Sample records for health risks line

  1. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

  2. EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

  3. Health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, C.C.; Etnier, E.L. (eds.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume examines occupational, public health, and environmental risks of the coal fuel cycle, the nuclear fuel cycle, and unconventional energy technologies. The 6 chapters explore in detail the relationship between energy economics and risk analysis, assess the problems of applying traditional cost-benefit analysis to long-term environmental problems (such as global carbon dioxide levels), and consider questions about the public's perception and acceptance of risk. Also included is an examination of the global risks associated with current and proposed levels of energy production and comsumption from all major sources. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 6 chapters; all are included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and four in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  4. Risk adjusted control charts for health care Willem Albers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    )) strongly suggest to apply SPC methods, in particular control charts, and we shall follow that line hereRisk adjusted control charts for health care monitoring Willem Albers Department of Applied membership can be used to adjust the basic negative binomial charts to the actual risk incurred. Attention

  5. Line Environment, Safety and Health Oversight

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Sets forth the Department's expectations line management environment, safety and health (ES&H) oversight and for the use of contractor self-assessment programs as the cornerstone for this oversight. Canceled by DOE O 226.1.

  6. The Health Risks: Seafood Contamination, Harmful Algal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health products from the sea. What is the central issue? Why should I care? How will OHH researchThe Health Risks: Seafood Contamination, Harmful Algal Blooms and Polluted Beaches Seafood associated public health costs. Announcing a New Interagency Report on Oceans and Human Health Research

  7. Health effects of risk-assessment categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

  8. assessing health risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  9. assess health risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  10. Health and environmental risks of energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives four examples of health risk assessments of energy systems: (1) Comparative risk assessment of the health effects of the coal and nuclear fuel cycles. Estimates differ from previous values chiefly by inclusion of ranges of uncertainty, but some coal-cycle numbers were re-estimated. Upper-boundary public disease risks of air pollution from coal-fired plants dominate. Reactors probably account for most of the potential effect of major nuclear accidents. Accidental death rates in electricity generation are low for reactors and higher for coal. (2) Upper boundary air pollution health risks of existing fossil-based energy technologies in the United States. Preliminary mortality estimates were obtained combining potential impacts of three index pollutants - SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 2/, and CO - as independent measures of risk. Four fuel cycle trajectories leading to three end-uses were analyzed. Example results: domestic wood burning has substantial potential impact, with an upper boundary exceeding that of coal; upper-boundary air pollution impacts of gas can exceed those of oil, because of NO/sub 2/. (3) Health risks of acid deposition and other transported air pollutants, carried out as part of an assessment of the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) Acid Rain and Transported Air Pollutants - Implications for Public Policy. Three scenarios were examined, leading to estimates of 40,000 to 50,000 annual premature deaths, depending on year (1978 vs 2000) and scenario (holding total emissions constant vs 30% reduction). (4) health effects of uranium mill tailings piles. Mortality risk is estimated to be minuscule (8.7 x 10/sup -9/ average individual lifetime cancer risk from a model mill, compared with 9.5 x 10/sup -4/ for background radiation). Methods that sum risks over the indefinite future are shown to be to be unrealistic. 39 references, 7 figures, 15 tables.

  11. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies. Revision 5/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which man is routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies. This report is not a risk assessment; nor does it contain instructions on how to do a risk assessment. Rather, it provides background information on how most of us think about risks and why it is difficult to do it rationally, it provides a philosophy and data with which to do a better job of judging risks more rationally, and it provides an overview of where risks of energy technologies fit within the spectrum of all risks. Much of the quantitative information provided here is on relative risk of dying of various causes. This is not because risk of dying is seen as the most important kind of risk, but because the statistics on mortality rates by cause are the highest quality data available on health risks in the general population.

  12. Optimization Online - Robust risk adjustment in health insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tengjiao Xiao

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 8, 2014 ... Abstract: Risk adjustment is used to calibrate payments to health plans based on the relative health status of insured populations and helps ...

  13. Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the interplay between human health and environmental risks associated with energy production, hazardous waste, national security and natural disasters. Research findings...

  14. Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

  15. A new approach to criteria for health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery, E-mail: J.Spickett@curtin.edu.au [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Katscherian, Dianne [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Western Australian Department of Health WA, PO Box 8172, Perth Business Centre WA 6849 (Australia); Goh, Yang Miang [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a developing component of the overall impact assessment process and as such needs access to procedures that can enable more consistent approaches to the stepwise process that is now generally accepted in both EIA and HIA. The guidelines developed during this project provide a structured process, based on risk assessment procedures which use consequences and likelihood, as a way of ranking risks to adverse health outcomes from activities subjected to HIA or HIA as part of EIA. The aim is to assess the potential for both acute and chronic health outcomes. The consequences component also identifies a series of consequences for the health care system, depicted as expressions of financial expenditure and the capacity of the health system. These more specific health risk assessment characteristics should provide for a broader consideration of health consequences and a more consistent estimation of the adverse health risks of a proposed development at both the scoping and risk assessment stages of the HIA process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more objective approach to health risk assessment is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences for chronic and acute impacts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences on the health care system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for event frequency that could impact on health. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The approach presented is currently being trialled in Australia.

  16. Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services 3-107 Research Transition of Insurance Policy Standards Department of Management Services Protective Services Management & Risk Management & Risk Assessment Office Resource Planning Tel: 780.248.1147 Tel: 780.492.5050 Tel: 780

  17. Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    URMIA Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template 2008 URMIA Journal Reprint Howard N. Apsan, Ph.D. The City University of New York University Risk Management CUNY and other universities to upgrade their risk management efforts? It is easy to suggest

  18. Safety and Health Regulatory and Policy Response Line- General Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Worker Safety and Health Standards Response Line, established in 1992, is a service that responds to questions DOE, DOE contractor, and DOE subcontractor personnel regarding DOE-adopted and -prescribed standards and directives. These responses may not represent official OSHA policies.

  19. Robust Risk Adjustment in Health Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 7, 2014 ... Moody's estimates the preliminary median operating margins for ..... [1] Staff, ORYX risk adjustment guide, Tech. rep., Joint Commission (2014).

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, SAFETY, AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    and healthy environment, to develop and facilitate emergency management best practices, to assist and educateENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, SAFETY, AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL Table of Contents Mission Manual Chapter VIII - Radiation Safety Technical Manual Chapter IX - Risk Management Technical Manual

  1. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R. [Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  2. Risk Communication - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15A MegawattElectricity:Risk

  3. Health risk assessment of environmental exposure to trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.P.; Farrar, D.G.; de Rooij, C.G. (Epidemiology Unit, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (England))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the animal data showed trichloroethylene (TRI) to be of low acute toxicity. Repeated exposure showed that the target organs were the liver, and to a lesser extent, the kidney. TRI is not mutagenic or only marginally mutagenic. There is no evidence of fetotoxicity or teratogenicity. TRI is judged not to exhibit chronic neurotoxicity. Lifetime bioassays resulted in tumors in both the mouse and the rat. However, because of qualitative and quantitative metabolic differences between rodent and human, no one suitable tumor site can be chosen for human health risk assessment. In addition, of the several epidemiology studies, none has demonstrated a positive association for increased tumor incidence. A review of the health effects in humans shows TRI to be of low acute toxicity and, following chronic high doses, to be hepatotoxic. Environmental exposure to TRI is mainly via the atmosphere, while the contribution from exposure to drinking water and foodstuffs is negligible. The total body burden was calculated as 22 micrograms/day. The safety margin approach based on human health effects showed that TRI levels are well within the safety margin for the human no-observable-effect level (10,000 times lower). The total body burden represents a risk of 1.4 X 10(-5) by linearized multistage modeling. Therefore, by either methodological approach to risk assessment, the environmental occurrence of TRI does not represent a significant health risk to the general population or to the population in areas close to industrial activities. 66 references.

  4. Lead Screening for NH Soils: Minimizing Health Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    family. On your soil test report, if the lead screening levels are elevated, you will receive in populated areas include the use of lead paint around homes (pre- 1970s), the use of lead-arsenate for pest does a "lead screening" test that indicates whether or not lead could pose a health risk for your

  5. Application of the bioecological model and health belief model to self-reported health risk behaviors of adolescents in the united states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleary, Sasha A.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    incorporates these three sources of risk-taking, however it lacks explanatory power. For this reason, this thesis focused on explaining risk perception of health risk behaviors (smoking cigarette, alcohol and marijuana use), and health risk behaviors...

  6. Risk assessment for improved treatment of health considerations in EIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demidova, Olga [Ecoline Environmental Assessment Center, PO Box 7 125047, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: odemidova@eac-ecoline.ru; Cherp, Aleg [Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy, Central European University (CEU), Nador u. 9, 1051, Budapest (Hungary)]. E-mail: cherpa@ceu.hu

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Risk Assessment (RA) processes are rarely used to complement each other despite potential benefits of such integration. This paper proposes a model for procedural and methodological integration of EIA and RA based on reported best practice approaches. The proposed model stipulates 'embedding' RA into EIA and is organized in accordance with the generic stages of the EIA process. The model forms the basis for the proposed Evaluation Package which can be used as a benchmarking tool for evaluating the effectiveness of integration of RA within particular EIAs. The current paper uses the package for evaluating seven Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) of waste incineration facilities in the UK produced between 1990 and 2000. Though RA was found to be an element of these EIAs, its prominence varied considerably from case to case. Systematic application of RA in accordance with the best practice was not observed. Particular omissions were demonstrated in assessing health impacts not directly associated with air emissions, identifying the receptors of health impacts (affected population), interpreting health impacts as health risks, dealing with uncertainties, and risk communications.

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse health risks Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: adverse health risks Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Health Care through the Lens of Risk Call for Papers for a four part special issue of...

  8. 05.09 1 Risk Management and Environmental Health & Safety REGENTS' POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    05.09 1 Risk Management and Environmental Health & Safety REGENTS' POLICY PART V ­ FINANCE AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Chapter 05.09 - Risk Management and Environmental Health and Safety P05 effectively and efficiently establish and maintain a risk management and environmental health and safety

  9. Information resources used in health risk assessment by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, G.B.; Baratta, M.; Wolfson, S.; McGeorge, L. [New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Trenton (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection`s responsibilities related to health-based risk assessment are described, including its research projects and its development of health based compound specific standards and guidance levels. The resources used by the agency to support health risk assessment work are outlined.

  10. Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Preventing Disability Among Working Participants in Kansas’ High-risk Insurance Pool: Implications for Health Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.; Welch, Greg W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health conditions that prevent individuals from working full time can restrict their access to health insurance. For people living in the 35 states that offer high-risk pools, coverage is available but premiums are 125–200% ...

  12. Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality M. Valari(1), L;-Pollutants concentrations [c] ·Average outdoors pollution ·Indoors air quality ·Other sources of intoxication (food, water etc.) -Population exposure: [c] x dt -Health data & air pollution health effects Health

  13. Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

  14. Safety & Risk Services Environmental Health and Safety Last Revised: 2010/10/20 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safety & Risk Services Environmental Health and Safety Last Revised: 2010/10/20 1 EXPOSURE CONTROL the presence or the reasonably anticipated presence of blood or OPIMs on an item or surface. RISK AND RESPONSIBILITIES The purpose of this exposure control plan is to eliminate or minimize the risk of occupational

  15. U.S. Department of Energy worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with environmental restoration and waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.; Travis, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management; Simek, M.A.; Sutherland, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scofield, P.A. [Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM). The methodology is appropriate for estimating worker risks across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex at both programmatic and site-specific levels. This document supports the worker health risk methodology used to perform the human health risk assessment portion of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) although it has applications beyond the PEIS, such as installation-wide worker risk assessments, screening-level assessments, and site-specific assessments.

  16. The Influence of Friendship Networks on Adolescents' Health-Risk Behaviors: A Social Network Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Kwon Chan

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Friendships among adolescents can exert significant influence on behaviors that pose risk to their health. However, empirical evidence for friendships’ influence is mixed due to various factors. Among these factors, are the complex mechanisms...

  17. SCHIFFERT HEALTH CENTER TUBERCULOSIS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM (REQUIRED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    symptoms? ___ NO If YES, check all that apply. Persistent cough for more than 3 weeks ___ Yes Unexplained weight loss ___ Yes Productive cough with bloody sputum ___ Yes Exposure Risks

  18. Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

  19. Updated 2011-12 HEALTH AND BEHAVIORAL RISKS OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    Updated 2011-12 HEALTH AND BEHAVIORAL RISKS OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE The negative physical and mental effects of the use of alcohol and other drugs are well documented. Use of these drugs may cause including depression, psychosis, and severe anxiety. Risks associated with specific drugs are described

  20. Assessing the health risk of solar development on contaminated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 11, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint A recently published report from Argonne's Environmental Science (EVS) division presents a methodology for assessing potential human health...

  1. adult health risk: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Knowledge concerning the current utilization of mental health care by the nation's geriatric population is greatly lacking. Research conducted...

  2. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound...

  3. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Rangeland Health and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    favorable condi- tions. Unfortunately, they do not provide dependable, continuous protection to the soil surface, nor do they provide sufficient forage for livestock and wildlife. Rangeland Health and Sustainability Allan McGinty Professor and Extension...

  4. Sensitivity of health risk estimates to air quality adjustment procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R.G.

    1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter is a summary of risk results associated with exposure estimates using two-parameter Weibull and quadratic air quality adjustment procedures (AQAPs). New exposure estimates were developed for children and child-occurrences, six urban areas, and five alternative air quality scenarios. In all cases, the Weibull and quadratic results are compared to previous results, which are based on a proportional AQAP.

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE Source, distribution, and health risk assessment of polycyclic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    polycyclic aro- matic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 87 urban street dust samples from Tianjin as a Chinese megacity that has undergone rapid urbanization were investigated. In the meantime, potential sources of PAHs were identified using the principal compo- nent analysis (PCA), and the risk of residents' exposure to PAHs via

  6. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J.J.; Wood, R.A.; Haszeldine, R.S. [Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage, School of GeoSciences, Grant Institute, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/ flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less than Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized.

  7. A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

  8. Health Safety & Environmental Protection Committee Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment of Energy Health Physics

  9. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

  10. An Evaluation of some Health Risks of the Pollution from Fossil Fuel Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Workshop Economic Evaluation of Damage Caused by Acidifying Pollutants London, May 9 - 11,version1-3Apr2014 Author manuscript, published in "UN/ECE Workshop Economic Evaluation of Damage Caused94-27 An Evaluation of some Health Risks of the Pollution from Fossil Fuel Combustion Guy Landrieu

  11. EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS). A human health risk assessment conducted by Peterson et al. (2006) for truck-mounted ultra-low volume (ULV to epidemic levels and dispersed to all 58 counties in the state, and was associated with low

  12. Diagnostic health risk assessment of electronic waste on the general population in developing countries' scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazzoli, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.frazzoli@iss.i [Food and Veterinary Toxicology Unit and WHO/FAO Collaborating Centre for Veterinary Public Health - Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Orisakwe, Orish Ebere [Toxicology Unit, Department of Pharmacology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, College of Health Sciences Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State (Nigeria); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Dragone, Roberto [Institute of Nanostructured Materials (ISMN), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, at the Department of Chemistry of the 'Sapienza' University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Food and Veterinary Toxicology Unit and WHO/FAO Collaborating Centre for Veterinary Public Health - Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Noodles Onlus, Nutrition and food safety and wholesomeness (Italy)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    E-waste is the generic name for technological waste. Even though aspects related to e-waste environmental pollution and human exposure are known, scientific assessments are missing so far on the actual risks for health sustainability of the general population exposed to e-waste scenarios, such as illicit dumping, crude recycling and improper treatment and disposal. In fact, further to occupational and direct local exposure, e-waste scenarios may impact on the environment-to-food chain, thus eliciting a widespread and repeated exposure of the general population to mixtures of toxicants, mainly toxic chemical elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and persistent organic pollutants. In the absence of any clear policy on e-waste flow management, the situation in the e-waste receiver countries may become quite scary; accordingly, here we address a diagnostic risk assessment of health issues potentially elicited by e-waste related mixtures of toxicants. Scientific evidence available so far (mainly from China) is discussed with special attention to the concept of health sustainability, i.e. the poor health burden heritage perpetuated through the mother-to-child dyad. Endocrine disruption and neurotoxicity are specifically considered as examples of main health burden issues relevant to perpetuation through life cycle and across generations; toxicological information are considered along with available data on environmental and food contamination and human internal exposure. The risk from exposure to e-waste related mixtures of toxicants of vulnerable subpopulation like breast-fed infants is given special attention. The diagnostic risk assessment demonstrates how e-waste exposure poses an actual public health emergency, as it may entrain significant health risks also for generations to come. Exposure scenarios as well as specific chemicals of major concern may vary in different contexts; for instance, only limited information is available on e-waste related exposures in a major site of e-waste dumping such as West Africa. Therefore, considerations are also given on data gaps possibly fitting a systematic risk assessment of the e-waste health impacts in different subscenarios as well as possible protective factors for exposed subpopulations.

  13. Instrumentation in Health Education and the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey (AHRBS) Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Matthew L.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , characteristics of the peer group. The author concluded the following: (1) published articles in the four health education journals inconsistently reported survey instrument characteristics or results of psychometric property testing for the data collected...

  14. Hanford Site Environmental Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk management summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Budget-Risk Management Summary report is prepared to support the annual request to sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex by DOE, Headquarters. The request requires sites to provide supplementary crosscutting information related to ES&H activities and the ES&H resources that support these activities. The report includes the following: (1) A summary status of fiscal year (FY) 1999 ES&H performance and ES&H execution commitments; (2)Status and plans of Hanford Site Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup activities; (3) Safety and health (S&H) risk management issues and compliance vulnerabilities of FY 2001 Target Case and Below Target Case funding of EM cleanup activities; (4) S&H resource planning and crosscutting information for FY 1999 to 2001; and (5) Description of indirect-funded S&H activities.

  15. Conceptual design report for environmental, safety and health phase III FY-91 line item

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mound Facility (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by the facility`s activities. Design has been completed, and construction is in progress for Phase I of this multiphase program. Phase II has been submitted for fiscal year (FY) 89 funding and Phase IV is being submitted as an FY 92 line item. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) addresses Phase III of the ES&H program.

