ,"Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  9. ,"Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  10. ,"Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  11. ,"Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  12. ,"Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  13. ,"Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  14. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8.0 - HOISTING AND RIGGING IN HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS February 18, 2010 Rev 1 Page 1 CHAPTER 18.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS..................................................................................................................................1 PAGINATION TABLE.....................................................................................................................................1 18.0 HOISTING AND RIGGING IN HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS

  15. Relation between combustion heat and chemical wood composition during white and brown rot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobry, J.; Dziurzynski, A.; Rypacek, V.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of beech and spruce wood were incubated with the white rot fungi Pleurotus ostreatus and Lentinus tigrinus and the brown rot fungi Fomitopsis pinicola and Serpula lacrymans (S. lacrimans) for four months. Decomposition (expressed as percent weight loss) and amounts of holocellulose, lignin, humic acids (HU), hymatomelanic acids (HY) and fulvo acids (FU) were determined and expressed in weight percent. Combustion heat of holocellulose and lignin was determined in healthy wood and in specimens where decomposition was greater than 50%. During white rot decomposition, combustion heat was unchanged even at high decomposition and the relative amounts of holocellulose and lignin remained the same. Total amounts of HU, HY and FU increased during the initial stages and stabilized at 20%. The content of HU plus HY was negligible even at the highest degree of decomposition. During brown rot decomposition, combustion heat was unchanged only in the initial stages, it increased continously with increasing rot. Lignin content was unchanged in the initial stages and increased after 30% weight loss. Total amounts of HU, HY and FU increased continuously, reaching higher values than in white rot decomposition; there were differences between the two species. Biosynthesis of HU plus HY began when weight loss reached 30%; there were differences in absolute and relative amounts between species. 24 references.

  16. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (BTU per Cubic Foot) Electric Power Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,025 1,027 1,028 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,025 2010's 1,022 1,021 1,022 1,025 1,029 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  17. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Cubic Foot) Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,029 1,026 1,028 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,025 2010's 1,023 1,022 1,025 1,028 1,032 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016

  18. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.0 - CRITICAL, SPECIAL, & ENGINEERED LIFTS January 4, 2016 Rev 1 Page 1 CHAPTER 3.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 CRITICAL LIFTS ....................................................................................................................................... 3 3.1 SCOPE .......................................................................................................................................................... 3 3.2 CRITICAL LIFT DETERMINATION

  19. Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program and Book of Abstracts Contents Organizers i-ii Detailed Program iii-viii Oral presentations 1-38 Posters P1-P27 Program Schematic back cover The LAPD Symposium brings together scientists from laser physics, low- temperature plasma chemistry and physics, and nuclear fusion. The Symposium is an important, unique, and fruitful source for cross-fertilization between these fields. Major topics include laser-aided diagnostics for fusion plasmas, industrial process plasmas, and environmental

  20. Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 August 2005 Contents Bechtel Nevada achieves 5 million hours! 1 WSI graduates fresh members of security 1 protective forces Handling radiation emergencies 2 SiteLines features a new editor 2 Rocky Flats survey 3 NTS Swift Water Rescue Team practices on the 3 Colorado River Drilling Program overcomes challenges at the NTS 3 Toastmasters: making effective communication a 4 worldwide reality Atomic Testing Museum update 4 Two more successful shots at JASPER 5 Hazardous Substance Inventory users 5

  1. The composition, heating value and renewable share of the energy content of mixed municipal solid waste in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horttanainen, M. Teirasvuo, N.; Kapustina, V.; Hupponen, M.; Luoranen, M.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • New experimental data of mixed MSW properties in a Finnish case region. • The share of renewable energy of mixed MSW. • The results were compared with earlier international studies. • The average share of renewable energy was 30% and the average LHVar 19 MJ/kg. • Well operating source separation decreases the renewable energy content of MSW. - Abstract: For the estimation of greenhouse gas emissions from waste incineration it is essential to know the share of the renewable energy content of the combusted waste. The composition and heating value information is generally available, but the renewable energy share or heating values of different fractions of waste have rarely been determined. In this study, data from Finnish studies concerning the composition and energy content of mixed MSW were collected, new experimental data on the compositions, heating values and renewable share of energy were presented and the results were compared to the estimations concluded from earlier international studies. In the town of Lappeenranta in south-eastern Finland, the share of renewable energy ranged between 25% and 34% in the energy content tests implemented for two sample trucks. The heating values of the waste and fractions of plastic waste were high in the samples compared to the earlier studies in Finland. These high values were caused by good source separation and led to a low share of renewable energy content in the waste. The results showed that in mixed municipal solid waste the renewable share of the energy content can be significantly lower than the general assumptions (50–60%) when the source separation of organic waste, paper and cardboard is carried out successfully. The number of samples was however small for making extensive conclusions on the results concerning the heating values and renewable share of energy and additional research is needed for this purpose.

  2. Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 June/July 2005 Contents Fires burn Nevada Test Site in June NNSA/NSO and Department of Homeland Security break ground at the Nevada Test Site U1h ribbon cutting marks the remarkable New training grounds dedicated at NTS Changes enhance the EAP Unicorn subcritical experiment completes key milestone New communication system takes flight SiteLines goes online DNFSB visits U1a Funnel clouds at the Nevada Test Site Community Environmental Monitor receives EPA award Take Our Daughters and Sons to

  3. ,"U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,"Annual",2015,"06/30/2003" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_cons_heat_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_cons_heat_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202)

  4. ,"U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2012" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_cons_heat_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_cons_heat_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202)

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic...

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic...

  7. Regressed relations for forced convection heat transfer in a direct injection stratified charge rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.M.; Schock, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    Currently, the heat transfer equation used in the rotary combustion engine (RCE) simulation model is taken from piston engine studies. These relations have been empirically developed by the experimental input coming from piston engines whose geometry differs considerably from that of the RCE. The objective of this work was to derive equations to estimate heat transfer coefficients in the combustion chamber of an RCE. This was accomplished by making detailed temperature and pressure measurements in a direct injection stratified charge (DISC) RCE under a range of conditions. For each specific measurement point, the local gas velocity was assumed equal to the local rotor tip speed. Local physical properties of the fluids were then calculated. Two types of correlation equations were derived and are described in this paper. The first correlation expresses the Nusselt number as a function of the Prandtl number, Reynolds number, and characteristic temperature ratio; the second correlation expresses the forced convection heat transfer coefficient as a function of fluid temperature, pressure and velocity. 10 references.

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  9. Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 ... 2 4 1.1. Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery ......

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - mather_twpice_heating_newyork.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manus Clear-Sky Heating Rates (Kday) Shortwave Longwave Net Ice Water Content + Liquid Water Content Radiative Heating Radiative heating profiles for the period January 26 -...

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumers",52,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2012" ,"Data 2","Heat Content of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers",52,"Annual",2015,"06/30/2003" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm25vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016"

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","12/2015","01/15/2013" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  4. Heat pump system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

    1982-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","La...

  6. IEA BESTEST In-Depth Diagnostic Cases for Ground Coupled Heat Transfer Related to Slab-on-Grade Construction: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Beausoleil-Morrison, I.; Ben-Nakhi, A.; Crowley, M.; Deru, M.; Henninger, R.; Ribberink, H.; Thornton, J.; Wijsman, A.; Witte, M.

    2009-06-01

    A set of validation test cases is presented to compare the results of midlevel detailed ground-coupled heat transfer models typically used with whole-building energy simulation software.

  7. Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 4 1.1. Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery .......................................................................................... 2 5 1.2. Challenges and Barriers for Waste Heat Recovery ..................................................................... 13 6 1.3.

  8. Woven heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  9. Industrial Process Heating - Technology Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Industrial Process Heating - Technology Assessment 1 2 Contents 3 4 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 5 1.1. Industrial Process Heating Overview ............................................................................................ 2 6 2. Technology Assessment and Potential ................................................................................................. 6 7 2.1. Status

  10. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residential Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)",29,"Weekly","3/14/2016","10/1/1990" ,"Release Date:","3/16/2016" ,"Next

  12. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  13. Combined Heat and Power

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Combined Heat and Power 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 4 1.1 Combined Heat and Power overview ........................................................................................... 2 5 1.2 Benefits of CHP for the Nation ...................................................................................................... 4 6 1.3 Benefits of CHP for

  14. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feb-15 Mar-15 Apr-15 May-15 Jun-15 Jul-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,035 1,030 1,025 1,022 1,020 1,020 2013-2015...

  15. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,046 1,044 1,047 1,032 1,030 1,029 2007-2014...

  16. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,040 1,040 1,048 1,046 983 959 2007-2014...

  17. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Feb-15 Mar-15 Apr-15 May-15 Jun-15 Jul-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 954 947 959 990 1,005 1,011 2013-2015...

  18. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 1,018 1,016 1,017 1,025 1,030

  19. Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    05 1,013 1,012 1,002 1,002 1,001

  20. Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 1,015 1,021 1,025 1,029 1,039

  1. Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 1,017 1,015 1,015 1,024 1,028

  2. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,030 1,032 1,029 1,028 1,030 1,044 2007-2014...

