Sample records for healthy forests restoration

  1. Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2010 Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative Collaboration Case Study #12;Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study: Woodland at Colorado State University, to conduct case studies of two collaborative forest health efforts

  2. Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2010 Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project Collaboration Case Study #12;Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study at Colorado State University, to conduct case studies of two collaborative forest health efforts

  3. The Duke Forest Stormwater Improvement and Wetlands Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the Duke Forest and the Pratt School of Engineering, restored 2000 feet (600 m) of stream Forest Sandy Creek Wetland Restoration site as well as the restoration of over 2000 feet of stream below. 1. Phase I: Re-contour and Restore more than 600 meters (2000 ft) of degraded stream

  4. Evaluation of Tree Seedling Mortality and Protective Strategies in Riparian Forest Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    of stream and river restoration projects throughout the United States; these receive an average of $1 of restora- tion objectives, only 10% of stream and river restoration projects include effectivenessEvaluation of Tree Seedling Mortality and Protective Strategies in Riparian Forest Restoration

  5. Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEIHas BeenLegal

  6. Studies on bottomland hardwood forest restoration and teaching with geographic information systems (GIS) in ecology labs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Matthew Earl

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in hydrologic restoration as gradients are created that support a diverse community. Tree seedlings were subjected to experimental flooding regimes typical of floodplain forests in rural and urban settings. Growth rates of seedlings varied over time and differed...

  7. Ghost Forests in the Sea: The Use of Marine Protected Areas to Restore Biodiversity to Kelp Forest Ecosystems in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dayton, Paul K.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P.E. 2004. The La Jolla Kelp Bed and Reserve: “In theabundance in the La Jolla Kelp Forest. Southern Calif. Acad.Restore Biodiversity to Kelp Forest Ecosystems in Southern

  8. Tamm review Contemporary forest restoration: A review emphasizing function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Reclamation restores severely degraded land generally devoid of vegetation, often the result of resource history: Available online 23 August 2014 Keywords: Reconstruction Rehabilitation Reclamation Replacement, reclamation, and replacement. While not a consen- sus terminology, these terms have a logical foundation

  9. ONE-YEAR REPORT ON SB-071 THE FOREST RESTORATION PILOT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program was originally introduced in 2007 legislation as House Bill 1130. This report, required trees to the extent consistent with ecological values and science; o Replant trees in deforested areas forest restoration information; Include an assessment to: o Identify both the existing ecological

  10. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. James A. Burger

    2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first quarterly Technical Report for the period October-December, 2003. A kick-off meeting was held with NETL administrators and scientists at Morgantown, WV, on December 2, 2002. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this first quarterly reporting period, five Graduate Research Assistants were recruited, an MOA was drafted between Virginia Tech and three industry cooperators, preliminary field locations for controlled studies were located, and a preliminary analysis of a carbon inventory of forest sites on mined land was made.

  11. Pool spacing, channel morphology, and the restoration of tidal forested wetlands of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Montgomery, David R.

    2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal forested wetlands have sustained substantial areal losses, and restoration practitioners lack a description of many ecosystem structures associated with these late-successional systems in which surface water is a significant controlling factor on the flora and fauna. The roles of large woody debris in terrestrial and riverine ecosystems have been well described compared to functions in tidal areas. This study documents the role of large wood in forcing channel morphology in Picea-sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated freshwater tidal wetlands in the floodplain of the Columbia River, U.S.A. near the Pacific coast. The average pool spacing documented in channel surveys of three freshwater tidal forested wetlands near Grays Bay were 2.2 ± 1.3, 2.3 ± 1.2, and 2.5 ± 1.5. There were significantly greater numbers of pools on tidal forested wetland channels than on a nearby restoration site. On the basis of pool spacing and the observed sequences of log jams and pools, the tidal forested wetland channels were classified consistent with a forced step-pool class. Tidal systems, with bidirectional flow, have not previously been classified in this way. The classification provides a useful basis for restoration project design and planning in historically forested tidal freshwater areas, particularly in regard to the use of large wood in restoration actions and the development of pool habitats for aquatic species. Significant modifications by beaver on these sites warrant further investigation to explore the interactions between these animals and restoration actions affecting hydraulics and channel structure in tidal areas.

  12. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

  13. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  14. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  15. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  16. Road-crossing restoration on alluvial creeks in the Klamath National Forest, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Forest of northern California. Upper Elk CreekBishop CreekStanza Creek Upper Boulder Creek Lower Boulder Creek Cecil

  17. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  18. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  19. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

  20. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  1. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Tree survival, height and diameter were measured after the first growing season. There were significant treatment and treatment x site interactions. A STELLA{reg_sign}-based model helped us develop insight as to whether it is possible to differentiate the permanent SOC from the C contained in the labile forms of SOM. The model can be used for predicting the amount of C sequestered on mine lands, and the amount of C that is expected to reside in the mine soil for more than 1,000 years. Based on our work, it appears that substantial carbon payments to landowners would be required to reach ''profitability'' under present circumstances. However, even though the payments that we examine could generate non-negative LEVs, there is no guarantee that the payments will actually cause landowners to reforest in practice. It is landowner utility associated with forestland profitability that will be the determining factor in actual conversion--utility that likely would include cash flow timing, amenities, and even the credit position of the landowner.

  2. THE SOUTHWEST ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION INSTITUTES In 2004, the Southwest Forest Health and Wildfire Prevention Act established institutes in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevention Act established institutes in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico for the purpose of ensuring Institute (ERI) at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Arizona New Mexico Forest & Watershed Restoration Institute (NMFWRI) at New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas, New Mexico. The SWERI

  3. Colorado Forest Restoration Institute October 14, 2009 4:01 pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    indicators Chapter 5. Recording, Organizing and Analysis of Data Chapter 6. Using your evidence to support. Chap ter 3 provides you with the concepts that are important when considering the well being of our us about Colorado's forest types. We then get into the nuts and bolts in Chapter 4 of how to get

  4. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  5. 2008 Forestry-related Legislation in Colorado The state of Colorado values healthy, resilient forest landscapes and is willing to invest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Forestry-related Legislation in Colorado The state of Colorado values healthy, resilient and value of Colorado's forests. At the time this report was written, several forestry-related bills were related to the WUI, fuels mitigation, fire fighting, bark beetle mortality and incentives for forestry

  6. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

  7. Sea Urchin Gonad Index a Key to Understanding Secondary Production in the Restoration of Giant Kelp Forests off Palos Verdes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Tom; Pondella, Dan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    project would be applicable in other areas with kelp forestsand kelp- dependent fisheries.NA KEYWORDS: sea urchin, kelp forest, urchin barren, gonad

  8. USING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY TO ASSIST FEDERAL FOREST MONITORING AND RESTORATION PROJECTS IN THE SOUTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wamser, William Kyle

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperspectral imagery and the corresponding ability to conduct analysis below the pixel level have tremendous potential to aid in landcover monitoring. During large ecosystem restoration projects, being able to monitor ...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerating forest fire Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    large areas of the Pacific Summary: change, nutrition and sustainability, fire effects, restoration, and forest-stream linkages... forests. Many dense, young forests were...

  10. PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    , are not pro- viding all the services of healthy ecosystems (6, 7). Stream and river restoration projectsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

  11. APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hershey, Anne

    APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment plant effluent on fish.S.A. Three site types were examined on each stream; two urban (restored and unrestored) and a forested site was not significant. 3. Restored stream sites had significantly higher fish richness and a trend towards greater

  12. Estuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    stream restoration activities. Recommend NOOA fund. 11. Scaling-Up Native Oyster Will restore 4 acresEstuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council Ranked Proposal Recommendation May 13, 2011 Project Name Description 1. Riverside Ranch Restoration Will restore 356 acres of estuarine

  13. Healthy buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is covered under the following headings: Healthy building strategies/productivity, Energy and design issues, Ventilation, Contaminants, Thermal, airflow, and humidity issues, School-related issues, Sources and sinks, Filtering, Operation and maintenance.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - atraumatic restorative treatment Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest Research Agency of the UK Forestry Commission Collection: Renewable Energy 37 Stream Restoration Databases and Case Studies: A Guide to Information Resources and...

  15. Healthy buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geshwiler, M.; Montgomery, L.; Moran, M. (eds.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This proceedings is of the Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Conference held September 4--8, 1991 in Washington, D.C. Entitled the IAQ 91, Healthy Buildings,'' the major topics of discussion included: healthy building strategies/productivity; energy and design issues; ventilation; contaminants; thermal, airflow, and humidity issues; school-related issues; sources and sinks; filtering; and operation and maintenance. For these conference proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for input into the Energy Data Base. (BN)

  16. NRDC: Good Wood: How Forest Certification Helps the Environment The Natural Resources Defense Council works to protect wildlife and wild places and to ensure a healthy environment for all life on earth.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health Environmental Justice U.S. Law & Policy Nuclear Weapons, Waste & Energy Smart Growth their buying power for good. 1. Why is it important to protect forests? 2. What is forest certification and how I buy FSC-certified wood products? 1. Why is it important to protect forests? Forests are more than

  17. NFWF Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) is accepting applications for up to $2.1 million to develop community capacity to sustain local natural resources for future generations by providing modest financial assistance to diverse local partnership for wetland, riparian, forest and coastal habitat restoration, urban wildlife conservation, stormwater management as well as outreach, education and stewardship.

  18. Restoration Tax Abatement (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Restoration Tax Abatement (RTA) Program provides five-year property tax abatement for the expansion, restoration, improvement, and development of existing commercial structures and owner-occupied...

  19. Healthy Roots By: Shelly Van Landingham, Forester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The following tips will help protect your trees' root systems: During planting, be sure to remove containers (plastic or otherwise), and wrapping (i.e. burlap, wire, string). However, this must be done without breaking the soil loose from the roots or breaking the roots. If containers are not removed

  20. Enjoy Living Healthy Hearts, Healthy Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    smoke free. #12;2 Healthy Hearts, Healthy Homes Why quit smoking? To improve your family's well, Healthy Homes series: Are You at Risk for Heart Disease? Do You Need To Lose Weight? Do You Know Your Cholesterol Levels? Keep the Beat: Control Your High Blood Pressure Protect Your Heart Against Diabetes Web

  1. Ecohydrologic Effects of Stream Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mount, Jeffrey F; Hammersmark, Christopher T

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and D. E. Wise. 2003. Stream Restoration: A Natural ChannelDesign Handbook. NC Stream Restoration Institute, NC Statethe Hydrological Effects of Stream Restoration in a Montane

  2. Habitat Restoration I. Defining ecological restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    ) Rehabilitation ­ visual improvements of a disturbed land 3) Reclamation ­ preparation and enhancement of degraded land to fulfill its former use or a new use A. Past "restoration" projects have been categorized by the three R's: #12;3 Reclamation B. How Ecological restoration differs from the 3 "Rs": 1) Reestablish

  3. Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference 'HILQLQJ6XFFHVV Naples Beach a Committee of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force and Working Group #12;Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference Page ii #12;December 11-15, 2000 z Naples, Florida Page

  4. Managing Sierra Nevada Forests Appendix: Examples of Forest Structures That May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    these following Bull et al.'s (1997)3 focus on five conditions: live trees with decay, hollows or brooms, snags, and brush. 1 Forester, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, Eldorado--Live tree with hollow structure. The tree has an old dead top with cavity nests and a new healthy top

  5. Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Frederick

    Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange David M. Blersch dblersch Shade of Blue and You 21 September 2010 #12;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange UB's ERIE Program www

  6. Restoring Native Grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, K. Brian; Wagner, Matthew; Smeins, Fred; Wilkins, Neal

    2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    are normally managed as monotypic (single species) stands of grass, so the plant diversity of the original ecosystem is lost. Non-Native Grasses and Wildlife The conversion of native grass- lands to bermudagrass pasture is detrimental to most native wildlife... property tax code now allows landowners to retain their agricul- tural tax valuation if they manage and/or restore their land for wildlife habitat, and this includes the restoration of native grasses. This tax incentive may extend to owners of smaller...

  7. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

  8. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

  9. Healthy Air Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maryland Healthy Air Act was developed with the purpose of bringing Maryland into attainment with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone and fine particulate matter by the...

  10. Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration : Annual Report, January 2008 - March 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Robin [USDA Forest Service, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period 2008-2009, there were 2 contracts with BPA. One (38539) was dealing with the restoration work for 2007 and the other (26198) was an extension on the 2006 contract including the NEPA for Dam removal on the old channel of the Sandy River. For contract 38539, the Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration project continued its focus on riparian hardwood reforestation with less emphasis on wetlands restoration. Emphasis was placed on Sundial Island again due to the potential removal of the dike and the loss of access in the near future. AshCreek Forest Management was able to leverage additional funding from grants to help finance the restoration effort; this required a mid year revision of work funded by BPA. The revised work not only continued the maintenance of restored hardwood forests, but was aimed to commence the restoration of the Columbia River Banks, an area all along the Columbia River. This would be the final restoration for Sundial Island. The grant funding would help achieve this. Thus by 2011, all major work will have been completed on Sundial Island and the need for access with vehicles would no longer be required. The restored forests continued to show excellent growth and development towards true riparian gallery forests. Final inter-planting was commenced, and will continue through 2010 before the area is considered fully restored. No new wetland work was completed. The wetlands were filled by pumping in early summer to augment the water levels but due to better rainfall, no new fuel was required to augment existing. Monitoring results continued to show very good growth of the trees and the restoration at large was performing beyond expectations. Weed problems continue to be the most difficult issue. The $100,000 from BPA planned for forest restoration in 2008, was augmented by $25,000 from USFS, $120,000 from OR150 grant, $18,000 from LCREP, and the COE continued to add $250,000 for their portion. Summary of the use of these funds are displayed in Table 1 (page 5). Work on the restoration of the original Sandy River channel (dam removal, contract 26198) continued slowly. The draft EA was completed and sent out for review. The COE has decided to finish the NEPA with the intent to complete the project.

  11. LOWELL C. KRUSE HEALTHY CHOICES. HEALTHY LIVES. SCHOLARSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Atchison, Brown, Doniphan, and Nemaha; and IN NEBRASKA: Nemaha and Richardson. #12;LOWELL C. KRUSE HEALTHY

  12. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  13. Lake restoration by dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorini, R.F.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary overview of the $17 million Vancouver Lake Restoration Project, the largest project of its type ever undertaken through the Federal Clean Lakes Program. It was funded jointly by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the Port of Vancouver. Although the project was conceived in 1965, a nationwide program to help fund such projects did not exist until 1976. Then, final approval was not received until 1981, after many volumes of studies and reviews. Construction was completed in June 1983, after 30 months--6 months ahead of schedule and underbudget. A great deal of time, money, and energy was expended to demonstrate to Federal and state environmental agencies that dredging was a key tool in effecting this lake's restoration.

  14. Hurricane Response and Restoration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Despite all of ISER’s efforts to promote reliability and resiliency in the energy sector, domestic and global events will occur that will disrupt the sector and ISER must always be prepared to respond. In the face of both manmade and natural disasters, ISER applies cutting edge technical solutions and emergency management expertise to help overcome challenges inherent in quickly restoring an incredibly complex U.S. energy system.

  15. ~ SEFS Student and Academic Services ~ Anderson 116/130 ~ sefsadv@uw.edu ~ 2065433077~ Updated 3/13/2013 Restoration Ecology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    in the Environmental Science and Resource Management major http such as environmental education or pursue graduate studies in biology, forest resources, agriculture, environmental@uw.edu ~ 2065433077~ Updated 3/13/2013 Restoration Ecology and Environmental Horticulture Option

  16. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  17. A Watershed Approach to Urban River Restoration: A Conceptual Restoration Plan for Sausal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ippolito, Teresa; Podolak, Kristen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forum: Evaluating Stream Restoration Projects. EnvironmentalR. Ladson. 2005. Stream restoration in urban catchmentsECONOMICS OF LID COMPARED TO IN- STREAM RESTORATION

  18. Restoring the Trinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the restoration of the Trinity River.? Tarrant Regional Water District (TWRD) and the A&M System?s Spatial Sciences Laboratory (SSL) and the Agricultural Research and Extension Center at Dallas are combining efforts to develop a comprehensive urban water... Research Institute of Texas and others. The Web site for the project is http://trinitybasin. tamu.edu Another project funded by the TWDB, SSL will study how urbanization and other land-use changes in the Upper Trinity watershed have affected sediment...

  19. O. Olgiati, GRET 2005 Peatland RestorationPeatland Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    Peat Industry and the Peatland Ecology Research Group (PERG). Researchers from many universities to evaluate restoration success ·How peatland restoration has influenced the way Canadian Peat industry in Canadapeatland management in Canada Capacity to accumulate peat through timeCapacity to accumulate peat through

  20. Post Project Analysis of a Restored Reach of Redwood Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Docto, Mia; Corvillon, Daniela Pena

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benchmark  for  stream  restoration  projects  (Dunne  &  the  stream  inventory  two  restoration  projects  have  production  stream.  Two  restoration  projects  have  

  1. Restoration Ecology Stable states vs. classic succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    #12;Wetland restoration goals #12;Wetland restoration goals Restoration of stream meanders ­ majorRestoration Ecology #12;Stable states vs. classic succession #12;Stable states vs. classic succession Beisner et al., 2003 #12;Restoration can be difficult if an ecosystem has moved to a new state

  2. Muddy River Restoration Project Begins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Muddy River Restoration Project Begins Page 5 #12;2 YANKEE ENGINEER February 2013 Yankee Voices of the Muddy River Restoration project. Inset photo: Flooding at the Muddy River. Materials provided by Mike Project Manager, on the passing of his father in law, Francis James (Jim) Murray, Jan. 9. ... to Laura

  3. LEARNING HERITAGE RESTORATION, LEARNING MATHEMATICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    of architectural historical heritage. Geometry of a heritage building Describing the geometry of a buildingLEARNING HERITAGE RESTORATION, LEARNING MATHEMATICS Santiago Sanchez-Beitia, Javier Barrallo is the first phase of a heritage restoration work. A precise geometric model must be conceptually simple

  4. Successful restoration of plant communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, Jeremie

    of restoration failure if seed source is incorrect #12;Unexpected results... Penstemon deustus (hot rock miles NEVADA UTAH IDAHOOREGON #12;Plant-focused restoration efforts Disturbed Site Cheatgrass (49%) Rock/Bare Ground (50%) Shrub (0.8%) Native Grass (0.7%) Cattle Dung (0.2%) Undisturbed Site Cheatgrass (0.7%) Rock

  5. Born of Fire--Restoring Sagebrush Steppe reversing the presence of invasive species,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    displace native species, but can fuel fires that favor invasion and yet more fires. Restoring a healthy and present use of native and nonnative plants in revegetation projects. Invasive Species Influenced by Fire between 1988 and 1999 indicated that there was a doubling of fires in the last 12 years, mostly between

  6. 18 years of restoration on Codornices Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fullmer, Chris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    funding for river and stream restoration  projects because 227 Rivers and Streams Restoration  Chris Fullmer  Abstract of river and  stream restoration projects.   Codornices 

  7. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Resources and Management Centre for The Centre for Forest Resources and Management aims the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration-energy development, forest resource forecasting, genetic improvement, woodland regeneration and creation, management

  8. The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Final Report 2000-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Christopher

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ? 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report.

  9. Tassajara Creek restoration project: Continued riparian habitat monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinh, Michelle; Percelay, Julie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dublin Comprehensive Stream Restoration Program. Tompkins,Berkeley LA 227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams December

  10. Forest Conservation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of Maryland's Forest Conservation Act is to minimize the loss of Maryland's forest resources during land development by making the identification and protection of forests and...