  16. Health risk from earthquake caused releases of UF{sub 6} at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N.W; Lu, S.; Chen, J.C.; Roehnelt, R.; Lombardi, D.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The health risk to the public and workers from potential exposure to the toxic materials from earthquake caused releases of uranium hexafluoride from the Paducah gaseous Diffusion Plant are evaluated. The results of the study show that the health risk from earthquake caused releases is small, and probably less than risks associated with the transportation of hydrogen fluoride and other similar chemicals used by industry. The probability of more than 30 people experiencing health consequences (injuries) from earthquake damage is less than 4xlO{sup 4}/yr.

  17. Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

  18. Risk Level Based Management System: a control banding model for occupational health and safety risk management in a highly regulated environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Kamerzell, R; Paik, S; Kapp, J; Harrington, D; Swuste, P

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk Level Based Management System (RLBMS) is an occupational risk management (ORM) model that focuses occupational safety, hygeiene, and health (OSHH) resources on the highest risk procedures at work. This article demonstrates the model's simplicity through an implementation within a heavily regulated research institution. The model utilizes control banding strategies with a stratification of four risk levels (RLs) for many commonly performed maintenance and support activities, characterizing risk consistently for comparable tasks. RLBMS creates an auditable tracking of activities, maximizes OSHH professional field time, and standardizes documentation and control commensurate to a given task's RL. Validation of RLs and their exposure control effectiveness is collected in a traditional quantitative collection regime for regulatory auditing. However, qualitative risk assessment methods are also used within this validation process. Participatory approaches are used throughout the RLBMS process. Workers are involved in all phases of building, maintaining, and improving this model. This work participation also improves the implementation of established controls.

  19. It's my body: calls to ChildLine Scotland about sexual health and wellbeing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newall, Elinor; Lewis, Ruth

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The last decade has seen increasing efforts by central and local government to target sexual health services and initiatives at young people in order to improve their sexual health. However, for Scotland’s Sexual Health ...

  20. Method of assessing a lipid-related health risk based on ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  1. Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Health risk assessment is based on access to comprehensive information about potentially hazardous agents in question. Relevant information is scattered throughout the literature, and often is not readily accessible. To be useful in assessment efforts, emerging scientific findings, risk assess parameters, and associated data must be compiled and evaluated systemically. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are among the federal agencies heavily involved in this effort. This symposium was a direct response by EPA and ORNL to the expressed needs of individuals involved in assessing risks from chemical exposure. In an effort to examine the state of the risk assessment process, the availability of toxicological information, and the future development and transfer of this information, the symposium provided an excellent cadre of speakers and participants from state and federal agencies, academia and research laboratories to address these topics. This stimulating and productive gathering discussed concerns associated with (1) environmental contamination by chemicals; (2) laws regulating chemicals; (3) information needs and resources; (4) applications; (5) challenges and priorities; and (6)future issues. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  2. Poor and In Poor Health Bottom Line: In the United States, discussion about how to improve health often turns to either access to care or health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    often turns to either access to care or health behaviors like smoking or diet. These things matter children not re- ceiving any health care in a given year is twice that of higher-income children. Another and changes rapidly during the first few years of life. U.S. Health Care The U.S. health care system includes

  3. Health risk assessment of environmental exposure to 1,1,1-trichloroethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verschuuren, H.G.; de Rooij, C.G. (Dow Europe, Horgen (Switzerland))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986 a survey was published by CEFIC on the occurrence of chlorinated solvents in ambient air, in surface water, and in ground water. The present article concentrates on 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-T), and puts into perspective the environmental occurrence and the toxicity. Critical toxicological data are briefly discussed. As no evidence of a carcinogenic effect of 1,1,1-T is apparent, the no-adverse-effect levels in chronic inhalation exposure in rats (875 ppm) and mice (1500 ppm) form the basis for the estimation of potential risk to human health. Environmental exposure to 1,1,1-T is mainly via the atmosphere (120 micrograms/day); the contributions of drinking water (2 micrograms/day) and food (3 micrograms/kg) are negligible. Safety margins are calculated by comparing the no-adverse-effect levels in rat and mouse studies with the total body burden. Safety margins are also calculated after converting no-adverse-effect levels into estimated internal dose levels by physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. Safety margins vary with the starting point, but are of the order of 10(5) for the general population and more than 10(4) for the population close to industrial activities. It may be concluded that the risk of a potential health effect resulting from environmental exposure to 1,1,1-trichloroethane is negligible. 43 references.

  4. Geomatic techniques for assessing ecological and health risk at U.S. Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regens, J.L.; White, L. [Tulane Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States); Albers, B.J. [BMD Federal, Germantown, MD (United States); Purdy, C.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous substances, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons, pose unique challenges in terms of environmental restoration and waste management, especially in aquatic environments. When stored, used or disposed of improperly, hazardous materials including transuranic wastes, high level wastes, low level wastes, greater than class C wastes, mixed wastes or chemical wastes can contaminate an array of environmental receptors ranging from soils, sediments, groundwater to surface water. Depending on the specific hazardous substance and site attributes, assessing ecological and health risk as a basis for environmental restoration and waste management can be a complex, problematic activity. This is basis for environmental restoration and waste management can be a complex, problematic activity. This is particularly true for the major Defense Programs facilities managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Environmental Restoration (ER) program of DOE was initiated in 1987 to consolidate and coordinate those regulatory activities designed to identify and remediate sites at installations contaminated with radioactive, chemical or mixed wastes. To supply the tools necessary for defining, describing, and characterizing the nature of contaminants within the DOE complex and identifying alternative post-remediation land use options, DOE has implemented a program for the research and development of spatial data technologies to aid in assessing ecological and health risk.

  5. An assessment of mercury emissions and health risks from a coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.M.; Lipfert, F.; Moskowitz, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Analytical Sciences Div.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) mandated that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluate the need to regulate mercury emissions from electric utilities. In support of this forthcoming regulatory analysis the U.S. DOE, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the US MeHg is the predominant way of exposure to mercury originated in the atmosphere. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1,000 MW coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. This study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Even at these more elevated exposure levels, the attributable incidence in mild neurological symptoms was estimated to be quite small, especially when compared with the estimated background incidence in the population. The current paper summarizes the basic conclusions of this assessment and highlights issues dealing with emissions control and environmental transport.

  6. The current use of studies on promoters and cocarcinogens in quantitative risk assessment. Environ. Health Perspect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Stara; D. Mukerjee; R. Mcgaughy; T P. Durkint; M. L. Dourson

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of the priority pollutants discussed in EPA's Ambient Water Quality Criteria documents have been reported to have promotion or cocarcinogenic activity. For example, phenol appears to have tumor-promoting activity in mice when repeatedly applied after initiation with either 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) or benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Similarly, it has been reported that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent promoter of liver tumors as well as a cocarcinogen. However, in developing guidelines to derive ambient water quality criteria, it became apparent that satisfactory approaches had not been developed for using promotion/cocarcinogen data in human health risk estimation, nor were available promotion and/or cocarcinogen data on individual chemicals strong enough to permit a defensible quantitative risk estimation, if such approaches had existed. For this reason, the criteria derived for pollutants with reported promotion/cocarcinogenic activities were based on approaches for carcinogenic (e.g., TCDD), toxic (e.g., fluoranthene) or organoleptic effects (e.g., 2,4-dichlorophenol). Nonetheless, with advances in studies on both the biological mechanisms and dose/response patterns of promoters and cocarcinogens, it may be possible to develop a scientifically valid quantitative approach to use this type of data for derivation of ambient water quality criteria or other risk assessments. Some progress toward this goal and the problems associated with this effort are discussed.

  7. A comparison between integrated risk assessment and classical health/environmental assessment: Emerging beneficial properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekizawa, Jun [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Tokushima, Japan, 1-1 Minamijosanjimacho, Tokushima 770-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: sekizawa@ias.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyocho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both humans and wildlife are exposed to various types of halogenated organic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), typically old chemicals, and tris(4-chlorophenyl) methane (TCPM) and brominated flame retardants, some new chemicals, simultaneously. Classical risk assessment has evaluated health and ecological risks independently by experts from different disciplines. Taking into considerations the recent concerns about endocrine disrupting chemicals and the progress of research in related areas, we integrated and assessed data on exposure and potential effects in humans and wildlife. Comparisons were made for organ concentrations, body burdens of several organochlorine compounds (OCs), metabolic capacities between humans and various wildlife. When we integrate the knowledge on effects and exposure in humans and in wildlife, new insights were suggested about similarities and/or differences in potential effects among various human populations living on different foods and having different body burdens. Combining existing information with emerging knowledge of mechanisms of actions on endocrine disrupting chemicals after exposure to above chemicals during early developmental stages will further elucidate potential risks from exposure to those chemicals.

  8. Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and environmental risks from energy production: A year-longaddition to the risks of the existing energy infrastructureto minimize HSE risk related to the world's existing energy

  9. Risk based optimization of the frequency of EDG on-line maintenance at Hope Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, A. [Public Service Electric & Gas, Hancocks Bridge, NJ (United States); Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International, Dublin, OH (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study to optimize the frequency of on-line maintenance of the emergency diesel generators at Hope Creek. This study was directed towards identifying, analyzing, and modifying maintenance planning and scheduling practices to assure the high availability of emergency diesel generators. Input from application of a recently developed reliability model, from considerations of probabilistic safety assessment, plant-specific experience, insights from personnel involved in EDG maintenance, and other practical issues were used to define a maintenance schedule that balances its beneficial and adverse impacts. Conclusions resulted in feasible recommendations to optimize and reduce the frequency of diesel on-line maintenance, allowing additional resources to better maintain other equipment important to safety.

  10. Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

  11. Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

  12. Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D W; Edson, R; Varela, M; Napier, B

    1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a {sup 90}Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as atmospheric transport, could be considered under future-funded research efforts for impacts to Alaska. The ANWAP risk assessment does not address the following wastes, media, and receptors: radioactive sources in Alaska (except to add perspective for Russian source term); radioactive wastes associated with Russian naval military operations and decommissioning; Russian production reactor and spent-fuel reprocessing facilities nonaqueous source terms; atmospheric, terrestrial and nonaqueous pathways; and dose calculations for any circumpolar locality other than Alaska. These other, potentially serious sources of radioactivity to the Arctic environment, while outside the scope of the current ANWAP mandate, should be considered for future funding research efforts.

  13. Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) offers the benefit of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions and thereby mitigating climate change risk, but it will also bring its own health, safety, and environmental risks. Curtis M. Oldenburg, Editor-in-Chief, considers these risks in the context of the broader picture of energy production. Over the last year, there have been major acute health, safety, and environmental (HSE) consequences related to accidents involving energy production from every major primary energy source. These are, in chronological order: (i) the Upper Big Branch (coal) Mine disaster, (ii) the Gulf of Mexico Macondo (oil) well blowout, (iii) the San Bruno (natural gas) pipeline leak and explosion, and (iv) the Fukushima (nuclear) reactor radioactivity releases. Briefly, the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster occurred in West Virginia on April 5, 2010, when natural methane in the mine ignited, causing the deaths of 29 miners, the worst coal mine disaster in the USA since 1970. Fifteen days later, the Macondo oil well in the Gulf of Mexico suffered a blowout, with a gas explosion and fire on the floating drilling platform that killed 11 people. The oil and gas continued to flow out of the well at the seafloor until July 15, 2010, spilling a total of approximately 5 million barrels of oil into the sea. On September 9, 2010, a 30-inch (76-cm) buried, steel, natural gas pipeline in San Bruno, California, leaked gas and exploded in a residential neighborhood, killing 8 people in their homes and burning a total of 38 homes. Flames were up to 1000 ft (300 m) high, and the initial explosion itself reportedly measured 1.1 on the Richter scale. Finally, on March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan's main island, Honshu, caused a tsunami that crippled the backup power and associated cooling systems for six reactor cores and their spent fuel storage tanks at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. At time of writing, workers trying to bring the crisis under control have been exposed to dangerous levels of radiation, and radioactive water and particulates have been released to the sea and atmosphere. These four disasters, all of which occurred within the past 12 months, were not unprecedented; similar events differing only in detail have happened around the world before, and such events will occur again. Today, developed nations primarily use fossil fuels to create affordable energy for comforts such as lighting, heating and air-conditioning, refrigeration, transportation, education, and entertainment, as well as for powering manufacturing, which creates jobs and a wealth of material goods. In addition to the risks of the existing energy infrastructure that have become obvious through these recent disasters, there is also the ongoing risk of climate change that comes from the vast emissions of greenhouse gases, primarily CO{sub 2}, from the burning of fossil fuels. The implementation of CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) will help mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel energy, but it also carries with it HSE risks. In my personal interactions with the public and with students, the main concern voiced is whether CO{sub 2} could leak out of the deep reservoirs into which it is injected and rise up out of the ground, smothering people and animals at the ground surface. Another concern expressed is that CO{sub 2} pipelines could fail and cause similar gaseous plumes of CO{sub 2}. The widespread concerns about CO{sub 2} leaking out over the ground surface may be inspired by events that have happened within natural systems in equatorial Africa, in Indonesia, and in Italy. Researchers have been investigating a wide variety of HSE risks of geologic CO{sub 2} storage for some time and have determined that wells are the main potential pathways for significant leakage from the deep subsurface. I discuss the acute HSE risks of CO{sub 2} leakage through wells and from pipelines, and compare the behavior of failures in CO{sub 2} wells and pipelines with oil and gas analogues from which most of our experien

  14. Methodology and a preliminary data base for examining the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Bassioni, A.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical model was developed to assess and examine the health effects associated with the production of electricity from uranium and coal fuels. The model is based on a systematic methodology that is both simple and easy to check, and provides details about the various components of health risk. A preliminary set of data that is needed to calculate the health risks was gathered, normalized to the model facilities, and presented in a concise manner. Additional data will become available as a result of other evaluations of both fuel cycles, and they should be included in the data base. An iterative approach involving only a few steps is recommended for validating the model. After each validation step, the model is improved in the areas where new information or increased interest justifies such upgrading. Sensitivity analysis is proposed as the best method of using the model to its full potential. Detailed quantification of the risks associated with the two fuel cycles is not presented in this report. The evaluation of risks from producing electricity by these two methods can be completed only after several steps that address difficult social and technical questions. Preliminary quantitative assessment showed that several factors not considered in detail in previous studies are potentially important. 255 refs., 21 figs., 179 tabs.

  15. Task 3 Report - PCBs in the Environment Near the Oak Ridge Reservation - A Reconstruction of Historical Doses and Health Risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Paul S; Widner, Thomas; Bonnevie, Nancy; Schmidt, Charlie; McCrodden-Hamblen, Jane; Vantaggio, Joanne; Gwinn, Patrick

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an in-depth assessment of historical releases of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and risks of adverse health effects in local populations. The study was conducted by ChemRisk, a service of McLaren/Hart, Inc., for the Tennessee Department of Health. The project team (1) investigated releases of PCBs from the government sites, (2) evaluated PCB levels in environmental media in the area, (3) described releases of PCBs from other sources in the area, and (4) evaluated potential human exposures and health impacts associated with the historical presence of these contaminants in the environment. Beginning in the 1940s, PCBs were used extensively on the ORR and throughout the U.S. as a fire retardant in electrical components. PCBs were also used as cutting fluids for lubrication and cooling during metal working operations. Using information specific to the ORR, the project team estimated health risks for five off-site populations: (1) farm families that raised beef, dairy cattle, and vegetables on the flood plain of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC); (2) individuals who may have purchased beef and milk from cattle raised in the EFPC flood plain; (3) commercial and recreational fish consumers; (4) individuals that may have consumed turtles; and (5) users of surface water for recreation. Noteworthy features of the study include a two-dimensional analysis of uncertainty and variability in the non-cancer risk estimates and an assessment of the uncertainty in PCB toxicology thresholds. Conservative estimates of cancer risks from the ORR releases of PCBs to consumers of fish from Watts Bar Reservoir and the Clinch River range from less than 1 in a 1,000,000 to 2 in 10,000. Three or less excess cases of cancer would be expected to occur among individuals who consumed fish from these local waters since the 1940's. Persons who consumed large amounts of fish from the Clinch R. and Watts Bar were also at risk from non -cancer effects of PCBs. However, for Watts Bar, these risks were mainly due to sources of PCBs other than the ORR; the releases from the ORR appear to have placed an additional one to two percent of the total number of fish consumers potentially at risk. This percentage corresponds to approximately 1,000-2,000 fish consumers over the last 50 years. This report is one in a set of eight technical reports on the Oak Ridge Offsite Dose Reconstruction.

  16. Call me 'at-risk' : maternal health in Sao Paulo's public health clinics and the desire for cesarean technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denyer, Laurie Michelle

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is based on ethnographic field research undertaken in a public health clinic in the periphery of São Paulo, as well as an examination of the "Humanisation of Childbirth Campaign". The Humanisation Campaign is a ...

  17. Essays on econometric modeling of subjective perceptions of risks in environment and human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, To Ngoc

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the estimator asymptotically unbiased and efficient. The third essay addresses the problem of modeling perceived mortality risks from arsenic concentrations in drinking water. I estimated a formal model that allows for ambiguity about risk. The empirical...

  18. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    risk from surface CO2 seeps. Data were elicited from Googas (17), a web-based catalogue of degassing

  19. Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and environmental risks from energy production: A year-longbroader picture of energy production. Over the last year,to accidents involving energy production from every major

  20. ELEVATED TEMPERATURE SENSORS FOR ON-LINE CRITICAL EQUIPMENT HEALTH MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Sebastian

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research program is to improve high temperature piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) sensor technology to make it useful for instrumentation and health monitoring of current and future electrical power generation equipment. The program will extend the temperature range of the sensor from approximately 700 C to above 1000 C, and ultrasonic coupling to objects at these temperatures will be investigated and tailored for use with the sensor. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) AlN deposition process was successfully transferred from film production on tungsten carbide substrates to titanium alloy and silicon carbide (SiC) substrates in the first year of the program, and additional substrates were evaluated. In the second year of the program, additional substrate research was performed with the goal of improving the performance of using SiC substrates. While greatly improved bandwidth was achieved, sensor survival at elevated temperature remains problematic. The elevated temperature coupling work continued with significant experimentation. Molten glasses were found to work within a limited temperature range, but metal foils applied with heat and pressure were found to have superior performance overall. The final year of the program will be dedicated to making further advances in AlN/ substrate behavior, and the design and implementation of a sensor demonstration experiment at very high temperature in a simulated industrial application.