  3. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feb-15 Mar-15 Apr-15 May-15 Jun-15 Jul-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,054 1,060 1,062 1,065 1,069 1,070 2013-2015...

  4. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 1,024 1,023 1,023 1,022 1,023

  5. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    20 1,018 1,019 1,026 1,025 1,027

  6. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    55 1,049 1,050 1,053 1,049 1,05

  7. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 1,028 1,027 1,028 1,029 1,030

  8. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    34 1,035 1,036 1,034 1,041 1,040

  9. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    43 1,041 1,039 1,041 1,045 1,041

  10. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 1,029 1,031 1,028 1,029 1,030

  11. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    26 1,026 1,026 1,025 1,024 1,023

  12. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 1,033 1,032 1,032 1,034

  13. Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    68 1,071 1,068 1,060 1,055 1,053

  14. Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    44 1,043 1,044 1,043 1,043 1,042

  15. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,073 1,069 1,076 1,069 1,060 1,051 2013

  16. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,044 1,044 1,043 1,051 1,051 1,049 2013

  17. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,026 1,024 1,024 1,023 1,023 1,023 2013

  18. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,030 1,028 1,029 1,028 1,026 1,027 2013

  19. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,011 965 989 996 996 997 2013

  20. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,034 1,028 1,024 1,033 1,035 1,041 2013

  1. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,027 1,027 1,028 1,028 1,030 1,030 2013

  2. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,043 1,044 1,041 1,039 1,034 1,033 2013

  3. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,059 1,059 1,058 1,058 1,057 1,056 2013

  4. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,040 1,042 1,039 1,037 1,035 1,031 2013

  5. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,024 1,015 1,020 1,024 1,021 1,024 2013

  6. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    35 1,033 1,035 1,033 1,031 1,030

  7. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 1,014 1,017 1,017 1,021 1,03

  8. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 1,010 1,019 1,015 1,033 1,04

  9. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 1,010 1,012 1,016 1,029 1,031

  10. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    07 1,010 1,012 1,014 1,015 1,023

  11. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 1,016 1,025 1,028 1,026 1,029

  12. Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    04 1,011 1,019 1,031 1,039 1,055

  13. Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    33 1,024 1,029 1,033 1,034 1,04

  14. Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 1,031 1,032 1,046 1,045 1,06

  15. Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 1,032 1,030 1,036 1,040 1,04

  16. Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    15 1,021 1,022 1,015 1,025 1,03

  17. Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    34 1,036 1,040 1,049 1,047 1,04

  18. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 1,014 1,014 1,021 1,026 1,027

  19. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 1,025 1,026 1,027 1,030 1,033

  20. Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    45 1,038 1,043 1,047 1,041 1,044

  1. Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    07 1,008 1,012 1,015 1,016 1,026

  2. Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    28 1,027 1,034 1,040 1,041 1,053

  3. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    32 1,029 1,028 1,030 1,043 1,065

  4. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,032 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,029 1,029 2013

  5. Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,002 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,001 1,000 2013

  6. Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,038 1,038 1,040 1,042 1,041 1,044 2013

  7. Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,023 1,022 1,019 1,029 1,014 1,015 2013

  8. California Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,037 1,037 1,037 1,035 1,037 1,037 2013

  9. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    27 1,023 1,025 1,032 1,031 1,034

  10. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    36 1,035 1,036 1,036 1,033 1,030

  11. Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    69 1,068 1,071 1,071 1,077 1,077

  12. Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    50 1,047 1,049 1,049 1,047 1,050

  13. Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    39 1,039 1,038 1,036 1,035 1,03

  14. Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    44 1,044 1,044 1,045 1,046 1,04

  15. Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    42 1,044 1,041 1,040 1,046 1,054

  16. California Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    23 1,020 1,022 1,028 1,028 1,035

  17. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    19 1,032 1,039 1,042 1,043 1,058

  18. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    23 1,025 1,027 1,043 1,054 1,050

  19. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    19 1,015 1,015 1,016 1,021 1,024

  20. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    22 1,018 1,015 1,016 1,022 1,028

  1. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    40 1,048 1,046 983 958 981

  2. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 1,027

  3. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    21 1,017 1,015 1,015 1,025

  4. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    08 1,011 1,011 1,016 1,021

  5. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 1,012 1,012 1,015 1,021 1,036

  6. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    06 1,009 1,014 1,016 1,038 1,052

  7. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 1,020 1,022 1,020 1,021 1,037

  8. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    30 1,027 1,030 1,028 1,028 1,025

  9. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    24 1,019 1,015 1,014 1,030 1,032

  10. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    44 1,047 1,032 1,030 1,028 1,026

  11. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    27 1,027 1,037 1,051 1,050 1,055

  12. Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    43 1,043 1,042 1,044 1,044 1,046

  13. Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    22 1,019 1,020 1,030 1,027 1,02

  14. Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    56 1,054 1,055 1,053 1,051 1,05

  15. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    70 1,065 1,066 1,064 1,069 1,073

  16. Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    36 1,040 1,034 1,045 1,043 1,044

  17. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,019 1,022 1,026 1,031 1,030 1,020 2007-2014...

  18. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mar-15 Apr-15 May-15 Jun-15 Jul-15 Aug-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,029 1,026 1,049 1,027 1,027 1,026 2013-2015...

  19. ,"Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusnem.xls" ...

  20. ,"Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusorm.xls" ...

  1. ,"Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcuswim.xls" ...

  2. ,"Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusvam.xls" ...

  3. ,"Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusutm.xls" ...

  4. ,"Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusohm.xls" ...

  5. ,"Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcustnm.xls" ...

  6. ,"Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcuswam.xls" ...

  7. ,"Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusnvm.xls" ...

  8. ,"Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusokm.xls" ...

  9. ,"Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcuswym.xls" ...

  10. ,"Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusvtm.xls" ...

  11. ,"Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcustxm.xls" ...

  12. ,"Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcuspam.xls" ...

  13. Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10 1,014 1,019 1,025 1,032 1,039

  14. Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    31 1,034 1,034 1,041 1,042 1,05

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10272015 9:02:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS1","MCRFPP11","MCRFPFL1","MCRFPNY1","MCRFPPA1","MCRFPV...

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10272015 9:02:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS1","MCRFPP11","MCRFPFL1","MCRFPNY1","MCRFPPA1","MCRFPV...

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTTRIUS1","MCRRIU... "Date","U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum ...

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...201982" ,"Data 2","Refiner and Blender Net Inputs",6,"Weekly","3182016","49... "Back to Contents","Data 2: Refiner and Blender Net Inputs" "Sourcekey","WBCRINUS2","W...

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRPUS1","M... "Date","U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production of Crude Oil and Petroleum ...

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contents","Data 1: Spot Price" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD","NGMEPG0PLCNUSDMMBTU" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid ...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Brazil (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ERENUS-NBRDMCF"...

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Japan (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0EVENUS-NJAMMCF" "Date","Liquefied U.S....

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0EVENUS-NJADMCF"...

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ERENUS-NJADMCF"...

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ..."Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262016 2:17:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Underground Storage ...

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015,"06/30/2003" ,"Release Date:","02/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","03/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_cons_heat_a_epg0_vgth_btucf_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_cons_heat_a_epg0_vgth_btucf_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202)

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Propane Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residential Propane Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)",46,"Weekly","3/14/2016","10/1/1990" ,"Release Date:","3/16/2016" ,"Next Release

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Propane Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wholesale Propane Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)",21,"Weekly","3/14/2016","10/7/2013" ,"Release Date:","3/16/2016" ,"Next Release

  9. ARM - Heat Index Calculations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CalculatorsHeat Index Calculations Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Heat Index Calculations Heat Index is an index that combines air temperature and relative humidity to estimate how hot it actually feels. The human body cools off through perspiration, which removes heat from

  10. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI); Zawacki, Thomas S. (St. Joseph, MI); Marsala, Joseph (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1994-11-29

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium.

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_dc_nus_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3/9/2016 2:54:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3/9/2016 2:56:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_imp_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3/9/2016 3:35:39 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3/9/2016 2:54:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3/9/2016 2:56:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_imp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3/9/2016 3:35:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products"

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3/9/2016 2:54:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production"

  18. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3/9/2016 2:54:41 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production"

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Daily","3/14/2016","1/2/1986" ,"Data 2","Conventional Gasoline",2,"Daily","3/14/2016","6/2/1986" ,"Data 3","RBOB Regular Gasoline",1,"Daily","3/14/2016","3/11/2003" ,"Data 4","No. 2 Heating Oil",1,"Daily","3/14/2016","6/2/1986" ,"Data 5","Ultra-Low-Sulfur No. 2 Diesel

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Weekly","3/11/2016","1/3/1986" ,"Data 2","Conventional Gasoline",2,"Weekly","3/11/2016","6/6/1986" ,"Data 3","RBOB Regular Gasoline",1,"Weekly","3/11/2016","9/12/2003" ,"Data 4","No. 2 Heating Oil",1,"Weekly","3/11/2016","6/6/1986" ,"Data 5","Ultra-Low-Sulfur No. 2 Diesel

  1. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard

    1980-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  2. Geothermal Heat Pumps- Heating Mode

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In winter, fluid passing through this vertical, closed loop system is warmed by the heat of the earth; this heat is then transferred to the building.