  11. Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives: Cooking on a Student's Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives: Cooking on a Student's Budget FScN 2002 ­ Fall & Spring Semesters/monthly menus within a realistic food budget and a modest supply list Gain valuable information and connect to a variety of resources on nutrition, food safety, budgeting and meal planning Develop a social network

  12. Restoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    , the first-ever comprehensive database of more than 37,000 stream and restoration projects nationwideRestoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila Maryland has the largest number of river restoration projects restoration and conservation. On a sweltering July afternoon, an assortment of men and women clad in T

  13. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  14. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  15. Business Plan for the Healthy Urban Tree Initiative Deeva Green | Davida Heller | Iigo Larraya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involved surveying the current state of urban forests and researching best practices in stewardship, capturing ambient air pollutants and absorbing storm water runoff. The business plan for the Healthy Urban project is the culmination of Columbia University's Master of Science in Sustainability Management

  16. Are tropical fungal endophytes hyperdiverse? Fungal endophytes are ubiquitous fungi that inhabit healthy plant tissues without

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Are tropical fungal endophytes hyperdiverse? Abstract Fungal endophytes are ubiquitous fungi that inhabit healthy plant tissues without causing disease. Endophytes have been found in every plant species sites in a lowland, moist tropical forest of central Panama, we quantified endophyte colonization

  17. Statewide Forest Resource Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Assessment (assessment). The assessment and strategy identify important forest lands and provideColorado Statewide Forest Resource Strategy #12;June 2010 Acknowledgments The Colorado State Forest Forest Resource Strategy. We also offer our thanks and acknowledgement to Greg Sundstrom, assistant staff

  18. R E V I E W A R T I C L E Agro-Successional Restoration as a Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    periods of cultivation (a few years to several decades), and complexity of species planted. The management forest restoration efforts. The synergism between these approaches is evidenced by many existing agro International doi: 10.1111/j.1526-100X.2009.00570.x new technologies are not adopted (Altieri 2004; Peneireiro

  19. Tassajara Creek restoration project: Continued riparian habitat monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinh, Michelle; Percelay, Julie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consulting. 2001. Tassajara Creek Restoration Project AnnualMorphology in the Tassajara Creek Restoration Project Area:back: Monitoring the Tassajara Creek Restoration Project. UC

  20. Post-project appraisal of Martin Canyon Creek restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Wayne; Roseman, Jesse

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Martin Canyon Creek Stream Restoration Owner’s Manual: FinalMartin Canyon Creek Stream Restoration in project documents,important component of stream restoration projects to assess

  1. Restoration With Reference: Rediscovering Cerrito Creek in Blake Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludy, Jessica; Podolak, Kristen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Small Urban Stream Restoration Project in Northernin combining in-stream restoration with water collection toProject LA 227 – Restoration of River and Streams University

  2. Oakland -- Strengthening a Neighborhood Through Stream Restoration [Roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, Walter

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Neighborhood Through Stream Restoration Walter Hoodproject in Oakland uses stream restoration as a tool fore slope restoration uses plant materials to,stabilize stream

  3. Peatland Restoration Guide Second Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    of Peat Moss Association Natural Resources and Energy #12;IIPeatland Restoration Guide Published in partnership by: Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Association 7, Oasis Court St. Albert, AB Canada, T8N 6N2 cspma@peatmoss.com www.peatmoss.com New Brunswick Departement of Natural Resources and Energy PO Box 6000 Fredericton, NB

  4. Environmental Security and Restoration | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contaminated sites. Argonne's work in environmental restoration addresses soil, surface water, sediment, and groundwater at contaminated sites, starting with environmental...

  5. Stream quality among active and restoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Stream quality among active and restoring river-based cranberry bogs Project By: Holly Engel and restoration. In this project, I assessed the quality and health of the streams in these bogs in comparison of Massachusetts has purchased several flow-through bogs and has been working to restore these stream and riparian

  6. 3. Hydrogeomorphic Variability and River Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    . It is difficult to design effective stream and channel restoration measures, or evaluate project performance expansion of efforts in and expenditures for stream restoration. Increasingly, resto- ration efforts focus39 3. Hydrogeomorphic Variability and River Restoration D. R. MONTGOMERY1 AND S. M. BOLTON2

  7. Forest Inventory and Analysis Research The Nation's Forest Census

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Inventory and Analysis Research F I A The Nation's Forest Census The U.S. Forest Inventory Monitoring Symposium November 4, 2008 #12;Forest Inventory and Analysis Research F I A The Nation's Forest Census FIA Program Perspectives · Only comprehensive forest inventory for each of the 50 States, Puerto

  8. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  9. A watershed blueprint: partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    txH2O | pg. 18 A watershed blueprint Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado?s health In 2002 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) set a target of 90 percent reduction of nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand... for the Arroyo Colorado to regain its healthy condition. Eight years later, the Arroyo Colorado, an ancient channel of the Rio Grande in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, has been the focus of multiple projects; educational and outreach efforts...

  10. A watershed blueprint: Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    txH2O | pg. 18 A watershed blueprint Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado?s health In 2002 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) set a target of 90 percent reduction of nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand... for the Arroyo Colorado to regain its healthy condition. Eight years later, the Arroyo Colorado, an ancient channel of the Rio Grande in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, has been the focus of multiple projects; educational and outreach efforts...

  11. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  12. Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

  13. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  14. Environmental Restoration 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cosper, M.B.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1997, the Environmental Restoration Program at the Savannah River Site achieved all of the ``Breakthrough Goals`` that were established with the regulatory agencies in 1995 to advance their cleanup efforts. Effective focus on field remediation was demonstrated by the allocation of 75% of program funding to remediation activities. The Remediation Phase is complete or has begun on sixty-nine waste sites that represent approximately 80% of the known environmental and health risk. The average time required for the assessment phase of active projects was reduced by 50%, from 49 to less than 24 months, which allows cleanup actions to start twice as fast as before. Breakthrough performance has tangible results. During 1997, all of the funding allocation was used effectively to accomplish environmental restoration scope worth over $123 million. That represents a validated cost efficiency of over 20% for the third straight year. Over half of the 500 contaminated acres at SRS have been cleaned up or are currently in the remediation phase. Almost 3 billion gallons of groundwater have been restored by removing over half a million pounds of organic solvents.

  15. Selecting a Consulting Forester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-038 5-06 Selecting a Consulting Forester Eric L. Taylor, Extension Specialist, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry, The Texas A&M University System A consulting forester is an independent... forest management experience does the for- ester have and in what capacity? ? In what professional or forestry-related organizations is the forester an active member? Recognized professional organizations include the Association of Consulting...

  16. Forest Lifeautumn | winter 2004 the forest!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    valley, near the spectacular Cornish coast Outdoor delights on your doorstep Come to the heart of Britain, rivers and streams, dramatic mountains, deep valleys and peaceful forest glades - they're all of exciting news, events, information and a great competition. Happy reading! In this issue of Forest Life we

  17. International Conference MANAGING FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Working Party 1.01.08 ­ Ecology and Silviculture of Spruces; co-hosted by the EU Interreg Project Forest of Alberta, Canada "Ecology and Silviculture of White Spruce in the Canadian Boreal Forest for Multiple Forest Integrity; Why Spruce is a Good Option" Kristina Blennow, SLU, Sweden "Perception of Risks

  18. FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lead to a more efficient model to achieve and document high levels of forest stewardship by Oregon comes from well-managed forests. For wood products companies that do business with the likes of Home by the State of Oregon to be less competent or protective of forest resources than those landowners who become

  19. Forest ecology Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Forest ecology Introduction Forest ecology is a part of ecology that is con- cerned with forests as opposed to grasslands, savan- nas, or tundra. Ecology is the study of the processes of interaction among organisms and between organ- isms and their environment. Ecology is often subdi- vided into physiological

  20. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  1. New Hypothesis for Environmental Restoration | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Hypothesis for Environmental Restoration Released: April 14, 2015 Carbonate minerals could remediate contaminated groundwater Co-precipitation of Np(V) into mineral...

  2. Spooner creek restoration and fish ladder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tom

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPOONER CREEK RESTORATION AND FISH LADDER Tom Moore (Phone:847-3132 Abstract Spooner Creek is a dendritic second orderflows into Cattaraugus Creek, a tributary of Lake Erie.

  3. Heart Healthy Home Cooking African American Style

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Heart Healthy Home Cooking African American Style With Every Heartbeat Is Life #12;#12;Heart Recipe Substitutions for Heart Healthy Cooking at the heart of African American family life and special celebrations. This recipe book brings together many

  4. Appendix 33 Forest Resources of the Flathead National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ponderosa pine, and aspen forest types also occur. #12;2 Figure 3--Area by forest type and habitat type Grand fir Aspen Ponderosa pine Forest type refers to the predominant tree species in a stand, based

  5. ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) - Implications and challenges of decentralized China's collective forest management Heng Sok (National Forest:00-10:30 Moderator: Heng Sok (Forestry Administration, Cambodia) Session: Forests and the market for timber products

  6. Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment A Foundation for Strategic Discussion and Private Forestry Redesign Initiative 2 National Guidance for Statewide Forest Resource Assessments 4 The Colorado Statewide Resource Assessment and all appendices are available online on the Colorado State Forest

  7. Foothills Model Forest Business Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foothills Model Forest Business Strategy 2007 ­ 2012 November 2006 #12;Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTS FOOTHILLS MODEL FOREST Business Strategy for April 2007 to March 2012 1.0 INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................... 4 2.4 Foothills Model Forest Values

  8. Ecological Restoration for Community Benefit: People and Landscapes in Northern California, 1840-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Lucy Ontario

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of Stream Restoration. ” Restoration Ecology 3,Robertson. “Privatizing stream restoration in the US. ”Moran, Sharon. “Stream Restoration Projects: A Critical

  9. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Castro JM, editors. Stream restoration in dynamic fluvialas part of the stream meander corridor restoration. Naturalwith stream meander corridor restoration and restored flow

  10. Forest Road Building Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations include zoning ordinances and permits for stream crossing, grading...

  11. Opportunities for Future Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .V.Birnie * Forest Research 1 #12;This document has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the ISO 9001

  12. Reconstruction and Restoration of PET Images.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Reconstruction and Restoration of PET Images. Ph.D. Thesis Peter Alshede Philipsen LYNGBY 1998 IMM with reconstruction and restoration of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images carried out at the Section of Digital contains a short introduction to PET imaging. The second part, chapters 2 to 4, describe the PET scanner

  13. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study National Planning Center of Expertise for Ecosystem Restoration Mississippi Valley Division Contract No. W Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study Prepared by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus

  14. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    1976 . Disturbance during logging stimulates re- generation of koa. USDA Forest Servo Res. Note PSW-306 and distribution of Acacia koa re- genera tion after logging were studied on a 500-acre (202-ha) tract of koa forest heavily infested with Passi- /1ora mol/issima vines on the island of Hawaii. Koa seedling density

  15. FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI PURPOSE COURT STUDENT RESIDENCES GREEN HOUSE STUDENT RESIDENCES STUDENT RESIDENCES RECPLEX STORAGE BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE

  16. Forests and historic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forests and historic environment UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Reference number #12;Forests and historic environment Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry Standard in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit: www

  17. SEYMOUR, G., AND A. TECLE. 2004. IMPACT OF SLASH PILE SIZE AND BURNING ON PONDEROSA PINE FOREST SOIL PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS. JOURNAL OF THE ARIZONA-NEVADA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE 37(2):74-82.2004GEOFF SEYMOUR AND AREGAI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEYMOUR, G., AND A. TECLE. 2004. IMPACT OF SLASH PILE SIZE AND BURNING ON PONDEROSA PINE FOREST SEYMOUR AND AREGAI TECLE. IMPACT OF SLASH PILE SIZE AND BURNING ON PONDEROSA PINE FOREST SOIL PHYSICAL 86001 ABSTRACT Slash-pile burns associated with restoration thinning treatments may change soil

  18. anadromous salmon restoration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    status of restoration sites. Such a self-monitoring approach of letting the fish diagnose the ecological state of restoration would effectively address the small-scale,...

  19. Post-project appraisal of Martin Canyon Creek restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Wayne; Roseman, Jesse

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ltd. 1999. Martin Canyon Creek Stream Restoration Owner’sAppraisal of Martin Canyon Creek Restoration Final ProjectDublin, California, Martin Canyon Creek is a small tributary

  20. Continued monitoring of the Tassajara Creek restoration project 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oden, Matt; DeHollan, Aurel

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Morphology in the Tassajara Creek Restoration Project Area:Back: Monitoring the Tassajara Creek Restoration Project. UCBed Elevation Tassajara Creek. UC Berkeley Water Resources

  1. Looking forward, looking back : monitoring the Tassajara Creek Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krofta, Chad; Novotney, Michael

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Station Elev. Tassajara Creek Long Profile Compiled SurveyImprovement Plans for Tassajara Creek Restoration. Downs, P.Morphology in the Tassajara Creek Restoration Project Area:

  2. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War...

  3. North Fork John Day Dredge Tailings Restoration Project Final Report 1997-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, John A. (US Forest Service, Pendleton, OR)

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USDA Forest Service (USFS) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) worked together to rehabilitate 2.1 miles of Clear Creek floodplain, a tributary of the North Fork John Day River Basin. Dredge tailing were deposited from mining operations on Clear Creek's floodplain from the 1930's to the 1950's. These tailing confined the stream channel and degraded the floodplain. The work was completed by moving dredge tailing piles adjacent to the Clear Creek channel, using track-mounted excavators and dump trucks. A caterpillar tractor was used to contour the material placed outside the immediate floodplain, blending it into the hillside. The restored floodplain was very near channel bankfull level following excavation and contoured to accept future flood flows. Monitoring was initiated through pre and post-project photo points and cross-section measurements. Work was completed in two efforts. In 1997 and 1998 floodplain restoration was adjacent to the reconstruction of Road 13 from the junction with Road 10 from Clear Creek River Mile 1.9 to 3.1 for a distance of 1.2 miles. In 1999 the Environmental Assessment for Lower Clear Creek--Granite Creek Floodplain Restoration Project was completed for work proposed on Clear Creek from the mouth up to River mile 1.9 and the Granite Creek floodplain from River miles 5.9 to 7.7. Restoration proposed in the 1999 Environmental Assessment is the subject of this report.

  4. Tongass National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two long-term timber contracts in the Tongass National Forest require private companies to harvest prescribed amounts of timber within agreed upon time frames during the 50-year contract life. This report has reviewed the accuracy of Forest Service figures for the volume of timber actually harvested under the two contracts, timber deleted from the private companies' operating plans, and backlogged timber. The author was unable to verify the first two figures because the Forest Service had not complied with all of its internal controls and because documentation and records were incomplete. The author was able to verify the figure for backlogged timber. While the Forest Service has tried to better account for timber prepared for harvesting through improved internal controls, this report believes additional actions are needed to ensure that forest supervisors comply with the internal controls for documenting harvested timber volumes and the information needed to support and report changes in timber sale activities is accurately reported.

  5. Howland Forest David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · An old-growth forest is a unique ecological endpoint · Long-term record of carbon is on factors that regulate long term carbon storage · Infrastructure · Topography experiment (21 ha) Canopy application, 18 kg N ha-1 y-1 (NH4NO3) C Sequestration Assessed in 3 Ways: · Eddy

  6. Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act enacts the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, which is a joint state and federal effort to provide for the conservation of the Everglades region. The plan regulates land and water...

  7. Energy Analysis of the Texas Capitol Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunn, B. D.; Banks, J. A.; Reddy, S. N.

    This paper presents the methodology and results of a detailed energy analysis of the Texas Capitol Restoration. The purpose of this analysis was two-fold: 1) to determine the projected energy cost savings of a series of design alternatives...

  8. MARSH LAKE, APPLETON, MINNESOTA ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    a dike to restore connectivity to an abandoned fish rearing pond adjacent to the dam. · Installing gated recreation features, including shoreline fishing access, picnic facilities, canoe access and a pedestrian

  9. A Watershed Approach to Urban River Restoration: A Conceptual Restoration Plan for Sausal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ippolito, Teresa; Podolak, Kristen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appraisal of the Sausal Creek restoration project, Oakland,Assessment of Sausal Creek: Physical Setting, Habitatmorphology of Sausal Creek, Oakland, California. Water

  10. Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Gary A.

    Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Ashley H. Moerke1,2 and Gary A. Lamberti1 Abstract Reach-scale stream restorations are becoming a common approach to repair degraded and nature of reach-scale stream restorations in this midwestern U.S. state. For 10 attempted restorations

  11. ISE 2012, Vienna USING RIVER RESTORATION OPERATIONS TO TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to assess how ecohydraulic models can predict actual biological responses to stream restoration. As other9 th ISE 2012, Vienna USING RIVER RESTORATION OPERATIONS TO TEST PREDICTIVE ECOHYDRAULIC MODELS physical restoration, it is still difficult to assess the ecological effects of restoration operations

  12. Revolutionising tRee bReeding p.13 FoRest development in 3d p.14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to restore and recreate lost natural values, all during an ongoing process of climate change. this task can is good for the climate 21 Mapping the ultrastructure of wood 21 Forests at centre of global tug of war 22 of Communication, Box 7077, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. Editorial staff: Nora Adelsköld (project leader, editor

  13. Psychologically Healthy Workplace Practices = Good Business

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Creating a psychologically healthy workplace is not just the right thing to do for employees; it’s also the smart thing to do for an organization’s financial well being and productivity. A small investment in psychologically healthy work practices can pay big dividends in years to come.

  14. making healthy prisons work in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelson, David G.

    making healthy prisons work in Canada PREMIERE SHOWING OF VIDEO DOCUMENTARY: `Cancer Walks Free panel discussion in support of healthy prisons in Canada. Panelists will discuss why preventive health be implemented in Canada. PANELISTS Ms. Mo Korchinski Film Director, Member of Women in2 Healing Dr. Keith

  15. Interdependent Network Restoration: Modeling Restoration Interdependencies and Evaluating the Value of Information-Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, John E.

    this IINDS problem model a centralized decision-making environment where a single decision-maker controls) that provide key services to a community. Electrical power systems, transportation, telecom- munications, waterInterdependent Network Restoration: Modeling Restoration Interdependencies and Evaluating the Value

  16. 5 Putting Science into Action on Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Putting Science into Action on Forest Service Lands William M. Block u.s. Forest Service, Rocky into Action on Forest Service Lands t':: Research and Development, National Forest Systems, State and Private Forestry, International Programs

  17. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Timothy B. [USFS; Miller, Karl V. [University of Georgia; Park, Noreen

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

  18. Forest fires: from economic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    and increasing deadwood, increasing recreation activities in forests, climate change, ... ) need for multi and Merlo, 2005 - Mediterranean Forest Values:37-68 133 ha-1 (overall average value in 18 Mediterranean

  19. A long-term post-project evaluation of an urban stream restoration project (Baxter Creek, El Cerrito, California)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purcell, Alison

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1995. Evaluating stream restoration projects. Environmentalof a small, urban stream restoration project in northernhistory of urban stream restoration. Aquatic Conservation:

  20. Process for restoring membrane permeation properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.G.

    1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for restoring the selectivity of high-free-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70--100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use. 8 figs.

  1. Process for restoring membrane permeation properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Casillas, Carlos G. (San Jose, CA)

    1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for restoring the selectivity of high-flee-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70-100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use.

  2. EA-2006: Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing a programmatic EA for actions recommended by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council to help restore ecological structure, function, and biodiversity within the Columbia River estuary. Activities under this program could include full reconnection of tidal influence through breaching dikes and levees; partial reconnection of tidal influence through culverts, bridges, and tidegates; enhancement of the quantity and quality of tidal channels; removal of invasive species; and restoration of riparian habitat conditions, such as planting native vegetation.