  1. Elevated Temperature Sensors for On-Line Critical Equipment Health Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Sebastian

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the program was to improve high temperature piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) sensor technology to make it useful for instrumentation and health monitoring of current and future electrical power generation equipment. Improvements were aimed primarily at extending the useful temperature range of the sensor from approximately 700 C to above 1000 C, and investigating ultrasonic coupling to objects at these temperatures and tailoring high temperature coupling for use with the sensor. During the project, the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) AlN deposition process was successfully transferred from film production on tungsten carbide substrates to titanium alloy and silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. Film adhesion under thermal cycling was found to be poor, and additional substrate materials and surface preparations were evaluated. A new, porous SiC substrate improved the performance but not to the point of making the films useful for sensors. Near the end of the program, a new family of high temperature piezoelectric materials came to the attention of the program. Samples of langasite, the most promising member of this family, were obtained and experimental data showed promise for use up to the 1000 C target temperature. In parallel, research successfully determined that metal foil under moderate pressure provided a practical method of coupling ultrasound at high temperature. A conceptual sensor was designed based upon these methods and was tested in the laboratory.

  2. Elevated Temperature Sensors for On-Line Critical Equipment Health Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Sebastian

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research program is to improve high temperature piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) sensor technology to make it useful for instrumentation and health monitoring of current and future electrical power generation equipment. The program will extend the temperature range of the sensor from approximately 700 C to above 1000 C, and ultrasonic coupling to objects at these temperatures will be investigated and tailored for use with the sensor. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) AlN deposition process was successfully transferred from film production on tungsten carbide substrates to titanium alloy and silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. Further evaluation of the piezoelectric films on titanium caused it to be discarded as a candidate material due to an excessive thermal expansion coefficient mismatch, causing film failure upon reheating from room temperature. Deposition on SiC is proceeding well, with a highly conductive grade of silicon carbide required for practical use. Additional substrate materials, including refractory metals and conductive ceramics, have been considered but are generally not promising in light of the experience with titanium. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was investigated as an alternate means of creating the films as an alternative to CVD. A concurrent effort has focused on investigation of means of coupling ultrasound from the sensor into the test object at high temperature. A literature search combined with preliminary experimentation has resulted in the selection of two methods for coupling: low melting point glasses and metal foil- pressure couplant. The work in the next two years of the program will include continued improvement of the CVD deposition process, experimental testing of films and coupling at high temperatures, and a laboratory demonstration of the sensor in a simulated industrial application

  3. The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Risk Assessment Factsheet environmental,M.,andToscano,W.(Eds).(2007).Risk Assessment for Environmental Health. · NationalAssociationofLocalBoardsofHealth.(2011).RiskAssessment assessment

  4. Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

  5. Is California Different? State-Specific Risk Adjustment Needs under Health Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulton, Brent D.; Dow, William H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relative Risk Score Percentile Range for U.S. and CaliforniaScore U.S. Members California Members Difference PercentileRange Percentile Upper Mean SE Mean SE Mean z-statistic

  6. Health literacy in Korean immigrants at risk for type2 diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Sarah E.; Rush, Elizabeth; Henry, Shayna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of health literacy with diabetes outcomes. JAMA. 24-31.in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. J Adv Nurs. 2008;prevalence of type 2 diabetes among California Asian adults?

  7. Simulations of long-term health risk from shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, C.A.; Fields, D.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRESTO (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code developed under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funding to evaluate possible health effects from shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes. The model is intended to assess radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impact to a static local population for up to 1000 years following the end of burial operations. Human exposure scenarios that may be considered by model include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and near site farming. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include:groundwater transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, resuspension, atmospheric transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, resuspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Off-site population and individual doses and cancer risks may be calculated as well as doses and risks to the intruder and farmer. Data have been compiled for three extant shallow land burial sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. Some simulation results for the Barnwell site are presented. 13 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risks involved in the routine release of /sup 85/Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of /sup 85/Kr. Instead of releasing the /sup 85/Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing /sup 85/Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from /sup 85/Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of /sup 85/Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for /sup 85/Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C also encourage delaying implementation of the /sup 85/Kr recovery in the early plants.

  9. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A., E-mail: chiu.weihsueh@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States); Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) — i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on “augmentation” of weight of evidence — using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards “integration” of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for “expansion” of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual “reorientation” of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  10. Prepared by Gallagher Student Health & Special Risk -4/23/2014 This document is provided as a resource intended for clients of Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. It is not intended for distribution without consent. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    , Emergency Services, Hospitalization, Maternity & Newborn Care, Mental Health / Substance Abuse DisorderPrepared by Gallagher Student Health & Special Risk - 4/23/2014 This document is provided consent. 1 Healthcare Reform Frequently Asked Questions For Students & Campus Administrators This updated

  11. Trends in the Health of Older Californians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Steven P.; Lee, Jennifer H.; Jawad, May Aydin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Status, Health Risks and Use of Health Services by SelectedPreventive Care and Use of Health Services Changes in HealthHealth Risks and Use of Health Services by County, Age 65

  12. Multimedia assessment of health risks for the Weldon Spring site remedial action project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haroun, L.A.; MacDonell, M.M.; Peterson, J.M.; Fingleton, D.J.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), is responsible for cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, Weldon Spring, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits, and the quarry. The Weldon Spring site became radioactively and chemically contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1960s. The US Department of the Army used the Weldon Spring site to produce dinitrotoluene (DNT) and trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosives from 1941 to 1946. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC, predecessor of the DOE) used the site to process uranium and thorium ore concentrates from 1957 to 1966. The quarry was used by the Army and the AEC for waste disposal beginning in the early 1940s; it was last used for disposal in 1969. Wastes placed in the quarry include TNT and DNT residues and radioactively contaminated materials. A summary of disposal activities at the quarry is presented. As part of the environmental compliance process at the Weldon Spring site, a baseline risk evaluation (BRE) was prepared to assess the potential risks associated with contamination present at the quarry. 13 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN RCD _WOMPOC:Human Health

  14. A body area network for wearable health monitoring : conductive fabric garment utilizing DC-power-line carrier communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Eric R. (Eric Randolph), 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wearable computing applications are becoming increasingly present in our lives. Of the many wearable computing applications, wearable health monitoring may have the most potential to make a lasting positive impact. The ...

  15. MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS LOCAL IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; LIPFERT, F.; MORRIS, S.M.; BANDO, A.; PENA, R.; BLAKE, R.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough quantitative understanding of the processes of mercury emissions, deposition, and translocation through the food chain is currently not available. Complex atmospheric chemistry and dispersion models are required to predict concentration and deposition contributions, and aquatic process models are required to predict effects on fish. However, there are uncertainties in all of these predictions. Therefore, the most reliable method of understanding impacts of coal-fired power plants on Hg deposition is from empirical data. A review of the literature on mercury deposition around sources including coal-fired power plants found studies covering local mercury concentrations in soil, vegetation, and animals (fish and cows). There is strong evidence of enhanced local deposition within 3 km of the chlor-alkali plants, with elevated soil concentrations and estimated deposition rates of 10 times background. For coal-fired power plants, the data show that atmospheric deposition of Hg may be slightly enhanced. On the scale of a few km, modeling suggests that wet deposition may be increased by a factor of two or three over background. The measured data suggest lower increases of 15% or less. The effects of coal-fired plants seem to be less than 10% of total deposition on a national scale, based on emissions and global modeling. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (1) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (2) sediment increments of 18-30%, (3) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (4) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg{sub 0} in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around two mid-size coal fired power plants. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot-spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. These programs found the following: (1) At both sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Kincaid plant, there was excess soil Hg along heavily traveled roads. The spatial pattern of soil mercury concentrations did not match the pattern of vegetation Hg concentrations at either plant. (2) At both sites, the subsurface (5-10 cm) samples the Hg concentration correlated strongly with the surface samples (0-5 cm). Average subsurface sample concentrations were slightly less than the surface samples; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (3) An unequivocal definition of background Hg was not possible at either site. Using various assumed background soil mercury concentrations, the percentage of mercury deposited within 10 km of the plant ranged between 1.4 and 8.5% of the RGM emissions. Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. Estimates of the percentage of total Hg deposition ranged between 0.3 and 1.7%. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the empirical findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to ''hot spots'', near the plants. The major objective of this study was to determine if there was evidence for ''hot-spots'' of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. Although the term has been used extensively, it has never been defined. From a public health perspective, such a ''hot spot'' must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must affect water bodies large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study support the hypothesis that n

  16. Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Beckman, R.J.; Myers, O.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.; Bestgen, H.T. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments.

  17. Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecoveryG -Hazmat work opensHealth

  18. THE LOCAL IMPACTS OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK. PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OF MARCH 2003 - MARCH 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN,T.M.LIPFERT,F.D.MORRIS,S.M.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a follow-up to previous assessments of the health risks of mercury that BNL performed for the Department of Energy. Methylmercury is an organic form of mercury that has been implicated as the form of mercury that impacts human health. A comprehensive risk assessment report was prepared (Lipfert et al., 1994) that led to several journal articles and conference presentations (Lipfert et al. 1994, 1995, 1996). In 2001, a risk assessment of mercury exposure from fish consumption was performed for 3 regions of the U.S (Northeast, Southeast, and Midwest) identified by the EPA as regions of higher impact from coal emissions (Sullivan, 2001). The risk assessment addressed the effects of in utero exposure to children through consumption of fish by their mothers. Two population groups (general population and subsistence fishers) were considered. Three mercury levels were considered in the analysis, current conditions based on measured data, and hypothetical reductions in Hg levels due to a 50% and 90% reduction in mercury emissions from coal fired power plants. The findings of the analysis suggested that a 90% reduction in coal-fired emissions would lead to a small reduction in risk to the general population (population risk reduction on the order of 10{sup -5}) and that the population risk is born by less than 1% of the population (i.e. high end fish consumers). The study conducted in 2001 focused on the health impacts arising from regional deposition patterns as determined by measured data and modeling. Health impacts were assessed on a regional scale accounting for potential percent reductions in mercury emissions from coal. However, quantitative assessment of local deposition near actual power plants has not been attempted. Generic assessments have been performed, but these are not representative of any single power plant. In this study, general background information on the mercury cycle, mercury emissions from coal plants, and risk assessment are provided to provide the basis for examining the impacts of local deposition. A section that covers modeling of local deposition of mercury emitted from coal power plants follows. The code ISCST3 was used with mercury emissions data from two power plants and local meteorological conditions to assess local deposition. The deposition modeling results were used to estimate the potential increase in mercury deposition that could occur in the vicinity of the plant. Increased deposition was assumed to lead to a linearly proportional increase in mercury concentrations in fish in local water bodies. Fish are the major pathway for human health impacts and the potential for increased mercury exposure was evaluated and the risks of such exposure estimated. Based on the findings recommendations for future work and conclusions are provided. Mercury is receiving substantial attention in a number of areas including: understanding of mercury deposition, bioaccumulation, and transport through the atmosphere, and improvements to the understanding of health impacts created by exposure to mercury. A literature review of key articles is presented as Appendix A.

  19. Cigarettes Health Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    include hydrogen cyanide (used in chemical weapons), carbon monoxide (found in car exhaust), formaldehyde on tobacco products! Think of something nice to buy with the extra cash you will save. You'll look better

  20. Health risks associated with exposure to gasoline additives-methyl tertiary butyl ether [MTBE]. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Special Hearing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This hearing focuses on an Alaskan study by the Centers for Disease Control which examines possible health risks associated with exposure to gasoline additive know as MTBE. Testimony is given by Dr. William Roper, Director, CDC.

  1. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  2. RISK COMMUNICATION FOR ES&H PROFESSIONALS AND LINE SUPERVISORS PARTICIPANT MANUAL COURSE NUMBER 004111 REV 0.1 JULY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALDRIDGE PK; ROCKS S

    2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This course will help you successfully apply risk communication principles when interacting with workers regarding work hazards. What Is the Difference Between a Risk and a Hazard? In many cases, the terms 'risk' and 'hazard' are incorrectly used interchangeably. A hazard is a physical condition or practice with the potential for causing harm/adverse effects. A risk is the probability of harm/adverse effects occurring from an exposure to a hazard. It is modified by the severity of harm (the consequence). Once a hazard is identified, a risk assessment is conducted to determine the severity of the risk. It uses scientific methods and rigorous tests to determine the effects of the risk on people and the environment. Risk Management takes data from the risk assessment and writes policies to help protect people and the environment against the risk. Risk communication is an ongoing process that starts soon after a hazard is identified and continues through the writing of policies. In the past, governing agencies did not do a good job of communicating risk; they would only communicate about risk after studies had been conducted and policies written.

  3. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment; evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provide estimates of: (1) individual risks based on central tendency exposure; (2) individual risks based on maximum environmental concentrations; (3) risks to highly exposed or susceptible subgroups of the population (e.g., subsistence farmers and school children); (4) risks associated with specific activities that may result in elevated exposures (e.g., subsistence fishermen and deer hunters); and (5) population risk. This approach allows for the estimation of risks to specific segments of the population taking into consideration activity patterns, number of individuals, and actual locations of individuals in these subgroups with respect to the facility. The fate and transport modeling of emissions from the facility to estimate exposures to identified subgroups is described.

  4. Do Housing Prices Reflect Environmental Health Risks? Evidence from More than 1600 Toxic Plant Openings and Closings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Currie, Janet

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A ubiquitous and largely unquestioned assumption in studies of housing markets is that there is perfect information about local amenities. This paper measures the housing market and health impacts of 1,600 openings and ...

  5. Do Housing Prices Reflect Environmental Health Risks? Evidence from More than 1600 Toxic Plant Openings and Closings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Currie, Janet

    A ubiquitous and largely unquestioned assumption in studies of housing markets is that there is perfect information about local amenities. This paper measures the housing market and health impacts of 1,600 openings and ...

  6. assessing human risks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: SYLLABUS Introduction to Human Health Risk Assessment CPH 418518 SWES 418518 Time: Tuesday...

  7. Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    management competencies Risk assessment, risk analysis and risk assessment tools Decision making conditions Public health and epidemiology Policy and organisational analysis Medicines management Case

  8. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  9. Estimates of health risks associated with radionuclide emissions from fossil-fueled steam-electric generating plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, C.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Title III, Section 112 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment, Congress directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to perform a study of the hazards to public resulting from pollutants emitted by electric utility system generating units. Radionuclides are among the groups of pollutants listed in the amendment. This report updates previously published data and estimates with more recently available information regarding the radionuclide contents of fossil fuels, associated emissions by steam-electric power plants, and potential health effects to exposed population groups.

  10. University of Connecticut Health Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    ; not working in the health care field; > 15mm induration. b. High Risk: Health Care workers or those with risk or other congregate settings, health care workers, children younger than 4 years of age, and highUniversity of Connecticut Health Center John Dempsey Hospital Department of Nursing (Patient

  11. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

  12. FB Line Basis for Interim Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shedrow, B.

    1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety analysis of the FB-Line Facility indicates that the operation of FB-Line to support the current mission does not present undue risk to the facility and co-located workers, general public, or the environment.

  13. Development and Health The impact of health on development in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    · breakdown of health care delivery systems · inadequate application of TB control measures · increasing drug's population are at risk - increasing due to: · breakdown of health care delivery systems · growing drugDevelopment and Health The impact of health on development in Africa #12;Health challenges

  14. National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Services wastewater system. Protocol for Assessing Community Excellence in Environmental Health: Tool for Community Environmental Health Assessment Many communities face disproportionate health risks. Environmental for Assessing Community Excellence in Environmental Health PACE EH is a community involvement tool. The National

  15. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 12 | December 2002 1239 DDT and Its Metabolites Alter Gene Expression in Human Uterine Cell Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLachlan, John

    Environmental Health Perspectives · VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 12 | December 2002 1239 DDT and Its- trichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, have been shown to mimic estrogen, binding to and activating the ERs, thereby often pro- ducing estrogen-like effects (2,16­21). DDT and its metabolites have displayed harmful

  16. MSU Safety & Risk Management Page 1 of 2 SAFETY & RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    MSU Safety & Risk Management Page 1 of 2 SAFETY & RISK MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY Safety & Risk Management (SRM) of new hires. Completion of a baseline occupational health evaluation Protection Program.) #12;MSU Safety & Risk Management Page 2 of 2 MSU provides additional medical evaluations

  17. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & INSTRUCTIONAL SAFETY 2009 ANNUAL REPORTS #12;2009 Annual Report Page 2 RISK MANAGEMENT I. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management program is to compare the annual cost

  18. Multiple Criteria Analysis and Water Resources Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    risk Quality of life Health Noncancer risk Costs Cost Technology availability Health risk Testing Management factors Environmental quality Treatment Chemical performance Fairness Cost of technology & Management 48:6, 2005 · Evaluation of drinking water treatment technology: An entropy-based fuzzy application

  19. BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of Nanoparticles are urgently needed to support risk assessments and regulatory policy decisions regarding materials containing · Environmental Protection Agency · DuPont · BASF · Evonik · Cabot · General Electric Approach The quartz crystal

  20. Realizing Health Reform’s Potential: Why a National High-Risk Insurance Pool Is Not a Workable Alternative to the Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and register to receive email alerts. Commonwealth Fund pub. 1792 Vol. 31 Why a National High-Risk Insurance Pool Is Not a Workable Alternative to the Marketplace Jean P. Hall Abstract The Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) was a national high-risk... to outline why national high-risk pools, which continue to be proposed as policy alternatives to ACA coverage expan- sions, are expensive to enrollees as well as their administrators and ultimately unsustainable. The key lesson—and the principle on which...

  1. Business Affairs Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    Business Affairs Environmental Health & Safety Dive Safety Facility/Fire Safety/ Building Codes Radiation Control & Radiological Services Occupational Safety/ Industrial Hygiene Risk Management IFAS Facility Safety Indoor Air Quality Industrial Hygiene Hearing Conservation OSHA Safety Underground

  2. Possibilities for health-conscious assisted housing mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arcaya, Mariana Clair

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many poor, segregated, urban neighborhoods are rife with risks to health, which contributes to stark racial and geographic disparities in health. Fighting health disparities requires buy-in from non-health professionals ...

  3. Fair return for risk? An examination of structure, competition and profitability in the market for private finance in the National Health Service 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellowell, Mark Stephen

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1993, the Private Finance Initiative (PFI) has been the dominant form of large-scale infrastructure procurement used by National Health Service (NHS) organisations in the United Kingdom. As of April 2011, 123 PFI ...