  3. Heat storage duration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

  4. Analysis of Joint Masonry Moisture Content Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, Kohta

    2015-10-01

    Adding insulation to the interior side of walls of masonry buildings in cold (and wet) climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns, such as condensation and freeze-thaw, have known solutions, but wood members embedded in the masonry structure will be colder (and potentially wetter) after an interior insulation retrofit. Moisture content & relative humidity were monitored at joist ends in historic mass brick masonry walls retrofitted with interior insulation in a cold climate (Zone 5A); data were collected from 2012-2015. Eleven joist ends were monitored in all four orientations. One limitation of these results is that the renovation is still ongoing, with limited wintertime construction heating and no permanent occupancy to date. Measurements show that many joists ends remain at high moisture contents, especially at north- and east-facing orientations, with constant 100% RH conditions at the worst cases. These high moisture levels are not conducive for wood durability, but no evidence for actual structural damage has been observed. Insulated versus non-insulated joist pockets do not show large differences. South facing joists have safe (10-15%) moisture contents. Given the uncertainty pointed out by research, definitive guidance on the vulnerability of embedded wood members is difficult to formulate. In high-risk situations, or when a very conservative approach is warranted, the embedded wood member condition can be eliminated entirely, supporting the joist ends outside of the masonry pocket.

  5. Stirling engine heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, L.N.; Houtman, W.H.; Percival, W.H.

    1988-06-28

    A hot gas engine is described wherein a working gas flows back and forth in a closed path between a relatively cooler compression cylinder side of the engine and a relatively hotter expansion cylinder side of the engine and the path contains means including a heat source and a heat sink acting upon the gas in cooperation with the compression and expansion cylinders to cause the gas to execute a thermodynamic cycle wherein useful mechanical output power is developed by the engine, the improvement in the heat source which comprises a plurality of individual tubes each forming a portion of the closed path for the working gas.

  6. Template:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ContentAssist Jump to: navigation, search This is the ContentAssist template. It is intended for inclusion on any page and will highlight extracted energy-related terms from the...

  7. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI); Zawacki, Thomas S. (St. Joseph, MI)

    1996-12-03

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium. A combination of weak and rich liquor working solution is used as the heat transfer medium.

  8. Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

  9. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing...

  10. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

  11. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  12. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

  13. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

  14. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard

    1981-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  15. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  16. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  17. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  18. Geothermal Heat Pumps- Cooling Mode

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In summer, the fluid removes heat from the building and transfers it to the relatively cooler ground in order to cool the building.

  19. Heat Transfer Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Transfer Laboratory Materials in solids or fluid forms play an important role in a wide range of mechanical systems and vehicle cooling applications. Understanding how materials behave when subjected to anticipated thermal conditions is critical to increasing their performance range and longevity. Argonne's Heat Transfer Laboratory enables researchers to: Synthesize and prepare heat transfer fluids Characterize heat transfer fluids Test convection-related heat transfer Test boiling heat

  20. Heat collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  1. Heat collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrigan, M.A.

    1981-06-29

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  2. Analysis of Joist Masonry Moisture Content Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, Kohta

    2015-10-08

    There are many existing buildings with load-bearing mass masonry walls, whose energy performance could be improved with the retrofit of insulation. However, adding insulation to the interior side of walls of such masonry buildings in cold (and wet) climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns, such as condensation and freeze-thaw have known solutions. But wood members embedded in the masonry structure will be colder (and potentially wetter) after an interior insulation retrofit. Moisture content & relative humidity were monitored at joist ends in historic mass brick masonry walls retrofitted with interior insulation in a cold climate (Zone 5A); data were collected from 2012-2015. Eleven joist ends were monitored in all four orientations. One limitation of these results is that the renovation is still ongoing, with limited wintertime construction heating and no permanent occupancy to date. Measurements show that many joists ends remain at high moisture contents, especially at north- and east-facing orientations, with constant 100% RH conditions at the worst cases. These high moisture levels are not conducive for wood durability, but no evidence for actual structural damage has been observed. Insulated vs. non-insulated joist pockets do not show large differences. South facing joists have safe (10-15%) moisture contents. Given the uncertainty pointed out by research, definitive guidance on the vulnerability of embedded wood members is difficult to formulate. In high-risk situations, or when a very conservative approach is warranted, the embedded wood member condition can be eliminated entirely, supporting the joist ends outside of the masonry pocket.

  3. Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

    1984-08-30

    The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

  4. Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huebotter, Paul R.; McLennan, George A.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

  5. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  6. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high- T e ECH heated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    discharges in the large helical device (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high- T e ECH heated discharges in the large helical device Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on January 28, 2017 Title: Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high- T e ECH heated discharges in the large helical device Authors: Pablant, N. A. ; Satake, S. ; Yokoyama, M. ; Gates, D. A. ; Bitter, M. ;

  7. #HeatChat @Energy: Ask Us Your Home Heating Questions | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy #HeatChat @Energy: Ask Us Your Home Heating Questions #HeatChat @Energy: Ask Us Your Home Heating Questions October 21, 2015 - 10:10am Addthis Check out our <a href="/node/780416">Energy Saver 101 infographic</a> for everything you need to know about home heating. Check out our Energy Saver 101 infographic for everything you need to know about home heating. Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Ask us

  8. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 634 578 46 1 Q 116.4 106.3...

  9. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI); Zawacki, Thomas S. (St. Joseph, MI)

    1998-07-21

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use, as the heat transfer medium, the working fluid of the absorption system taken from the generator at a location where the working fluid has a rich liquor concentration.

  10. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, B.A.; Zawacki, T.S.

    1998-07-21

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use, as the heat transfer medium, the working fluid of the absorption system taken from the generator at a location where the working fluid has a rich liquor concentration. 5 figs.

  11. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valenzuela, Javier (Hanover, NH)

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  12. Water Heating Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Heating Basics Water Heating Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:15am Addthis A variety of systems are available for water heating in homes and buildings. Learn about: Conventional Storage Water Heaters Demand (Tankless or Instantaneous) Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Addthis Related Articles Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Solar Water Heater Basics Heat Pump Water Heater Basics Energy Basics Home Renewable Energy Homes &

  13. PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

  14. Check Heat Transfer Surfaces

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This tip sheet discusses the importance of checking heat transfer surfaces in process heating systems.

  15. Absorption Heat Pump Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Absorption heat pumps are essentially air-source heat pumps driven not by electricity, but by a heat source such as natural gas, propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption heat pumps, they are also referred to as gas-fired heat pumps.

  16. CONTENT MODEL HOW-TO

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003241MLTPL00 Content Model Guidelines  https://github.com/usgin/usginspecs/wiki/Content-Model-Guidelines 

  17. Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jardine, D.M.

    1983-03-22

    This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle. 18 figs.

  18. Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jardine, Douglas M. (Colorado Springs, CO)

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle.

  19. Ground Source Heat Pumps | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    heating andor cooling system that takes advantage of the relatively constant year-round ground temperature to pump heat to or from the ground. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle...

  20. Bayonet heat exchangers in heat-assisted Stirling heat pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yagyu, S.; Fukuyama, Y.; Morikawa, T.; Isshiki, N.; Satoh, I.; Corey, J.; Fellows, C.

    1998-07-01

    The Multi-Temperature Heat Supply System is a research project creating a city energy system with lower environmental load. This system consists of a gas-fueled internal combustion engine and a heat-assisted Stirling heat pump utilizing shaft power and thermal power in a combination of several cylinders. The heat pump is mainly driven by engine shaft power and is partially assisted by thermal power from engine exhaust heat source. Since this heat pump is operated by proportioning the two energy sources to match the characteristics of the driving engine, the system is expected to produce cooling and heating water at high COP. This paper describes heat exchanger development in the project to develop a heat-assisted Stirling heat pump. The heat pump employs the Bayonet type heat exchangers (BHX Type I) for supplying cold and hot water and (BHX Type II) for absorbing exhaust heat from the driving engine. The heat exchanger design concepts are presented and their heat transfer and flow loss characteristics in oscillating gas flow are investigated. The main concern in the BHX Type I is an improvement of gas side heat transfer and the spirally finned tubes were applied to gas side of the heat exchanger. For the BHX Type II, internal heat transfer characteristics are the main concern. Shell-and-tube type heat exchangers are widely used in Stirling machines. However, since brazing is applied to the many tubes for their manufacturing processes, it is very difficult to change flow passages to optimize heat transfer and loss characteristics once they have been made. The challenge was to enhance heat transfer on the gas side to make a highly efficient heat exchanger with fewer parts. It is shown that the Bayonet type heat exchanger can have good performance comparable to conventional heat exchangers.

  1. Passive heat transfer means for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1984-01-01

    An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. Means such as shrouding normally isolated the secondary condensing section from effective heat transfer with the heat sink, but a sensor responds to overheat conditions of the reactor to open the shrouding, which thereby increases the cooling capacity of the heat pipe. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

  2. Table of Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION J. B. Natowitz, Director SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS SECTION III: NUCLEAR...