  3. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and management. The program emphasizes sustainable, multiple-use management and includes substantial field work work, etc.) Fall FNR 4624C Field Operations for Management of Ecosystems 3 credits FNR 4660 NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Forest Resource Management Forest

  4. National Forest Inventory of Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Inventory of Great Britain Survey Manual #12;2 Remember to Save your Edit Session Regularly, Validate the information and Backup the Data NFI Survey Manual National Forest Inventory Survey in the surveys contributes to the National Forest Inventory (NFI) of Great Britain. With the information from

  5. Mensuration protocol National Forest Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NFI: Mensuration protocol for the National Forest Inventory June 2010 E. D. Mackie, R. W. Matthews and A. Brewer1 FR Biometrics Division 1 IFOS, Forestry Commission #12;National Forest Inventory (NFI or square boundary. In the case of a section 2 #12;National Forest Inventory (NFI): Mensuration Protocol

  6. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  7. ForestDevelopment Community Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    in Africa as a basis for developing applied integrated, multiple use forest resource management for timber and non-timber forest products from these systems, and for forest rehabilitation af- ter degradation from to Fusarium circinatum. Forestry companies worldwide have tried to hybridise P. radiata with other Pinus

  8. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

  9. The effectiveness of riparian restoration for improving instream fish habitat in four hardwood-dominated California streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opperman, Jeff J; Merenlender, A M

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of riparian and stream restoration in the Western Unitedeval- uation of stream restoration. Restoration EcologyPess. 2002. A review of stream restoration techniques and a

  10. Codornices Creek Corridor: Land Use Regulation, Creek Restoration, and their Impacts on the Residents’ Perceptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokenberga, Aiga; Sen, Arijit

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Restoration on Codornices Creek. Restoration of Rivers andHarper Colophon. Cordonices Creek Corridor Haggerty, L.Associates. 2003. Codornices Creek Watershed Restoration

  11. Lessons and Experiences from a Stream Restoration Project in the Piedmont of North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Thomas; Hajnos, Edward

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    report documenting stream restoration and enhancement isInc. is participating in a stream restoration study with theof North Carolina. Stream restoration in North Carolina is

  12. Stream restoration case studies in North Carolina utilizing natural channel design techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, William A.; Jennings, Gregory D.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA. Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group (STREAM RESTORATION CASE STUDIES IN NORTH CAROLINA UTILIZINGand streambanks. Stream restoration options for incised

  13. Monitoring channel change at the Sausal Creek Restoration Project, Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantham, Ted; Tollefson, Kate

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s LA 227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams Class (Professors LA 227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams Class (Professors LA 227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams Class- Fall

  14. Evaluation of Riparian Restoration to Enhance Anadromous Fish Habitat along a Napa County Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaber, Christine O.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Salmonid Stream Restoration Manual. Part XI:2003. Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group (Napa County rangeland stream restoration project designed to

  15. Cerrito Creek step-pools: An opportunity for restoration and education at Blake Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrends, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of Urban Stream Restoration. Aquatic Conservation:accepted within the stream restoration community. This isBranch). LA227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams. University

  16. Baxter Creek Gateway Park: assessment of an urban stream restoration project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Judd; Lunde, Kevin B; Zaro, Theresa

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Small Urban Stream Restoration Project in Northernfor: LA 227- Restoration of Rivers and Streams Instructor:restoration project was constructed with aspects of stream

  17. Restoration Potential of a Mining-Impacted Urban Stream: Horseshoe Branch of Lion Creek, Oakland, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hackenjos, Bethany; Woelfle-Erskine, Cleo; Wood, Jacob

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the bay. The urban stream restoration movement that arose inecological value. Few stream restoration projects in the Bayon- campus lake and stream restoration activities. An active

  18. Codornices Creek Corridor: Land Use Regulation, Creek Restoration, and their Impacts on the Residents’ Perceptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokenberga, Aiga; Sen, Arijit

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two East Bay Urban Stream Restoration Projects: Codornicesfunding for river and stream restoration projects, becausepreservation, and restoration of urban streams and their

  19. ORISE: Training Tools for Healthy Schools | How ORISE is Making...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Tools for Healthy Schools CDC gains wider audience through e-learning developed by ORAU Training Tools for Healthy Schools ORAU instructional designers and developers are...

  20. Urban agriculture is a gateway to healthy foods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pérez, John A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    healthy tomorrow. Urban agriculture has multiple benefitsWestlake. 192 CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 4Editorial Urban agriculture is a gateway to healthy foods A

  1. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  2. Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional Reduction in Cadmium in Blue Crabs J connected to the Hudson River estuary. A major Superfund dredging cleanup in 1994-1995 removed most ofcadmiumsedimentconcentrationswithinthecovefollowing the cleanup. This unique study demonstrates the efficacy of a major dredging cleanup

  3. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, D.L.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200 C for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency. 2 figs.

  4. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency.

  5. New Approachesfor Bulk Power System Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    New Approachesfor Bulk Power System Restoration by AbbasKETABI M.Sc in Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Technology Department of Electrical Engineering, Teheran, Iran Supervisors: SHARIF Professor: Ali M. RANJBAR and complexity. Both factors increase the risk of major power outages. After a blackout, power needs

  6. Restoration projects within urban systems frequently encounter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    designers to the use of models to predict the discharge associated with bankfull water surface elevation calculated for a given storm event can vary considerably by the use of modeling alone. It is much moreAbstract Restoration projects within urban systems frequently encounter various complexities

  7. "Reliability, Resiliency, and Restoration for Smarter Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    "Reliability, Resiliency, and Restoration for Smarter Grid Workshop" Save the Date April 3 and 4 at mohlsen@bnl.gov "The Resilient Smart Grid" to be held at Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, Long Island://www.bnl.gov/maps/. This is the 5th workshop that BNL is hosting on the Smart Grid. This Workshop will build on the previous

  8. atlantic forest state: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 credits FORT 110* Forest Inventories (3) FORT 140 Forest Surveying (3) FORT 160 to Forestry 1 FORT 105 - Forest Mensuration* 3 FORT 110 - Forest...

  9. Secretary Bodman Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East Texas More Quickly Secretary Bodman Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East Texas More Quickly September 28, 2005 - 10:58am...

  10. Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and how of Engineers #12;The Issue The Corps created an ecosystem restoration mission out of congressional authorities ecosystem services enough to reduce national welfare. Implementing projects under that mission requires

  11. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  12. Assessing channel reconfiguration as river restoration bioassessment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Assessing channel reconfiguration as river restoration ­ bioassessment and disturbance Desiree love - restoration "various techniques used to replicate the hydrological, morphological, and ecological features that have been lost in a stream due to urbanization, farming, or other disturbance

  13. Creating Jobs and Restoring Coastal Habitats A Sea Change for Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    increasingly protected from direct impacts from activities like channel dredging operations and "scarring" from restoration (defined as projects costing up to $1 million for implementation). The Council leverages resources

  14. Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

  15. Forest Landscape Description and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Forest Landscape Description and Inventories a basis for landplanning and design Pacific Southwest landscape description and inventories ­ a basis for land plan- ning and design. Berkeley, Calif., Pacific SW. Illustrates their application in two inventories made to aid managers and landscape architects in planning

  16. Extension Note Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based harvesting systems led to the development of the "Site Degradation Guidelines for the Vancouver Forest Region to validate soil disturbance guidelines, were lacking at that time. Early attempts had been made to assess, and to measure tree growth over the longer term as an indication of site productivity. The first trial

  17. International Conference MANAGING FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    speeches 1305-1310 Welcome by Chair of IUFRO Group 1.01.08 Ulf Johansson, SLU, Sweden 1310-1325 Opening-1440 The challenges of sustainability delivering multiple ecosystem services in a private sector commercial forest of Edinburgh, UK 1600-1620 Early thinning of energy wood in dense mixtures of Norway spruce and birch

  18. USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

  19. South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern Coastal Areas information needed for ecosystem restoration in the Southern Coastal Areas of South Florida. In 1996 that time, ecosystem restoration has advanced from planning to implementation; progress in research has

  20. How Fish Communities Differ Across Stream Restoration Intensities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    ! ! ! ! How Fish Communities Differ Across Stream Restoration Intensities Andrew Miano1 Mentor to their natural function. This is known as stream restoration. Unfortunately, ecological concepts can be left out during stream restoration JK$>*!*1!$9:!'LLMN. This is in part due to the fact that ecologists still do

  1. Do in-stream restoration structures enhance salmonid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    Do in-stream restoration structures enhance salmonid abundance? A meta-analysis. Whiteway et al. (2010) Presentation by: Shannon Clarke Rob Johnstone #12;Does Stream Restoration Work? Yes. Now we can go home. #12;Outline · What is a stream? · Why is stream restoration important? · Looking at Whiteway

  2. Restoration of Soldier Spring: an isolated habitat for native

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the channel and restore aquatic habitat along 450 m of degraded stream. Following treatment, the bed refilled in the stream declined as the degradation worsened, but it rebounded following the restoration treatments. While the stream. New restoration efforts began in 1998 with support from a number of tribal, federal, and school

  3. Methods for Saving and Restoring Register Values across Function Calls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whalley, David

    Methods for Saving and Restoring Register Values across Function Calls JACK W. DAVIDSON AND DAVID B The method used to save and restore the values of registers across function calls can affect performance that empirically evaluated six different schemes for saving and restoring registers on CISC machines. The methods

  4. What is the National Forest Inventory? The National Forest Inventory is a record of key information about forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What is the National Forest Inventory? The National Forest Inventory is a record of key information is the information gathered? Data for the National Forest Inventory is being collected using ground surveys, aerial representative picture of the state of Britain's forests and woodland. National Forest Inventory #12;Has

  5. FCS Guidance Note 33: Forest operations and red squirrels: November 2006 Forest operations and red squirrels in Scottish forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacts on red squirrels. The survey, forest design and operational planning practices set outFCS Guidance Note 33: Forest operations and red squirrels: November 2006 1 Forest operations Guidance Note: Forest operations and wildlife in Scottish forests. This note sets out further advice on how

  6. Old growth in northwestern California National Forests. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardsley, D.; Warbington, R.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report estimates old-growth forest area and summarizes stand characteristics of old growth in northwestern California National Forests by forest type. Old-growth definitions for each forest type are used.

  7. Effect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt-dominated watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    restoration activities often seek to directly modify stream channel and riparian zone surface and subsurface: Cookhouse Meadow stream restoration project, 2004). Recently, bio- technical restoration techniquesEffect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt

  8. Promoting Successful Restoration through Effective Monitoring in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    for their assistance in arranging the web-based reviews. #12;3 Stream Restoration from stream restoration. Since most restoration is at the reach scale1 Promoting Successful Restoration through Effective Monitoring

  9. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  10. www.hfhl.umn.edu Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives (HFHL) Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Lives (HFHL) Institute is an all-university Institute supported by funds from the University funding cycle (fall 2014) OR proposals may be prepared and submitted to other equivalent Universitywww.hfhl.umn.edu Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives (HFHL) Institute Planning Grant Program for Community-University

  11. How can we improve information delivery to support conservation and restoration decisions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seavy, Nathaniel E.; Howell, Christine A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis (2005) Stream restoration databases and caseGoodwin P (2007) Stream restoration in the Paci?c Northwest:

  12. Age-class structure of old growth ponderosa pine/douglas-fir stands and its relationship to fire history. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arno, S.F.; Scott, J.H.; Hartwell, M.G.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes age structure of nine old growth ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir stands in western Montana. Interprets the influence of past fires and 20th century five exclusion on stand structure. Gives implications for management to restore and maintain these forests for multiple resource values.

  13. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

  14. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  15. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  16. Russian: United States Environmental Restoration Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Russian - United States Environmental Restoration Workshop, held in Washington, D.C., and Richland, Washington, from April 5 through 18, 1993, was the first extended collaborative information exchange between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Russian scientists at the site level. In addition to the Russian scientists, workshop participants included scientists and staff from DOE, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the US Environmental Training Institute (USETI), universities, and the private sector. The first week (April 5 through 10) of the workshop took place in Washington, D.C., where the Russian and US participants were presented with a US perspective on environmental restoration and remediation issues from representatives in DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The second week (April 11 through 18) occurred in Richland, Washington, where the participants were presented with site-specific environmental restoration and remediation issues related to Hanford Site cleanup. This report is a compilation of the presentations, discussions, and experiences shared during the second week of the workshop in Richland, Washington.

  17. Strategic planning for power system restorations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van Hententyck, Pascal [BROWN UNIV.; Coffrin, Carleton [BROWN UNIV.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers the power system restoration planning problem (PSRPP) for disaster recovery, a fundamental problem faced by all populated areas. PSRPPs are complex stochastic optimization problems that combine resource allocation, warehouse location, and vehicle routing considerations. Furthermore, electrical power systems are complex systems whose behavior can only be determined by physics simulations. Moreover, these problems must be solved under tight runtime constraints to be practical in real-world disaster situations. This work is three fold: (1) it formalizes the specification of PSRPPs; (2) introduces a simple optimization-simulation hybridization necessary for solving PSRPPs; and (3) presents a complete restoration algorithm that utilizes the strengths of mixed integer programming, constraint programming, and large neighborhood search. This paper studied a novel problem in the field of humanitarian logistics, the Power System Restoration Problem (PSRPP). The PSRPP models the strategic planning process for post disaster power system recovery. The paper proposed a multi-stage stochastic hybrid optimization algorithm that yields high quality solutions to real-world benchmarks provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The algorithm uses a variety of technologies, including MIP, constraint programming, and large neighborhood search, to exploit the structure of each individual optimization subproblem. The experimental results on hurricane disaster benchmarks indicate that the algorithm is practical from a computational standpoint and produce significant improvements over existing relief delivery procedures.

  18. Tax Credit for Forest Derived Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest-derived biomass includes tree tops, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody debris leftover from activities such as timber harvesting, forest thinning, fire suppression, or forest health m...

  19. Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Channel Revised Fourth Edition Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Research Program Santa Barbara Coastal Long Term Ecological Research Program #12;Kelp Forests of the Santa

  20. Protection of Forest Resources (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road...

  1. Instruments to preserve or restore woodlands and to improve the supply of forest goods and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    , Landscape, Tourism, Biodiversity, Carbon sequestration, water supply, ... loc.reg. localregional localreg www.watershedconnect.com Water related PES www.forestcarbonportal.com Carbon PES www

  2. Studies on bottomland hardwood forest restoration and teaching with geographic information systems (GIS) in ecology labs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Matthew Earl

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    .6 Growth of planted mature tree species from Spring 2004 to Fall 2005. Bars on columns represent one SE, and different letters indicated differences at P ridges..., and sloughs with relative elevations??????????????... 51 4.2 Survival of planted pioneer tree species on ridges, mounds and pools, and flats from Spring 2004 to Fall 2005. Bars on columns represent one SE, and different letters indicate...

  3. ucsf sustainability healthy environment, sustainable future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    ucsf sustainability healthy environment, sustainable future UC SAN FRANCISCO ANNUAL REPORT FY 2009-2010 Annual Report of the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Sustainability #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary 1 UCSF Sustainability Governance 3 Table 1: CACS Members 4 Figure 1: UCSF Sustainability

  4. Forest density mapping in the lower 48 states: A regression procedure. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Z.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis (SO-FIA) research unit conducted a project to map the distribution of forest lands for the entire United States. Forest types and forest densities were mapped, and a new forest type group map for the country was produced (Powell and others, in press; Zhu and Evans 1992). The project supported the 1993 Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment Update program, by which the Forest Service was required to provide statistics on current forest land and rangeland conditions.

  5. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Paper Company Sara Kendall Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme Berlyn Professor

  6. Rock Weirs as Tools for Stabilization in Restoration Projects: An appraisal and comparison of two stream restoration projects in Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, Dave; Maendly, Romain; Poindexter, Cristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rosgen, D. 1992. Stream Restoration Plan for Wildcat Creek.investment in stream restoration in the U.S. exceeds $2comparison of two stream restoration projects in Northern

  7. Planning aquatic ecosystem restoration monitoring programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, R.M.; Wellman, K.F.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted as part of the Evaluation of Environmental Investments Research Program (EEIRP). The EEIRP is sponsored by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify relevant approaches and features for environmental investment measures to be applied throughout the project life; (2) develop methods to access the effectiveness of the approach or feature for providing the intended environmental output; (3) develop and provide guidance for formulating environmental projects; and (4) provide guidance for formulating and identifying relevant cost components of alternate restoration plans.

  8. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Environmental Pre-Law provides a solid undergraduate-use management and includes substantial field work and group projects. Specialization: Environmental Pre-Law Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in Natural Resources and Conservation 3 credits FOR3434C Forest Resources

  9. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Phillips and Thomas J. Corcoran Optimal Control of Raw Timber Production Processes .................................................................................................. 60 Malcolm Kirby Forest Management Planning for Timber Production: A Sequential Approach.S.DEPARTMEN'I' OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 32 OPERATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING METHODS: proceedings

  10. June 2014 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 32:2 189 Ecological Restoration Vol. 32, No. 2, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disturbance regimes that vary in the kind, frequency, severity, and duration of disturbance. We investigated are characterized by general patterns of perturbation, including the types of disturbance and their frequency ARTICLE Restoration of Heterogeneous Disturbance Regimes for the Preservation of Endangered Species Steven

  11. Restoration Prioritization Toolset: Documentation and User’s Guides 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Chaeli; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Anderson, Michael G.; Borde, Amy B.

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This user’s guide provides technical background and details on the Restoration Prioritization Toolset developed for GoMRC as well as instructions for use.

  12. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint RICHLAND, Wash. - The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American...

  13. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts...

  14. Lone Star Healthy Streams Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Kevin; Redmon, Larry

    13 Progress Report ? July 15, 2010 TWRI submitted Quarter 14 Progress Report ? October 13, 2010 TWRI submitted Quarter 15 Progress Report ? January 14, 2011 TWRI submitted Quarter 16 Progress Report Subtask 1.3: Coordination of project... on July 1, 2010 to provide a 6-month no-cost extension that extended the project end date to March 31, 2011 to allow completion of the Bacteroides analysis and development of the final report. Lone Star Healthy Streams Final Report 13 Subtask...

  15. Environmental Restoration Program Document Control Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, L.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Document Control Plan has been developed to comply with the document control system requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), the Hanford Federal Facility and the ER Program. One of the five components, or summary subprojects, of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program is program management and support, which includes both management systems development and information and data management. Efforts within the management systems development area include the creation of a document control plan. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed and established an overall document control system that governs the methods by which all WHC documents are generated, maintained, and disposed of. The ER Program performing organizations within WHC utilize the established WHC document control systems to the maximum extent possible. These systems are discussed in Chapters 3.0 and 4.0 of this plan. In addition, this plan describes the documents that require control within the ER Program and how they will be controlled.

  16. The Future of Forest Certification in A Roundtable Discussion by Forest Stakeholders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , minimize energy wastes, follow local laws, and respect people's rights. · Multiple forest certification upon them. One strategy is forest certification. Certification of forests and forest products is touted as a strategy for sustaining forests and the life support services they provide. Rather than remain mired in win

  17. For Immediate Release: January 30, 2008 Sustaining Virginia's Forests through Forest Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and products processed in ways that sustain forest health, minimize energy wastes, follow local laws, and the people and communities that depend upon them. One strategy is forest certification. Certification of forests and forest products is touted as a strategy for sustaining forests and the life support services

  18. UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and people

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and people #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements for sustainable forest management Element of SFM Reference number Good forestry practice requirement Reference #12;UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and people Forestry Commission: Edinburgh #12;ii Forests

  19. Guidelines on local European forest energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    fellings, ... and · Biodisel, bioethanol and oil from crops (forest) · cutting 20% of the GHS gas emissions

  20. Redwood Creek, Marin County 2010 Monitoring Study of a Salmonid Habitat Stream Restoration Project: Seven-­?Year Post-­?Project Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crockett, Richard; Cundy, Fiona; Hanley, Colin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Salmonid  Habitat  Stream  Restoration  Project:   Seven-­?227  |  Stream  and  River  Restoration   Term  Project  |  in  the  Stream  and   River   Restoration  class  

  1. Benthic Invertebrate Community Composition in Four Stream across a Restoration Intensity Gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Benthic Invertebrate Community Composition in Four Stream across a Restoration Intensity Gradient of cranberry farming on streams. These restoration projects vary in their intensity from low restoration streams with varying degrees of restoration intensity to determine if increased restoration intensity more

  2. Early post-restoration re-vegetation performance and critical social and institutional factors in a landowner-involved restoration project on lower Wooden Valley Creek, Napa County, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Morgan; Post, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micheli. “Forum: Evaluating Stream Restoration Projects. ”adaptive management of small stream restoration projects.Current efforts in stream restoration emphasize the

  3. Forests and The Texas Economy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Jay O'; Williams, Richard A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in tree mortality caused by pine bark beetles and the con version of timberland to other uses. The effects of pro jected land use changes are illustrated in Figure 10-1. The future of the forest industry sector depends on the sol ution to timber growth... organizations interested in forestry in Texas. As an indication of the economic and social importance of forests, both the public and private sectors are well represented. The forest products industry, an important component of the forestry sector...