  4. The Evolution of Medical Spending Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruber, Jonathan

    How has the economic risk of health spending changed over time for U.S. households? We describe trends in aggregate health spending in the United States and how private insurance markets and public insurance programs have ...

  5. Syllabus: PHS 650 Principles of Environmental Health for Public Health Practice Spring, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    following exposure to environmental hazards. Explain current environmental risk assessment methods environmental health issues. Describe approaches for assessing, preventing, and managing environmental hazards1 Syllabus: PHS 650 Principles of Environmental Health for Public Health Practice Spring, 2012

  6. Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    chronic disease complications Improve quality of life Reduce health care costs #12;ImpactHealth Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal

  7. Influence of egocentrism, future time perspective, and health locus of control on risk-takeing in adolescents diagosed with cancer and their siblings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Nancy Ann

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    & Hobbie, 1996). Adolescents treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and brain tumors may be at greater risk foz pooz- quality decision making leading to risky behaviors. Cognitive impairment, including attentional problems and difficulties.... 9 years, SD = 1. 7), with mean age at diagnosis being 6. 5 years (SD = 4. 1). Although 47'-, of the sample had been diagnosed with leukemia, other disease types were also represented (i. e. , Wilm's tumoz, neuroblastoma, osteo/Swing's sarcoma...

  8. Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health University and mixtures, and the risk of ecological damage due to their use or release. 3. It facilitates informed ingredient, actions to prevent health and environmental harm depend on accurate knowledge of product

  9. University of Rochester, University Health Service Eastman Institute for Oral Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    University of Rochester, University Health Service Eastman Institute for Oral Health Health line.) 1. Aetna Student Health for the individual. Total = $2,436 (8/1/12-7/31/13) Includes the mandatory health fee that covers visits to UHS and UCC. I understand that I need to call UHS before going

  10. Risk D&D Rapid Prototype: Scenario Documentation and Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Report describes process and methodology associated with a rapid prototype tool for integrating project risk analysis and health & safety risk analysis for decontamination and decommissioning projects.

  11. Community Health & Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Community Health & Public Health Preparedness in the Marcellus Shale Era 2011 Pennsylvania Public Photo credit: Pittsburgh Tribune- Review, Keith Hodan #12;Safety by the Numbers PA Marcellus Citations. Conference presentation, Spain. · County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania (CCAP). (2010). Marcellus

  12. THE COMPETITION BETWEEN METHYLMERCURY RISKS AND OMEGA-3 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACID BENEFITS: A REVIEW OF CONFLICTING EVIDENCE ON FISH CONSUMPTION AND CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The health concerns of methylmercury (MeHg) contamination of seafood have recently been extended to include cardiovascular effects, especially premature mortality. Although the fatty acids (fish oils) found in most species are thought to confer a wide range of health benefits, especially to the cardiovascular system, some epidemiological studies have suggested that such benefits may be offset by adverse effects of MeHg. This comprehensive review is based on searches of the NIH MEDLINE database and compares and contrasts 145 published studies involving cardiovascular effects and exposures to mercury and other fish contaminants, intake of fatty acids including dietary supplements of fish oils, and rates of seafood consumption. Since few of these studies include adequate simultaneous measurements of all of these potential predictor variables, we summarized their effects separately, across the available studies of each, and then drew conclusions based on the aggregated findings. It is important to realize that studies of seafood consumption encompass the net effects of all of these predictor variables, but that seafood intake studies are rarely supported by human biomarker measurements that reflect the actual uptake of harmful as well as beneficial fish ingredients. As a result, exposure measurement error is an issue when comparing studies and predictor variables. It is also possible that the observed benefits of eating fish may relate more to the characteristics of the consumers than to those of the fish. We found the evidence for adverse cardiovascular effects of MeHg to be sparse and unconvincing. Studies of cardiovascular mortality show net benefits, and the findings of adverse effects are mainly limited to studies Finland at high mercury exposure levels. By contrast, a very consistent picture of beneficial effects is seen for fatty acids, after recognizing the effects of exposure uncertainties and the presence of threshold effects. Studies based on measured biomarker levels are seen to be the most reliable and present a convincing picture of strong beneficial effects, especially for those causes of death involving cardiac arrhythmia. This conclusion also extends to studies of fish-oil supplementation. Studies based on fish consumption show mainly benefits from increased consumption. This finding is supported by an ecological study at the national population level, for which the lifestyle effects that might be correlated with fish consumption within a given population would be expected to ''average out'' across nations. Finally, the net survival benefits resulting from eating fish are consistent with studies involving complete diets, although benefits are also seen to accrue from reduced consumption of red meat and saturated fats.

  13. Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

  14. Employment as a Health Determinant for Working-age, Dually-eligible People with Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Kurth, Noelle K.; Hunt, Suzanne L.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Individuals with disabilities are a health disparity population with high rates of risk factors, lower overall health status, and greater health care costs. The interacting effect of employment, health and disability has not been...

  15. LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

  16. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuxen, L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  17. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  18. Health and Safety Policy Statement4 Health and Safety Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    To achieve this, the University will ensure effective management of risk by setting and reviewing a quality-based health and safety management system and workplace health framework, and by allocating the resources necessary to attain these. It will also define clear management systems and ensure the involvement of all

  19. University of Connecticut Health Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    University of Connecticut Health Center John Dempsey Hospital (Patient Identification, platelets) is and/or potentially may become medically indicated as a part of my care. 2. My doctor* has told about the known risks involved in receiving a transfusion. I know that blood used at the Health Center

  20. Privacy and identifiability in clinical research, personalized medicine, and public health surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassa, Christopher A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic transmission of protected health information has become pervasive in research, clinical, and public health investigations, posing substantial risk to patient privacy. From clinical genetic screenings to publication ...

  1. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  2. Risk Assessment Risk communication 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    · 1 1997 2003 WHO #12;6060 NTU Alumni Bimonthly No.87 Fault tree Event tree [2] Nuclear reactor of nuclear power plants. Reliability Engineering and Safety System, 52:297-314. [4] Jonas Hagmann. 2012. Fukushima: probing the analytical and epistemological limits of risk analysis. Journal of Risk Research. 15

  3. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and...

  4. Exploring the factors associated with preconception health behaviors among women of childbearing age: a naturalistic inquiry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delissaint, Dieula

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Poor maternal health is one of the major risk factors related to adverse birth outcomes. Women entering pregnancy with poor health status are at higher risk of these outcomes. Prenatal care has been established as the standard prevention paradigm...

  5. Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance Shmuel Oren University of the critical infrastructures in our society. Risk assessment and systematic consideration of risk in the design knowledge for engineers, like physics for instance, consideration of risk has penetrated all engineering

  6. D & D screening risk evaluation guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

  7. Schiffert Health Center TUBERCULOSIS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    · Persistent cough of unknown etiology for more than 3 weeks · Productive cough with bloody sputum Section 2

  8. Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS as required under the CONTROL OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH REGULATIONS (COSHH) and the DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES AND EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERES Involving the Use of Hazardous Chemicals. COSHH requires health risks to be assessed and controlled

  9. ORISE: Nurse Triage Lines Support | How ORISE is Making a Difference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of nurse triage lines as a promising method for reducing disparities in access to quality health care during an influenza pandemic. Nurse triage lines are used daily in the United...

  10. Risk assessment activities at NIOSH: Information resources and needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stayner, L.T.; Meinhardt, T.; Hardin, B. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health, and Mine Safety and Health Acts, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is charged with development of recommended occupational safety and health standards, and with conducting research to support the development of these standards. Thus, NIOSH has been actively involved in the analysis of risk associated with occupational exposures, and in the development of research information that is critical for the risk assessment process. NIOSH research programs and other information resources relevant to the risk assessment process are described in this paper. Future needs for information resources are also discussed.

  11. ORISE: Health physics services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE ProjectCrisis and RiskEnvironmentLiteracyHealthHealth

  12. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk (most common ­ personal hygiene very important); d) storage ­ leaks; and e) waste ­ storage and disposal

  13. adult health evidence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nor promoted for this at-risk population. Given financial restrictions facing many health care systems, guidance is needed to direct limited available resources toward the...

  14. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk all connections and fittings prior to start of anesthesia. Carefully pour Isoflurane from Environmental Health & Safety before re-entering the laboratory. REFERENCES 1. Procedure

  15. Center for Community Health At the Center for Community Health (CCH),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Center for Community Health At the Center for Community Health (CCH), the community is our patient. Our focus is on disease prevention and improving access to care, especially for at-risk populations, to prevent health problems before they start. Partnering with the URMC, our research- based interventions

  16. Risk perspectives for TOPAZ II flight mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, A.C. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary estimate of the nuclear-related public health risk presented by launching and operating the Russian TOPAZ II space reactor as part of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). This risk is then compared to the risks from the operation of commercial nuclear power reactors and previously planned and/or launched space nuclear power missions. For the current mission profile, the initial estimate of the risk posed by launching and operating TOPAZ II is significantly less (at least two orders of magnitude) than that estimated for prior space nuclear missions. Even allowing for the large uncertainties in this estimate, it does not appear that the NEPSTP mission will present a significant health risk to the public.

  17. WORKING PAPER N 2007 -40 The distortionary effect of health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , health care, public/private, compulsory/voluntary insurance PARIS-JOURDAN SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES for modeling the impact of insurance on health- care demand extending some of the results of the two-risk model and still consume healthcare. Keywords: Health insurance, Adverse selection, Health care, Public

  18. Combustion & Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ? Combustion of fossil fuels for ? Electricity ? Industrial processes ? Vehicle propulsion ? Cooking and heat ? Other ? Munitions ? Fireworks ? Light ? Cigarettes, hookahs? FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? SCALE (think health... for public health and strategies to reduce GHG ? Reduce CO2 emissions by 50% by 2030 ? Reduction in PM2.5 deaths greatly offset costs in all models FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: PM EXPOSURE ? Combustion is source of most concern ? Health...

  19. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  20. Risk Without Return

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Lisa R.; Mahmoud, Ola

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mitra, I. (2010). Extreme risk analysis. The Journal offrom the fact that the risk parity strategy was diversifiedboth in capital and in risk weights. Further research into

  1. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Management Plan. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE) to effectively plan for environment, safety and health activities that protect the environment, workers and the public from harm. This document, which covers fiscal year 1996, reflects planning by operating contractors and Program Offices in early 1994, updated to be consistent with the President`s FY 1996 budget submittal to Congress, and subsequent Department of Energy Program refinements. Prior to 1992, only a small number of facilities had a structured process for identifying environment, safety and health (ES and H) needs, reporting the costs (in both direct and indirect budgets) of ES and H requirements, prioritizing and allocating available resources, and efficiently communicating this information to DOE. Planned costs for ES and H activities were usually developed as an afterthought to program budgets. There was no visible, consistently applied mechanism for determining the appropriate amount of resources that should be allocated to ES and H, or for assuring that significant ES and H vulnerabilities were planned to be funded. To address this issue, the Secretary (in November 1991) directed DOE to develop a Safety and Health Five-Year Plan to serve as a line management tool to delineate DOE-wide programs to reduce and manage safety and health risks, and to establish a consistent framework for risk-based resource planning and allocation.

  2. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Is Quantitative Risk Assessment?" Risk Analysis, Aubrey,quantitative methods of how people do science, engineering and risk analysisthe Quantitative Definition of Risk." Risk Analysis, 1(1),

  3. IMPROVING ACCESS TO CARDIOVASCULAR PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE FOR THE UNINSURED POLISH POPULATION IN THE GREATER CHICAGO AREA-EXPERIENCE FROM THE POLISH AMERICAN ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK FACTOR MODIFICATION (POLAARIS) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    more than 40% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Also, the lipid profiles indicated high triglycerides, low HDL and normal LDL levels. In fact, an institutional learning has been that being ?Polish? is a risk factor for coronary artery...

  4. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program Guide to Risk Assessment & Response August 16, 2012 #12; i ...........26 List of Figures Figure 1: The Risk Management Process.......................................................................................................12 #12; 1 Overview The risk management process--of identifying, analyzing, evaluating

  5. Credit Risk Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Credit Risk Analyst in the Transacting and Credit Risk Management department of the Office of Risk Management. The Transacting and Credit Risk...

  6. Series Transmission Line Transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buckles, Robert A. (Livermore, CA); Booth, Rex (Livermore, CA); Yen, Boris T. (El Cerrito, CA)

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A series transmission line transformer is set forth which includes two or more of impedance matched sets of at least two transmissions lines such as shielded cables, connected in parallel at one end ans series at the other in a cascading fashion. The cables are wound about a magnetic core. The series transmission line transformer (STLT) which can provide for higher impedance ratios and bandwidths, which is scalable, and which is of simpler design and construction.

  7. Electric Transmission Lines (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission has jurisdiction over all electricity transmission lines crossing over or under railroad tracks at public highway crossings. This section contains general regulations...

  8. Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service (Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management) riskmanagement@uoregon.edu Fax: 541-346-7008 As a volunteer Tort Claims Act, ORS 30.260-300, and Oregon Department of Administrative Services Risk Management

  9. CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK? It is often hard to explain why one person develops cancer and another does not. There are risk factors that could increase a person's likelihood of developing cancer, however, some people may have many of these risk factors and never get cancer. When thinking about your

  10. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  12. Office Of Worker Safety And Health Assistance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Worker Safety and Health Assistance supports program and line organizations in the identification and resolution of worker safety and health issues and management concerns utilizing a corporate issues management process for crosscutting issues providing technical support for organizational specific issues and concerns.

  13. Pink Ribbons, Blue Moons, and Silver Linings: Communicating, Coping, and Caring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkel, Adrianne; Dennis, Michael Robert; Keyton, Joann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kunkel, A., Dennis, M. R., & Keyton, J. (2010). Pink ribbons, blue moons, and silver linings: Communicating, coping, and caring. Health Communication, 25, 583-584. Publisher’s official version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2010.496825. Open...). Pink ribbons, blue moons, and silver linings: Communicating, coping, and caring. Health Communication, 25, 583-584. Text of paper: Pink Ribbons, Blue Moons, and Silver Linings: Communicating, Coping, and Caring Adrianne Kunkel, University...

  14. Environmental Health Policy Decisions: The Role of Uncertainty in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    are informed by the link between economic and quantitative risk analysis on the one hand, and the critical role in quantitative risk assessments and associated regulatory outcomes. In representing a broad spec- trum implications for those health professionals, particu- larly in the area of quantitative risk assessment, whose

  15. The virtual absence of refereed information on potential risks of GM crops has been documented by Domingo (2000) for human health and by Wolfenbarger and Phifer (2000) for the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 The virtual absence of refereed information on potential risks of GM crops has been documented) is a technology which has been released prematurely into the marketplace. As a result, GM crops are vulnerable and longevity of ag biotech have been fatally compromised by a) misrepresenting GM crops as solutions to real

  16. Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    related to health problems and health care systems, through developing and applying theories, concepts44 Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology in interdisciplinary academic fields, involving health, medicine and nursing as well as the field of sociology

  17. Intrinsic AGN Absorption Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred Hamann

    2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong absorption lines are common in rest-frame UV spectra of AGNs due to a variety of resonant transitions, for example the HI Lyman series lines (most notably Ly-alpha 1216) and high-ionization doublets like CIV 1549,1551. The lines are called ``intrinsic'' if the absorbing gas is physically related to the AGN, e.g. if the absorber resides broadly within the radius of the AGN's surrounding ``host'' galaxy. Intrinsic absorption lines are thus valuable probes of the kinematics, physical conditions and elemental abundances in the gas near AGNs. Studies of intrinsic absorbers have historically emphasized the broad absorption lines (BALs) in quasars. Today we recognize a wider variety of intrinsic lines in a wider range of objects. For example, we now know that Seyfert 1 galaxies (the less luminous cousins of quasars) have intrinsic absorption. We also realize that intrinsic lines can form in a range of AGN environments --- from the dynamic inner regions like the BALs, to the more quiescent outer host galaxies >10 kpc away. This article provides a brief introduction to current observational and theoretical work on intrinsic AGN absorbers.

  18. Health Economics College of Public Health and Health Professions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    of health, the demand for health care, health insurance theory, the demand for health insurance, the health insurance market and managed care, the market for physicians' services, production and cost of health care care environment. #12;2 Apply general and health economics concepts and show demonstrated competence

  19. Coherent soliton communication lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yushko, O. V., E-mail: olesya.yushko@gmail.com; Redyuk, A. A.; Fedoruk, M. P.; Turitsyn, S. K. [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The data transmission in coherent fiber-optical communication lines using solitons with a variable phase is studied. It is shown that nonlinear coherent structures (solitons) can be applied for effective signal transmission over a long distance using amplitude and optical-phase keying of information. The optimum ratio of the pulse width to the bit slot at which the spectral efficiency (transmitted bits per second and hertz) is maximal is determined. It is shown that soliton fiber-optical communication lines can ensure data transmission at a higher spectral efficiency as compared to traditional communication lines and at a high signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. Oilfield property development: Risk assessment, management and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, M.; Robles, H.; Manweiler, D. [Environmental Science & Engineering, Inc., Fountain Valley, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several regulatory authorities in California have developed new regulations/guidelines for oilfield remediation and subsequent development. The sole intent of the new regulations/guidelines is to protect public health; however, these efforts are often misdirected. In fact, many of the regulations/guidelines impose remediation or construction standards that, in effect, render the development of such properties impractical. These standards include or require stringent contaminant cleanup standards, minimum development setbacks from active and abandoned wells, natural-gas venting provisions for abandoned wells, and the widespread use of soil-gas barriers. Clearly, these regulatory changes have been made without due consideration of risk. Because, in actuality, the risks posed by former oilfield properties are insignificant when compared to other non- oilfield properties. The history of oilfield development in Southern California has shown that although some physical and chemical hazards do exist, oilfield development, properly managed, can usually be accomplished with acceptable residual risk. Rigid control measures, based on inaccurate assumptions, merely inhibit the useful development of valuable property and misdirect resources that could be more effectively applied where the risks are real and significant. To protect public health and allow for efficient resource allocation, risk control measures must be both adequate and proportional to the actual health risks and hazards posed. This paper reviews the history of oil production in Southern California, explains the known health risks associated with oilfield property development, and describes a risk management approach that will address these risks at an acceptable cost.

  1. Risk Management Strategy Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Risk Management Strategy Introduction 1. The risk of adverse consequences is inherent in all activity. Dynamic enterprise will inevitably create new risks. Risk management is about ensuring that all significant relevant risks are understood and prioritised as part of normal management

  2. Risk-adjusted monitoring of survival times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Reynolds, Marion R.; Woodall, William H.