  3. Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles Technology available for licensing: A stable, nonreactive nanofluid that exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties with only a minimal increase in pumping power required relative to the base heat transfer fluid. A stable, non-reactive nanofluid that exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties Enables more productive and efficient cooling systems PDF icon nanoparticle_heat_transfer_fluids

  4. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Feb-15 Mar-15 Apr-15 May-15 Jun-15 Jul-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,029 1,029 1,029 1,028 1,028 1,028 2013-2015...

  5. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,023 1,017 1,020 1,031 1,032 1,028 2007-2014...

  6. Heat Content of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Total Consumption Electric Power Other Sectors Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 1,023 1,022 1,024 1,027 1,030 1,037 2003-2015 Alabama 1,018 1,018 1,016 1,017 1,025 1,030 2007-2015 Alaska 1,005 1,013 1,012 1,002 1,002 1,001 2007-2015 Arizona 1,016 1,015 1,021 1,025 1,029 1,039 2007-2015 Arkansas 1,012 1,017 1,015

  7. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,023 1,022 1,024 1,027 1,030 1,037 2003-2015 Total Consumption 1,023 1,022 1,024 1,027 1,032 2003-2014 Electric Power 1,022 1,021 1,022 1,025 1,029 2003-2014 Other Sectors 1,023 1,022 1,025 1,028 1,032 2003-2014

  8. Heat Content of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History U.S. 1,037 1,036 1,037 1,037 1,038 1,038 2012-2015 Alabama 1,032 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,029 1,029 2013-2015 Alaska 1,002 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,001 1,000 2013-2015 Arizona 1,038 1,038 1,040 1,042 1,041 1,044 2013-2015 Arkansas 1,023 1,022 1,019 1,029 1,014 1,015 2013-2015

  9. New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,024 1,025 1,028 2010's 1,021 1,022 1,024 1,030 1,034...

  10. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,018 1,034 1,019 2010's 1,019 1,020 1,022 1,020 1,021...

  11. New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    27 1,028 1,028 1,029 1,029 1,030

  12. New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    43 1,042 1,041 1,041 1,044 1,044

  13. District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,037 1,036 1,035 1,045 1,039 1,044 2013

  14. New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    37 1,040 1,032 1,030 1,032 1,031

  15. New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 1,026 1,029 1,045 1,042 1,046

  16. New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 1,022 1,024 1,030 1,035 1,041

  17. North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    55 1,073 1,065 1,082 1,064 1,05

  18. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,074 1,073 1,082 2010's 1,076 1,083 1,080 1,083 1,073...

  19. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    17 1,020 1,031 1,032 1,029 1,028

  20. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    26 1,026 1,023 1,019 1,024 1,030

  1. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    05 1,005 1,018 1,023 1,035 1,051

  2. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    76 1,083 1,080 1,083 1,073 1,08

  3. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    37 1,036 1,037 1,037 1,038 1,038 2012

  4. New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    38 1,049 1,040 1,048 1,042 1,046

  5. North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    117 1,095 1,078 1,093 1,097 1,112

  6. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    28 1,028 1,028 1,028 1,028 1,028

  7. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    31 1,029 1,031 1,031 1,030 1,030

  8. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    62 1,060 1,056 1,053 1,053 1,058

  9. District of Columbia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14 1,016 1,029 1,048 1,037 1,044

  10. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed by Electric Power Sector

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 1,021 1,022 1,025 1,029

  11. Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed by Other Sectors

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 1,028

  12. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    99 1,099 1,102 1,090 1,114 1,090

  13. ,"New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusnhm.xls" ...

  14. ,"South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcussdm.xls" ...

  15. ,"New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusnjm.xls" ...

  16. ,"Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusrim.xls" ...

  17. ,"South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusscm.xls" ...

  18. ,"West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcuswvm.xls" ...

  19. ,"North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusncm.xls" ...

  20. ,"North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusndm.xls" ...

  1. ,"New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusnym.xls" ...

  2. New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,024 1,025 1,028 2010's 1,021 1,022 1,024 1,030 1,035...

  3. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,023 1,015 1,011 1,011 1,013 1,018 2007-2014...

  4. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    May-15 Jun-15 Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,035 1,033 1,038 1,037 1,038 1,040 2013-2015...

  5. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Apr-15 May-15 Jun-15 Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,034 1,032 1,032 1,031 1,031 1,032 2013-2015...

  6. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,023 1,021 1,021 2010's 1,022 1,025 1,031 1,033 1,031...

  7. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,032 1,031 1,031 1,031 1,034 1,035 1,034 1,033 1,034 1,034 1,033 1,032 2014 1,032 1,031 1,032 1,031 1,031 1,031 1,031...

  8. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,021 1,022 1,025 1,031 1,033 1,031 2007-2014...

  9. Heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackenbury, P.J.

    1983-12-08

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  10. Heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackenbury, Phillip J.

    1986-01-01

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  11. Heat transfer and heat exchangers reference handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-15

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with an understanding of the basic concepts of heat transfer and the operation of heat exchangers.

  12. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  13. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AC05-00OR22800 TABLE OF CONTENTS Contents Page # TOC - i SECTION A - SOLICITATION/OFFER AND AWARD ......................................................................... A-i SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS ........................................................ B-i B.1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED ....................................................................................B-2 B.2 TRANSITION COST, ESTIMATED COST, MAXIMUM AVAILABLE FEE, AND AVAILABLE FEE (Modification 295,

  14. Widget:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ContentAssist Jump to: navigation, search This widget generates a bar of recommended reading related to the page on which it is embedded. Additionally, this widget mines the...

  15. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2007-07-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

  16. Dehumidifying Heat Pipes | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    claims that your thermostat can be set higher with the low humidity air, allowing a net energy savings. Related Information Home Cooling Systems Air Conditioning Heat Pump Systems...

  17. Carbon footprints of heating oil and LPG heating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Eric P.

    2012-07-15

    For European homes without access to the natural gas grid, the main fuels-of-choice for heating are heating oil and LPG. How do the carbon footprints of these compare? Existing literature does not clearly answer this, so the current study was undertaken to fill this gap. Footprints were estimated in seven countries that are representative of the EU and constitute two-thirds of the EU-27 population: Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Poland and the UK. Novelties of the assessment were: systems were defined using the EcoBoiler model; well-to-tank data were updated according to most-recent research; and combustion emission factors were used that were derived from a survey conducted for this study. The key finding is that new residential heating systems fuelled by LPG are 20% lower carbon and 15% lower overall-environmental-impact than those fuelled by heating oil. An unexpected finding was that an LPG system's environmental impact is about the same as that of a bio heating oil system fuelled by 100% rapeseed methyl ester, Europe's predominant biofuel. Moreover, a 20/80 blend (by energy content) with conventional heating oil, a bio-heating-oil system generates a footprint about 15% higher than an LPG system's. The final finding is that fuel switching can pay off in carbon terms. If a new LPG heating system replaces an ageing oil-fired one for the final five years of its service life, the carbon footprint of the system's final five years is reduced by more than 50%.

  18. Dual source heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  19. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean (Lafayette, IN); Willi, Martin Leo (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott Byron (Metamara, IL); Timmons, Kristine Ann (Chillicothe, IL)

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  20. Contents.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paul Clavin Contents Combustion Waves and Fronts in Flows P. Clavin and G. Searby Cambridge University Press (to appear) Orders of magnitude 2 Lecture 1: 1-1: Overall...

  1. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    008 High Temperature Superconductivity for Electric Systems Peer Review Final Report i TABLE OF CONTENTS High Temperature Superconductivity for Electric Systems Program Overview ...... 1 The Peer Review................................................................................................................ 3 Review Criteria ................................................................................................................. 5 Guidelines

  2. Table_of_Contents

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Table of Contents 1. Physical Security .............................................................................................................................. 1-1 101. Headquarters Security Badges ........................................................................................ 101-1 102. HSPD-12 Badges and the PIV Process ........................................................................... 102-1 103. Prohibited Articles

  3. #AskEnergySaver: Home Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heating #AskEnergySaver: Home Heating October 29, 2014 - 12:56pm Addthis This month our experts answered your #AskEnergySaver questions on home heating. | Image courtesy of Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. This month our experts answered your #AskEnergySaver questions on home heating. | Image courtesy of Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Looking for more ways to save energy? Check out Energy Saver for

  4. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2006-12-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

  5. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

  6. Combined Heat and Power Systems (CHP): Capabilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    D&MT Capabilities fact sheet that describes the NREL capabilities related to combined heat and power (CHP).

  7. Multiple source heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  8. Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high- T e...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Investigation of ion and electron heat transport of high- T e ECH heated discharges in the large helical device Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become...

  9. Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Image of a heat exchanger. |...

  10. Heat release analysis of engine pressure data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gatowski, J.A.; Balles, E.N.; Chun, K.M.; Nelson, F.E.; Ekchian, J.A.; Heywood, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    In analyzing the processes inside the cylinder of an internal combustion engine, the principal diagnostic at the experimenter's disposal is a measured time history of the cylinder pressure. This paper develops, tests, and applies a heat release analysis procedure that maintains simplicity while including the effects of heat transfer, crevice flows and fuel injection. The heat release model uses a one zone description of the cylinder contents with thermodynamic properties represented by a linear approximation. Applications of the analysis to a single-cylinder spark-ignition engine, a special square cross-section visualization spark-ignition engine, and a direct-injection stratified charge engine are presented.