  4. Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration ImplementationCA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration ImplementationBay–Delta Program. 2000. Ecosystem Restoration Program:

  5. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rivers: implications for ecosystem restoration: Final reportto CALFED. Ecosystem Restoration Program Agreement No.support tools to guide ecosystem restoration planning and

  6. Carneros Creek: Assessing restoration implications for a sinuous stream using 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional simulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beagle, Julie; Marzion, Rachael; Matella, Mary

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. et al. A Review of Stream Restoration Techniques and aa restoration strategy for this stream. Furthermore,velocity stream (Facey and Grossman, 1992), restoration

  7. Semi-Blind Image Restoration via Mumford-Shah Regularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sochen, Nir

    Semi-Blind Image Restoration via Mumford-Shah Regularization L. Bar N. Sochen N. Kiryati School. The proposed variational method integrates semi-blind image deconvolution (paramet- ric blur is in the unified treatment of the semi-blind restoration and segmentation problems, the important special case

  8. Water Supply Analysis for Restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Water Supply Analysis for Restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico Josué Medellín-Azuara1 ; Jay R, Mexico. Potential water sources include reductions in local agricultural and urban water use through headings: Water supply; Restoration; Mexico; Colorado River; Environmental issues. Introduction Providing

  9. Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    . Despite this uncertainty, new methods of ecosystem service valuation are suggesting that the economicRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1 benefits of restoration can outweigh costs. Payment for Ecosystem Service schemes could therefore provide

  10. NAME: Eelgrass Restoration in Puget Sound LOCATION: Puget Sound, WA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    NAME: Eelgrass Restoration in Puget Sound LOCATION: Puget Sound, WA ACRES: 3,700 acres of subtidal restoration efforts and to contribute to the Puget Sound Partnership's Action Agenda recovery goal of 20% more within the Puget Sound region of the Salish Sea: the Nisqually, Elwha, and Skokomish Rivers. These major

  11. Innovative Approach for Urban Stream Restoration Undergraduate Thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Innovative Approach for Urban Stream Restoration Undergraduate Thesis CHBE 494 Kosta Sainis Thesis of British Columbia campus. This will restore the fish-bearing stream, which once flowed through campus Engineering #12;i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The novelty of this study is the design of a stream which is able

  12. New Strategies for Implementing Locally Integrated Stream Restoration Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    1 New Strategies for Implementing Locally Integrated Stream Restoration Projects Cheryl de Boer opportunities for improvements and alterations at different areas of the stream. Based on an existing framework acknowledgment and consequently, river restoration projects have commenced that are for a large portion in fact

  13. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  14. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  15. Register Allocation Using Lazy Saves, Eager Restores, and Greedy Shuffling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dybvig, R. Kent

    Register Allocation Using Lazy Saves, Eager Restores, and Greedy Shuffling Robert G. Burger Oscar-suited for both caller- and callee-save reg- isters, our strategy employs a "lazy" save mechanism that avoids saves for all effective leaf routines, an "eager" restore mechanism that reduces the effect of memory

  16. Restoration strategy for power distribution networks using optimal supervisory control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jong-Tae

    the supervisory control technique to a line-restoration problem aiming to increase the steady-state security level of lines and transformers and the bus voltage for the security assessment. 2 Preliminary The supervisoryRestoration strategy for power distribution networks using optimal supervisory control M.-S. Lee

  17. Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Rooftop PV installation on the Forest...

  18. Special Issue: High Elevation Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . They yield raw material for rustic homes, exquisite paneling, and life-giving energy. They capture, purify gathering, hunting, and places to wow visitors. (For the purpose of this report, high country forests

  19. Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecoveryG -Hazmat workHowHealthy

  20. Multifunctional Riverscapes: Stream restoration, Capability Brown's water features, and artificial whitewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podolak, Kristen Nichole

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and challenges for stream restoration in the United States.and challenges for stream restoration in the United States.of a small, urban stream restoration project in northern

  1. The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences the metabolism of prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodds, Walter

    The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences, the restoration allowed recovery of some features of open-canopy prairie streams. Woody expansion apparently. Keywords: macroalgae, microalgae, primary production, restoration, streams Introduction North American

  2. Multifunctional Riverscapes: Stream restoration, Capability Brown’s water features, and artificial whitewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podolak, Kristen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and challenges for stream restoration in the United States.and challenges for stream restoration in the United States.of a small, urban stream restoration project in northern

  3. Mastication of forest biomass for wildfire hazard reduction and forest health improvement has expanded dramatically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mastication of forest biomass for wildfire hazard reduction and forest health improvement has or tree spacing is adequate to allow sufficient room for equipment operation. b. Carefully review

  4. Remote sensing and forest damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, N.J.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, damage to North American forests caused by insects, diseases, pollution, and fire results in multibillion dollar losses of revenue and resources. To respond to these losses effectively, forest managers need timely information on the location, extent, and spread of the damage. Traditional techniques for monitoring forest damage include high-resolution aerial photography, color infrared photography, and visual reconnaissance mapping. These techniques require visual interpretation of the data and often are somewhat subjective. In addition, because such analyses are time-consuming and costly, many areas of forest are never mapped, and in cases where maps exist, they often are obsolete or incomplete. An airborne imager has been developed to solve the problems of time-consuming visual analysis and interpretations. The Programmable Multispectral Imager measures small changes - invisible by conventional detection methods - in light reflected by the forest canopy. The PMI measures the color an intensity of reflected light and records this information digitally in computer tape aboard an aircraft. This information is then available for later entry into a computer for processing and enhancement. Although airborne imagers have been available for nearly three decades, they have not been used extensively for forest damage assessment or other forestry applications because of their poor sensitivity and their limited number of fixed spectral channels. The PMI is the first of a new generation of imagers that combine high sensitivity with the flexibility of continuous spectral coverage. This allows scientists to evaluate the potential causes and effects of stress on vegetation.

  5. A post project appraisal of the restoration/rehabilitation of Alamo Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smolko, Darrell

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associates, Ltd. , Alamo Creek: Conceptual Restoration Plan/Basis of Design Summary Alamo Creek Restoration, Phase 1aRehabilitation of Alamo Creek Darrell Smolko UC Berkeley

  6. Post-Project Assessment of the 2003 Cerrito Creek Restoration and Recommendations for Additional Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adlong, Michelle; Cook, Michael; Kennedy, Matthew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that in the future, stream restoration projects installrecommend that future stream restoration projects considerrestoration, while in the six years since the entire stream

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - acids restore chloride Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Channel Restoration on Water Velocity, Transient Storage, and Nutrient Uptake... of stream restoration, but little is known of the interplay between hydrogeomorphic features...

  8. Hydrodynamic and Ecological Assessment of Nearshore Restoration: A Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Thom, Ronald M.; Fuller, Roger

    2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Along the Pacific Northwest coast, much of the estuarine habitat has been diked over the last century for agricultural land use, residential and commercial development, and transportation corridors. As a result, many of the ecological processes and functions have been disrupted. To protect coastal habitats that are vital to aquatic species, many restoration projects are currently underway to restore the estuarine and coastal ecosystems through dike breaches, setbacks, and removals. Information on physical processes and hydrodynamic conditions are critical for the assessment of the success of restoration actions. Restoration of a 160- acre property at the mouth of the Stillaguamish River in Puget Sound has been proposed. The goal is to restore native tidal habitats and estuary-scale ecological processes by removing the dike. In this study, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was developed for the Stillaguamish River estuary to simulate estuarine processes. The model was calibrated to observed tide, current, and salinity data for existing conditions and applied to simulate the hydrodynamic responses to two restoration alternatives. Responses were evaluated at the scale of the restoration footprint. Model data was combined with biophysical data to predict habitat responses at the site. Results showed that the proposed dike removal would result in desired tidal flushing and conditions that would support four habitat types on the restoration footprint. At the estuary scale, restoration would substantially increase the proportion of area flushed with freshwater (< 5 ppt) at flood tide. Potential implications of predicted changes in salinity and flow dynamics are discussed relative to the distribution of tidal marsh habitat.

  9. Which Chiral Symmetry is Restored in High Temperature QCD?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Bernard; Tom Blum; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs M. Heller; James E. Hetrick; K. Rummukainen; R. Sugar; D. Toussaint; Matthew Wingate

    1996-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Sigma models for the high temperature phase transition in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) suggest that at high temperature the SU(N_f) x SU(N_f) chiral symmetry becomes exact, but the anomalous axial U(1) symmetry need not be restored. In numerical lattice simulations, traditional methods for detecting symmetry restoration have sought multiplets in the screening mass spectrum. However, these methods were imprecise and the results, so far, incomplete. With improved statistics and methodology, we are now able to offer evidence for a restoration of the SU(2) x SU(2) chiral symmetry just above the crossover, but not of the axial U(1) chiral symmetry.

  10. Automated distribution scheme speeds service restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwell, E. [Lakeland Electric and Water, FL (United States)] [Lakeland Electric and Water, FL (United States); Gamvrelis, T. [Harris Canada, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Control Div.] [Harris Canada, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Control Div.; Kearns, D. [S and C Electric Co., Chicago, IL (United States)] [S and C Electric Co., Chicago, IL (United States); Landman, R. [H and L Instruments, North Hampton, NH (United States)] [H and L Instruments, North Hampton, NH (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes an automated distribution scheme that met Lakeland Electric requirements for an automated scheme that would restore power to a major customer in less than 60 seconds. In January 1993, Lakeland Electric and Water (LEW) took on the design and construction of a new 12.47-kV automated distribution system for the Publix Supermarket Industrial complex. The industrial complex in Lakeland, Florida, totals 2 million square feet and houses a dairy processing plant, bakery, produce plant, deli plant, data processing facility for Publix`s entire retail network, purchasing department, as well as several maintenance facilities. The retail chain is LEW`s largest customer with a peak demand of 15.5 MW and a load factor of 81%. Publix`s rapid expansion plan has placed a great deal of pressure on this facility to perform at peak level with no interruptions of product flow. The task at hand was to provide Publix with a state-of-the-art, automated, distribution system built to withstand the inherent weather-related situations in central Florida, lightning and hurricanes.

  11. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  12. Healthy Housing Opportunities During Weatherization Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.; Tohn, E.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer and early fall of 2010, the National Center for Healthy Housing interviewed people from a selection of state and local agencies that perform weatherizations on low-income housing in order to gauge their approach to improving the health and safety of the homes. The interviews provided a strong cross section of what work agencies can do, and how they go about funding this work when funds from the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) do not cover the full extent of the repairs. The report also makes recommendations for WAP in how to assist agencies to streamline and maximize the health and safety repairs they are able to make in the course of a standard weatherization.

  13. The healthy cell bias of estrogen action: mitochondrial bioenergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    The healthy cell bias of estrogen action: mitochondrial bioenergetics and neurological implications action' hypothesis examines the role that regulating mitochondrial function and bioenergetics play

  14. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology

  15. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Trust for Public Land Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Michael Jenkins Forest Trends Aban Kabraji The World Nancy Marek Project Manager Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme Berlyn

  16. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Pennsylvania John Gordon InterForest Rose Harvey The Trust for Public Land Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Michael Barbara Ruth Program Coordinator Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology and Director

  17. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme The Forestland Group Ralph Grossi American Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home

  18. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling Chadwick Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest

  19. Department of Forest Resourcesand Environmental Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    , MF, MNR, and PhD). Its research areas include Forest Ecology and Management, Forest Biometrics on a perception-based score plus a citation-and-publication-based composite index. The National Research Council

  20. KELP FOREST FOOD WEBS IN GWAII HAANAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grazing Rates on Kelp Assimilation of Kelp-derived Organic Carbon in Kelp Forest Food Webs | 33 IntertidalKELP FOREST FOOD WEBS IN GWAII HAANAS: Ecosystem-Level Effects of Predator Depletion and Recovery

  1. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINLAND SOURCES 2007 - Forest industry production Print Home Finland Government Authorities Local » Turnover » Profit » Energy Year 2006 » Shipping Business services Infrastructure Economy Education strategy of the EU's Forest-Based Industries Technology Platform provides a good basis for preparing

  2. National Forest Inventory Description of attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Inventory Description of attributes Woodland_S: Woodland source (a) NFI base map have been mapped in accordance with the NFI mapping rules. National Forest Inventory #12;(f) 2010 AP

  3. Forests and biodiversity UK Forestry Standard Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; forestry; soil; sustainable forest management; UK Forestry Standard. FCGL001/FC-GB(MMJ)/JTCP-2.5K/NOV11 for sustainable forest management Good forestry practice requirement Element of SFM Reference number Legal

  4. Relating forest biomass to SAR data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeToan, T.; Beaudoin, A. (Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements CNRS- Univ. Paul Sabatier Toulouse (FR)); Riom, J.; Guyon, D. (Lab. de Bioclimatologie INRA, Bordeaux (FR))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of an experiment defined to demonstrate the use of radar to retrieve forest biomass. The SAR data, after calibration, has been analyzed together with ground data collected on forest stands from young stage (8 yrs) to nature stage (46 yrs). The dynamic range of the radar backscatter intensity from forest was found maximum at P-band and decreases with increasing frequencies. Also, cross-polarized backscatter intensity yields the best sensitivities to variations of forest biomass. L-band data confirmed past results on good correlation with forest parameters. The most striking observation has been the strong correlation of P-band backscatter intensity to forest biomass. In order to develop algorithms to infer forest biomass from spaceborne SAR's, the experimental results will be compared with observations on other forest ecosystems and will be interpreted by theoretical modeling.

  5. Forest plantations in the Midsouth, USA. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosson, J.F.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plantation forestry is one means of controlling the temporal and spatial aspects of stand regeneration after harvest. Intensive plantation forestry can ultimately reduce harvesting pressure and disturbance on natural stands and and stands intended to be set aside for esthetics, recreation, or watershed protection. Reported here is the status of forest plantations in the Midsouth States. It is important to know if plantations are meeting their fullest potential and what shortcomings, if any, need to be addressed. Information gathered includes plantation area, forest type, ownership, volume, site class, and stockings. Additionally, comparisons were made to see if there was a difference between plantation and natural-stand volumes.

  6. COMPREHENSIVE EVERGLADES RESTORATION PLAN CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN FLORIDA PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Florida ecosystem while providing for other water- related needs of the region in the 2000 Water Resources incremental restoration of natural processes critical for the development of peat soils and tree islands

  7. Statistical Models for Images: Compression, Restoration and Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simoncelli, Eero

    /or nonlinear transfor­ mations, into statistically independent components. The classical approach, and the Sloan Center for Theoretical Neurobiology at NYU. 1. Wavelet Marginal Statistical Model Recently, multiStatistical Models for Images: Compression, Restoration and Synthesis Eero P. Simoncelli Center

  8. MEETING SUMMARY OF THE ESTUARY HABITAT RESTORATION COUNCIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Restoration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS); · Mr. Paul Cough, Director, Oceans and Coastal Protection the exact amount of FY 2011 funds that would be available for new projects. Paul Cough noted and the other

  9. aquatic ecosystem restoration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L. A. Aguirre 2006-01-01 124 Climate change as an ecosystem architect: Implications to rare plant ecology, conservation, and restoration CiteSeer Summary: Recent advances in...

  10. Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AC03- 76SF00098. The report “Easing the Natural Gas Crisis:Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased Deployment ofRestoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable

  11. Assessing Urban Forest Effects and Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Scranton area. The Authors DAVID J. NOWAK is a research forester and project leader, ROBERT E. HOEHN III

  12. DOE model conference on waste management and environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reports dealing with current topics in waste management and environmental restoration were presented at this conference in six sessions. Session 1 covered the Hot Topics'' including regulations and risk assessment. Session 2 dealt with waste reduction and minimization; session 3 dealt with waste treatment and disposal. Session 4 covered site characterization and analysis. Environmental restoration and associated technologies wee discussed in session 5 and 6. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  13. Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the prescribed means for providing direct input to the US Department of Energy Headquarters regarding the status, accomplishments, strategy, and issues of the Richland Environmental Restoration Project. The project mission, organizational interfaces, and operational history of the Hanford Site are provided. Remediation strategies are analyzed in detail. The document includes a status of Richland Environmental Restoration project activities and accomplishments, and it presents current cost summaries, schedules, and technical baselines.

  14. Denman Forestry Issues Series: Washington's Forest Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Denman Forestry Issues Series: Washington's Forest Regulations and Their Impacts on The Private College of Forest Resources continued its Denman Forestry Issues Series on May 30, 2001. Alumni landowners. Policy analysts and speakers representing the Washington Farm Forestry Assn., Washington Forest

  15. UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and climate change #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements for sustainable forest management Good forestry practice requirement Element of SFM Reference number Legal of SFM Reference number #12;Forests and climate change Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry

  16. SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    #12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 02 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest ii Vol. 1, No. 2, July ­ September 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Board Dr. Urs Geiser Zurich University, Switzerland Dr. Mamoona Wali Muhammad Pakistan Forest Institute

  17. SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    #12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 03 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest ii Vol. 1, No. 3, October - December 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 03 ISSN: 2218-8045 October - December 2010 Editor-in-Chief Dr. Abid

  18. SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    #12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest iii Vol. 1, No. 1, April ­ June 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 ISBN: 2218-8045 April ­ June 2010 Contents P. No Introductions: Pakistan

  19. Global integration for metals, mining and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as coils, bars and sheets. · Forest and paper companies own or lease forests, cut timber, process woodBeyond the familiar Global integration for metals, mining and forest and paper companies Industrial commitment by IBM Global Business Services to provide analysis and viewpoints that help companies realize

  20. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability http Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3 5 7 9 12 #12;1 Sustainability 10 Years after Rio The Forest and Paper Industry's Messages

  1. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices;1 Sustainability 10 Years after Rio The Forest and Paper Industry's Messages Sustainability has become an essential

  2. North Dakota`s forest resources, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugen, D.E.; Piva, R.J.; Kingsley, N.P.; Harsel, R.A.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The third inventory of North Dakota`s forests reports 44.1 million acres of land, of which 673 thousand acres are forested. This paper contains detailed tables related to area, volume, growth, removals, mortality, and ownership of North Dakota`s forests.

  3. Forests and soil UK Forestry Standard Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; forestry; soil; sustainable forest management; UK Forestry Standard. FCGL006/FC-GB(MMJ)/JCTP-2.5K/NOV11 for sustainable forest management Good forestry practice requirement Element of SFM Reference number LegalForests and soil UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements

  4. Forest Research Much more than trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and scientific experts in sustainable forest management. Our scientists, mathematical modellers and survey staff and supplying scientific evidence on the human, ecological and economic aspects of sustainable forest management and land-use management, whose work focuses on the use of applied science for tree, woodland and forest

  5. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

  6. Aquifer restoration at in-situ leach uranium mines: evidence for natural restoration processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.; Bell, N.E.; Martin, W.J.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments with aquifer sediments and leaching solution (lixiviant) from an in-situ leach uranium mine. The data from these laboratory experiments and information on the normal distribution of elements associated with roll-front uranium deposits provide evidence that natural processes can enhance restoration of aquifers affected by leach mining. Our experiments show that the concentration of uranium (U) in solution can decrease at least an order of magnitude (from 50 to less than 5 ppM U) due to reactions between the lixiviant and sediment, and that a uranium solid, possibly amorphous uranium dioxide, (UO/sub 2/), can limit the concentration of uranium in a solution in contact with reduced sediment. The concentrations of As, Se, and Mo in an oxidizing lixiviant should also decrease as a result of redox and precipitation reactions between the solution and sediment. The lixiviant concentrations of major anions (chloride and sulfate) other than carbonate were not affected by short-term (less than one week) contact with the aquifer sediments. This is also true of the total dissolved solids level of the solution. Consequently, we recommend that these solution parameters be used as indicators of an excursion of leaching solution from the leach field. Our experiments have shown that natural aquifer processes can affect the solution concentration of certain constituents. This effect should be considered when guidelines for aquifer restoration are established.