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the monitoring of clinical outcomes, where each patient has a di®erent risk of death prior to undergoing a health care procedure.We propose a risk-adjusted survival time CUSUM chart (RAST CUSUM) for monitoring clinical outcomes where the primary endpoint is a continuous, time-to-event variable that may be right censored. Risk adjustment is accomplished using accelerated failure time regression models. We compare the average run length performance of the RAST CUSUM chart to the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart, using data from cardiac surgeries to motivate the details of the comparison. The comparisons show that the RAST CUSUM chart is more efficient at detecting a sudden decrease in the odds of death than the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart, especially when the fraction of censored observations is not too high. We also discuss the implementation of a prospective monitoring scheme using the RAST CUSUM chart.

  3. Holes in Spectral Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of an atom in the presence of a static perturbation is investigated. The perturbation couples a decaying state with a nondecaying state. A "hole" appears in the emission line at a frequency equal to the frequency difference between...

  4. Line Extension Alternatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Board (PSB) of Vermont developed rules regarding utility line extension requests. While the majority of the rules focus on the procedure followed (and associated fees) for the...

  5. Electric Transmission Lines (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electric transmission lines capable of operating at 69 kV or greater cannot be constructed along, across, or over any public highways or grounds outside of cities without a franchise from the...

  6. Power line detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Latorre, V.R.; Watwood, D.B.

    1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A short-range, radio frequency (RF) transmitting-receiving system that provides both visual and audio warnings to the pilot of a helicopter or light aircraft of an up-coming power transmission line complex. Small, milliwatt-level narrowband transmitters, powered by the transmission line itself, are installed on top of selected transmission line support towers or within existing warning balls, and provide a continuous RF signal to approaching aircraft. The on-board receiver can be either a separate unit or a portion of the existing avionics, and can also share an existing antenna with another airborne system. Upon receipt of a warning signal, the receiver will trigger a visual and an audio alarm to alert the pilot to the potential power line hazard. 4 figs.

  7. Power line detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Latorre, Victor R. (Tracy, CA); Watwood, Donald B. (Tracy, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short-range, radio frequency (RF) transmitting-receiving system that provides both visual and audio warnings to the pilot of a helicopter or light aircraft of an up-coming power transmission line complex. Small, milliwatt-level narrowband transmitters, powered by the transmission line itself, are installed on top of selected transmission line support towers or within existing warning balls, and provide a continuous RF signal to approaching aircraft. The on-board receiver can be either a separate unit or a portion of the existing avionics, and can also share an existing antenna with another airborne system. Upon receipt of a warning signal, the receiver will trigger a visual and an audio alarm to alert the pilot to the potential power line hazard.

  8. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  9. Study downplays health concerns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringer, J.

    1996-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A government-funded study has concluded that reformulated gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) does not increase short-term health risks when compared with gasoline that does not contain the additive. The study, performed by the Health Effects Institute (Cambridge, MA), compared data from dozens of animal, human, and epidemiological studies of health effects linked to oxygenates, including MTBE and ethanol, but did not find enough evidence to warrant an immediate reduction in oxygenate use. However, the study did recommend that additional research be conducted on possible health consequences associated with the gasoline additives, including neurotoxic effects, if oxygenates continue to be used long term. Oxygenates have been used in gasoline since 1992, when EPA mandated that several municipalities use MTBE or other oxygenates in reformulated gasoline to reduce carbon monoxide emissions and meet Clean Air Act requirements. Shortly after the program began, residents in areas where the oxygenates were used complained of nausea, headaches, and dizziness. The institute says the study--funded by EPA and the Centers for Disease Control--will be used for a broader review of gasoline oxygenates by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: GPH RQ = Requirement Program: 01848 LN = Line Plan: 3200MPH RG 5298 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS, 643, 653, 675, 677 or 695 LN 0030 - Environmental Health Sciences: EHS 501, 506, 507 or 508 LN 0040

  11. Risk management for buildings -- Has the time come?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, D.L.; Hunter, R.L.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are both incentives and challenges for applying formal risk management processes to buildings and other structures, including bridges, highways, dams, stadiums, shopping centers, and private dwellings. Based on an assessment of several issues, the authors conclude that for certain types of buildings and structures the time has come for the use of a formal risk-management approach, including probabilistic risk assessment methods, to help identify dominant risks to public health, safety, and security and to help manage these risks in a cost-effective manner.

  12. BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A R RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDIN T PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEM

  13. UCSC Student Health Services Student Health Insurance Office 1156 High Street Phone: (831) 459-2389

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    -line waiver process. Please have your insurance information available before you log-on to the on-line waiver: INSURANCE INFORMATION Ins. Company Name: Ins. Phone #: Member ID #: Group #: Insurance Address: Subscriber from the insurance company or an insurance agent. ** 4. Does your health insurance plan have a pre

  14. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  15. Risk Estimation Methodology for Launch Accidents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Daniel James; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bechtel, Ryan D.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As compact and light weight power sources with reliable, long lives, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) have made space missions to explore the solar system possible. Due to the hazardous material that can be released during a launch accident, the potential health risk of an accident must be quantified, so that appropriate launch approval decisions can be made. One part of the risk estimation involves modeling the response of the RPS to potential accident environments. Due to the complexity of modeling the full RPS response deterministically on dynamic variables, the evaluation is performed in a stochastic manner with a Monte Carlo simulation. The potential consequences can be determined by modeling the transport of the hazardous material in the environment and in human biological pathways. The consequence analysis results are summed and weighted by appropriate likelihood values to give a collection of probabilistic results for the estimation of the potential health risk. This information is used to guide RPS designs, spacecraft designs, mission architecture, or launch procedures to potentially reduce the risk, as well as to inform decision makers of the potential health risks resulting from the use of RPSs for space missions.

  16. Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    · Long Term Care Administrator · Training Coordinator · Clinical Health Education Specialist · Health Media Director · Long Term Care Facilities Manager Fact Sheet HEALTH SCIENCE Highlights · Health Science

  17. Confronting Nuclear Risks: Counter-Expertise as Politics Within

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutkin, Boris

    Confronting Nuclear Risks: Counter-Expertise as Politics Within the French Nuclear Energy Debate of knowledge and expertise on the environ- mental and health risks of nuclear energy in France. From disaster (26 April 1986). Since then, the biggest nuclear accident ever has added par- ticular significance

  18. air pollution risk: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air pollution risk First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Health Risk Assessment:...

  19. Health Physicist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as a Health Physicist in the Facility Operations Division, Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM). The selectee will be regarded as a...

  20. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  1. Omega Transmission Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vehmas, Joni

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we show how bi-anisotropic media with omega-type response can be realized using periodically loaded transmission lines. General conditions for the needed unit cell circuit block are derived. Also, an implementation is shown and analyzed.

  2. Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

  3. HEALTH ECONOMICS Health Econ. (in press)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    health services/economics; costs and cost analysis; health services/utilization; quality of health careHEALTH ECONOMICS Health Econ. (in press) Published online in Wiley InterScience (www and ROBERT BLACKb a Department of Population and Family Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School

  4. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    "--today we hear that word bantered about more than ever. Whether the context is national (health care reformCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection March 2010 Volume VIII (7) Greetings health sciences' colleagues, community

  5. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    with a variety of topics including substance abuse, worksite health promotion, health care cost containment the importance of health care as well as the promotion, protection and maintenance of health. Without a doubt things in the area of health promotion and health care. As the COHS look to the future, we need to take

  6. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

  7. Actuarial science is the quantitative analysis of risk. In addition to mathematics and statistics courses, students in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Actuarial science is the quantitative analysis of risk. In addition to mathematics and statistics. Actuaries help individuals, businesses and society manage risk by evaluating the likelihood of future events's risk tolerance with various risk parameters such as age of the insured, health status, place

  8. Command Line Tools Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Command Line Tools Cloud Computing #12;Everybody (or nearly everybody) loves GUI. AWS Command Line of advanced features. After surviving the cloud computing class till now, Your are almost a command line guru! You need AWS command line tools, ec2-api-tools, to maximize the power of AWS cloud computing. Plugging

  9. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; DeGrassie, J.S.

    1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other. 5 figures.

  10. Formation depths of Fraunhofer lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurtovenko, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have summed up our investigations performed in 1970--1993. The main task of this paper is clearly to show processes of formation of spectral lines as well as their distinction by validity and by location. For 503 photospheric lines of various chemical elements in the wavelength range 300--1000 nm we list in Table the average formation depths of the line depression and the line emission for the line centre and on the half-width of the line, the average formation depths of the continuum emission as well as the effective widths of the layer of the line depression formation. Dependence of average depths of line depression formation on excitation potential, equivalent widths, and central line depth are demonstrated by iron lines.

  11. Operational health physics training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

  12. Model-based Security Analysis of the German Health Card Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurjens, Jan

    information systems, security, German Health Card. 1 #12;1 Introduction The use of health-care information information security that are particularly significant for health-care systems, due both to the inherent these risks and enable secure health-care information systems, the security analysis has to be embedded

  13. Health Services Researcher in Oncology, Assistant Professor, Medical Center Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    , quality, cost, disparities, or outcomes relevant to cancer care. The major in the overall mix of clinical care, clinical teaching, scholarly activity that advances clinical medicine, and institutional service--appropriate to the programmatic need

  14. Safety and Health Regulatory and Policy Response Line | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDERSTATE0-1of Energy

  15. Maternal Vitamin D Status Related to Triacylglycerol in Early Pregnancy and Subsequent Risk for Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Ka Ian

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Research has suggested roles of vitamin D in health beyond its action on calcium homeostasis and bone health. Recent studies revealed a high proportion of pregnant women having low vitamin D status. This may lead to increased risks for preeclampsia...

  16. Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

  17. Drill string transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Bradford, Kline (Orem, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmission line assembly for transmitting information along a downhole tool comprising a pin end, a box end, and a central bore traveling between the pin end and the box end, is disclosed in one embodiment of the invention as including a protective conduit. A transmission line is routed through the protective conduit. The protective conduit is routed through the central bore and the ends of the protective conduit are routed through channels formed in the pin end and box end of the downhole tool. The protective conduit is elastically forced into a spiral or other non-linear path along the interior surface of the central bore by compressing the protective conduit to a length within the downhole tool shorter than the protective conduit.

  18. Transmission line: design manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farr, H.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this manual is to outline the various requirements for, and the procedures to be followed in the design of power transmission lines by the Bureau of Reclamation, US Department of the Interior. Numerous design studies, which have been made on specific aspects of transmission line design, are included with explanations of their applications. Information is presented concerning such aspects as selection of type of construction, conductor sags and tensions, insulation, lightning protection, clearance patterns, galloping conductors, structure limitation and guying charts, and structure spotting. Structure design examples are limited to wood-pole construction. Interpretations of the National Electrical Safety Code and other codes are made as required. Some of the example problems were developed when the sixth edition of NESC was current, and are so noted; however, most examples use the 1977 edition of NESC.

  19. Risk management at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, D.J.; Hislop, R.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The only facility at Argonne National Laboratory which is classified as high hazard is EBR-II. A Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), including external events, has been completed for EBR-II. There were several objectives for this project; to provide a quantitative estimate of the risk associated with the operation of EBR-II, to provide a framework for managerial decision-making for the management of risk at the facility, and to provide insights into the nature of the risk of EBR-II that can be applied in the design of future LMRS. Other ANL facilities do not have complete probabilistic assessments. Despite this fact, Risk Management is an essential part of ANL`s approach to safety and operations. Risk management at Argonne National Laboratory is not limited to accelerator or nuclear facilities. It is also an integral part of construction activities. The Advanced Photon Source, a major construction project at the Laboratory, utilizes a variety of risk assessment techniques to identify potential construction loss exposures and to develop measures to eliminate them. Over the past 15 years, in excess of 15,000 pages of regulatory requirements pertaining to environment safety and health have been printed in the Federal Register. Not all of these are applicable to Argonne National Laboratory all of the time, but as a highly-visible, nationally-funded facility, compliance with those that are applicable must be above reproach. Therefore, risk management is also a very important part of construction activities at ANL. This paper will give examples of these activities, such as, the EBR-II PRA, risk-based analyses of Fuel Cycle Facility Safety Systems, reliability studies of the Access Control Interlock System for the Advanced Photon Source and management approaches for controlling risk during the construction activities at APS.

  20. ADVANCED BUSINESS CERTIFICATE (ABC) HEALTH CARE FINANCE AND INSURANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Management (HSMG 5686) Global Healthcare Systems (HSMG 5687) Risk Management and Quality Across Borders (HSMG Management & Insurance Studies offers an Advanced Business Certificate for business professionals who, hospitals, health plans, pharmaceutical companies, long-term care facilities, physician practice management

  1. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Types of Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Types of risk associated with range ecosystems include climatic, biological, financial and political risks. These risks are explained so that managers can know how to handle them....

  2. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bookstaber, R. (1999). "Risk Management in ComplexG. E. (2004). "How Useful Is Quantitative Risk Assessment?"Risk Analysis, Aubrey, A. (2010). "Preventing Diabetes:

  3. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    , College of Health Sciences. · "Innovative Ways to Address Idaho's Healthcare Needs: Long-Term CareCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection February 2011 Volume IX (3) Since the last COHS newsletter, the faculty

  4. Students' Health Service Hampton House Health Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    .bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/meningitis www.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/mumps www.bristol.ac.uk/infectious-diseases/measles. Health care / Health care Student support Health care Registering with a doctor It is important that you register' Health Service The Students' Health Service (SHS) offers full general practice care, including: ·travel

  5. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    today. In politics, in education, in health care, in society in general we are so turned inwardCollege of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April/May 2010 Volume VIII (8) WOW! Spring semester of 2010 is almost

  6. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection April 2011 Volume IX (4) The end of the spring semester is quickly approaching accreditation review. Similarly, the Environmental and Occupational Health program also had a very positive

  7. Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING Charles S. Tapiero Department Head and Morton and Angela Topfer · Corporate Finance and Financial Markets · Computational Finance · Risk Finance · Technology and Algorithmic Finance A Collective Leadership Students participation #12;RESEARCH STRENGTHS · Black Swans and Fragility

  8. Utility Lines and Facilities (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to the construction of utility and power lines and facilities. They address the use of public right-of-ways for such construction, underground power lines, and construction...

  9. Sandia Energy - Security Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Risk Assessment Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Security Risk Assessment Security Risk Assessmentcwdd2015-05-04T21:...

  10. Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1103) Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguityby author(s). Subjective Risk, Con?dence, and Ambiguity ?567. Ellsberg, D. (1961), ‘Risk, ambiguity and the savage

  11. Essays in time and risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprenger, Charles

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.4.1 Risk Attitudes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3.1 Additional Risk Preference Measures . . . . . . . .An Endowment Effect for Risk: Experimental Tests of

  12. Learning and risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyarzun, Carlos

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

  13. Livestock Risk Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Bill; Bennett, Blake; Jones, Diana

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    risk insurance with an ending date of coverage that meets their risk management objectives. Feeder cattle producers may want the end date of coverage to match the William Thompson, Blake Bennett and DeDe Jones* Figure 1: Livestock Risk Protection...

  14. Maersk Line Equipment guide

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AOU1a ComplexMaersk Line Equipment

  15. Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

  16. Risk & QualityRisk & Quality ManagementManagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    liability."" [Balsaono RR, Brown[Balsaono RR, Brown MK, Risk ManagementMK, Risk Management inin Legal

  17. Checklist of Successful Health Plan Approaches to Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Checklist of Successful Health Plan Approaches to Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Yes at risk for heart disease, stroke, and related conditions and risk factors (e.g., routine screenings the health plan offer specialized disease management programs for members who have been diagnosed with heart

  18. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, April 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research progress for the reporting period is briefly summarized for the following sections: (1) health studies, (2) technology assessments, (3) biological and radiation physics, (4) chemical physics, (5) Office of Risk Analysis, and (6) health and environmental risk and analysis. (ACR)

  19. Design Optimization of Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, Eric B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensor networks drive decisions. Approach: Design networks to minimize the expected total cost (in a statistical sense, i.e. Bayes Risk) associated with making wrong decisions and with installing maintaining and running the sensor network itself. Search for optimal solutions using Monte-Carlo-Sampling-Adapted Genetic Algorithm. Applications include structural health monitoring and surveillance.

  20. FIELD ACTION REPORTS mmunity Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , water is abundant; however, wells may be affected by unsanitary dis posal of sewage and solid waste. Project collaborators used the Protocol for Assessing Commu nity Excellence in Environmental Health (PACE; · Identify populations at risk of exposure to environmental hazards; · Identify and collect mean ingful

  1. PARALLELS OF RADIATION- AND FINANCIAL-RISK MANAGEMENT ON PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogue, M.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The financial collapse of 2007 provides an opportunity for a cross-discipline comparison of risk assessments. Flaws in financial risk assessments bear part of the blame for the financial collapse. There may be a potential for similar flaws to be made in radiological risk assessments. Risk assessments in finance and health physics are discussed in the context of a broader view of the risk management environment. Flawed risk assessments can adversely influence public acceptance of radiological technologies, so the importance of quality is magnified.

  2. RADTRAN3. Radioactive Material Transport Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, M.M.; Taylor, J.M.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Reardon, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADTRAN3 is a flexible analytical tool for calculating both the incident-free and accident impacts of transporting radioactive materials. The consequences from incident-free shipments are apportioned among eight population subgroups and can be calculated for several transport modes. The radiological accident risk (probability times consequence summed over all postulated accidents) is calculated in terms of early fatalities, early morbidities, latent cancer fatalities, genetic effects, and economic impacts. Groundshine, ingestion, inhalation, direct exposure, resuspension, and cloudshine dose pathways are modeled to calculate the radiological health risks from accidents. Economic impacts are evaluated based on costs for emergency response, cleanup, evacuation, income loss, and land use. RADTRAN3 can be applied to specific scenario evaluations (individual transport modes or specified combinations), to compare alternative modes or to evaluate generic radioactive material shipments. Unit-risk factors can easily be evaluated to aid in performing generic analyses when several options must be compared with the amount of travel as the only variable.