  11. Geothermal Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Heat Pump Basics Geothermal Heat Pump Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:12am Addthis Text Version Geothermal heat pumps use the constant temperature of the earth as an exchange medium for heat. Although many parts of the country experience seasonal temperature extremes-from scorching heat in the summer to sub-zero cold in the winter-the ground a few feet below the earth's surface remains at a relatively constant temperature. Depending on the latitude, ground temperatures range from 45°F

  12. Table of Contents

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    COMMUNICATIONS REQUIREMENTS OF SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES October 5, 2010 i Table of Contents I. Introduction and Executive Summary.......................................................... 1 a. Overview of Smart Grid Benefits and Communications Needs................. 2 b. Summary of Recommendations .................................................................... 5 II. Federal Government Smart Grid Initiatives ................................................ 7 a. DOE Request for Information

  13. Concentrating solar heat collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fattor, A.P.

    1980-09-23

    A heat storage unit is integrated with a collection unit providing a heat supply in off-sun times, and includes movable insulation means arranged to provide insulation during off-sun times for the heat storage unit.

  14. Absorption heat pump system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  15. Absorption heat pump system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  16. Residential heating oil price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 4.1 cents from a week ago to 2.89 per gallon, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the...

  17. Expanded Content Envelope For The Model 9977 Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G. A.; Loftin, B. M.; Nathan, S. J.; Bellamy, J. S.

    2013-07-30

    An Addendum was written to the Model 9977 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging adding a new content consisting of DOE-STD-3013 stabilized plutonium dioxide materials to the authorized Model 9977 contents. The new Plutonium Oxide Content (PuO{sub 2}) Envelope will support the Department of Energy shipment of materials between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Savannah River Site facilities. The new content extended the current content envelope boundaries for radioactive material mass and for decay heat load and required a revision to the 9977 Certificate of Compliance prior to shipment. The Addendum documented how the new contents/configurations do not compromise the safety basis presented in the 9977 SARP Revision 2. The changes from the certified package baseline and the changes to the package required to safely transport this material is discussed.

  18. Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  19. Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  20. Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  1. Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low...

  2. Multi-lead heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1984-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again.

  3. Multi-lead heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, L.D.

    1982-08-25

    The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again.

  4. Multi-lead heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, L.D.

    1984-07-03

    The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again. 4 figs.

  5. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  6. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

  7. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

  8. International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method (IEA BESTEST): In-Depth Diagnostic Cases for Ground Coupled Heat Transfer Related to Slab-on-Grade Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Beausoleil-Morrison, I.; Ben-Nakhi, A.; Crowley, M.; Deru, M.; Henninger, R.; Ribberink, H.; Thornton, J.; Wijsman, A.; Witte, M.

    2008-09-01

    This report documents a set of idealized in-depth diagnostic test cases for use in validating ground-coupled floor slab heat transfer models. These test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST.

  9. Smart, simple energy-saving tips to beat the heat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Tribal Affairs Newsroom Search News Articles... Search Smart, simple energy-saving tips to beat the heat 7292015 2:02 PM Tweet Page Content BPA and its electric...

  10. Guide to Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    among the most effcient and comfortable heating and cooling technologies available because they use the earth's natural heat to provide heating, cooling, and often, water heating. ...

  11. Contents TRU Waste Celebration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 September 2005 A publication for all members of the NNSA/NSO family Contents TRU Waste Celebration by Katherine Schwartz On July 28, 2005, Bechtel Nevada hosted a function to commemorate the dedication and hard work of every Joanne Norton of meeting the milestone of completion of characterization of all legacy waste drums stored at the NTS for 30 years." , assistant general manager for Environmental Management at BN, was equally pleased. making direct contact with it. the dedicated

  12. NESEA Newsletter Content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NESEA Newsletter Content Middle School Curriculum Created by Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA) Click on the links below to take you to the Chapter heading: Solar Panels: The Basics Solar Cells: P-N Junction Solar Panels: Amps, Volts and Power Solar Panels: Manufacture Solar Panels: PV Applications & More Parts of a Solar Cell Getting Started with Gears 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123 PREMIER MIDDLE SCHOOL MODEL SOLAR

  13. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirol, Lance D. (Shelly, ID)

    1988-01-01

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

  14. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirol, L.D.

    1987-02-11

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

  15. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  16. Ultra Low Sulfur Home Heating Oil Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batey, John E.; McDonald, Roger

    2015-09-30

    This Ultra Low Sulfur (ULS) Home Heating Oil Demonstration Project was funded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and has successfully quantified the environmental and economic benefits of switching to ULS (15 PPM sulfur) heating oil. It advances a prior field study of Low Sulfur (500 ppm sulfur) heating oil funded by NYSERDA and laboratory research conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Canadian researchers. The sulfur oxide and particulate matter (PM) emissions are greatly reduced as are boiler cleaning costs through extending cleaning intervals. Both the sulfur oxide and PM emission rates are directly related to the fuel oil sulfur content. The sulfur oxide and PM emission rates approach near-zero levels by switching heating equipment to ULS fuel oil, and these emissions become comparable to heating equipment fired by natural gas. This demonstration project included an in-depth review and analysis of service records for both the ULS and control groups to determine any difference in the service needs for the two groups. The detailed service records for both groups were collected and analyzed and the results were entered into two spreadsheets that enabled a quantitative side-by-side comparison of equipment service for the entire duration of the ULS test project. The service frequency for the ULS and control group were very similar and did indicate increased service frequency for the ULS group. In fact, the service frequency with the ULS group was slightly less (7.5 percent) than the control group. The only exception was that three burner fuel pump required replacement for the ULS group and none were required for the control group.

  17. PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PDF icon PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) More Documents & Publications PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support

  18. Heat Treating Apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Saro, Robert (Annandale, NJ); Bateman, Willis (Sutton Colfield, GB)

    2002-09-10

    Apparatus for heat treating a heat treatable material including a housing having an upper opening for receiving a heat treatable material at a first temperature, a lower opening, and a chamber therebetween for heating the heat treatable material to a second temperature higher than the first temperature as the heat treatable material moves through the chamber from the upper to the lower opening. A gas supply assembly is operatively engaged to the housing at the lower opening, and includes a source of gas, a gas delivery assembly for delivering the gas through a plurality of pathways into the housing in countercurrent flow to movement of the heat treatable material, whereby the heat treatable material passes through the lower opening at the second temperature, and a control assembly for controlling conditions within the chamber to enable the heat treatable material to reach the second temperature and pass through the lower opening at the second temperature as a heated material.

  19. Thulium-170 heat source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walter, Carl E. (Pleasanton, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard (Livermore, CA); VanSant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

    1992-01-01

    An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

  20. Thermoelectric heat exchange element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callas, James J. (Peoria, IL); Taher, Mahmoud A. (Peoria, IL)

    2007-08-14

    A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

  1. Personalized professional content recommendation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-10-27

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  2. Personalized professional content recommendation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-11-05

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  3. Microsoft Word - contents

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2001-272-TAR MAC-GWDUR 1.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Site Observational Work Plan for the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site January 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW 511-0006-10-000 Document Number U0143200 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0143200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan -Durango, Colorado January

  4. Triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

    1984-01-01

    A triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The triple loop heat exchanger comprises portions of a strong solution line for conducting relatively hot, strong solution from a generator to a solution heat exchanger of the absorption refrigeration system, conduit means for conducting relatively cool, weak solution from the solution heat exchanger to the generator, and a bypass system for conducting strong solution from the generator around the strong solution line and around the solution heat exchanger to an absorber of the refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator to an undesirable level. The strong solution line and the conduit means are in heat exchange relationship with each other in the triple loop heat exchanger so that, during normal operation of the refrigeration system, heat is exchanged between the relatively hot, strong solution flowing through the strong solution line and the relatively cool, weak solution flowing through the conduit means. Also, the strong solution line and the bypass system are in heat exchange relationship in the triple loop heat exchanger so that if the normal flow path of relatively hot, strong solution flowing from the generator to an absorber is blocked, then this relatively, hot strong solution which will then be flowing through the bypass system in the triple loop heat exchanger, is brought into heat exchange relationship with any strong solution which may have solidified in the strong solution line in the triple loop heat exchanger to thereby aid in desolidifying any such solidified strong solution.