  7. Forest Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartment of Energy's FinancialForest Products Forest Products

  8. PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Short-term responses of decomposers to flow restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeRoy, Carri J.

    most stream restoration projects, lack pre-restoration data and clearly defined goals, making et al., 2005; Bernhardt et al., 2005). Biotic recovery in response to stream restoration can be rapidPRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Short-term responses of decomposers to flow restoration in Fossil Creek

  9. Defining a Stream Restoration Body of Knowledge as a Basis for National Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Forum Defining a Stream Restoration Body of Knowledge as a Basis for National Certification Sue L-7900.0000814 Introduction The practice of stream restoration has become widely accepted as an essential component protocols remain for the practice of stream restoration. Given the lack of consistency, many restoration

  10. River restoration, habitat heterogeneity and biodiversity: a failure of theory or practice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    heterogeneity (HH) promotes restoration of biodiversity. This paradigm is reflected in stream restoration in streams that were not in need of restoration. 3. We found habitat and macroinvertebrate data for 78 independent stream or river restoration projects described by 18 different author groups in which invertebrate

  11. The British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    hillslopes to stream channels are restored, a also low-level treatment, where only hillslope restoration work a restoration program would be over a 4-8 year period, using 8-16 experimental stream triplets. AppropriateThe British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring

  12. Two Decades of River Restoration in California: What Can We Learn?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    Restoration Science Synthe- sis (NRRSS), we developed a summary database of 4,023 stream restoration projectsTwo Decades of River Restoration in California: What Can We Learn? G. M. Kondolf,1 S. Anderson,2 for design, monitoring, and reporting restoration projects, and that although moni- toring is far more

  13. Forest Fuels ReductionForest Fuels Reduction Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    the initial fuels reduction treatments leave the site with regard to long-term forest vegetation and soil are the productivity and cost rates for alternative choices of equipment for mechanical fuels reduction; what reduction operations for existing markets and new markets? (eg. biomass energy) Research Rationale

  14. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program Cross-Sectional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program ­ Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;1 Final Report Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program P. Sullivan, and William Fisk Environmental Energy Technologies Division February 2014 The research

  15. Ozone response relationships in healthy nonsmokers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Hebel, J.R.; Chatham, M.D.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant concentration responses were observed in FVC, FEV1, FEF25-75, SGaw, IC, and TLC in 20 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers exposed randomly to 0.00, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 ppm O/sub 3/. In addition, significant response changes for FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75 were shown with time over the 2-h exposure. Intermittent, heavy exercise (VE, 68 L/min) lasting 14 min was employed every 30 min during exposure. Inspection of the concentration and time response curves suggests that the threshold for the group response is at or below 0.15 ppm O/sub 3/. Six subjects experienced decreases greater than 5% in FEV1 or greater than 15% in SGaw at 0.15 ppm. This concentration is only slightly higher than the 1-h O/sub 3/ National Ambient Air Quality Standard. A dose-related response was also seen for cough, nose and throat irritation, and chest discomfort. The work load, length of exposure, and individual sensitivity must be considered for establishing a safe O/sub 3/ exposure level.

  16. Ozone-response relationships in healthy nonsmokers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Hebel, J.R.; Chatham, M.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant concentration responses were observed in FVC1 FEV1, FEF 25-75, SGaw, IC, and TLC in 20 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers exposed randomly to 0.00, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 ppm O3. In addition, significant response changes for FVC1 FEV1, FEF25-75 were shown with time over the 2-h exposure. Intermittent, heavy exercise (VE1 68L/min) lasting 14 min was employed every 30 min during exposure. Inspection of the concentration and time-response curves suggests that the threshold for the group response is at or below 0.15 ppm O/sub 3/. Six subjects experienced decreases > 5% in SGaw at 0.15 ppm. The concentration is only slightly higher than the 1-h O/sub 3/ National Ambient Air Quality Standard. A dose-related response was also seen for cough, nose and throat irritation, and chest discomfort. The work load, length of exposure, and individual sensitivity must be considered for establishing a safe O/sub 3/ exposure level.

  17. Forest Productivity and Diversity: Using Ecological Theory and Landscape Models to Guide Sustainable Forest Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huston, M.A.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable forest management requires maintaining or increasing ecosystem productivity, while preserving or restoring natural levels of biodiversity. Application of general concepts from ecological theory, along with use of mechanistic, landscape-based computer models, can contribute to the successful achievement of both of these objectives. Ecological theories based on the energetics and dynamics of populations can be used to predict the general distribution of individual species, the diversity of different types of species, ecosystem process rates and pool sizes, and patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity over a broad range of environmental conditions. This approach requires subdivision of total biodiversity into functional types of organisms, primarily because different types of organisms respond very differently to the spatial and temporal variation of environmental conditions on landscapes. The diversity of species of the same functional type (particularly among plants) tends to be highest at relatively low levels of net primary productivity, while the total number of different functional types (particularly among animals) tends to be highest at high levels of productivity (e.g., site index or potential net primary productivity). In general, the diversity of animals at higher trophic levels (e.g., predators) reaches its maximum at much higher levels of productivity than the diversity of lower trophic levels (e.g., plants). This means that a single environment cannot support high diversity of all types of organisms. Within the framework of the general patterns described above, the distributions, population dynamics, and diversity of organisms in specific regions can be predicted more precisely using a combination of computer simulation models and GIS data based on satellite information and ground surveys. Biophysical models that use information on soil properties, climate, and hydrology have been developed to predict how the abundance and spatial distribution of various plants and animals. These models can be, used to predict the patterns of forest type and structure that develop in response to variation in productivity and disturbance across complex landscapes, as well as species diversity and the distribution and population fluctuations of threatened species in specific regions.

  18. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    -use management and includes substantial field work and group projects. Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Watershed Science & Management Watershed Science & Management prepares students to address the many management issues associated with water

  19. COMPARING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES UNDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPARING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES UNDER COMMUNITY-BASED AND CONVENTIONAL TENURES IN BRITISH OF MASTER OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT In the School of Resource and Environmental Management © David Mealiea 2011 of Canada, this work may be reproduced, without authorization, under the conditions for Fair Dealing

  20. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 Progress of Slash Breakdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 with slash are based in part on information on its rate of breakdown and decay. Slash changes in structure. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests

  1. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.; Bohlen, C.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  2. Rock Weirs as Tools for Stabilization in Restoration Projects: An appraisal and comparison of two stream restoration projects in Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, Dave; Maendly, Romain; Poindexter, Cristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corps of Engineers). 1995. Permit Number 19613S92. USACE Sanof Engineers Section 404 (1995) permit for the restoration

  3. December 2008 ECoLoGICAL RESToRATIoN 26:4 287 Ecological Restoration Vol. 26, No. 4, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Rebecca

    and Martin W. Doyle S tream mitigation banking is rapidly becoming a major driver of the stream restoration is becoming a major private-sector source of stream restoration funding, perhaps presaging a major shift to restore or enhance an area of stream habita

  4. American Chestnut Restoration: Can We Bring Back the Mighty Giant...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PM Stacy Clark, U.S. Forest Service, Washington, DC UT Science Forum Dining Room C-D, Thompson-Boling Arena, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville CONTACT : Email: Mark Littmann...

  5. Adaptively Addressing Uncertainty in Estuarine and Near Coastal Restoration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, Ronald M.; Williams, Greg D.; Borde, Amy B.; Southard, John A.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Laufle, Jeffrey C.; Glasoe, Stuart

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Restoration projects have an uncertain outcome because of a lack of information about current site conditions, historical disturbance levels, effects of landscape alterations on site development, unpredictable trajectories or patterns of ecosystem structural development, and many other factors. A poor understanding of the factors that control the development and dynamics of a system, such as hydrology, salinity, wave energies, can also lead to an unintended outcome. Finally, lack of experience in restoring certain types of systems (e.g., rare or very fragile habitats) or systems in highly modified situations (e.g., highly urbanized estuaries) makes project outcomes uncertain. Because of these uncertainties, project costs can rise dramatically in an attempt to come closer to project goals. All of the potential sources of error can be addressed to a certain degree through adaptive management. The first step is admitting that these uncertainties can exist, and addressing as many of the uncertainties with planning and directed research prior to implementing the project. The second step is to evaluate uncertainties through hypothesis-driven experiments during project implementation. The third step is to use the monitoring program to evaluate and adjust the project as needed to improve the probability of the project to reach is goal. The fourth and final step is to use the information gained in the project to improve future projects. A framework that includes a clear goal statement, a conceptual model, and an evaluation framework can help in this adaptive restoration process. Projects and programs vary in their application of adaptive management in restoration, and it is very difficult to be highly prescriptive in applying adaptive management to projects that necessarily vary widely in scope, goal, ecosystem characteristics, and uncertainties. Very large ecosystem restoration programs in the Mississippi River delta (Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act; CWPPRA) have incorporated very specific and detailed elements in a more active adaptive management effort. In Puget Sound, the Puget Sound Action Team uses site-specific case studies, monitoring, and public involvement to direct actions to reduce microbial contamination of harvestable shellfish. Small-scale projects can also be improved through application of adaptive management. For example, directed research and site assessments resulted in successful restoration of seagrasses near a ferry terminal in Puget Sound. It is recommended that all restoration programs be conducted in an adaptive management framework, and where appropriate, a more active adaptive management approach be applied. The net effect should be less uncertainty, improved project success, advancement of the science of restoration, and cost savings.

  6. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, David; Aronsuu, Kimmo; Jackson, Aaron

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) has significantly declined along the Oregon coast and in the Columbia River Basin (Downey et al. 1993, Close and Jackson 2001). Declines in adults can be partially attributed to hydroelectric dams, which have impeded passage of adult Pacific lamprey in the Columbia and Snake rivers (Moser et al. 2002), thus effecting larval recruitment in the basin (Moser and Close in press). Adult Pacific lamprey also declined in numbers in the Umatilla River, a tributary of the Columbia River (Close and Jackson 2001). In addition to hydro power dams in the Columbia River, habitat alterations and chemical treatments have been involved in the collapse of Pacific lamprey populations in the Umatilla River (Close 1999). To initiate the restoration effort, CTUIR began developing a restoration plan in 1998. The goal of the lamprey research and restoration project is to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable level. This report is summarizing the studies and restoration efforts concluded in 2002.

  7. Restoration of cross sections above intrusive salt domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, R.C.; Groshong, R.H. Jr. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applicability of bed-length restoration to the sequence above a vertical intrusion of salt was tested on an experimental model that included deposition of units during uplift. Restoration of the model resulted in an apparently unbalanced cross section due to excess bed length in the pre-growth interval. The excess bed length was due to significant internal strain. For a correct restoration, it is thus important to distinguish between the growth and pre-growth sequences. The thinning index, which quantifies the thinning onto the uplift, aids in making this distinction. A thinning index vs. depth curve has a sharp inflection at the top of the pre-growth sequence. The pre-growth sequence is restored by area balancing. The growth sequence deforms mainly by formation of a crestal graben, with little other strain. Sequential restoration of growth intervals shows the growth history of the dome. When applied to the Pool Creek salt dome from the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, the methods developed for the model served to separate the pre-growth from the growth sequence and to indicate a growth history of vertical intrusion changing through time to vertical intrusion plus regional extension.

  8. Benefits of On-Site Management of Environmental Restoration Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, Michael J. ,P.E.; Wood, Craig, R.E.M.; Kwiecinski, Daniel, P.E.; Alanis, Saul

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    As Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) began assessing options under which to conduct the remediation of environmental restoration sites, it became clear that the standard routes for permanent disposal of waste contaminated with hazardous materials would be difficult. Publicly, local citizens' groups resisted the idea of large volumes of hazardous waste being transported through their communities. Regulations for the off-site disposal are complicated due to the nature of the environmental restoration waste, which included elevated tritium levels. Waste generated from environmental restoration at SNL/NM included debris and soils contaminated with a variety of constituents. Operationally, disposal of environmental restoration waste was difficult because of the everchanging types of waste generated during site remediation. As an alternative to standard hazardous waste disposal, SNL/NM proposed and received regulatory approval to construct a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU). By containing the remediation wastes on-site, SNL/NM's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program managed to eliminate transportation concerns from the public, worked with regulatory agencies to develop a safe, permanent disposal, and modified the waste disposal procedures to accommodate operational changes. SNL/NM accomplished the task and saved approximately $200 million over the life of the CAMU project, as compared to off-site disposal options.

  9. COLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENT CFRI Conference onCFRI Conference onCFRI Conference onCFRI Conference on W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENT CFRI Conference on.outcomes on the ground.outcomes on the ground. o Foundation = Statewide Forest Resource AssessmentsFoundation = Statewide Forest Resource AssessmentsFoundation = Statewide Forest Resource AssessmentsFoundation = Statewide

  10. 2013 Colorado Forest Health Report 2013 Report on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 Colorado Forest Health Report 2013 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests Caring Timm Schaubert, Outreach Division Supervisor. Thanks also to William M. Ciesla, Forest Health;A January 2014 2013 Colorado Forest Health Report As your new Colorado State Forester, it is my

  11. Critical fermion density for restoring spontaneously broken symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagen Kleinert; She-Sheng Xue

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry breakdown is affected by the presence of a sea of fermions in the system. When its density exceeds a critical value, the broken symmetry can be restored. We calculate the critical value and discuss the consequences for three different physical systems: First, for the standard model of particle physics, where the spontaneous symmetry breakdown leads nonzero masses of intermediate gauge bosons and fermions. The symmetry restoration will greatly enhance various processes with dramatic consequences for the early universe. Second, for the Gell-Mann--L\\`evy $\\sigma$-model of nuclear physics, where the symmetry breakdown gives rise to the nucleon and meson masses. The symmetry restoration may have important consequences for formation or collapse of stellar cores. Third, for the superconductive phase of condensed-matter, where the BCS condensate at low-temperature may be destroyed by a too large electron density.

  12. Proceedings of the Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference Laboratory Measurement of Secondary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference Laboratory Measurement of Secondary Pollutant Technologies Division September 2009 #12;Proceedings of the Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference Disclaimer;Proceedings of the Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference Laboratory Measurement of Secondary Pollutant Yields from

  13. Repulsive and restoring Casimir forces with left-handed materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaping Yang; Ran Zeng; Shutian Liu; Hong Chen; Shiyao Zhu

    2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate repulsive Casimir force between slabs containing left-handed materials with controllable electromagnetic properties. The sign of Casimir force is determined by the electric and magnetic properties of the materials, and it is shown that the formation of the repulsive force is related to the wave impedances of two slabs. The sign change of the Casimir force as a function of the distance is studied. Special emphasis is put on the restoring Casimir force which may be found to exist between perfectly conducting material and metamaterial slabs. This restoring force is a natural power for the system oscillation in vacuum and also can be used for system stabilization.

  14. Materials and methods for autonomous restoration of electrical conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaiszik, Benjamin J; Odom, Susan A; Caruso, Mary M; Jackson, Aaron C; Baginska, Marta B; Ritchey, Joshua A; Finke, Aaron D; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Sottos, Nancy R; Braun, Paul V; Amine, Khalil

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An autonomic conductivity restoration system includes a solid conductor and a plurality of particles. The particles include a conductive fluid, a plurality of conductive microparticles, and/or a conductive material forming agent. The solid conductor has a first end, a second end, and a first conductivity between the first and second ends. When a crack forms between the first and second ends of the conductor, the contents of at least a portion of the particles are released into the crack. The cracked conductor and the released contents of the particles form a restored conductor having a second conductivity, which may be at least 90% of the first conductivity.

  15. Forested tract-size profile of South Carolina`s NIPF landowners. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.T.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information gathered from 3078 permanent forest survey sample plots showed that nearly 0.9 million acres, or 10 percent of the nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) timberland in South Carolina is in forested tracts 10 acres or less. Forested tracts ranging from 11 to 100 acres accounted for the largest proportion of NIPF timberland. Forested tract size varied significantly by NIPF-ownership group. By NIPF-ownership group, the other corporate group recorded the highest average forested tract size of 3,802 acres. Volume of softwood growing stock as significantly higher in the larger tract size categories. Hardwood growing-stock volume per acre was significantly higher in the largest and smallest forested tract-size classes. Softwood growing-stock removals exceeded growth across all forested-parcel categories, whereas hardwood growing-stock growth surpassed hardwood removals in two tract-size classes.

  16. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Are Your Pastures Healthy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Rector, Barron S.; Hays, K. Brian

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape: Are Your Pastures Healthy? Larry D. White, Barron S. Rector and K. Brian Hays Professor and Extension Range Specialist; Associate Professor and Extension Range Specialist; and Extension Assistant-Water Conservation; The Texas A&M University...

  17. #AskBerkeleyLab: Cost and Availability of Healthy Food

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buluswar, Shashi

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Shashi Buluswar, Executive Director at the LBNL Institute for Globally Transformative Technologies, answers a question from Ashley on why healthy food costs so much and is not available in low-income neighborhoods.

  18. Effects of lithium carbonate administration to healthy cats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieringer, Therese Marie

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS DF LITHIUM CARBONATE ADMINISTRATION TO HEALTHY CATS A Thesis by THERESE MARIE DIERINGER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Veterinary Medicine and Surgery EFFECTS OF LITHIUM CARBONATE ADMINISTRATION TO HEALTHY CATS A Thesis by THERESE MARIE DIERINGER Approved as to style and content by: George E. Lees (Chai r of Committee) Scott...

  19. China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

  20. Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contracts with logging companies covering more than 15 million hectares of forest," the report stated with logging companies instead giving villages gifts of salt and beer worth less than $100. "In a contextIllegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests

  1. Forest statistics for Michigan's eastern upper peninsula unit, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) is a continuing endeavor as mandated by the Renewable Resources Research Act of 1978. The objective of FIA is to periodically inventory the Nation's forest land to determine its extent, condition, and volume of timber, growth, and removals. Up-to-date resource information is essential to frame forest policies and programs.

  2. PUBLIC ACCEPTABILITY OF FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AT MORGAN-MONROE STATE FOREST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    providing brief explanations of alternative management practices. An on-site survey of recreationists to forest management on public land, the present study used survey methodologies to examine stakeholder254 PUBLIC ACCEPTABILITY OF FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AT MORGAN-MONROE STATE FOREST Shannon C

  3. EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE Dr. Daniel R. Unger, Remote) or the United States Forest Service (USFS) via the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (SFIA

  4. Forest biomass as a source of renewable energy in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuerker, M.F.; Ayaz, H.; Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Turkey illegal cutting takes place, which cannot be controlled. Legal cuttings have also been done by several state forest enterprises. As a result, the amount of wood raw material produced by forest enterprises legally and by forest villagers illegally has exceeded the potential capacity of the forest. According to the research related to Macka and other Turkish state forests, the state forests have been decreasing day by day. This is because the amount of wood raw material taken from the forests has exceeded the production potential of the forest. That study concluded that the Macka and other Turkish forests will be exhausted after 64 and 67 years, respectively. This study also examined both establishing and exploiting energy forests near the forest villages and producing fuel briquettes manufactured using the residues of agriculture, forestry, and stock breeding to diminish the demand for illegal fuel wood cutting from the state forests.

  5. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader. Forest Products Case Studies Advanced Quality Control System for the Thermomechanical Pulping Process Improves Quality and Reduces...

  6. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) AF&PA's message is to provide significant value to member companies through outstanding performance in those areas...

  7. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    versions of the calculation tools are available at the NCASI web site. Estimating Product Sequestration AF&PA, again working with the International Council of Forest and Paper...