  3. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  4. Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures Preface The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its management together with the means for identifying, analysing and managing risk in order to minimise its frequency and impact. The risks considered significant

  5. Professional Certificate in Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    Professional Certificate in Risk Management 2010 Program 3 Part-time Courses CRM01: Essentials of Risk Management ­ Next Session Fall 2010 CRM02: Risk Control ­ Jan. 12 - April 26, 2010 CRM03: Risk to apply for the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) designation. #12;Professional Certificate in Risk

  6. of Health Care National Institutes of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    of Health Care National Institutes of Health Expanding Horizons Strategic Plan 2005-2009 UR nesmohsirh retir,ztnelinaoJ #12;of Health Care Expanding Horizons Strategic Plan 2005-2009 National Center.S Department of Health and Human Services National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine #12;A M mo

  7. Students' Health Service Hampton House Health Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    .ac.uk/infectious-diseases. Health care / Student support Other NHS services NHS 111 NHS 111 is a telephone service, giving in an emergency. Student support / Health care Student support Health care Registering with a doctor practice care, including: · travel immunisation and advice · contraceptive advice · sexual health testing

  8. Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    5th Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health Hosted by The Stanford WSDM* Center May 21;3 Welcome to the 5th Annual Women's Health Forum - hosted by the Stanford WSDM Center, also known as the Stanford Center for Health Research on Women and Sex Differences in Medicine. The Stanford WSDM Center

  9. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection 1 Dean's Message College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection December 2009 January 2010 Volume VIII (5) Moving from the Superficial the superficial level so that the result is the formation of deep relationships, caring, compassion, justice, love

  10. Center for Health & Counseling Services Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    College How is West Nile diagnosed? If a health care provider suspects WNV, samples of the patient's bloodCenter for Health & Counseling Services Health Services 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, NJ 07430 Nile Virus outbreak is the biggest since the virus was first identified in the United States, health

  11. College of Health Sciences Health Sciences Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    the sweeping changes associated with health care reform. Health care reform represents the most significant health care legislation since the development of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. It has tremendous potential ramification for the future of our college. Health care reform will dramatically increase

  12. Estimating radiogenic cancer risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA`s estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures in light of information that has become available since the publication of BIER III, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model is one in which the age-specific relative risk coefficients are obtained by taking the geometric mean of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks from Japan to the U.S. (multiplicative and NIH projection methods). Using 1980 U.S. vital statistics, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population.

  13. Risk prediction models for melanoma: A systematic review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A.; Emery, Jon; Kassianos, Angelos P.; Walter, Fiona M.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. 2 General Practice and Primary Care Academic Centre, University of Melbourne, Australia. 3 School of Primary, Aboriginal and Rural Health Care, University of Western Australia, Australia. Running title: Risk prediction models... :1000129. 35. English, DR, Armstrong, BK. Identifying people at high risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma: Results from a case-control study in Western Australia. Br. Med. J. (Clin. Res. Ed). 1988; 296: 1285–1288. 36. Amir, E, Freedman, OC, Seruga...

  14. Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denning, R. S. [Ohio State Univ., 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1142 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

  15. Conditional Risk Mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megiddo

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Key words: Risk; Conjugate Duality; Stochastic Optimization; Dynamic ... MSC2000 Subject Classification: Primary: 90C15,90C48; Secondary: 91B30,

  16. Retractable pin dual in-line package test clip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bandzuch, Gregory S. (Washington, PA); Kosslow, William J. (Jefferson Boro, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a Dual In-Line Package (DIP) test clip for use when troubleshooting circuits containing DIP integrated circuits. This test clip is a significant improvement over existing DIP test clips in that it has retractable pins which will permit troubleshooting without risk of accidentally shorting adjacent pins together when moving probes to different pins on energized circuits or when the probe is accidentally bumped while taking measurements.

  17. Bipolar pulse forming line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Mark A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A bipolar pulse forming transmission line module for linear induction accelerators having first, second, third, fourth, and fifth planar conductors which form an interleaved stack with dielectric layers between the conductors. Each conductor has a first end, and a second end adjacent an acceleration axis. The first and second planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, the fourth and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, and the first and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the first ends via a shorting plate adjacent the first ends. The third planar conductor is electrically connectable to a high voltage source, and an internal switch functions to short a high voltage from the first end of the third planar conductor to the first end of the fourth planar conductor to produce a bipolar pulse at the acceleration axis with a zero net time integral. Improved access to the switch is enabled by an aperture through the shorting plate and the proximity of the aperture to the switch.

  18. EC Transmission Line Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to identify materials acceptable for use in the US ITER Project Office (USIPO)-supplied components for the ITER Electron cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) transmission lines (TL), PBS-52. The source of material property information for design analysis shall be either the applicable structural code or the ITER Material Properties Handbook. In the case of conflict, the ITER Material Properties Handbook shall take precedence. Materials selection, and use, shall follow the guidelines established in the Materials Assessment Report (MAR). Materials exposed to vacuum shall conform to the ITER Vacuum Handbook. [Ref. 2] Commercial materials shall conform to the applicable standard (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN) for the definition of their grade, physical, chemical and electrical properties and related testing. All materials for which a suitable certification from the supplier is not available shall be tested to determine the relevant properties, as part of the procurement. A complete traceability of all the materials including welding materials shall be provided. Halogenated materials (example: insulating materials) shall be forbidden in areas served by the detritiation systems. Exceptions must be approved by the Tritium System and Safety Section Responsible Officers.

  19. Health Effects Support Document for Hexachlorobutadiene Health Effects Support Document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For Hexachlorobutadiene

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), as amended in 1996, requires the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish a list of contaminants to aid the agency in regulatory priority setting for the drinking water program. In addition, SDWA requires EPA to make regulatory determinations for no fewer than five contaminants by August 2001. The criteria used to determine whether or not to regulate a chemical on the CCL are the following: The contaminant may have an adverse effect on the health of persons. The contaminant is known to occur or there is a substantial likelihood that the contaminant will occur in public water systems with a frequency and at levels of public health concern. In the sole judgment of the administrator, regulation of such contaminant presents a meaningful opportunity for health risk reduction for persons served by public water systems. The Agency’s findings for the three criteria are used in making a determination to regulate a contaminant. The Agency may determine that there is no need for regulation when a contaminant fails to meet one of the criteria. This document provides the health effects basis for the regulatory determination for hexachlorobutadiene. In arriving at the regulatory determination, data on toxicokinetics, human

  20. ORISE: Health Promotion and Outreach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE ProjectCrisis and RiskEnvironmentLiteracyHealth

  1. User Interfaces 1 Command Line Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    User Interfaces 1 Command Line Interfaces getting arguments of the command line a command line 2013 1 / 39 #12;User Interfaces 1 Command Line Interfaces getting arguments of the command line a command line interface to store points fitting points with polyfit of numpy 2 Encapsulation by Object

  2. Lung Health Dissertation Grant (LH) Program Description Page 1 of 6 5/25/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Lung Health Dissertation Grant (LH) Program Description Page 1 of 6 5/25/2011 IMPORTANT NOTES REFERENCE. The objective of the Lung Health Research Dissertation Grant is to support pre-doctoral dissertation research in the various disciplines of social science examining risk factors affecting lung health

  3. Essays on risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jindapon, Paan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the preferred distribution by a simple mean-preserving spread and the cost is a utility cost. Higher-order increases in risk lead to higher-order generalizations, and the com- parative statics method yields a unified approach to the problem of comparative risk...

  4. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Quantification issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dourson, M.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantitative procedures associated with noncancer risk assessment include reference dose (RfD), benchmark dose, and severity modeling. The RfD, which is part of the EPA risk assessment guidelines, is an estimation of a level that is likely to be without any health risk to sensitive individuals. The RfD requires two major judgments: the first is choice of a critical effect(s) and its No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL); the second judgment is choice of an uncertainty factor. This paper discusses major assumptions and limitations of the RfD model.

  5. Introduction Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    with the originality and creativity to establish total health care, (2advanced healthcare specialists with abundant and researchers who can put total health care into practice. 21 20084 2 3 total health care #1232 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Health Sciences Health Problems

  6. winter 2015 Health Informatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    UinG anD PrOfeSSiOnal eDUCatiOn HEALTH INFORMATICS ANd ANALYTICS #12;2 Advancing Health Care Through.S. health care prior to commencing study. High-quality, Convenient Online Learning Format All courses, computer science and health care. In this introductory course, gain broad exposure to the field of health

  7. HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and correlates of injection drug use among drug users in Pakistan.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfusion risks in Karachi, Pakistan. Int J Infect Dis.dis- orders in Pakistan. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 1988;4:threat: HIV/AIDS policy in Pakistan. Health Policy Plann.

  8. Maternal Blood Lead Levels and the Risk of Pregnancy Induced Hypertension. The "EDEN" Cohort Study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Maternal Blood Lead Levels and the Risk of Pregnancy Induced Hypertension. The "EDEN" Cohort title: Lead and Gestational Hypertension Key words: cadmium; environmental health; epidemiology; gestation; hypertension; lead; manganese. Acknowledgments: We are indebted to the participating families

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

  10. On-line maintenance methodology development and its applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J.; Jae, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang Univ., 17 Haengdang, Sungdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing economic pressures being faced and the potential for shortening outage times under the conditions of deregulated electricity markets in the world, licensees are motivated to get an increasing amount of the on-line maintenance (OLM). The benefits of the OLM includes increased system and plant reliability, reduction of plant equipment and system material condition deficiencies that could adversely impact operations, and reduction of work scope during plant refueling outages. In Korea, allowance guidelines of risk assessment is specified in the safety regulation guidelines 16.7 and 16.8 of the Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety (KINS), which is 'General guidelines of Risk-informed application for requesting permission of changes' and 'Requesting permission of changes of Risk-informed application for Technical Specification'. We select the emergency diesel generator (EDG) of the Ulchin unit 3 and 4 for risk assessment analysis by applying configuration changes. The EDG which has plant safety level IE belongs to on-site standby power (A, B train EDG) in electric distribution system. The EDG is important component because it should maintain standby status during plant is operating, therefore we select the EDG for target component of risk assessment analysis. The risk assessment is limited to CDF. The risk assessment is performed by using AIMS-PSA Release2. We evaluate CDF by applying the configuration changes with some assumptions. Evaluation of the full power operation and Low power/Shut down operation was performed. This study has been performed for introducing a methodology and performing risk assessment. (authors)

  11. Sandia Energy - Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Materials, Reliability, & Standards Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health...

  12. CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network MAINE Keeping Track, Promoting Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    analysis systems. These systems provide health planners, policymakers, and other decision makers critical risk factors. For example, the new analysis revealed that 40% of all childhood lead poisonings (Tracking Network). The Tracking Network is a dynamic Web-based tool that, for the first time, provides

  13. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Cancer classification issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltse, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues presented are related to classification of weight of evidence in cancer risk assessments. The focus in this paper is on lines of evidence used in constructing a conclusion about potential human carcinogenicity. The paper also discusses issues that are mistakenly addressed as classification issues but are really part of the risk assessment process. 2 figs.

  14. Integration of site-specific health information: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry health assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is required to conduct a health assessment of any site that is listed on or proposed for the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. Sixteen US Department of Energy (DOE) sites currently fall into this category. Health assessments contain a qualitative description of impacts to public health and the environment from hazardous waste sites, as well as recommendations for actions to mitigate or eliminate risk. Because these recommendations may have major impacts on compliance activities at DOE facilities, the health assessments are an important source of information for the monitoring activities of DOE's Office of Environmental Compliance (OEC). This report provides an overview of the activities involved in preparing the health assessment, its role in environmental management, and its key elements.

  15. Addressing Genetics Delivering Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Addressing Genetics Delivering Health A strategy for advancing the dissemination and application of genetics knowledge throughout our health professions Funded by Hilary Burton September 2003 Executive education of health workers q providing strategic overview of education programme q collaborating

  16. DIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Andrew

    a centralized resource of regional health care services for persons with developmental disabilitiesDIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES FOR BRONX RESIDENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES 2012 Compiled Albert Einstein College of Medicine in collaboration with Health Services Committee, Bronx Developmental

  17. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the geologic and hydrologic conditions and evaluates potential health risks to workers in the natural gas industry in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site, where the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission detonated an underground nuclear device in 1967. The 29-kiloton detonation took place 4,240 feet below ground surface and was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, on land administered by Carson National Forest. A site-specific conceptual model was developed based on current understanding of the hydrologic and geologic environment. This conceptual model was used for establishing plausible contaminant exposure scenarios, which were then evaluated for human health risk potential. The most mobile and, therefore, the most probable contaminant that could result in human exposure is tritium. Natural gas production wells were identified as having the greatest potential for bringing detonation-derived contaminants (tritium) to the ground surface in the form of tritiated produced water. Three exposure scenarios addressing potential contamination from gas wells were considered in the risk evaluation: a gas well worker during gas-well-drilling operations, a gas well worker performing routine maintenance, and a residential exposure. The residential exposure scenario was evaluated only for comparison; permanent residences on national forest lands at the Gasbuggy site are prohibited

  18. University Health Care Health Sciences Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    University Health Care Health Sciences Center 30 N. 1900 E. 6DOW /DNH &LW\\ 87 84132-2204 Phone and your child. University Health Care School of Medicine Division of Pediatric Nephrology & Hypertension care physician after each visit. x If you would like a copy of your child's clinic note you must

  19. Health and Counselling Services SFU Health Promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health and Counselling Services SFU Health Promotion A division of Student Services HEALTHY CAMPUS COMMUNITY 2 0 1 3 R E P O R T #12;Dr. Tim Rahilly Dr. Nancy Johnston FOREWORD The health and well. We have a responsibility as a caring community to create a setting that not only supports students

  20. Risk Management in Biopharmaceutical Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply Chain Risk Managementof Recent Work on Supply Chain Risk Management . . . . .M. , Supply chain risk management: Outlining an agenda for

  1. ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY Risk Management Services, University of Alberta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Provide technical expertise and service to departments in aspects of hazardous waste management, re-cycle and disposal and the environment Collect and transport hazardous waste from the campus to the waste facility of research proposals for funding applications Approval of work protocols involving biohazards Regulate

  2. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has delineated a set of rules for naming PAH compounds. There are only a select number of compounds that are given trivial names such as fluorene, chrysene, and pyrene (Figure 1). The numbering system is determined... 154.2 3.98 (3.66) NC Fluorene 166.2 800 4.18 (3.86) NC Anthracene 178.2 59 2.4x 10 -4 4.5 (4.15) NC Phenanthrene 178.2 435 6.8x 10 -4 4.46 (4.15) NC 2-Methylanthracene 192.3 21.3 4.77 NC 9-Methylphenanthrene 192.3 261 4.77 NC 1...

  3. Possible Health Risks Damage to brain and nervous system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    blood pressure. Protecting Your Family If the building structure was built before1978 or you suspect to entering your home. Provide low fat nutritious meals high in calcium and iron to children. How does Lead exposure occur? Inhalation Ingestion How do I get screened for Lead Poisoning? Ask your doctor to do

  4. Examining the Communication of Environmental Health Risks among

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    with Incineration as Trash Disposal Method 75.5% 92.6% 0.015 *P Value More Active P Value Ever Attended a Community Meeting 44.0% 81.0% 0.000 Familiar with Incineration.24% 0.010 Familiar with Incineration as Trash Disposal Method 66.67% 89.16% 0.008 *P Value

  5. Communicating Health Risks Working Safely With Beryllium | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space Data CorporationPast

  6. Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstituteDOE Origins Resources

  7. Systemic risk in consumer finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Martha

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceSystemic risk in consumer finance Martha Poon, NYU At the

  8. (Energy Risk Professional, ERP), (GARP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    · ­ Dragana Pilipovic. Energy Risk: Valuing and Managing Energy Derivatives,2nd Edition (New York: Mc). 9: Risk Management of Energy Derivatives · ­ Alexander Triantis. Handbook of Modern Finance (New 1 ( ) : . (Energy Risk Professional, ERP

  9. Risk in the Weapons Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

  10. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational...

  11. ORISE: Public Health Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communication Public Health Communication The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in addressing public health...

  12. ORISE: Public Health Preparedness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by convening community-based workshops and key stakeholder meetings aimed at managing a health care surge during a public health emergency. By identifying and involving key...

  13. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Russell B. (Oakland, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  14. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1985-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  15. Electrical transmission line diametrical retainer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a mechanism for retaining an electrical transmission line. In one embodiment of the invention it is a system for retaining an electrical transmission line within down hole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second end of a drill pipe, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The invention allows the electrical transmission line to with stand the tension and compression of drill pipe during routine drilling cycles.

  16. Psychosocial risks: acting upon the organisation by ergonomic intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Psychosocial risks: acting upon the organisation by ergonomic intervention Johann Petita , Bernard Duguéa a Department Of Ergonomics, ENSC, Bordeaux Institute of Technology, 146 rue Léo-Saignat, 33076. On the basis of an ergonomic intervention in an insurance company, we were able to show that the health

  17. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  18. ORISE: Crisis and Risk Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crisis and Risk Communication Crisis and Risk Communication Because a natural disaster, act of terrorism or other public emergency can happen without notice, having a planned,...

  19. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Cancels DOE G 413.3-7.

  20. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS application hosted in the cloud · Alaska DHHS fined $1.7M ­ Portable device stolen from vehicle · Mass Eye

  1. Environmental Factors and Breast Cancer Risk For millions of women whose lives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    their health history, past environmental exposures, and lifestyle. The participants will be given yearly follow Gene The impact of family history on breast cancer risk suggests that genetic factors play an importantEnvironmental Factors and Breast Cancer Risk For millions of women whose lives have been affected

  2. Guidance for Controlling Potential Risks to Workers Exposed to Class B Biosolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance for Controlling Potential Risks to Workers Exposed to Class B Biosolids This guidance is intended only for controlling health risks to workers from Class B biosolids during handling and land;1 Introduction Biosolids are the organic residues resulting from the treatment of commercial, industrial

  3. Transmission Lines Emulating Moving Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vehmas, Joni; Tretyakov, Sergei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we show how the electromagnetic phenomena in moving magnetodielectric media can be emulated using artificial composite structures at rest. In particular, we introduce nonreciprocal periodically loaded transmission lines which support waves obeying the same rules as plane electromagnetic waves in moving media. Because the actual physical structure is at rest, in these transmission lines there are no fundamental limitations on the velocity values, which may take values larger than the speed of light or even complex values (considering complex amplitudes in the time-harmonic regime). An example circuit of a unit cell of a "moving" transmission line is presented and analyzed both numerically and experimentally. The special case of composite right/left handed host line is also studied numerically. Besides the fundamental interest, the study is relevant for potential applications in realizing engineered materials for various transformations of electromagnetic fields.