  5. Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar water heating systems use heat exchangers to transfer solar energy absorbed in solar collectors to the liquid or air used to heat water or a space. Heat exchangers can be made of steel, copper, bronze, stainless steel, aluminum, or cast iron. Solar heating systems usually use copper,

  6. Heat transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  7. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  8. Heat transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  9. Table of Contents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U U . . S S . . D D E E P P A A R R T T M M E E N N T T O O F F E E N N E E R R G G Y Y O O F F F F I I C C E E O O F F I I N N S S P P E E C C T T O O R R G G E E N N E E R R A A L L Semiannual Report toCongress DOE/IG-0065 April 1 - September 30, 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS From the Desk of the Inspector General ..................................................... 2 Impacts Key Accomplishments ............................................................................................... 3

  10. Fusion heating technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, A.J.

    1982-06-01

    John Lawson established the criterion that in order to produce more energy from fusion than is necessary to heat the plasma and replenish the radiation losses, a minimum value for both the product of plasma density and confinement time t, and the temperature must be achieved. There are two types of plasma heating: neutral beam and electromagnetic wave heating. A neutral beam system is shown. Main development work on negative ion beamlines has focused on the difficult problem of the production of high current sources. The development of a 30 keV-1 ampere multisecond source module is close to being accomplished. In electromagnetic heating, the launcher, which provides the means of coupling the power to the plasma, is most important. The status of heating development is reviewed. Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), lower hybrid heating (HHH), and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) are reviewed.

  11. Geothermal District Heating Economics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-07-12

    GEOCITY is a large-scale simulation model which combines both engineering and economic submodels to systematically calculate the cost of geothermal district heating systems for space heating, hot-water heating, and process heating based upon hydrothermal geothermal resources. The GEOCITY program simulates the entire production, distribution, and waste disposal process for geothermal district heating systems, but does not include the cost of radiators, convectors, or other in-house heating systems. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating basedmore » on the climate, population, and heat demand of the district; characteristics of the geothermal resource and distance from the distribution center; well-drilling costs; design of the distribution system; tax rates; and financial conditions.« less

  12. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  13. Residential heating oil price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 3.6 cents from a week ago to 3.04 per gallon. That's down 99.4 cents from a year ago, based on the...

  14. Residential heating oil price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 6.3 cents from a week ago to 2.91 per gallon. That's down 1.10 from a year ago, based on the...

  15. Residential heating oil price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.5 cents from a week ago to 2.84 per gallon. That's down 1.22 from a year ago, based on the...

  16. Residential heating oil price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 7.6 cents from a week ago to 2.97 per gallon. That's down 1.05 from a year ago, based on the...

  17. Consolidated Electric Cooperative- Heat Pump and Water Heating Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consolidated Electric Cooperative provides rebates to residential customers who install electric water heaters, dual-fuel heating system or geothermal heat pumps. A dual-fuel heating systems...

  18. Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used ...

  19. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, Donald M. (Leola, PA)

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  20. Solar heat receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA); Hansen, Leif J. (Berkeley, CA); Evans, David B. (Orinda, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700.degree.-900.degree. C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  1. Solar heat receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

    1982-09-29

    A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  2. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  3. MA HEAT Loan Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents information on the success of Massachusetts's HEAT loan offerings and how the financing tool is funded.

  4. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  5. Pioneering Heat Pump Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: To install and monitor an innovative WaterFurnace geothermal system that is technologically advanced and evolving; To generate hot water heating from a heat pump that uses non-ozone depleting refrigerant CO2. To demonstrate the energy efficiency of this system ground source heat pump system.

  6. Heat Pumps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Geothermal heat pumps are expensive to install but pay for themselves over time in reduced heating and cooling costs. Learn more about how geothermal heat pumps heat and cool buildings by concentrating the naturally existing heat contained within the earth -- a clean, reliable, and renewable source of energy. In moderate climates, heat pumps can be an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Several types of heat pumps are available, including

  7. Home Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heating Home Heating Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating Everything you need to know about home heating, including how heating systems work, the different types on the market and proper maintenance. Read more Thermostats Thermostats Save money on heating by automatically setting back your thermostat when you are asleep or away. Read more Wood and Pellet Heating Wood and Pellet Heating Wood and pellets are renewable fuel sources, and modern wood

  8. Heat pipe heat transport system for the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alger, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    Life issues relating to a sodium heat pipe heat transport system are described. The heat pipe system provides heat, at a temperature of 1050 K, to a 50 kWe Stirling engine/linear alternator power converter called the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC). The converter is being developed under a National Aeronautics and Space Administration program. Since corrosion of heat pipe materials in contact with sodium can impact the life of the heat pipe, a literature review of sodium corrosion processes was performed. It was found that the impurity reactions, primarily oxygen, and dissolution of alloy elements were the two corrosion process likely to be operative in the heat pipe. Approaches that are being taken to minimize these corrosion processes are discussed.

  9. AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Combine Heat and Power: A Clean Energy Solution, August 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Solution Combined Heat and Power August 2012 Combined Heat and Power: A Clean Energy Solution 1 Contents Executive Summary .................................................................................................... 3 Introduction ................................................................................................................ 5 Combined Heat and Power as A Clean Energy Solution ......................................... 7 The Current Status of CHP and Its

  10. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Absorption heat pump system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN); Perez-Blanco, Horacio (Knoxville, TN)

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  12. Heat pump apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Horowitz, Jeffrey S. (Woodridge, IL)

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus including a compact arrangement of individual tubular reactors containing hydride-dehydride beds in opposite end sections, each pair of beds in each reactor being operable by sequential and coordinated treatment with a plurality of heat transfer fluids in a plurality of processing stages, and first and second valves located adjacent the reactor end sections with rotatable members having multiple ports and associated portions for separating the hydride beds at each of the end sections into groups and for simultaneously directing a plurality of heat transfer fluids to the different groups. As heat is being generated by a group of beds, others are being regenerated so that heat is continuously available for space heating. As each of the processing stages is completed for a hydride bed or group of beds, each valve member is rotated causing the heat transfer fluid for the heat processing stage to be directed to that bed or group of beds. Each of the end sections are arranged to form a closed perimeter and the valve member may be rotated repeatedly about the perimeter to provide a continuous operation. Both valves are driven by a common motor to provide a coordinated treatment of beds in the same reactors. The heat pump apparatus is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  13. Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Illustration of a solar water heater. Illustration of a solar water heater. Heat-transfer fluids carry heat through solar collectors and a heat exchanger to the heat storage tanks...

  14. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  15. Advanced Energy and Water Recovery Technology from Low Grade Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexin Wang

    2011-12-19

    The project has developed a nanoporous membrane based water vapor separation technology that can be used for recovering energy and water from low-temperature industrial waste gas streams with high moisture contents. This kind of exhaust stream is widely present in many industrial processes including the forest products and paper industry, food industry, chemical industry, cement industry, metal industry, and petroleum industry. The technology can recover not only the sensible heat but also high-purity water along with its considerable latent heat. Waste heats from such streams are considered very difficult to recover by conventional technology because of poor heat transfer performance of heat-exchanger type equipment at low temperature and moisture-related corrosion issues. During the one-year Concept Definition stage of the project, the goal was to prove the concept and technology in the laboratory and identify any issues that need to be addressed in future development of this technology. In this project, computational modeling and simulation have been conducted to investigate the performance of a nanoporous material based technology, transport membrane condenser (TMC), for waste heat and water recovery from low grade industrial flue gases. A series of theoretical and computational analyses have provided insight and support in advanced TMC design and experiments. Experimental study revealed condensation and convection through the porous membrane bundle was greatly improved over an impermeable tube bundle, because of the membrane capillary condensation mechanism and the continuous evacuation of the condensate film or droplets through the membrane pores. Convection Nusselt number in flue gas side for the porous membrane tube bundle is 50% to 80% higher than those for the impermeable stainless steel tube bundle. The condensation rates for the porous membrane tube bundle also increase 60% to 80%. Parametric study for the porous membrane tube bundle heat transfer performance was also done, which shows this heat transfer enhancement approach works well in a wide parameters range for typical flue gas conditions. Better understanding of condensing heat transfer mechanism for porous membrane heat transfer surfaces, shows higher condensation and heat transfer rates than non-permeable tubes, due to existence of the porous membrane walls. Laboratory testing has documented increased TMC performance with increased exhaust gas moisture content levels, which has exponentially increased potential markets for the product. The TMC technology can uniquely enhance waste heat recovery in tandem with water vapor recovery for many other industrial processes such as drying, wet and dry scrubber exhaust gases, dewatering, and water chilling. A new metallic substrate membrane tube development and molded TMC part fabrication method, provides an economical way to expand this technology for scaled up applications with less than 3 year payback expectation. A detailed market study shows a broad application area for this advanced waste heat and water recovery technology. A commercialization partner has been lined up to expand this technology to this big market. This research work led to new findings on the TMC working mechanism to improve its performance, better scale up design approaches, and economical part fabrication methods. Field evaluation work needs to be done to verify the TMC real world performance, and get acceptance from the industry, and pave the way for our commercial partner to put it into a much larger waste heat and waste water recovery market. This project is addressing the priority areas specified for DOE Industrial Technologies Program's (ITP's): Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) Portfolio - Waste Heat Minimization and Recovery platform.