  8. 10/17/2011 Hardwood Bottomland Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Management Manual Natural Flooding · Infuses forest with nutrients and organic matter · Flooding can slow: ­ Drier floodplains ­ Higher nutrient pooling ­ Greater herbaceous biomass ­ Lower water tables ­ Lower

  9. Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for biodiversity conservation, water protection, recreational needs, climate change mitigation management of forests in a future characterized by change. Our vision; · Communication of ne

  10. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) supports the Climate VISION initiative to address climate change through enhanced research in technology and science, incentives, and...

  11. Hangman Restoration Project : Annual Report, August 1, 2001 - July 31, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Gerald I.; Coeur D'Alene Tribe.

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia Basin resulted in the extirpation of anadromous fish stocks in Hangman Creek and its tributaries within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation. Thus, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss garideini), westslope cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) as well as local wildlife populations. Additionally, the Tribe was forced to convert prime riparian habitat into agricultural lands to supply sustenance for their changed needs. Wildlife habitats within the portion of the Hangman Creek Watershed that lies within the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation have been degraded from a century of land management practices that include widespread conversion of native habitats to agricultural production and intensive silvicultural practices. Currently, wildlife and fish populations have been marginalized and water quality is significantly impaired. In the fall of 2000 the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Wildlife Program, in coordination with the Tribal Fisheries Program, submitted a proposal to begin addressing the degradations to functioning habitats within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation in the Hangman Watershed. That proposal led to the implementation of this project during BPA's FY2001 through FY2003 funding cycle. The project is intended to protect, restore and/or enhance priority riparian, wetland and upland areas within the headwaters of Hangman Creek and its tributaries in order to promote healthy self-sustaining fish and wildlife populations. A key goal of this project is the implementation of wildlife habitat protection efforts in a manner that also secures areas with the potential to provide stream and wetland habitats essential to native salmonid populations. This goal is critical in our efforts to address both resident fish and wildlife habitat needs in the Hangman Watershed. All proposed implementation activities are conducted in the headwaters of the system and are expected to prove beneficial to the natural functions of the entire Hangman Watershed. The following is the FY2001 annual report of Project activities and is submitted as partial fulfillment of Operation and Maintenance Task 2.a. The Objectives and Tasks for this first year were designed to position this Project for a long-term habitat restoration effort. As such, efforts were largely directed at information gathering and project orientation. The major task for this first year was development of a Habitat Prioritization Plan (attached) to guide implementation efforts by selecting areas that will be of greatest benefit to the native ecology. Completion of the first year tasks has positioned the project to move forward with implementing restoration activities using the latest information to accomplish the greatest possible results. The Project will be looking to implement on-the-ground protection and restoration efforts in the coming fiscal year using the data and information gathered in the last fiscal year. Continually refining our understanding of the natural watershed functions and fish and wildlife habitats within the Project Area will result in an increase in the efficiency of project implementation. Research and data gathering efforts will remain a strong emphasis in the coming fiscal year, as it will throughout the life of this Project.

  12. BLIND ITERATIVE RESTORATION OF IMAGES WITH SPATIALLY-VARYING BLUR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    BLIND ITERATIVE RESTORATION OF IMAGES WITH SPATIALLY-VARYING BLUR John Bardsley Stuart Jefferies (PSF) by using a combination of methods including sectioning and phase diversity blind deconvolution whose PSFs are correlated and approximately spatially-invariant, and apply iterative blind deconvolution

  13. Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems, Peter Toft signal to noise ratio and the low spa­ tial resolution in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images ? And Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Images? ffl Segmentation of MR Images ­ Extraction of important edges

  14. Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Alshede Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems,uk,pto,lkh@imm.dtu.dk Abstract In this paper we present a Bayesian method to enhance functional 3D PET images using apriori as a true PET­MR result, and further more show how to obtain the desired information from the MR images. 1

  15. Restoration of Native Woodland on Ancient Woodland Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this Practice Guide should be addressed to: HMSO, Licensing Division, St Clements House, 2­16 Colegate, Norwich networks, habitat action plans, landscape ecology, native woodlands, restoration ecology. Printed-natural woodland 3 The ecological effects of plantations on ancient woodland sites 4 Native woodland Habitat Action

  16. Expanding public involvement in the restoration of federal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.W.; Rouse, N.V. [ABB Environmental Services, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Lawley, S.B. [SOUTHNA VFACENGCOM, North Charleston, SC (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In February of 1994, the Navy released a guidance document entitled Establishment of Restoration Advisory Boards. This guidance recommends that all Navy facilities with practicing Technical Review Committees (TRCs) transition these committees into Restoration Advisory Boards, or RABS. Subsequently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in concert with the Department of Defense (DOD), issued similar draft guidance that also strongly recommends this transition to RABs be accomplished. The intent of creating RABs is to increase community participation in the federal facility environmental restoration process. The RAB`s mission is to provide an avenue for early, two-way communication between the affected community and the environmental decision makers. The Navy strongly believes that implementing RABs will accelerate cleanups by ensuring that the affected communities have a voice early in the restoration process. The Navy is implementing this guidance at a number of Navy facilities, including bases that have been targeted for closure. This paper discusses DOD and Navy policy and joint EPA and DOD guidelines for implementing RABs, techniques to recruit additional community members, the process for selecting RAB members, orientation of RAB members, and RAB operational considerations. It also provides insight into what the Navy has learned by establishing RABs.

  17. Plant Population Viability and Restoration Potential for Rare Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant Population Viability and Restoration Potential for Rare Plants Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental March 2011 with renewable energy by 2020. Largescale solar developments are needed to achieve this goal

  18. Weber's Law and Weberized TV Restoration Jianhong Shen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Weber's Law and Weberized TV Restoration Jianhong Shen School of Mathematics University the influence of human vi­ sion psychology. Weber's Law in psychology and psychophysics claims that hu­ man [Physica D, 60:259­268, 1992]. We study the issues of existence and uniqueness for the pro­ posed Weberized

  19. c12) United States Patent (54) DATA RESTORE MECHANISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    c12) United States Patent Ohr (54) DATA RESTORE MECHANISM (75) Inventor: James Philip Ohr, St. Paul-Perrotta ..... 7111162 4/2004 Tellin et a!. 4/2004 Anna et a!. 8/2004 Foley et a!. 9/2004 Tan et a!. 9/2004 Gagne et a

  20. Phase III Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , two making approximately three trips per day, for approximately 15 weeks during peak tourist season to be reduced during the off-peak winter season. To support the project, passenger queuing areas ­ one Horizon oil spill. ESTIMATED COST The estimated amount of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill early restoration

  1. RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1 Nancy Reichard2 1 Presented Resources. Redwood Community Action Agency. Eureka, Calif. Abstract: Protecting riparian habitat from livestock grazing on private land is a complex task that requires paying attention to sociological

  2. Restoration and Management of the Inner Mongolia Grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Synopsis Restoration and Management of the Inner Mongolia Grassland Require a Sustainable Strategy, anthropogenic activities have led to large-scale land degradation across the vast Inner Mongolia grassland for gener- ations (1, 2). Inner Mongolia covers an area of 1.1 million km2 and has a population of 20

  3. Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research The value of peat bogs as open habitats may suffice on lowland raised bogs. Damming furrows is ineffective if the peat is severely cracked sundew, Drosera anglica #12;Introduction In their natural state, peat bogs provide unique habitats

  4. WRITTEN STATEMENT BY DEPUTY CHIEF, ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION DIVISION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involvement in the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill response effort. My name is Tony Penn and I am the Deputy restoration following an oil spill. The Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill, the largest accidental oil spill as a whole from the BP oil spill. NOAA and our co-trustees have been working tirelessly to assess

  5. The European Forest Institute and the Finnish Forest Research Institute: The supply of woody biomass from the forests in the EU can be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biomass from the forests in the EU can be significantly increased The supply of woody biomass from and recycled wood) for the 27 EU member states. As with woody biomass from forests, the supply of woody biomassThe European Forest Institute and the Finnish Forest Research Institute: The supply of woody

  6. Post-Project Performance Assessment of a Multi-Phase Urban Stream Restoration Project on Lower Codornices Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Docto, Mia; Hoffman, Johanna; Walls, Scott

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Multi-Phase Urban Stream Restoration Project on Lowerof a Multi-Phase Urban Stream Restoration Project on Lowerof a Multi-Phase Urban Stream Restoration Project on Lower

  7. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass Program Review High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations DE-EE0001036 S. Taylor (Auburn University), R. Rummer (USDA Forest...

  8. atlantic forest landscape: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of pub- lic preferences, park Standiford, Richard B. 8 Forests and landscape UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Renewable Energy Websites Summary: for sustainable forest...

  9. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

  10. amazonian forest regrowth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 2 Plant species...

  11. amazonian forest french: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 3 Effects of...

  12. amazonian forest culture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 3 Effects of...

  13. amazonian forests implications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 3 Effects of...

  14. area determines forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been inadequate to accurately determine forest carbon stocks, much less the effects logging is known to be widespread, the exact areas of tropical forest subject to logging...

  15. amazon forest biomass: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as wind, solar - and biomass. Part of Our Rural Economy - forest product companies now can 162 Fuel to Burn: Economics of Converting Forest Environmental Sciences...

  16. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations This...

  17. Regulation and Moral Hazard in Forest Concessions in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbinotto Neto, Giácomo; Tillmann, Eduardo A; Ratnieks, Ianes

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Forest Concessions in Brazil. Planejamento e Políticaswelfare maximization in Brazil. Rio de Janeiro: IPEA, 1998.in Forest Concessions in Brazil Eduardo A. Tillmann MS.

  18. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A...

  19. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management:...

  20. Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy - LCA Issues and Challenges...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy - LCA Issues and Challenges Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy - LCA Issues and Challenges Breakout Session 2D-Building Market Confidence and...

  1. Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets...

  2. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  3. A key extensional metamorphic complex reviewed and restored: The Menderes Massif of western Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    A key extensional metamorphic complex reviewed and restored: The Menderes Massif of western Turkey of the Menderes Massif in western Turkey, and subsequently a map-view restoration of its Neogene unroofing history

  4. Post-Project Appraisal for the Winter Creek Restoration Redwood Grove, UC Botanical Gardens at Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiala, Shannon; Janes, Kelly; Sousa, Ricardo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this reach of Winter Creek? 3. How did construction4. Pre-restoration. Winter Creek, looking upstream. 2005.5. Pre-restoration. Winter Creek, looking downstream. 2005.

  5. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework Adina M. Merenlender · Mary K. Matella of hydrologic habitat connectivity and benefits of habitat restoration alternatives we provide: (1) a review

  6. ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION EFFORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION examines biological carbon sequestration using a grassland restoration as a model system. Chapter 1 for biological carbon sequestration. In this analysis, we found that significantly greater soil carbon

  7. Changing national forest values: A content analysis. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengston, D.N.; Xu, Z.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This evolution of forest values is currently being widely discussed and debated in the forestry community. It is often claimed that a fundamental shift in forest values has taken place in recent decades. Gordon argued that a shift in public values is part of the explanation for the declining influence of the multiple-use sustained-yield paradigm of forest management. It is increasingly recognized that the values people hold about forest ecosystems are an important part of the social underpinning of ecosystem management, the emerging forest management paradigm. In either case, values play a critical role in identifying ecosystem management goals, setting the context for decisionmaking, and guiding our choices.

  8. Overview and ApproachesOverview and Approaches to Ecosystem Restorationto Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview and ApproachesOverview and Approaches to Ecosystem Restorationto Ecosystem Restoration to restoreTo the extent possible, we need to restore historic conditions on the ecosystem scalehistoric conditions on the ecosystem scale to achieve these goalsto achieve these goals Habitat LossHabitat Loss #12

  9. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Cattaraugus Creek Watershed Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Cattaraugus Creek Watershed Ecosystem Restoration of Expertise for Ecosystem Restoration Mississippi Valley Division Contract No. W912HQ-10-D-0002 Task Order Watershed Ecosystem Restoration at Springville Dam, Draft Detailed Project Report/Environmental Assessment

  10. Predictive Modeling of Transient Storage and Nutrient Uptake: Implications for Stream Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predictive Modeling of Transient Storage and Nutrient Uptake: Implications for Stream Restoration of reactive transport modeling for stream restoration purposes: the accuracy of the nutrient spiraling geomorphology and hydraulics influence nu- trient uptake is vital for stream restoration projects that modify

  11. Stream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, David

    Stream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1 and J. David Allan1,2 Abstract Restoration activities intended to improve the condition of streams and rivers are widespread types of activities and their effectiveness. We developed a database of 1,345 stream restoration

  12. A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER ­ RIO, and restoration efforts. Cochiti Dam was constructed on the main stem of the Rio Grande in 1973 for flood control minnow. Recent restoration strategies include removal of non-native riparian vegetation, mechanical

  13. App D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Restoration, Management 83 2.4.6 Compatibility of Wetland Management and Stream Management 84 2 2.5.5 Protection, Restoration, Management 103 2.5.6 Compatibility of Pond Management and StreamApp D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of Terrestrial Habitats

  14. Stream Restoration Databases and Case Studies: A Guide to Information Resources and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, David

    Stream Restoration Databases and Case Studies: A Guide to Information Resources and Their Utility, and case studies of stream and river restoration projects. These resources include a wide range, web-based databases of stream restoration projects. In this process, more data sources were discovered

  15. Estimates Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    Estimates Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives by E Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives by E.R. Keeley1 , P.A. Slaney2 from the literature to assess the effects of stream restoration efforts on densities of salmonid fish

  16. Comparing Stream Geomorphology and Channel Habitat along a Stream Restoration Gradient Sam Stewart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Comparing Stream Geomorphology and Channel Habitat along a Stream Restoration Gradient Sam Stewart University #12;Abstract Stream restoration is a growing science due to the realization that the human into a whole reach study. This involved selecting four stream sites that would create a stream restoration

  17. Examining food webs and trophic dynamics across a stream restoration intensity gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Examining food webs and trophic dynamics across a stream restoration intensity gradient Lena Weiss restoration, food webs, trophic dynamics Abstract: Stream ecosystems provide a plethora of important services in the stream channel itself. While there has been a recent push towards restoring these heavily degraded

  18. FISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    ) from a natal stream and is applied as a case study in California's Shasta River. Restoration activitiesFISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa * and J. R. LUNDb restoration alternatives for improving fish habitat by evaluating tradeoffs between fish production

  19. QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report and First Year Monitoring Data. The project restored 2,000 linear feet of stream and created 3 new acres of wetlands. An as-built survey of Understanding language for stream and wetlands restorations services, between Coal Township and the US Fish

  20. ROBUST VIDEO RESTORATION BY JOINT SPARSE AND LOW RANK MATRIX APPROXIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zuowei

    ROBUST VIDEO RESTORATION BY JOINT SPARSE AND LOW RANK MATRIX APPROXIMATION HUI JI, SIBIN HUANG, ZUOWEI SHEN, AND YUHONG XU Abstract. This paper presents a new video restoration scheme based domain, we formulate the video restoration problem as a joint sparse and low-rank matrix approximation

  1. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , comprising a total value of £1.4 billion (2 billion), the bulk of which is produced by European forest tree stock in an inactive condition for extended periods, and to ensure plant quality where supply. #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2004­2005 41 Assessing seedling quality Despite

  2. Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy www.csfs.colostate.edu Colorado Forest resource assessments had to be completed by June 2010 ­ required to receive S&PF funds in the future (2008;Resource Assessment and Strategy Partners Resource Assessment and Strategy Partners Colorado Division

  3. Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012 Southwestern US trees face rising drought, and several other partner organizations. 3:01 Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connection Described in a paper published in Nature Climate Change this week, "Temperature as a potent driver of regional forest

  4. Functional Differential Equations in Sustainable Forest Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    regulation. The sustainability of harvesting a given constant volume in a simplified forest model is studied regulation model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 5.2 A different discretization) Frederiksberg, Denmark Abstract This article deals with the dynamics of the volume control method in forest

  5. Canada's National Forest Inventory An Interagency Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada's National Forest Inventory An Interagency Collaboration Mark Gillis and Michael Brady: · Timber supply analysis · Management unit planning Management Inventory #12;· Canada's NFI-2001 ­ NFI 2006... National Inventory #12;Canada's National Forest Inventory (1976-2001) ­ compilation

  6. PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS Y.Q. Jiang, Q. Zhou, and L. Lin Mechanical ABSTRACT Planar micro supercapacitors utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and very robust cycling stability. As such, we believe these planar MEMS supercapacitors could

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Contribution of forest management artefacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ORIGINAL PAPER Contribution of forest management artefacts to plant diversity at a forest scale.3% were within 4 m of an artefact and 8.4% were located on an artefact. The artefact contribution to total included or not in the artefact contribution. Road verges were the least frequent artefacts but provided

  8. Healthy Housing Reference Manual Now Available The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healthy Housing Reference Manual Now Available The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)/U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Healthy Housing Reference Manual is a revised and updated edition of the 1976 CDC Basic Healthy Housing Inspection manual. The Healthy Housing Reference Manual

  9. LETTER TO THE EDITOR Conservation, ecology, restoration, and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    : Challenges under global change." The main emphasis of the conference was placed on the eu- Mediterranean pine for sustain- able management. The climate change context was an added complexity for all the attendees dynamics and forest management, ecophysi- ology, fire sciences, and climate change. An exhaustive synthesis

  10. Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration programs at DOE facilities. An integral part of this mission involves the safe and cost-effective environmental restoration of the Hanford Site. For over 40 years the Hanford Site supported United States national defense programs, largely through the production of nuclear materials. One legacy of historical Hanford Site operations is a significant waste inventory of radioactive and/or regulated chemical materials. Releases of these materials have, in some cases, contaminated the Hanford Site environment. The DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for protecting human health and the environment from potential Hanford Site environmental hazards by identifying, assessing, and mitigating risks posed by contaminated sites.

  11. Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan. Remediating the nuclear weapons complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the end of the cold war, the US has a reduced need for nuclear weapons production. In response, the Department of Energy has redirected resources from weapons production to weapons dismantlement and environmental remediation. To this end, in November 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (renamed the Office of Environmental Management in 1994). It was created to bring under a central authority the management of radioactive and hazardous wastes at DOE sites and inactive or shut down facilities. The Environmental Restoration Program, a major component of DOE`s Environmental Management Program, is responsible for the remediation and management of contaminated environmental media (e.g., soil, groundwater, sediments) and the decommissioning of facilities and structures at 130 sites in over 30 states and territories.

  12. NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN DER LELIE,D.JONES,K.W.REID-GREEN,J.D.STERN,E.A.

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

  13. Watershed Restoration through Culture-Based Education and Community Outreach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Margaret Rose

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    branched off and traveled to Thames, Canada. Other Oneidas stayed in the homelands. The map in Figure 2 shows the route the Oneidas took. Today there are three Oneida reservations: Oneida, New York; Oneida, Thames in Ontario, Canada; and Oneida... Club. RESTORATION PROJECTS The Duck Creek Fish Passage project involves the removal of two dams on Duck Creek and enhancement of the fish passage barrier at a third dam. This project will enhance the ability of lake fish in Green Bay to access...

  14. The Ecohydrological Implications of a Restored Rangeland in Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, Patrick 1989-

    2012-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    , lateral vegetative spread, natural regen- eration, plant traits, restoration, seed bank, standing veg- etation, wetland, Wicken Fen. Introduction In Britain, as in other parts of Europe, fen meadow and lowland wet grassland habitats have declined... under a range of biophysical conditions (for example dif- ferent hydroperiods) was addressed through identifying species functional traits. Species were classified to C-S-R and Regen- eration Strategy types according to Grime et al. (2007...