  4. The beauty of laser lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sue-Mie

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A line, the simplest way to express an artist's feelings or interpretation of an object, has its own emotions that an artist can employ for her purpose. Laser light, the most self-concentrated, self-sustained and directed, ...

  5. Authorization of Line Extension (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any entity permitted to establish an electric light and power plant, and/or transmission or distribution lines within a city, village, or public electric light and power district, may also extend...

  6. VISAR: Line-imaging interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemsing, W.F.; Mathews, A.R.; Warnes, R.H.; George, M.J.; Whittemore, G.R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) was applied to measure velocity across the diameter of a metal plate explosively accelerated to 5.5 km/s. Amplified, single- frequency laser light was focused to illuminate a line on the metal surface. The line's image was focused through the interferometer to a streak camera that swept in time and recorded directly on film. During the experiment, the Doppler-shift caused motion of the interference fringes. Analysis of the digitized film record yielded a continuum of time-resolved velocity histories. Velocity gradients across the plate that first swept radially inward, then reflected outward, were clearly measured. Increased power provided by the laser amplifier greatly improved the signal-to-noise ratio compared to our previous line VISAR experiments. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Analysis of interconnect microstrip lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luong, Giam-Minh

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the return loss of the slot-coupled microstrip dipole. Section C presents two simulations of the return loss on the slot- coupled rectangular patch antenna. A. Interconnect of Microstrip Lines Several circuits with the geometry of Figure 1 were fabricated.... Experimental and Theoretical Results of the Interconnect Two circuits were designed and fabricated. Each circuit consists of two substrates as shown in Figure 9. One substrate has an open microstrip line etched in one side and an aperture etched...

  8. Fin-line horn antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reindel, John (San Diego, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fin line circuit card containing a fin line slot feeds a dipole antenna ich extends a quarterwave outside the waveguide and provides an energy beam focal point at or near the open end of the waveguide. The dipole antenna thus maintains a wide and nearly constant beamwidth, low VSWR and a circular symmetric radiation pattern for use in electronic warfare direction finding and surveillance applications.

  9. Being Aboriginal and Taiwanese in the Pursuit of Community Well-Being: Examining the Janus-Face of Public Health Among Bunun Peoples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Shyh-Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    local Bunun claim that gout problems (tongfong, literally “distributing risk factors (for gout, hypertension, or highand accompanying health issues like gout or high cholesterol

  10. TOXNET and Beyond: Using the National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templin-Branner, W.

    2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal provides access to numerous databases that can help you explore environmental chemicals and risks. TOXNET and Beyond: Using NLM's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal conveys the fundamentals of searching the NLM's TOXNET system of databases in chemistry, toxicology, environmental health, and related fields. In addition to TOXNET, the course will highlight various resources available through the Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal.

  11. Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EA 4272 Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French Oyster Farming Véronique le Bihan Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French Oyster Farming Véronique Le Bihan, Sophie Pardo, Patrice and their businesses contribute to defining their degree of risk perception and reliance on management tools. Beyond

  12. THE FUNDAMENTAL RISK QUADRANGLE IN RISK MANAGEMENT, OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uryasev, Stanislav

    THE FUNDAMENTAL RISK QUADRANGLE IN RISK MANAGEMENT, OPTIMIZATION AND STATISTICAL ESTIMATION1 R be confronted in numerous situations. Dealing with them systematically for purposes in risk management Statistical estimation is inevitably a partner with risk management in handling hazards, which may be known

  13. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated risk assessment that could assist in the EM prioritization efforts. (authors)

  14. CHEIBA TRUST Health Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEIBA TRUST Health Insurance Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield www.anthem.com BlueAdvantage Point of Service Plan (HMO/POS) Prime Health Plan (PPO) and Custom Plus Health Plan Phone.................................................................................................................1-800-542-9402 Provider Directories Health and Dental www.anthem.com HMO Chiropractic Landmark

  15. IMMUNIZATION HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Noboru

    (regardless of insurance coverage), as well as current staff and faculty. We offer medical care, health1 HEALTH AND IMMUNIZATION GUIDE #12;2 HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST Immunization Form due (one timeEdu and Haven Courses completed by: August 11, 2014 WWW.CMU.EDU/HEALTH-SERVICES Questions? Contact us at 412

  16. IMMUNIZATION HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Noboru

    . We offer medical care, health promotion and insurance services, including: Alcohol and Drug1 HEALTH AND IMMUNIZATION GUIDE #12;2 HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST Immunization Form due (one time ­ September 5, 2014 Spring Semester 2015 ­ January 31, 2015 Summer Semester 2015 ­ June 15, 2015 WWW.CMU.EDU/HEALTH

  17. POSTGRADUATE Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    .Sc.Courses Cancer Care 54 Dementia 55 Gerontological Nursing 56 Mental Health 57 Midwifery 59 Nursing 60 Palliative Care 61 Postgraduate Diplomas Clinical Health Sciences Education 62 Nursing (Specialist) 63 HigherPOSTGRADUATE COURSES 2012 Health Sciences TheUniversityofDublinPostgraduateCourses2012Health

  18. Oregon Health & Science University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to high-quality health care for all, especially Oregonians. 4. Help meet Oregon's health and science, however, has changed dramatically. National and statewide health care reform alters the ways care, including the changing health care environment, new and disruptive technologies, globalization, changing

  19. Graduate Assistant Health Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Center (formerly NMSU Student Health Center) for all outpatient primary health care services. Campus:30 pm by Appt- Psychiatry & Women's Health · 7:30 am- 4:30 pm Urgent Care Evaluation, Pharmacy, Lab, X ­ prescription medications ­ testing & procedures ­ office visits for part-time students #12;United Health Care

  20. Rethinking Risk: Aspiration as Pure Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Greg B

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of an environmental decision problem where di¤erent investment packages (acts) lead to di¤erent possible levels of global wealth and overall levels of global warming. Avoiding the all too easy economic assumption that the global wealth levels can simply be adjusted... by some amount to re‡ect the e¤ect of the global temperature levels, we are now left with two numerical components in this problem. There are thus separate measures of risk aversion that deal with wealth and temperature, and therefore two di¤erent concepts...

  1. Use of Xenon Difluoride to Clean Hazardous By-Products in Ion Implanter Source Housings, Turbo Pumps, and Fore-Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despres, J.; Chambers, B.; Bishop, S.; Kaim, R.; Letaj, S.; Sergi, S.; Sweeney, J.; Tang, Y.; Wilson, S.; Yedave, S. [ATMI, 7 Commerce Drive, Danbury, CT, 06810 (United States)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the use of xenon difluoride to clean deposits in the source housing, source turbo pump, and source turbo pump fore-line of ion implanters. Xenon difluoride has previously been shown to be effective in increasing the lifetime of the ion source{sup 1,2} and this paper presents an extension of the technology to other areas within the tool. Process by-products that are deposited in the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line can not only pose productivity issues, in the case of coatings on insulators, but can also be flammable and toxic in the case of deposits formed within the turbo pump and fore-line. The results presented in this paper detail the initial successful examples of using xenon difluoride to clean these deposits.ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is capable of cleaning an insulator in an ion implanter. Typically during use an insulator will become increasingly coated with deposits that could lead to productivity problems. By introducing xenon difluoride into the source housing the insulator residues were effectively cleaned in-situ, thereby extending the maintenance interval and resulting in significant consumable savings.Similar deposits that form in the turbo pump and fore-line could not only lead to production problems due to turbo pump failure or fore-line build-up, but pose significant health risks during the ex-situ cleaning process. Through internal testing ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is able to clean phosphorus and germanium deposits located within a turbo pump. Additionally, testing has demonstrated that the turbo pump fore-line can be cleaned in-situ without the need to remove these components, thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of fires. The cleaning reaction progress and by-products were monitored using FTIR spectrometry and thermocouples.In order to efficiently clean the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line xenon difluoride delivery must be optimized. This paper also details a hardware concept that maximizes xenon difluoride delivery and allows the clean to be done in a way that is viable for production ion implanters.

  2. Florida Electric Transmission Line Siting Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Transmission Line Siting Act (TLSA) is the state’s centralized process for licensing electrical transmission lines which; (a) are 230 kV or larger; (b) cross a county line; and, (c) are 15...

  3. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT January 2008 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT CP-320 714-278-7346 #12;2006 ­ 2007 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Executive Summary A. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management

  4. Eighth Annual Risk Management Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Eighth Annual Risk Management Conference Risk Management Amidst Global Rebalancing 10 ­ 11 July 2014, Singapore The Risk Management Institute (RMI) at the National University of Singapore invites submissions for its 8th annual conference on risk management in Singapore on 10 and 11 July 2014. We

  5. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT November 2006 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT LH-806C 714-278-7346 #12;2005 ­ 2006 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Executive Summary A. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management

  6. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT November 2005 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT LH-806C 714-278-7346 #12;2004 ­ 2005 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Introduction The Office of University Risk Management provides resources, advice and training that allow

  7. Pest Risk Analysis for Hymenoscyphus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pest Risk Analysis for Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus for the UK and the Republic of Ireland #12;2 PRA for Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus C.E. Sansford 23rd May 2013 Pest Risk Analysis Pest Risk Analysis for Hymenoscyphus (Kowalski and Holdenrieder, 2009). 1 Please cite this document as: Sansford, CE (2013). Pest Risk Analysis

  8. Environmental Public Health Performance Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self Agency: Total Environmental Health Program Budget: #12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (v. 2.0); Environmental Health Program Assessment Instrument, 1/7/2010 Page 2 Proportion

  9. On-line chemical composition analyzer development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, M.J.; Garrison, A.A.; Muly, E.C.; Moore, C.F.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy consumed in distillation processes in the United States represents nearly three percent of the total national energy consumption. If effective control of distillation columns can be accomplished, it has been estimated that it would result in a reduction in the national energy consumption of 0.3%. Real-time control based on mixture composition could achieve these savings. However, the major distillation processes represent diverse applications and at present there does not exist a proven on-line chemical composition sensor technology which can be used to control these diverse processes in real-time. This report presents a summary of the findings of the second phase of a three phase effort undertaken to develop an on-line real-time measurement and control system utilizing Raman spectroscopy. A prototype instrument system has been constructed utilizing a Perkin Elmer 1700 Spectrometer, a diode pumped YAG laser, two three axis positioning systems, a process sample cell land a personal computer. This system has been successfully tested using industrially supplied process samples to establish its performance. Also, continued application development was undertaken during this Phase of the program using both the spontaneous Raman and Surface-enhanced Raman modes of operation. The study was performed for the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, whose mission is to conduct cost-shared R D for new high-risk, high-payoff industrial energy conservation technologies. Although this document contains references to individual manufacturers and their products, the opinions expressed on the products reported do not necessarily reflect the position of the Department of Energy.

  10. What can emission lines tell us?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Stasinska

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Generalities 2 Empirical diagnostics based on emission lines 3 Photoionization modelling 4 Pending questions 5 Appendix: Lists of useful lines and how to deal with them

  11. ITER risk workshop facilitator guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of planning risk management is to make everyone involved in a program aware that risk should be a consideration in the design, development, and fielding of a system. Risk planning is a tool to assess and mitigate events that might adversely impact the program. Therefore, risk management increases the probability/likelihood of program success and can help to avoid program crisis management and improve problem solving by managing risk early in the acquisition cycle.

  12. ITER risk workshop participant guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of planning risk management is to make everyone involved in a program aware that risk should be a consideration in the design, development, and fielding of a system. Risk planning is a tool to assess and mitigate events that might adversely impact the program. Therefore, risk management increases the probability/likelihood of program success and can help to avoid program crisis management and improve problem solving by managing risk early in the acquisition cycle.

  13. River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment (RCBRA) Human Health Risk Assessment (Volume 2)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15ARiskSands Jim Hansen U.S.

  14. Dumbarton Express Line DB heading to Stanford Oval. AC Transit Line U on Palm Drive.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumbarton Express Line DB heading to Stanford Oval. AC Transit Line U on Palm Drive. Photo: Karl Nielsen Photo: Dong Wang Schedules: AC Transit Line U Dumbarton Express Line DB Connections with BART Transit Line U Line U provides express service between Stanford and the Fremont BART station. Other East

  15. Occupational Safety and Health Program at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Calderon

    1999-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The West Valley Nuclear Services Co. LLC (WVNS) is committed to provide a safe, clean, working environment for employees, and to implement U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements affecting worker safety. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Occupational Safety and Health Program is designed to protect the safety, health, and well-being of WVDP employees by identifying, evaluating, and controlling biological, chemical, and physical hazards in the work place. Hazards are controlled within the requirements set forth in the reference section at the end of this report. It is the intent of the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program to assure that each employee is provided with a safe and healthy work environment. This report shows the logical path toward ensuring employee safety in planning work at the WVDP. In general, planning work to be performed safely includes: combining requirements from specific programs such as occupational safety, industrial hygiene, radiological control, nuclear safety, fire safety, environmental protection, etc.; including WVDP employees in the safety decision-making processes; pre-planning using safety support re-sources; and integrating the safety processes into the work instructions. Safety management principles help to define the path forward for the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program. Roles, responsibilities, and authority of personnel stem from these ideals. WVNS and its subcontractors are guided by the following fundamental safety management principles: ''Protection of the environment, workers, and the public is the highest priority. The safety and well-being of our employees, the public, and the environment must never be compromised in the aggressive pursuit of results and accomplishment of work product. A graded approach to environment, safety, and health in design, construction, operation, maintenance, and deactivation is incorporated to ensure the protection of the workers, the public, and the environment.'' These principles are demonstrated through: Conducting all activities in an atmosphere of trust and confidence based on open, honest, and responsive communication. Using innovative and effective approaches to risk identification and management. Applying a systematic approach to planning and execution of all activities that affect the environment, safety, and health through use of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System. Holding line management fully accountable to effectively plan and integrate environment, safety, and health activities into field activities. Providing clear policy and direction on environment, safety, and health issues to guide field work. Encouraging and promoting the sharing of environment, safety, and health information and resources. Empowering employees through training, information, tools, and program involvement to effectively protect themselves and the environment. Ensuring it is every employees' responsibility to identify and report potential safety and health hazards and environmental noncompliance. Together, as a team, we accomplish our mission while protecting the environment and preserving the safety and health of each employee and the public.

  16. Graduate School of Public Health (Graduate School of Public Health) (Dept. of Public Health)`

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Guebuem

    including environmental health covering concept of contents and meanings. (Health Care Management-3-0 History of Health & Medical Care , , . , , , . This course reviews Graduate School of Public Health #12;#12;(Graduate School of Public Health) (Dept. of Public

  17. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins; John M. Beck

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Risk Management System (RMS) is a database used to maintain the project risk register. The RMS also maps risk reduction activities to specific identified risks. Further functionality of the RMS includes mapping reactor suppliers Design Data Needs (DDNs) to risk reduction tasks and mapping Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRTs) to associated risks. This document outlines the basic instructions on how to use the RMS. This document constitutes Revision 1 of the NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk. It incorporates the latest enhancements to the RMS. The enhancements include six new custom views of risk data - Impact/Consequence, Tasks by Project Phase, Tasks by Status, Tasks by Project Phase/Status, Tasks by Impact/WBS, and Tasks by Phase/Impact/WBS.

  18. Risk analyses for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed of in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing the contaminants` toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks have been found to be within the US EPA target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.

  19. HEALTH SERVICE Facts About

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    example, coughing or sneezing). WHO IS AT RISK? Meningitis can strike at any age; however, certain groups

  20. National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health and HumanNational Institute of Mental Health Division of Intramural Research Programs http://intramural.nimh.nih.gov/ [NIMH of Fellowship Training] National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Department of Health

  1. Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies -Health Sciences Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Six: [14 Credit Hours] NURS 45010 Health Care Policy and Delivery Systems or NURS 46000 Health Care 41581 Health Psychology (3) or SOC 42563 Sociology in Health and Health Care (3) 3 Health Science 45080 Physiology of Exercise 3 PHIL 40005 Health Care Ethics 3 General Elective (lower or upper

  2. Quasistellar Objects: Intervening Absorption Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane C. Charlton; Christopher W. Churchill

    2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review, at a level appropriate for graduate students and non-specialists, the field of quasar absorption lines (QALs). Emphasis is on the intervening absorbers. We present the anatomy of a quasar spectrum due to various classes of intervening absorption systems, and a brief historical review of each absorber class (Lyman-alpha forest and Lyman limit systems, and metal-line and damped Lyman-alpha absorbers). We also provide several heuristic examples on how the physical properties of both the intergalactic medium and the gaseous environments associated with earlier epoch galaxies can be inferred from QALs. The evolution of these environments from z=4 are discussed.

  3. Consumer Query Health Profile Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Consumer Query Health Profile Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center Query resulted in 570 BSU Classified and Non-Classified employees that participated in the Fall 2004 Health Risk Appraisal. Non.2% 9.6% 7.7% 9.0% Heart Disease 2.3% 2.3% 2.6% 3.1% No Primary Care Physician 33.0% 31.8% 30.0% 24

  4. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, July 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress made for the period July 1984 through September 1985. Sections describe research in health studies, dosimetry and biophysical transport, biological and radiation physics, chemical physics, and risk analysis. (ACR)

  5. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 11 | November 2002 1057 The Health Impacts of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Environmental Health Perspectives · VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 11 | November 2002 1057 The Health Impacts Majid Ezzati1 and Daniel M. Kammen2 1Risk, Resource, and Environmental Management Division, Resources, crop residues, and dung) and coal as their primary source of domestic energy (1,2). Biomass accounts

  6. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides a framework for identifying and managing key technical, schedule, and cost risks through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, dated 7-28-06. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-7A, dated 1-12-11. Does not cancel other directives.