  16. Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Systems | Department of Energy presentation covers typical sources of waste heat from process heating equipment, characteristics of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power. PDF icon Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems (August 20, 2009) More Documents & Publications Energy Systems Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment Seven Ways to Optimize Your Process Heat System

  17. Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuen-Sen Lin

    2008-12-31

    Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data, the synthetic fuel contained slightly less heat energy and fewer emissions. Test results obtained from adding different levels of a small amount of hydrogen into the intake manifold of a diesel-operated engine showed no effect on exhaust heat content. In other words, both synthetic fuel and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen may not have a significant enough effect on the amount of recoverable heat and its feasibility. An economic analysis computer program was developed on Visual Basic for Application in Microsoft Excel. The program was developed to be user friendly, to accept different levels of input data, and to expand for other heat recovery applications (i.e., power, desalination, etc.) by adding into the program the simulation subroutines of the desired applications. The developed program has been validated using experimental data.

  18. Heat pump system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swenson, Paul F. (Shaker Heights, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaven, FL)

    1983-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  19. Heat pump system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-06-21

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  20. Water-heating dehumidifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, John J.

    2006-04-18

    A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

  1. Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heat Management Options Industrial Process Heating Systems By Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi E-mail: athekdi@e3minc.com E3M, Inc. August 20, 2009 2 Source of Waste Heat in Industries * Steam Generation * Fluid Heating * Calcining * Drying * Heat Treating * Metal Heating * Metal and Non-metal Melting * Smelting, agglomeration etc. * Curing and Forming * Other Heating Waste heat is everywhere! Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc 3 Waste Heat Sources from Process Heating Equipment * Hot gases -

  2. ARM - Relative Humidity Calculations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CalculatorsRelative Humidity Calculations Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Relative Humidity Calculations Heat Index is an index that combines air temperature and relative humidity to estimate how hot it actually feels. The human body cools off through perspiration, which

  3. Renewable energy technologies for federal facilities: Geothermal heat pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This sheet summarizes information on geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), which extracts heat from the ground in the winter and transfers heat to the ground in the summer. More than 200,000 GHPs are operating in US; they can reduce energy consumption and related emissions by 23 to 44% compared to air-source heat pumps. Opportunities for use of GHPs, requirements, and cost are described. Important terms are defined.

  4. Fluidized bed heat treating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B; Pfennigwerth, Glenn L

    2014-05-06

    Systems for heat treating materials are presented. The systems typically involve a fluidized bed that contains granulated heat treating material. In some embodiments a fluid, such as an inert gas, is flowed through the granulated heat treating medium, which homogenizes the temperature of the heat treating medium. In some embodiments the fluid may be heated in a heating vessel and flowed into the process chamber where the fluid is then flowed through the granulated heat treating medium. In some embodiments the heat treating material may be liquid or granulated heat treating material and the heat treating material may be circulated through a heating vessel into a process chamber where the heat treating material contacts the material to be heat treated. Microwave energy may be used to provide the source of heat for heat treating systems.

  5. Passive solar space heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of passive solar space heating is presented indicating trends in design, new developments, performance measures, analytical design aids, and monitored building results.

  6. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  7. Total Space Heat-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    12 1 18 (*) 2 1 Q 6 Buildings without Cooling ... 30 1 (*) 4 (*) 14 (*) 4 (*) 1 6 Water-Heating Energy Source Electricity ... 402 21 57 42...

  8. Cover Heated, Open Vessels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This tip sheet on covering heated, open vessels provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  9. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2007-09-18

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  10. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2011-06-28

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  11. Ductless Heat Pumps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  12. Heat Pump Water Heaters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  13. Heat rejection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Gregory C. (Richland, WA); Tokarz, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Parry, Jr., Harvey L. (Richland, WA); Braun, Daniel J. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

  14. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasol, D.

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  15. Remote possibly hazardous content container sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Volz, David L. (59 La Paloma, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus capable of sampling enclosed containers, where the contents of the container is unknown. The invention includes a compressed air device capable of supplying air pressure, device for controlling the amount of air pressure applied, a pneumatic valve, a sampling device having a hollow, sampling insertion needle suspended therein and device to communicate fluid flow between the container and a containment vessel, pump or direct reading instrument.

  16. Replacing Resistance Heating with Mini-Split Heat Pumps, Sharon, Connecticut (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    Mini-split heat pumps can provide space heating and cooling in many climates and are relatively affordable. These and other features make them potentially suitable for retrofitting into multifamily buildings in cold climates to replace electric resistance heating or other outmoded heating systems. This report investigates the suitability of mini-split heat pumps for multifamily retrofits. Various technical and regulatory barriers are discussed and modeling was performed to compare long-term costs of substituting mini-splits for a variety of other heating and cooling options. A number of utility programs have retrofit mini-splits in both single family and multifamily residences. Two such multifamily programs are discussed in detail.

  17. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  18. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-08-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

  19. The bainitic mechanism of austenite formation during rapid heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaluba, W.J.; Taillard, R.; Foct, J.

    1998-10-09

    Strips of a spheroidized 0.68% C, 0.67% Mn and 0.24% Si pearlitic steel were submitted to rapid heat cycles. The samples were heated by direct electrical conduction up to a peak temperature and immediately water quenched. The morphological features of the {alpha} {r_arrow} {gamma} transformation were studied by light and electron microscopy. It was found that austenite at an early stage of the transformation has a specific lath-like morphology and that its growth always starts directly from a grain boundary of ferrite. Moreover, the presence of retained austenite allows the prediction of relatively high carbon content in the transformation product. The particular interaction of austenite laths with carbide particles gives an indication that the growth mechanism can be displacive at its early stage. Comparing the morphological characteristics of austenite formation observed in this study with those reported for austenite decomposition, a bainitic model of the early stage of {alpha} {r_arrow} {gamma} transformation is proposed.

  20. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonde, Wayne L. (Livermore, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watetight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures.

  1. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonde, W.L.; Contolini, R.J.

    1992-03-24

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watertight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures. 13 figs.

  2. Radioisotopic heat source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, G.J.; Selle, J.E.; Teaney, P.E.

    1975-09-30

    Disclosed is a radioisotopic heat source and method for a long life electrical generator. The source includes plutonium dioxide shards and yttrium or hafnium in a container of tantalum-tungsten-hafnium alloy, all being in a nickel alloy outer container, and subjected to heat treatment of from about 1570$sup 0$F to about 1720$sup 0$F for about one h. (auth)

  3. Home Heating Hints | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Heating Hints Home Heating Hints December 9, 2014 - 5:10pm Addthis Sealing air leaks can help you save energy and money this winter. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sealing air leaks can help you save energy and money this winter. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What are the key facts? Programmable

  4. Knudsen heat capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babac, Gulru; Reese, Jason M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a “Knudsen heat capacity” as a more appropriate and useful fluid property in micro/nanoscale gas systems than the constant pressure heat capacity. At these scales, different fluid processes come to the fore that are not normally observed at the macroscale. For thermodynamic analyses that include these Knudsen processes, using the Knudsen heat capacity can be more effective and physical. We calculate this heat capacity theoretically for non-ideal monatomic and diatomic gases, in particular, helium, nitrogen, and hydrogen. The quantum modification for para and ortho hydrogen is also considered. We numerically model the Knudsen heat capacity using molecular dynamics simulations for the considered gases, and compare these results with the theoretical ones.

  5. Improved solar heating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  6. Solar heating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schreyer, James M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Concord, TN)

    1982-01-01

    An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

  7. Effect of Niobium Content on Shape Memory Characteristics of (Ni47Ti44)100-xNbx Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, X.M.; Yan, D.S.; Rong, L.J.; Li, Y.Y.

    2004-06-28

    The effect of niobium content on shape memory characteristics in (Ni47Ti44)100-xNbx (at.%) alloys (x=3,9,15,20,30) was investigated in detail by performing differential scanning calorimetry and cryogenic tensile tests at a temperature of (Ms+30 K). The results show that tensile strain as much as 6% vanished completely in five alloys after unloading and then heating to 473K. But with increasing the deformation, substantial plastic deformation that was irreversible occurred in the niobium-rich phase. As a result, the residual elongation increased. Moreover, the degradation of the shape recovery ratio increased with increasing niobium content. It was also found that the transformation hysteresis was widened by deformation. The effect of niobium content on the transformation hysteresis and shape memory effect was investigated systematically and the related mechanism has been proposed based on microstructural analysis. In view of the engineering application, where wide hysteresis and better shape memory effect is desired, the optimized niobium content is proposed.

  8. Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2010-12-28

    An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

  9. Visual Analysis of Weblog Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Michelle L.; Payne, Deborah A.; McColgin, Dave; Cramer, Nick O.; Love, Douglas V.

    2007-03-26

    In recent years, one of the advances of the World Wide Web is social media and one of the fastest growing aspects of social media is the blogosphere. Blogs make content creation easy and are highly accessible through web pages and syndication. With their growing influence, a need has arisen to be able to monitor the opinions and insight revealed within their content. In this paper we describe a technical approach for analyzing the content of blog data using a visual analytic tool, IN-SPIRE, developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We highlight the capabilities of this tool that are particularly useful for information gathering from blog data.