  15. Stennis Space Center Use of MODIS Forest Monitoring Products in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, William W.

    of MODIS Forest Monitoring Products in Developing a Forest Threat Early Warning System Stennis Space Center Prototypical Early Warning System (EWS) results ­ Posting of NRT results on-line for use by USFS Forest Monitoring Products in Developing a Forest Threat Early Warning System Stennis Space Center

  16. Forest inventory Charles T. Scott & Jeffrey H. Gove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest inventory Charles T. Scott & Jeffrey H. Gove Volume 2, pp 814­820 in Encyclopedia, Chichester, 2002 #12;Forest inventory Forest inventory is an accounting of trees and their related by a comprehensive survey of all households in the country. Similarly, forest inventories seek to enumerate

  17. Forest Enterprise Scotland Head Office 1 Highlander Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Scotland'sNationalForestEstate2013-2016 The role of Scotland's National Forest Estate Commission Picture Library unless otherwise stated. Designed by Whitenoise Creative for Forestry Commission of Forestry Commission Scotland charged with managing the National Forest Estate. Scotland's National Forest

  18. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

  19. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

  20. Vehicle routing for the last mile of power system restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coffrin, Carleton [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van Hentenryck, Pascal [BROWN UNIV.

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studied a novel problem in power system restoration: the Power Restoration Vehicle Routing Problem (PRVRP). The goal of PRVRPs is to decide how coordinate repair crews effectively in order to recover from blackouts as fast as possible after a disaster has occurred. PRVRPs are complex problems that combine vehicle routing and power restoration scheduling problems. The paper proposed a multi-stage optimization algorithm based on the idea of constraint injection that meets the aggressive runtime constraints necessary for disaster recovery. The algorithms were validated on benchmarks produced by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the infrastructure of the United States. The disaster scenarios were generated by state-of-the-art hurricane simulation tools similar to those used by the National Hurricane Center. Experimental results show that the constraint-injection algorithms can reduce the blackouts by 50% or more over field practices. Moreover, the results show that the constraint-injection algorithm using large neighborhood search over a blackbox simulator provide competitive quality and scales better than using a MIP solver on the subproblems.

  1. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  2. Restoration and analysis of amateur movies from the Kennedy assassination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breedlove, J.R.; Cannon, T.M.; Janney, D.H.; Kruger, R.P.; Trussell, H.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the evidence concerning the assassination of President Kennedy comes from amateur movies of the presidential motorcade. Two of the most revealing movies are those taken by the photographers Zapruder and Nix. Approximately 180 frames of the Zapruder film clearly show the general relation of persons in the presidential limousine. Many of the frames of interest were blurred by focus problems or by linear motion. The method of cepstral analysis was used to quantitatively measure the blur, followed by maximum a posteriori (MAP) restoration. Descriptions of these methods, complete with before-and-after examples from selected frames are given. The frames were then available for studies of facial expressions, hand motions, etc. Numerous allegations charge that multiple gunmen played a role in an assassination plot. Multispectral analyses, adapted from studies of satellite imagery, show no evidence of an alleged rifle in the Zapruder film. Lastly, frame-averaging is used to reduce the noise in the Nix movie prior to MAP restoration. The restoration of the reduced-noise average frame more clearly shows that at least one of the alleged gunmen is only the light-and-shadow pattern beneath the trees.

  3. Cluster Analysis-Based Approaches for Geospatiotemporal Data Mining of Massive Data Sets for Identification of Forest Threats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Richard T [ORNL] [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL] [ORNL; Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL] [ORNL; HargroveJr., William Walter [USDA Forest Service

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate methods for geospatiotemporal data mining of multi-year land surface phenology data (250 m2 Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) in this study) for the conterminous United States (CONUS) as part of an early warning system for detecting threats to forest ecosystems. The approaches explored here are based on k-means cluster analysis of this massive data set, which provides a basis for defining the bounds of the expected or normal phenological patterns that indicate healthy vegetation at a given geographic location. We briefly describe the computational approaches we have used to make cluster analysis of such massive data sets feasible, describe approaches we have explored for distinguishing between normal and abnormal phenology, and present some examples in which we have applied these approaches to identify various forest disturbances in the CONUS.

  4. 31 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the materials from the forests through the supply chain. Brian Condon, the wood procurement manager for Bio pointed out they have foresters working every day making sure the biomass plant is maintaining31 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR

  5. Impacts of disturbance initiated by road construction in a subtropical cloud forest in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico Lydia P. Olandera,* , F.N Scatenab , Whendee L. Silverc a Department Forestry, USDA Forest Service, Call Box 25000, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, 00928-2500, USA c Ecosystem tropical forests, were evaluated in the subtropical cloud forests of Puerto Rico. The vegetation, soil

  6. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  7. Kenya's forests: going up in smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, G.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Closed forest and commercially valuable woodland account for at most 11,406 square miles in Kenya (about 5.2% of the country's area). Plantation forests, mainly of exotic conifers, cover more than 550 square miles, and it is hoped that exotic plantation species will entirely replace dependence on the indigenous forests for pulp, sawn timber and other roundwood. However, reliance on charcoal as a fuel has led to widespread deforestation, particularly along highways and within 20 miles of towns and major villages. Deforestation is likely to increase with increasing population pressure.

  8. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Are Your Streams Healthy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Rector, Barron S.; Hays, K. Brian

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy rainfall. Determine whether or not they have adequate vegetative cover and whether or not they are eroding. Then classify stream banks into one of four categories (Fig. 1). Are Your Streams Healthy? Larry D. White, Barron S. Rector and K. Brian...

  9. Keep your heart healthy About the British Heart Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    Keep your heart healthy #12;About the British Heart Foundation The British Heart Foundation (BHF) is the nation's heart charity, saving lives through pioneering research, patient care and vital information. You ..........................................................................4 What are coronary heart disease and stroke? ......................5 What increases my risk

  10. Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs Selecting healthy plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs Selecting healthy plants Take a step back to examine swollen nodules at the container edge, rather than circling like in a plastic container. The nodules store with soil or mulch ­ ignore these and find the first permanent woody root growing radially out from

  11. EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs

  12. 188 Forest health surveillance in Victoria Australian Forestry 2008 Vol. 71 No. 3 pp. 188195

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    available for sustainable timber production (VictorianAssociation of Forest Industries 2008). Native forestForests. While several companies manage plantations in Victoria, HVP Plantations (formerly Hancock Victoria

  13. Colorado Statewide Forest Products Industry Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Products Industry Profile Economic Sustainability and Ecological and Comparisons · Production and Processing · Sales and Markets · Economic and Ecological Contributions Sawmills · 1/4 for Roundwood (post and pole, vigas, house logs), furniture, excelsior etc. ­ Sawmill

  14. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis The Home Depot Michael Jenkins Forest Trends Aban Kabraji The World Conservation Union (IUCN) Eva Mary Tyrrell Executive Director Barbara Ruth Program Coordinator Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture

  15. Geospatial Analysis School of Forest Resources &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Geospatial Analysis GIS 4121 School of Forest Resources & Conservation Geomatics Program _______________________________________________________________________________________ 1 GIS 4121 Geospatial Analysis INSTRUCTORS: Dr. Hartwig Henry Hochmair (FLREC Fort Lauderdale) Dr MATERIALS: de Smith, MJ, Goodchild, MF, & Longley, PA (2010). Geospatial Analysis (3rd ed.). Leicester

  16. Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing pine forests for the production of pine straw is a promising new enterprise in East Texas. This publication explains the processes and equipment needed to harvest and market pine straw....

  17. BIODIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT: EUCALYPTUS & FOREST LAW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    in Brazil. Specializations include: Wood construction, Industrialization and marketing of forest products Other: A. 4% to sawmills B. Wood pellets C. system Short rotations of 6-7 years Managed for Fiber or Fuel-wood http

  18. Robust scheduling in forest operations planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Lui Cheng

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest operations planning is a complex decision process which considers multiple objectives on the strategic, tactical and operational horizons. Decisions such as where to harvest and in what order over different time ...

  19. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  20. EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration’s proposal to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of a coho salmon restoration program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Proposed Action would involve building a new, small, in-basin adult holding/spawning, incubation and rearing facility on the Wenatchee River at one of two potential sites; and constructing and improving several sites in both the Wenatchee and Methow river basins in north central Washington State.

  1. MMS; Two more months needed for Gulf of Mexico restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that two more months could be needed to restore Gulf of Mexico oil and gas production shut in because of Hurricane Andrew, Minerals Management Service estimates. Hurricane Andrew swept west across South Florida into the gulf, then turned north and struck the Louisiana coast Aug. 25. Operators last week continued filing with MMS district offices in the New Orleans region reports of newly discovered damage to offshore oil and gas structures. By midweek, MMS listed more that 241 platforms, well satellites, and other offshore structures and 135 pipelines damaged by the storm.

  2. Economics in Criticality and Restoration of Energy Infrastructures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Gale A.; Flaim, Silvio J.; Folga, Stephen M.; Gotham, Douglas J.; McLamore, Michael R.; Novak, Mary H.; Roop, Joe M.; Rossmann, Charles G.; Shamsuddin, Shabbir A.; Zeichner, Lee M.; Stamber, Kevin L.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economists, systems analysts, engineers, regulatory specialists, and other experts were assembled from academia, the national laboratories, and the energy industry to discuss present restoration practices (many have already been defined to the level of operational protocols) in the sectors of the energy infrastructure as well as other infrastructures, to identify whether economics, a discipline concerned with the allocation of scarce resources, is explicitly or implicitly a part of restoration strategies, and if there are novel economic techniques and solution methods that could be used help encourage the restoration of energy services more quickly than present practices or to restore service more efficiently from an economic perspective. AcknowledgementsDevelopment of this work into a coherent product with a useful message has occurred thanks to the thoughtful support of several individuals:Kenneth Friedman, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Assurance, provided the impetus for the work, as well as several suggestions and reminders of direction along the way. Funding from DOE/OEA was critical to the completion of this effort.Arnold Baker, Chief Economist, Sandia National Laboratories, and James Peerenboom, Director, Infrastructure Assurance Center, Argonne National Laboratory, provided valuable contacts that helped to populate the authoring team with the proper mix of economists, engineers, and systems and regulatory specialists to meet the objectives of the work.Several individuals provided valuable review of the document at various stages of completion, and provided suggestions that were valuable to the editing process. This list of reviewers includes Jeffrey Roark, Economist, Tennessee Valley Authority; James R. Dalrymple, Manager of Transmission System Services and Transmission/Power Supply, Tennessee Valley Authority; William Mampre, Vice President, EN Engineering; Kevin Degenstein, EN Engineering; and Patrick Wilgang, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Assurance.With many authors, creating a document with a single voice is a difficult task. Louise Maffitt, Senior Research Associate, Institute for Engineering Research and Applications at New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology (on contract to Sandia National Laboratories) served a vital role in the development of this document by taking the unedited material (in structured format) and refining the basic language so as to make the flow of the document as close to a single voice as one could hope for. Louise's work made the job of reducing the content to a readable length an easier process. Additional editorial suggestions from the authors themselves, particularly from Sam Flaim, Steve Folga, and Doug Gotham, expedited this process.

  3. Workforce estimates for environmental restoration at Pinellas Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    April, J.G.; Stahlman, E.J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to assist the Pinellas Plant, Largo, Florida, in estimating work-force requirements for the anticipated environmental restoration (ER) mission. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has prepared workforce estimates required for ER and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) at Pinellas Plant. These estimates are presented in the report and were based on a comparison of several ER projects of similar magnitude, including Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska; Hanford in Richland, Washington; and the Radium Chemical D&D project in Queens, New York. The characterization of the Pinellas Plant was based on the RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] Facility Investigation Report: Pinellas Plant.

  4. FAQS Job Task Analyses - Environmental Restoration | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |ExelonFAQ: RelocationCriticality SafetyRestoration

  5. Montana Watershed Restoration Plans Wiki | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana:Northeast AsiaAir|UndergroundRestoration Plans Wiki

  6. Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the amount and type of precipitation that falls across the western United States. Research shows a trend1 Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you Water is a crucial, industry, energy, recreation, and the natural resources we manage and care about. While most citizens

  7. Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajo´s National Forest, Brazil PaulJN, Scotland b Instituto do Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazo^nia (IMAZON), CEP 66060-160 Bele´m, Brazil c Projeto Dendrogene, EMBRAPA, CEP 66095-100 Bele´m, Brazil Received 23 November 2005; received

  8. The Economic Importance of New Hampshire's Forest-Based Economy FOREST-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    forests and trees are to our state's economy. While the statistics in this publication focus on economic Acknowledgements: Funding for this report was provided by the Public Service Company of NH and the U.S. Endowment products manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, wood energy, and the forest-based recreational

  9. Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

  10. A Guide for Virginia Forest Landowners Jennifer L. Gagnon, Coordinator, Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Education Program, Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, Virginia Tech Introduction As a private of timber harvest planning and how to work with professional foresters and natu- ral resource management final management decisions. Resources for learning more about any of the topics covered are available

  11. An internship with the Galveston Bay Foundation emphasizing Coastal Marsh Restoration with Spartina alterniflora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoud, Joey

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bay Foundation's Seed Project in Baytown, Texas. At this location, the Foundation has a control pond where they grow cordgrass &om seedlings to mature plants ready for use in the Foundation's restoration sites. My internship study area was located... to be implemented to effectively establish the marsh vegetation and hydrology needed to start the process of restoring the wetlands. The types of vegetation used to restore the areas were mainly Spartina alrerniflora and Scirpus robosrus plants. Both...

  12. Edge effects in a forest mosaic: implications for oak regeneration in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Barrera, Fabiola

    Forest edges created by scattered-patch clear-cutting have become a common landscape feature in tropical montane forests, including pine-oak and evergreen cloud forests. Forest-edge-pasture gradients were characterised ...

  13. What's Happening in Colorado's Aspen Forests? Gradual, longterm changes and recent widespread death of aspen trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What's Happening in Colorado's Aspen Forests? Gradual, longterm changes and recent widespread death of aspen trees The normal development of forests includes changes, with most trees forests experience fire, insect outbreaks, severe winds, or major droughts. All the aspen forests

  14. Expanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    Forest Service research on recycling is being led by scientists at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPLExpanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology Theodore L. Laufenberg, Program Manager Forest Products Conservation and Recycling Said Abubakr

  15. Lone Star Healthy Streams: Keeping Texas streams clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutwell, Kathryn S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    time. #31;is prevents fecal material from accumulating in creek pastures during rainy seasons and ending up in streams. ?Results showed that when alternative o -stream water was provided, the amount of time ca#20;le spent in the creek was reduced... Corporation. LONE STAR HEALTHY STREAMS Keeping Texas streams clean Think contaminated water only occurs in developing countries? Even in the United States, high levels of bacteria in some water bodies make them potentially unsuitable for recreation...

  16. Assessing channel morphology following a floodplain restoration project : Wildcat Creek, Richmond, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Ashley; Battaglia, Charles F.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    restore a portion of the Creek without planning for theand White, M. Lower Wildcat Creek flood control project: aProject on Lower Wildcat Creek. UC Berkeley Hydrology

  17. Cerrito Creek step-pools: An opportunity for restoration and education at Blake Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrends, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of the Alamo Creek Restoration (East Branch).Vincent H. Resh. 1992. Strawberry Creek on the University ofRediscovering Cerrito Creek in Blake Garden. LA227

  18. Post project evaluation of Miller Creek (Marin, CA) restoration : vegetation survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting, Jantrue; Pope-Daum, Caitilin

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Valley Units 3-6 Miller Creek Stabilization/RestorationProject Evaluation, Miller Creek, California: Assessment oftoe of bank grade change creek channel water surface LEGEND

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - alaska installation restoration Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creek Watershed Restoration Juneau, Alaska Duck Creek is a small, anadromous fish stream located... Sediment removal from channel Wetlands revegetation NOAA Community-Based...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - aesthetic all-ceramic restorations Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of California at San Francisco Collection: Biology and Medicine 3 Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Summary: as the reason for the...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - aesthetic indirect restorative Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Illinois State University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5 Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Summary: as the reason for the...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - arizona installation restoration Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surrounding a hydropower decommissioning in Fossil Creek, Arizona... consequences of stream restoration on an exotic crayfish population. Master's ... Source: Marks, Jane -...

  3. The Fun Never Stops--Ten Years of Environmental Restoration Success at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimick, F. B.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the many contributors to the success of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories between 1992 and 2002.

  4. Restoration Potential of a Mining-Impacted Urban Stream: Horseshoe Branch of Lion Creek, Oakland, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hackenjos, Bethany; Woelfle-Erskine, Cleo; Wood, Jacob

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    revenues to remediate mining impacts. State and regionalRestoration Potential of a Mining-Impacted Urban Stream:have addressed the impacts of mining, although hundreds of

  5. Quantum Statistics Basis, Thermodynamic Analogies and the Degree of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soffer, Bernard H; Kikuchi, Ryoichi

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and EstimationApril 3, 1992) The Maximum Entropy method, using physicalare discussed. Maximum Entropy (ME) estimation has been

  6. Beneficial Use of Drilling Waste - A Wetland Restoration Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pioneer Natural Resources

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This project demonstrated that treated drill cuttings derived from oil and gas operations could be used as source material for rebuilding eroding wetlands in Louisiana. Planning to supply a restoration site, drill a source well, and provide part of the funding. Scientists from southeastern Louisiana University's (SLU) Wetland Biology Department were contracted to conduct the proposed field research and to perform mesocosm studies on the SLU campus. Plans were to use and abandoned open water drill slip as a restoration site. Dredged material was to be used to create berms to form an isolated cell that would then be filled with a blend of dredged material and drill cuttings. Three elevations were used to test the substrates ability to support various alternative types of marsh vegetation, i.e., submergent, emergent, and upland. The drill cuttings were not raw cuttings, but were treated by either a dewatering process (performed by Cameron, Inc.) or by a stabilization process to encapsulate undesirable constituents (performed by SWACO, Division of Smith International).

  7. Demonstration Dock Designed to Benefit Eelgrass Habitat Restoration (Washington)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Gayaldo, Perry F.; Curtis, Craig A.; Court, Brian L.; Pierce, David M.; Robison, David S.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The derelict Thomas Oil Dock on state tidelands in Port Townsend, Washington, was redesigned for the Northwest Maritime Center by a committee including marine scientists, architects, engineers, educators, regulators, and user groups. The committee's objectives were to create a ''demonstration dock'' using the best-available technologies and design features to restore nearshore habitat functions, particularly for threatened fisheries resources, while accommodating the unique requirements of the educational facility to house vessels ranging from historic tall ships to sea kayaks. A key nearshore habitat restoration goal was to reduce fragmentation of eelgrass where shade from the existing dock inhibited growth, by improving conditions with a new dock design and transplanting eelgrass to connect existing patches. Ecological conditions were evaluated through diver surveys; mapping existing eelgrass, macroalgae, and substrates; and review of controlling factors. Data on the attenuation an d diffusion of photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR) was collected and evaluated relative to eelgrass light requirements. Potential shade impacts of existing and alternative dock designs and materials were modeled. Key design features to improve habitat functions included the installation of reflective material under the dock to increase the incidence of PAR at the substrate level, reduction in the number of piles and associated shade impacts through the use of steel piles instead of wood, increase in the length of the trestle to 286 to move the greatest area of overwater structure beyond the range of eelgrass, and the use of grating in strategic locations to reduce the potential of a light/dark barrier to fish passage.

  8. Axial-vector coupling constants and chiral-symmetry restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henley, E.M. (Department of Physics FM-15 and Institute for Nuclear Theory HN-12, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Hwang, W.P. (Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10764 (Taiwan, Province of China)); Kisslinger, L.S. (Department of Physics, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isovector axial-vector coupling constant {ital g}{sub {ital A}} is determined by using the method of QCD sum rules. A sum rule for ({ital g}{sub {ital A}}{minus}1) is obtained, and it is shown that, with standard values of the quark condensates, {ital g}{sub {ital A}}=1.26{plus minus}0.08. It is also shown that the isovector axial-vector coupling ({ital g}{sub {ital A}}{minus}1)=0 in the limit in which chiral symmetry is restored, and the quark condensate vanishes. A sum rule is also obtained for the isoscalar'' axial-vector coupling constant {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}}, which is found to be 0.13 if the isovector values of susceptibilities are used. On the other hand, {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}}={minus}0.68 if the quark condensate is set to zero while {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}}={minus}1.00 if both the quark and gluon condensates vanish in the event of chiral-symmetry restoration. The values of {ital g}{sub {ital A}} and {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}} allow us to deduce {Delta}{ital u} and {Delta}{ital d} in the proton.