  10. Evaluation of Tritium Content and Release from Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Sharon M.; Chattin, Marc Rhea; Giaquinto, Joseph; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2015-09-01

    It is expected that tritium pretreatment will be required in future reprocessing plants to prevent the release of tritium to the environment (except for long-cooled fuels). To design and operate future reprocessing plants in a safe and environmentally compliant manner, the amount and form of tritium in the used nuclear fuel (UNF) must be understood and quantified. Tritium in light water reactor (LWR) fuel is dispersed between the fuel matrix and the fuel cladding, and some tritium may be in the plenum, probably as tritium labelled water (THO) or T2O. In a standard processing flowsheet, tritium management would be accomplished by treatment of liquid streams within the plant. Pretreating the fuel prior to dissolution to release the tritium into a single off-gas stream could simplify tritium management, so the removal of tritium in the liquid streams throughout the plant may not be required. The fraction of tritium remaining in the cladding may be reduced as a result of tritium pretreatment. Since Zircaloy® cladding makes up roughly 25% by mass of UNF in the United States, processes are being considered to reduce the volume of reprocessing waste for Zircaloy® clad fuel by recovering the zirconium from the cladding for reuse. These recycle processes could release the tritium in the cladding. For Zircaloy-clad fuels from light water reactors, the tritium produced from ternary fission and other sources is expected to be divided between the fuel, where it is generated, and the cladding. It has been previously documented that a fraction of the tritium produced in uranium oxide fuel from LWRs can migrate and become trapped in the cladding. Estimates of the percentage of tritium in the cladding typically range from 0–96%. There is relatively limited data on how the tritium content of the cladding varies with burnup and fuel history (temperature, power, etc.) and how pretreatment impacts its release. To gain a better understanding of how tritium in cladding will behave during processing, scoping tests are being performed to determine the tritium content in the cladding pre- and post-tritium pretreatment. Samples of Surry-2 and H.B. Robinson pressurized water reactor cladding were heated to 1100–1200°C to oxidize the zirconium and release all of the tritium in the cladding sample. Cladding samples were also heated within the temperature range of 480–600ºC expected for standard air tritium pretreatment systems, and to a slightly higher temperature (700ºC) to determine the impact of tritium pretreatment on tritium release from the cladding. The tritium content of the Surry-2 and H.B. Robinson cladding was measured to be ~234 and ~500 µCi/g, respectively. Heating the Surry-2 cladding at 500°C for 24 h removed ~0.2% of the tritium from the cladding, and heating at 700°C for 24 h removed ~9%. Heating the H.B. Robinson cladding at 700°C for 24 h removed ~11% of the tritium. When samples of the Surry-2 and H.B. Robinson claddings were heated at 700°C for 96 h, essentially all of the tritium in the cladding was removed. However, only ~3% of the tritium was removed when a sample of Surry-2 cladding was heated at 600°C for 96 h. These data indicate that the amount of tritium released from tritium pretreatment systems will be dependent on both the operating temperature and length of time in the system. Under certain conditions, a significant fraction of the tritium could remain bound in the cladding and would need to be considered in operations involving cladding recycle.

  11. JOBAID-LAUNCHING ONLINE CONTENT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this jobaid you will learn how to launch Online Content "Items" or Courses. In the LMS you can launch most anything as an "item": documents, courses, webpages and track users that have completed...

  12. Radiant Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heating Systems » Radiant Heating Radiant Heating In-wall radiant heating in a house under construction near Denver. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. In-wall radiant heating in a house under construction near Denver. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. Radiant heating systems supply heat directly to the floor or to panels in the wall or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer -- the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and

  13. ARM - Measurement - Ice water content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    content ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ice water content The concentration (mass/vol) of ice water particles in a cloud. Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including

  14. ARM - Measurement - Liquid water content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    content ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Liquid water content The concentration (mass/vol) of liquid water droplets in a cloud. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded

  15. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2007-05-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

  16. Integrating preconcentrator heat controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchier, Francis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Arakaki, Lester H. (Edgewood, NM); Varley, Eric S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus for controlling the electric resistance heating of a metallic chemical preconcentrator screen, for example, used in portable trace explosives detectors. The length of the heating time-period is automatically adjusted to compensate for any changes in the voltage driving the heating current across the screen, for example, due to gradual discharge or aging of a battery. The total deposited energy in the screen is proportional to the integral over time of the square of the voltage drop across the screen. Since the net temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, of the screen, from beginning to end of the heating pulse, is proportional to the total amount of heat energy deposited in the screen during the heating pulse, then this integral can be calculated in real-time and used to terminate the heating current when a pre-set target value has been reached; thereby providing a consistent and reliable screen temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, from pulse-to-pulse.

  17. Micro heat barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  18. Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from iStockphoto.com Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar water heating systems use heat exchangers to transfer solar energy absorbed in solar...

  19. Research and Development Roadmap for Water Heating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetzler, William; Gagne, Claire; Baxter, Van D; Lutz, James; Merrigan, Tim; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2011-10-01

    Although water heating is an important energy end-use in residential and commercial buildings, efficiency improvements in recent years have been relatively modest. However, significant advancements related to higher efficiency equipment, as well as improved distribution systems, are now viable. DOE support for water heating research, development and demonstration (RD&D) could provide the impetus for commercialization of these advancements.

  20. Heat treatment furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

    2014-10-21

    A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

  1. Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility 6801 Industrial Road Springfield, VA Date: October 9, 2014 Time: ...

  2. Workshop on Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop on Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Thursday, October 9, 2014 List of Attendees OrganizationAttendees DOE - John Cymbalsky - Ashley Armstrong - Johanna ...

  3. Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative, the geothermal heat pump system moves heat from the ground to a building (or from a building to the ground) through a series of flexible pipe ...

  4. Water Heating | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Heating Water Heating September 2, 2015 - 11:07am Addthis Low-flow fixtures will help you reduce your hot water use and save money on your water heating bills. | Photo...

  5. Residential heating oil price decreases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    heating oil price decreases The average retail price for home heating oil fell 10.5 cents from a week ago to 2.93 per gallon, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the...

  6. Residential heating oil prices available

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    heating oil prices available The average retail price for home heating oil is 2.41 per gallon, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information...

  7. Passive solar heating analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Jones, R.W.; Mc Farland, R.D.; Wray, W.O.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses about the design of solar heating systems. The terms and symbols are clearly defined. Step-by-step procedures are indicated. Worked examples are given with tables, graphs, appendixes.

  8. Renewable Heat NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: On August 2015, NYSERDA increased the incentive levels for technologies offered under the Renewable Heat NY program. In general, new incentives fund up to 45% of the total project cost, which...

  9. Heat Pump Water Heaters | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Heat & Cool Water Heating Heat Pump Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters A diagram of a heat pump water heater. A diagram of a heat pump water heater. Most homeowners who...

  10. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    responsible contractor's processes and, as a minimum, shall be signed and dated by the following: 1. Technical Approver (see Appendix A for definition) 2. Manager responsible...

  11. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results shall be reported based on calculated concentration or activity values (whether negative, positive, or zero) using the appropriate blank for each nuclide (see Section...

  12. Contents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Wages and salaries 2 1,575 1,596 1,566 Social security costs 126 120 116 Pension costs ... contracts represent mark-to-market movements on certain physical and financial ...

  13. contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signal is often digitized to around 12 bits of information at the RTU. The communication media between the supervisory site and the RTUs are designed to handle packets of this...

  14. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    organization (such as Safety or Quality Assurance). Depending upon the site-specific organizational structure, the following reviewapprovals are recommended: DOERL-92-36,...

  15. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effective Date: 6107 Vol. 2: iv LIST OF TERMS ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials CFR Code of Federal Regulations CWP...

  16. Contents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ® ALOHA A R E A L L O C A T I O N S O F H A Z A R D O U S A T M O S P H E R E S User's Manual M A R C H 2 0 0 4 c a e o ® C O M P U T E R - A I D ED M A N A G E M E N T O F E M E R G E N C Y O P E R A T I O N S * U N IT E D STA T E S * E N V IR O N M E N T A L P R O TE C T I O N A G E N C Y NAT I ONA L O C E A N IC A ND ATMOSPH ER IC A D M IN IST RATION U .S . D E P A R TM ENT OF CO M M E R C E U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION Chemical

  17. Heat flux limiting sleeves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, William G. (Tampa, FL)

    1985-01-01

    A heat limiting tubular sleeve extending over only a portion of a tube having a generally uniform outside diameter, the sleeve being open on both ends, having one end thereof larger in diameter than the other end thereof and having a wall thickness which decreases in the same direction as the diameter of the sleeve decreases so that the heat transfer through the sleeve and tube is less adjacent the large diameter end of the sleeve than adjacent the other end thereof.

  18. Freezable heat pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, Donald M. (Leola, PA); Sanzi, James L. (Lancaster, PA)

    1981-02-03

    A heat pipe whose fluid can be repeatedly frozen and thawed without damage to the casing. An additional part is added to a conventional heat pipe. This addition is a simple porous structure, such as a cylinder, self-supporting and free standing, which is dimensioned with its diameter not spanning the inside transverse dimension of the casing, and with its length surpassing the depth of maximum liquid.

  19. ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ListAtmospheric Heat Budget Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Atmospheric Heat Budget The average temperature of the earth has remained approximately constant at about 15 degrees Celsius during the past century. It is therefore in a state of radiative balance, emitting the same

  20. Convective heat flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, James C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.