  9. Forest cover change and illegal logging in the Ukrainian Carpathians in the transition period from 1988 to 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Forest cover change and illegal logging in the Ukrainian Carpathians in the transition period from 2009 Keywords: Forest harvesting Illegal logging Forest disturbance Landsat Support vector machines Ukraine Carpathians Forest inventory data Forest resource assessment Post-socialist transition Illegal

  10. Geospatiotemporal Data Mining in an Early Warning System for Forest Threats in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Mills, Richard T [ORNL; Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL; Vulli, Srinivasa S [ORNL; HargroveJr., William Walter [United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), United States Forest Service (USFS)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the potential of geospatiotemporal data mining of multi-year land surface phenology data (250~m Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) in this study) for the conterminous United States as part of an early warning system to identify threats to forest ecosystems. Cluster analysis of this massive data set, using high-performance computing, provides a basis for several possible approaches to defining the bounds of ``normal'' phenological patterns, indicating healthy vegetation in a given geographic location. We demonstrate the applicability of such an approach, using it to identify areas in Colorado, USA, where an ongoing mountain pine beetle outbreak has caused significant tree mortality.

  11. Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

  12. Department of Forest and Wood Science Academic Programmes for 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    ; harvesting and supply; biomass conversion; energy production; marketing of bio-energy; economicsDepartment of Forest and Wood Science Academic Programmes for 2014 Postgraduate Diploma Enquiries: Head of Department Contact details: Department of Forest and Wood Science Stellenbosch University

  13. atlantic forest area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    techniques to forest group and basal area mapping using satellite imagery and forest inventory data CiteSeer Summary: Accurate, current, and cost-effective fire fuel data are...

  14. Forest Plan A summary of a forum explor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology

  15. acuminata forests affected: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  16. austrocedrus chilensis forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  17. argentinean yungas forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  18. alnus acuminata forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  19. BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing June 18, 2008 - 4:29pm Addthis In an effort to encourage...

  20. Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction Operation in Southwest Oregon1 literature has quantified harvesting system effectiveness or soil disturbance concerns from such operations. This paper reports results of soil disturbance generated from an integrated forest harvesting

  1. People and Forests: a case study from Benin, West Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraus, Erika Beth

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate how sacred forests in Benin, West Africa, contribute to forest conservation. Local use of natural resources is well-practiced in maintaining wooded space; the same use of those ...

  2. Evalua&ng Forest Biomaterials with Environmental Life Cycle Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Environmental Life cycle assessment (LCA) to understand impacts of forest productsEvalua&ng Forest Biomaterials with Environmental Life Cycle Assessment Hosted in the industrial sphere, with addiKonal effects 6 #12;Life Cycle Assessment Method

  3. In Search of Sustainable (Urban) Forest Management in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), 1981 · Research associate, EIA, 1981-83 · PhD, forest management and EIA, 1983-86 · Research scholar

  4. Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.

  5. Institutional change in the forest sector : the Russian experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulybina, Olga

    of corporate responsibility, forest certification, model forests, foreign forest management practices and visions of sustainability. The results of both state and non-state activities aimed at reforming the forest sector are debatable and yet to be seen... ecological crisis of his day’, namely the problem of soil fertility within capitalist agriculture, the antagonism of town and country, and the necessity of ecological sustainability. Idealist Structuralism Similarly to materialist structuralists, Emile...

  6. Preordered forests, packed words and contraction algebras Anthony Mansuy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    an increasing condition, we obtain the Hopf subalgebra of heap-ordered forests Hho (see [FU10, GL90]). Moreover

  7. International Symposium "The evaluation of forest Policies and Programmes"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    for the internalisation of Carbon sequestration function Forest management (art. 3.4): - after Decision 11 COP 7: 15

  8. Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

  9. Principles of Forest Stewardship1 1As per the Foresters Act S.4(2)(b) "to advocate for and uphold principles of stewardship of forests, forest lands, forest resources and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and resilience of the ecosystem. Ecological integrity refers to the wholeness of ecosystems, as well. Ecological Integrity 4 2. Information and Understanding 4 3. Forest Management Goals and Objectives 4 4 and landscape levels which maintains and protects ecosystem function, integrity and resilience. It is based upon

  10. Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model (FASOM): Model structure and policy applications. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.M.; Alig, R.J.; Callaway, J.M.; McCarl, B.A.; Winnett, S.M.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest and Agricultural Sector Opimization Model (FASOM) is a dynamic, nonlinear programming model of the forest and agricultural sectors in the United States. The FASOM model initially was developed to evaluate welfare and market impacts of alternative policies for sequestering carbon in trees but also has been applied to a wider range of forest and agricultural sector policy scenarios. The authors describe the model structure and give selected examples of policy applications. A summary of the data sources, input data file format, and the methods used to develop the input data files also are provided.

  11. A Current Overview of Forest Products Certification Shadia Duery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manufacturing industry developed to track certified forest products from the forest through the supply chain management (Ozanne and Vlosky 1997). In addition to reducing negative perceptions by consumers in the wood manufacturing industry developed to verify certified forest products. CoC works as a control

  12. Advisory Committee on Forest Research Paper 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advisory Committee on Forest Research Paper 2001/02 Report of Visiting Group ­ Forest Research Environmental Research Branch 29 ­ 30 October 2001 1. Review Procedures On the invitation of Mr Jim Dewar, Chief visited the Alice Holt Research Station of Forest Research on 29 and 30 October 2001. Secretarial support

  13. Thinking about efficiency of resource use in forests Dan Binkleya,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binkley, Dan

    of forests can be described as a function of the supply of resources, the proportion of resources captured not represent those that occur at the scale of forests and years, owing to more complete biomass accounting of biomass partitioning to optimize resource capture and use. Patterns in the growth of forests, across

  14. Is Forestry Right Do you care about forests, wildlife,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Is Forestry Right For You? · Do you care about forests, wildlife, water, wilderness interest in the future of forestry? · Do you feel there should be changes made to forest practices? · Do at www.unbc.ca/forestry BSc Natural Resources Management Forest Ecology and Management #12;Some Career

  15. WISDOM number two / page 7 IN THE FOREST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisk, Thomas D.

    a decision support tool for land managers that met the needs of the BLM managers perfectly. The ForestERA project was in the final stages of a 2 million acre analysis of forest and fire risk management jurisdictions, they could accomplish for- est management planning to address fire risks. Luckily, the Forest

  16. What can I do with a degree in Forest Engineering?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    What can I do with a degree in Forest Engineering? ENGINEERING Planning your career Choosing a career involves more than just finding out what is open to you. Knowledge about yourself is central.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Forest Engineering? Forest engineering is a hybrid of engineering, forestry and management

  17. Biomass Chronosequences of United States Forests: Implications for Carbon Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichstein, Jeremy W.

    Management and Carbon Sequestration Forests account for a large fraction of the carbon stored in global soils for forest management aimed at carbon sequestration is controversial. On the one hand, logging diminishes of succession (Peet 1981, 1992; Shugart 1984). In the context of forest management aimed at carbon sequestration

  18. FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, W.J.

    size distribution model for estimating oil reserves and for use in forest management under the `natural estimates of oil reserves, and be of use for ecosystem based forest management under the `naturalFOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA. William J. Reed #3; JUNE, 1999. Abstract

  19. ForestGALES A PC-based wind risk model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be needed to uproot or break the tree? 3.1 What wind speed would create the force required to damageForestGALES A PC-based wind risk model for British Forests User's Guide Version 2.0 June 2004 Barry by strong winds in Britain 1.1 Historical context ­ Previous predictive windthrow model 1.1 What does Forest

  20. ESTIMATION OF FOREST CARBON VOLUME AND VALUE IN TENNESSEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ¨ Acknowledgement INTRODUCTION ¨ U.S. Forest ¤188 Million Acres ¤16% carbon sequestration occurred in forest ¤310Carl. 2001. "The Economics of Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Soils." Department of Agricultural of The Potential for Carbon Sequestration by Forests: Evidence from Southern Mexico." Ecological Economics 33

  1. Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change policies: escalation of wood energy production, consumption and trade 3. Globalization of forest, 22 June 2011 Ed.Pepke@efi.int 1 Global forest products market trends by Dr. Ed Pepke Senior Timber European Forest Institute Contents I. Introduction II. Global market drivers III. Global trade trends IV

  2. Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane HIMR, UoB 13th January 2014 #12 and James Martin at the University of Oxford. Edward Crane (HIMR, UoB) Forest fires, explosions, and random process and the Brownian CRT. Edward Crane (HIMR, UoB) Forest fires, explosions, and random trees 13th

  3. ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics There is a need canopy structure and partitions dynamic rates for a tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island (BCI structure and partitions dynamic rates in a tropical forest. In Review. Journal of Ecology. #12;PPA model

  4. Simulating the Future Forested Landscapes of the Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University June 10, 2002 #12;Technical Assistance Jonathan Brooks, GIS #12;Technical Assistance · Marie 2500000 3000000 3500000 5 20 50 80 100 Years Acres Forest Industry - Losses to Urban & Rural Resid. Forest Industry - Remaining Wildland Forest Non-Industrial Private - Losses to Urban & Rural Resid. Non

  5. SCIENCE AND FOREST CONCESSIONS Bastiaan Louman, Fernando Carrera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY Can forest concessions be a means to conserve natural state forests? Bolivia has 10 years availability of information, however, outside assistance has been necessary. Bolivia has the longest history of concessions in Bolivia, Guatemala and Peru include the costs of forest management, slow and difficult

  6. Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    1 Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration. of Michigan & Univ. of Washington Outline Introduction - PET/CT background - CT-based attenuation correction for PET Conventional sinogram decomposition in DE-CT Statistically motivated sinogram restoration in DE

  7. Restoring Resiliency: Case Studies from Pacific Northwest Estuarine Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Vavrinec, John; Borde, Amy B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of many ecological restoration projects is to establish an ecosystem with fully developed structure and function that exhibits resistance to and resilience from disturbances. Coastal restoration projects in the Pacific Northwest provide opportunities to understand what is required to restore the resilience of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) populations. Factors influencing resilience observed in three case studies of eelgrass restoration include minimum viable population, adaptations of transplant populations, and natural and anthropogenic disturbances at restoration sites. The evaluation of resiliency depends on selecting appropriate monitoring metrics and the frequency and duration of monitoring. Eelgrass area, cover and shoot density provide useful and reliable metrics for quantifying resilience of restored meadows. Further, five years of monitoring of these metrics provides data that can reasonably predict the long-term viability of a planted plot. Eelgrass appears to be a resilient ecosystem in general, though one that data suggest may exhibit tipping points brought about by compounded environmental conditions outside of its tolerance ranges. Explicit inclusion of resilience in the planning and practice of habitat restoration may reduce uncertainties and improve the performance of restored systems by increasing buffering capacity, nurturing sources of renewal (e.g., seeds and rhizomes), and managing for habitat forming and maintaining processes (e.g., sediment dynamics) at multiple scales.

  8. 18. Restoration of Puget Sound Rivers: Do We Know How to Do It?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    18. Restoration of Puget Sound Rivers: Do We Know How to Do It? Susan Bolton, Derek B. Booth;484 Restoration of Puget Sound Rivers: DoWe Know How to Do It? Humans depend on a wide range of natural goods for the Puget Sound region. Several messages are repeated throughout various chapters in this volume: integrate

  9. A High Resolution Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound to Support Nearshore Restoration Feasibility Analysis and Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estuarine and coastal hydrodynamic processes are sometimes neglected in the design and planning of nearshore restoration actions. Despite best intentions, efforts to restore nearshore habitats can result in poor outcomes if circulation and transport which also affect freshwater-saltwater interactions are not properly addressed. Limitations due to current land use can lead to selection of sub-optimal restoration alternatives that may result in undesirable consequences, such as flooding, deterioration of water quality, and erosion, requiring immediate remedies and costly repairs. Uncertainty with achieving restoration goals, such as recovery of tidal exchange, supply of sediment and nutrients, and establishment of fish migration pathways, may be minimized by using numerical models designed for application to the nearshore environment. A high resolution circulation and transport model of the Puget Sound, in the state of Washington, was developed to assist with nearshore habitat restoration design and analysis, and to answer the question “can we achieve beneficial restoration outcomes at small local scale, as well as at a large estuary-wide scale?” The Puget Sound model is based on an unstructured grid framework to define the complex Puget Sound shoreline using a finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM). The capability of the model for simulating the important nearshore processes, such as circulation in complex multiple tidal channels, wetting and drying of tide flats, and water quality and sediment transport as part of restoration feasibility, are illustrated through examples of restoration projects in Puget Sound.

  10. An Economic Analysis of Stream Restoration in an Urban Watershed: Austin, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Chi-Ying

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the 1990s. One of the streams, the Walnut Creek tributary, was restored in 2003. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of stream restoration on housing values. We applied the hedonic pricing method to evaluate the changes in housing value...

  11. Dynamic Issues in MPLS Service Restoration Radim Bartos and Arun Gandhi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartos, Radim

    Dynamic Issues in MPLS Service Restoration Radim Bartos and Arun Gandhi Department of Computer overhead on the nodes in the network. KEY WORDS IP Networks, Network Protocols, Service Restoration, MPLS to the order of tens of milliseconds to seconds [2], such as voice, stream- ing video, etc. Presently, IP

  12. Semi-BlindImage Restoration Based on TelltaleWatermarking Deepa Kundur and DimitriosHatzinakos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundur, Deepa

    in the embedded stream. The altered stream is used for semi-blind restoration to undo tampering. It is assumedSemi-BlindImage Restoration Based on TelltaleWatermarking ~ AUTHENTIC IMAGE Deepa Kundur the restorationof locally degraded images based on telltalefragilewatermarking. In our approach a data stream culled

  13. File system, SaveRestore and Sequencer for LINAC2, DESY2, PETRA3 and FLASH,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    File system, SaveRestore and Sequencer for LINAC2, DESY2, PETRA3 and FLASH, a status report Jürgen 4 #12;Basic principle of "Machine file system" disk save rings linacs · `set points' · `read-back' values · position Quads · position Beam · etc. machine file restore More features: ·compare: between file

  14. Lebanese Science Journal, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2007 19 APPLICATION OF RESTORATION ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lebanese Science Journal, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2007 19 APPLICATION OF RESTORATION ECOLOGY PRINCIPLES, France ckhater@cnrs.edu.lb (Received 23 June 2006 - Accepted 1 March 2007) ABSTRACT Restoration ecology is an emerging science dealing with applied ecology and aiming at "helping nature to recreate itself

  15. One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake Final Report Fremont Lake #20 Water-two-three punch to knockout toxic algae and restore water quality in Nebraska's numerous sandpit lakes. "It seems to help rid the too-often toxic algae prone Fremont State Lakes of the oily green scum that can close them

  16. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

  17. Break-up stage restoration in multifragmentation reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ad. R. Raduta; E. Bonnet; B. Borderie; N. Le Neindre; S. Piantelli; M. F. Rivet

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the case of Xe+Sn at 32 MeV/nucleon multifragmentation reaction break-up fragments are built-up from the experimentally detected ones using evaluations of light particle evaporation multiplicities which thus settle fragment internal excitation. Freeze-out characteristics are extracted from experimental kinetic energy spectra under the assumption of full decoupling between fragment formation and energy dissipated in different degrees of freedom. Thermal kinetic energy is determined uniquely while for freeze-out volume - collective energy a multiple solution is obtained. Coherence between the solutions of the break-up restoration algorithm and the predictions of a multifragmentation model with identical definition of primary fragments is regarded as a way to select the true value. The broad kinetic energy spectrum of $^3$He is consistent with break-up genesis of this isotope.

  18. Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  19. Is Rho-Meson Melting Compatible with Chiral Restoration?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul M. Hohler; Ralf Rapp

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing in-medium vector spectral functions which describe dilepton data in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, we conduct a comprehensive evaluation of QCD and Weinberg sum rules at finite temperature. The starting point is our recent study in vacuum, where the sum rules have been quantitatively satisfied using phenomenological axial-/vector spectral functions which describe hadronic tau-decay data. In the medium, the temperature dependence of condensates and chiral order parameters is taken from thermal lattice QCD where available, and otherwise estimated from a hadron resonance gas. Since little is known about the in-medium axial-vector spectral function, we model it with a Breit-Wigner ansatz allowing for smooth temperature variations of its width and mass parameters. Our study thus amounts to testing the compatibility of the $\\rho$-broadening found in dilepton experiments with (the approach toward) chiral restoration, and thereby searching for viable in-medium axial-vector spectral functions.

  20. Eelgrass Enhancement and Restoration in the Lower Columbia River Estuary, Period of Performance: Feb 2008-Sep 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, C.; Thom, R; Borde, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability to enhance distribution of eelgrass (Zostera marina) in the Columbia River Estuary to serve as refuge and feeding habitat for juvenile salmon, Dungeness crab, and other fish and wildlife. We strongly suspected that limited eelgrass seed dispersal has resulted in the present distribution of eelgrass meadows, and that there are other suitable places for eelgrass to survive and form functional meadows. Funded as part of the Bonneville Power Administration's call for Innovative Projects, we initiated a multistage study in 2008 that combined modeling, remote sensing, and field experimentation to: (1) Spatially predict habitat quality for eelgrass; (2) Conduct experimental plantings; and (3) Evaluate restoration potential. Baseline in-situ measurements and remote satellite observations were acquired for locations in the Lower Columbia River Estuary (LCRE) to determine ambient habitat conditions. These were used to create a habitat site-selection model, using data on salinity, temperature, current velocity, light availability, wave energy, and desiccation to predict the suitability of nearshore areas for eelgrass. Based on this model and observations in the field, five sites that contained no eelgrass but appeared to have suitable environmental conditions were transplanted with eelgrass in June 2008 to test the appropriateness of these sites for eelgrass growth. We returned one year after the initial planting to monitor the success rate of the transplants. During the year after transplanting, we carried out a concurrent study on crab distribution inside and outside eelgrass meadows to study crab usage of the habitat. One year after the initial transplant, two sites, one in Baker Bay and one in Young's Bay, had good survival or expansion rates with healthy eelgrass. Two sites had poor survival rates, and one site had a total loss of the transplanted eelgrass. For submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) restoration projects, these are reasonable success results and represent a small net gain in eelgrass in the LCRE. Crabs used both the eelgrass and unvegetated substrate, though in neither were there great abundance of the young-of-the-year crabs. During the field assessment of 12 potential transplant sites, divers discovered one site in southern Young's Bay that contained a previously undocumented eelgrass bed. This integrated project developed the first predictive maps of sites suitable for eelgrass and other SAV in the lower estuary. In addition, techniques developed for this project to assess light levels in existing and potential submerged habitats have great potential to be used in other regions for nearshore and coastal monitoring of SAV. Based on these preliminary results, we conclude that eelgrass distribution could likely be expanded in the estuary, though additional information on current eelgrass locations, usage by species of interest, and monitoring of current conditions would help develop a baseline and verify benefit. Our recommendations for future studies include: (1) Site Monitoring. Continued monitoring of restoration sites along with physical metrics of light, temperature and salinity within beds. Continued monitoring will both assist managers in understanding the longevity and expansion rate of planted sites and inform practical guidance on the minimum planted eelgrass required to develop a resilient meadow. (2) Natural bed documentation and monitoring. Document current eelgrass habitat conditions in the Columbia River by mapping eelgrass and other SAV species and monitoring physical metrics in natural beds. This will assist by better defining the factors that control the annual and spatial variation in eelgrass in the estuary, and thus lead to improved management. Improved information on conditions will help refine a habitat suitability model that can more accurately predict where eelgrass can be restored or areas under duress. (3) Monitor Species Use. Expanded monitoring of Dungeness crab and salmon use and benefit from eelgrass in the estuary to evaluate how