  7. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  8. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  9. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox (Columbia, MO)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  10. Camera Calibration Using Line Correspondences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Richard

    Camera Calibration Using Line Correspondences Richard I. Hartley G.E. CRD, Schenectady, NY, 12301. The three cameras may have different unknown calibrations, and the essential matrices corresponding to each, camera calibration and scene reconstruction. In the case where all the three cameras are assumed to have

  11. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gasbuggy site is in northern New Mexico in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County (Figure 1-1). The Gasbuggy experiment was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation, a tight, gas-bearing sandstone formation. The 29-kiloton-yield nuclear device was placed in a 17.5-inch wellbore at 4,240 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), approximately 40 ft below the Pictured Cliffs/Lewis shale contact, in an attempt to force the cavity/chimney formed by the detonation up into the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The test was conducted below the southwest quarter of Section 36, Township 29 North, Range 4 West, New Mexico Principal Meridian. The device was detonated on December 10, 1967, creating a 335-ft-high chimney above the detonation point and a cavity 160 ft in diameter. The gas produced from GB-ER (the emplacement and reentry well) during the post-detonation production tests was radioactive and diluted, primarily by carbon dioxide. After 2 years, the energy content of the gas had recovered to 80 percent of the value of gas in conventionally developed wells in the area. There is currently no technology capable of remediating deep underground nuclear detonation cavities and chimneys. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must continue to manage the Gasbuggy site to ensure that no inadvertent intrusion into the residual contamination occurs. DOE has complete control over the 1/4 section (160 acres) containing the shot cavity, and no drilling is permitted on that property. However, oil and gas leases are on the surrounding land. Therefore, the most likely route of intrusion and potential exposure would be through contaminated natural gas or contaminated water migrating into a producing natural gas well outside the immediate vicinity of ground zero. The purpose of this report is to describe the current site conditions and evaluate the potential health risks posed by the most plausible contaminant exposure scenario, drilling of natural gas wells near the site. The results of this risk evaluation will guide DOE's future surveillance and monitoring activities in the area to ensure that site conditions are adequately protective of human health. This evaluation is not a comprehensive risk assessment for the site; it is intended to provide assurance that DOE's monitoring approach can detect the presence of site-related contamination at levels well below those that would pose an unacceptable risk to human health.

  12. Evidence of Southern Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    POS Evidence of Coverage Southern Health Services, Inc. SH.POS.11-09 #12;Table of Contents SH................................................................................................10 Facts about Southern Health .....................................................................12 Members' Responsibilities to Know How and When to Seek Care ............................13 Section

  13. ORISE: Health Promotion and Outreach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Promotion and Outreach Health Promotion & Outreach The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides health promotion and outreach support to government...

  14. Alerting device and method for reminding a person of a risk

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Runyon, Larry (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Gunter, Wayne M. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An alerting device and method to remind personnel of a risk is disclosed. The device has at least two sensors, a logic controller, a power source, and an annunciator that delivers a visual message, with or without an audible alarm, about a risk to a person when the sensors detect the person exiting a predetermined space. In particular, the present invention reminds a person of a security, safety, or health risk upon exiting a predetermined space. More particularly, the present invention reminds a person of an information security risk relating to sensitive, proprietary, confidential, trade secret, classified, or intellectual property information.

  15. Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development Mitchell J. Small,*, Paul C, Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada 89512, United States 1. INTRODUCTION The recent U.S. shale gas Issue: Understanding the Risks of Unconventional Shale Gas Development Published: July 1, 2014 A broad

  16. Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health & Safety Sub Department Name 480 Oak Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 T 650.723.0448 F 650.725.3468 DEPUTY DIRECTOR, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Exempt, Full-Time (100% FTE) Posted May 1, 2014 The Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) at Stanford University seeks

  17. Health Insurance Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    options. You may be able to get coverage now through existing programs. Visit HealthCare.gov to learn more, and coinsurance. You'll want to consider these details while you're exploring your options. Visit HealthCare will offer essential health benefits, including doctor visits, preventive care, hospitalization

  18. Being Interactive Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Being Interactive Treating Health Care T he numbers are staggering. In a chilling report, the U care, training staff, and accrediting staff and health-care facilities, which involve determin- ing.ahrq.gov/clinic/ptsafety/summary.htm). Pressures on Health Care To come up with a credible approach for improv- ing patient safety, we need

  19. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Monday, January 27, 2014 2:30pm ­ 4:00pm (Reception to follow at the Center for Health Policy and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He studies how economic, political, and natural environments affect population health in developing countries using a mix of experimental

  20. Health Psychology Chapter Eleven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    % of health care research focuses on mortality or physiological indicators of morbidity to determine treatmentHealth Psychology Chapter Eleven: Management of Chronic Illness #12;Quality of Life: What outcome. #12;Kaplan's Model Argues that the most important indicators of health and wellness

  1. HEALTH CARE ASSOCIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    HEALTH CARE COMPLIANCE ASSOCIATION 5780 Lincoln Drive · Suite 120 · Minneapolis, MN 55436 · 888 of the following document, "Evaluating and Improving a Compliance Program, A Resource for Health care Board Members, Health care Executives and Compliance Officers." This resource is now available to all HCCA members

  2. Public Health FAT FACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    : THE UNITED STATES SPENDS MORE ON HEALTH CARE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY. YET WE CONTINUE TO FALL FAR BEHIND States spends an astonishing percent of our gross domestic product on health care--significantly moreColumbia Public Health HOT TOPIC Climate Change FAT FACTORS Obesity Prevention BOOK SMART

  3. Student Health Benefit Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    and programs tailored to the needs of students. The SHBP coordinates care with University Health Services (UHS), UMass Amherst's fully accredited health center. UHS provides comprehensive primary care, walk-in care2 2013-2014 Student Health Benefit Plan (SHBP) Designed for the Students of Policy Period: August 1

  4. STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    pastoral care as well as teaching Take positive steps to promote students well-being Ensure the health students to make contact with their GP or local mental health services. The Duty of Care and Negligence1 STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH POLICY Revised January 2013 #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION 1. Context Widening

  5. Horizon Health EAP Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Andrew

    /09) HorizonCareLinkSM ­ All the help you need online Horizon Health EAP also provides services through counselors- Child care or elder care services- Pet care and veterinarians- Adoption resources- Health clubsHorizon Health EAP Services Employee Assistance Program with Telephone and 3 Face

  6. PRIVACY OF HEALTH INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and civil fraud and abuse regulations. Finally, HIPAA was intended to streamline the health care system through the adoption of consistent standards for transmitting uniform electronic health care data between providers of health care services (e.g. MCW) and payers (e.g. Medicare). In order to adopt transmission

  7. PUBLIC HEALTH Noroviruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    under special circumstances. Usually, health care providers will first try to rule out other germs or worsen, contact your health care provider. #12;What can you do to prevent NLV infection? Follow the tips), or the diarrhea is very bad, call your health care provider for advice. Are there any restrictions for people

  8. Engineering VA Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    Engineering VA Health Care The Department of Veterans Affairs is offering a unique career to all regions of the country and toward numerous health care leadership roles. B.S. degree or M engineers to be effective Healthcare Technology Program Managers in the Veterans Health Administration

  9. Second Line of Defense Spares Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Dale L.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.; Thorsen, Darlene E.

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 2012, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an assessment and analysis of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Sustainability spare parts program. Spare parts management touches many aspects of the SLD Sustainability Program including contracting and integration of Local Maintenance Providers (LMP), equipment vendors, analyses and metrics on program performance, system state of health, and maintenance practices. Standardized spares management will provide better data for decisions during site transition phase and will facilitate transition to host country sustainability ownership. The effort was coordinated with related SLD Sustainability Program initiatives, including a configuration items baselining initiative, a metrics initiative, and a maintenance initiative. The spares study has also led to pilot programs for sourcing alternatives that include regional intermediate inventories and partnering agreements that leverage existing supply chains. Many partners from the SLD Sustainability program contributed to and were consulted in the course of the study. This document provides a description of the findings, recommendations, and implemented solutions that have resulted from the study.

  10. Millersville University Health Services Confidentiality and Privacy of Health Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    will share your health information with other designated business associates (ie: laboratories, radiology facilities) o Health Services may use and disclose health information to contact you o Health Services may

  11. Leadership in Health Care Systems: Health Care Organization Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Leadership in Health Care Systems: Health Care Organization Management and Leadership Track: ­ Health Care Organization, Management and Leadership ­ Clinical Research Coordinator ­ Clinical Nurse in health care ethics ­ Public mission ­ Fiscal stewardship ­ Inclusiveness and diversity ­ Theory based

  12. An Analysis of the Risks of a Terrorist Attack on LNG Receiving Facilities in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    An Analysis of the Risks of a Terrorist Attack on LNG Receiving Facilities in the United States #12;An Analysis of the Risks of a Terrorist Attack on LNG Receiving Facilities in the United States 3-D Aerial View from Proposed SES LNG Receiving Facility Site to Downtown Long Beach [White line is 2

  13. The South African Disease: Apartheid Health and Health Services by Cedric de Beer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robb, Judith

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apartheid Health and Health Services. Trenton, N.J. :Given that health and health services are directly relatedApartheid Health and Health Services, examines the truth of

  14. A quantitative analysis of health, safety and environment policy in France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A quantitative analysis of health, safety and environment policy in France Thomas Audiffrena , Jean-Marc Rallob , Franck Guarnieria , Christophe Martina a Mines ParisTech, Center for Research on Risks was introduced in France to regulate the role of occupational risk prevention specialists (OHS professionals

  15. MINUTES OF THE NUTRITION COORDINATING COMMITTEE (NCC) MEETING, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    published by the FDA on the quantitative risk and benefit assessment of commercial fish consumption that was based on MeHg's adverse contribution to health. The advisory did not include a quantitative analysis. DRAFT FDA RISK AND BENEFIT ASSESSMENT REPORT ­ EFFECTS OF FISH CONSUMPTION ON FETAL NEURODEVELOPMENT

  16. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berven, B.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration.

  17. Information Security Office Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    or Approved) 6/01/2013 CISO Jason Pufahl, CISO Approved 6/01/2013 RMAC Risk Management Advisory Council

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

  19. Environmental epidemiology: risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, R.L.; Whittemore, A.S. (eds.)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers presented at the symposium are in the disciplines of biometry, environmental medicine, epidemiology, mathematics, and statistics. Attention is given to assessing risk due to environmental agents, particularly those known to be carcinogenic; both the complex medical issues involved and the mathematical and statistical methodologies used in analysis are presented. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 15 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  20. Efficient generic on-line/off-line (threshold) signatures without key exposure q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kwangjo

    security requirements. Ó 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The notion of on-line/off-line manufacturing process or as a background computation whenever the card is connected to power, and the on-lineEfficient generic on-line/off-line (threshold) signatures without key exposure q Xiaofeng Chen a

  1. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apollonio, Marco [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  2. DRAFT NISTIR 8023 Risk Management for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with replication devices. Keywords 3D printers; 3D scanners; copiers; countermeasures; exploits; mitigation; multifunction devices; printers; replication devices; risk; risk assessment; risk management; scanners; security

  3. Sandia Energy - Risk and Safety Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk and Safety Assessment Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Risk and Safety AssessmentTara...

  4. Risk Management Process Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    risk management process The cybersecurity risk management process explained in the Electricity Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline has two primary...

  5. Risk transfer via energy savings insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fields of energy management and risk management are thusand Renewable Energy Options For Risk Management andbarriers to energy efficiency projects: risk of under-

  6. Equity Risk Premium and Insecure Property Rights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magin, Konstantin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper # 2009 -01 Equity Risk and Insecure Property Rightsof California Berkeley Equity Risk Premium and InsecureHow much of the equity risk premium puzzle can be attributed

  7. Risk-Averse Stochastic Dual Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Václav Kozmík

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 26, 2013 ... Abstract: We formulate a risk-averse multi-stage stochastic program using conditional value at risk as the risk measure. The underlying random ...

  8. Vulnerability, Risk Management, and Agricultural Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fafchamps, Marcel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. (1980). “Attitudes Towards Risk: Experimental MeasurementIncentive Flexibility, and Risk. ” Americal Journal ofCaria, A. S. (2009), Risk Attitudes and The Formation of

  9. Risk Taking and Gender in Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scotchmer, Suzanne

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Investors’ Attitudes toward Risk. ” forthcoming (2003)in attitudes toward ?nancial risk. ” Evolution and HumanGrossman. 2005a. “Sex and Risk: Experimen- tal Evidence. ” (

  10. Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic of Science and Health, the School of Health and Human Performance at DCU is developing an international reputation in health and exercise science. As such, the School of Health and Human Performance is committed

  11. Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Six: [15 Credit Hours] NURS 45010 Health Care Policy and Delivery Systems or NURS 46000 Health CareRoadmap: Integrated Health Studies ­ Health Services ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSV] College of Education, Health, and Human Services School of Health Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last

  12. Certification of Health Care Provider for Employee's Serious Health Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    of Health Care Provider for Employee's Serious Health Condition (Family and Medical Leave Act) SECTION I health condition to submit a medical certification issued by the employee's health care provider. Please: __________________________________________________________________________________ First Middle Last SECTION III: For Completion by the HEALTH CARE PROVIDER INSTRUCTIONS to the HEALTH

  13. Algorithmic Aspects of Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stehr, Mark-Oliver

    Algorithmic Aspects of Risk Management Ashish Gehani1 , Lee Zaniewski2 , and K. Subramani2 1 SRI International 2 West Virginia University Abstract. Risk analysis has been used to manage the security of sys configuration. This allows risk management to occur in real time and reduces the window of exposure to attack

  14. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT 2003-04 ANNUAL REPORT OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT #12;2 I. Introduction "Of course you have to go out on a limb sometimes, that's where the best outcome in a changing environment, is the essence of risk management.3 This Report was developed

  15. Human Resources, Safety & Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Human Resources, Safety & Risk Management 1600 Holloway Avenue, ADM 252 San Francisco, California OF RISK AND AGREEMENT TO PAY CLAIMS Activity: San Francisco State University Campus Recreation Department participating in this Activity. I am aware of the risks associated with traveling to/from and participating

  16. Quantitative Risk Management Rudiger Frey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Rüdiger

    Lecture Quantitative Risk Management R¨udiger Frey Universit¨at Leipzig Wintersemester 2010 risk management C. Introduction to Portfolio Credit Derivatives c 2010 (Frey) 1 #12;A. Introduction of counterparties. Measuring and management of credit risk is of high importance for financial institutions

  17. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT 2010 ANNUAL REPORT #12;2010 Annual Report Page 2 I. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management,538 $ 197,196 TOTAL Risk Management Costs $ 4,675,390 $ 4,541,975 $ 3,764,749 $ 3,703,959 $ 4

  18. "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Environmental Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Appendixes Environmental Impact Statement NESHAPS for Radionuclides for Hazardous Air Pollutants Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS Radionuclides VOLUME 2 for Hazardous Air Pollutants EPA 520.1'1.-89-006,-2 Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS

  19. FINANCIAL RISK MANAGER (FRM ) CERTIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Dec 2013 (Save 30%) (Save 15%) Module 1 Foundation of Risk Management & Quantitative Analysis 1086FINANCIAL RISK MANAGER (FRM® ) CERTIFICATION TRAINING PROGRAM 2014 JANUARY INTAKE 4 January to 10 1321 1552 Module 2 Financial Markets and Products & Valuation and Risk Models 1637 1985 2333 Module 3

  20. RISK AND INVESTMENT IN LIBERALIZED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISK AND INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT IN LIBERALIZED ELECTRICITY MARKETS Jacob Lemming Department during the period 2000­2003. The papers are centered around the theme Financial Risk in a Liberalized at Risk Management To be included in: Modelling Prices in Competitive Electricity Markets, edited by Derek

  1. Direct from CDC Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health specialists atAColorado's Tri-County Health Department, as well as at health departments in other, and Douglas counties, and have become more engaged in city planning. Tri-County's environmental health special

  2. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric power outages. Storm damage to transmission lineselectric power and transportation sectors. Storm damage to transmission lines

  3. In-line thermoelectric module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pento, Robert (Algonquin, IL); Marks, James E. (Glenville, NY); Staffanson, Clifford D. (S. Glens Falls, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric module with a plurality of electricity generating units each having a first end and a second end, the units being arranged first end to second end along an in-line axis. Each unit includes first and second elements each made of a thermoelectric material, an electrically conductive hot member arranged to heat one side of the first element, and an electrically conductive cold member arranged to cool another side of the first element and to cool one side of the second element. The hot member, the first element, the cold member and the second element are supported in a fixture, are electrically connected respectively to provide an electricity generating unit, and are arranged respectively in positions along the in-line axis. The individual components of each generating unit and the respective generating units are clamped in their in-line positions by a loading bolt at one end of the fixture and a stop wall at the other end of the fixture. The hot members may have a T-shape and the cold members an hourglass shape to facilitate heat transfer. The direction of heat transfer through the hot members may be perpendicular to the direction of heat transfer through the cold members, and both of these heat transfer directions may be perpendicular to the direction of current flow through the module.

  4. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft® Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tool’s design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

  5. Energy and Human Health Kirk R. Smith,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords coal, air pollution, biomass fuel, petroleum, nuclear energy accrue to the harvesting and burning of solid fuels, coal and biomass, mainly in the form of occupational health risks and household and general ambient air pollution. Lack of access to clean fuels

  6. Indoor Air Quality and Health in FEMA Temporary Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor Air Quality and Health in FEMA Temporary Housing For Healthcare Providers Background formaldehyde and air quality in FEMA trailers. This fact sheet provides basic information on formaldehyde expo sure, other air quality concerns, risk factors and tips to give to trailer residents so they can

  7. Underage Drinking Underage drinking is a serious public health problem in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    poses enormous health and safety risks. The consequences of underage drinking can affect everyone alcohol » By age 15, more than 50 percent of teens have had at least 1 drink.1 » By age 18, more than 70 on Drug Use and Health: Volume I. Summary of National Findings (Office of Applied Studies, NSDUH Series H

  8. LED Lighting Flicker and Potential Health Concerns: IEEE Standard PAR1789 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    LED Lighting Flicker and Potential Health Concerns: IEEE Standard PAR1789 Update Arnold Wilkins for mitigating health risks to viewers" has been formed to advise the lighting industry, ANSI/NEMA, IEC, EnergyStar and other standards groups about the emerging concern of flicker in LED lighting. This paper introduces

  9. Premier Inc. Serving 1,700 hospitals and more than 43,000 other health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reducing the cost of care. Owned by 200 not-for- profit health care providers and health system organizations, the alliance enables the owners to share services and programs aimed at improving the quality services: group purchasing and supply chain management, insurance and risk management, and informatics

  10. University of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    University of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT 2010 Annual Report #12;ERM 2010 Annual Report 2 December 2010 "Enterprise Risk Management" (ERM) - a process - to integrate risk into strategic UW Enterprise Risk Management Framework . . . . . . . . . 6 Illustration of ERM Components

  11. Optimal risk sharing under distorted probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludkovski, Michael; Young, Virginia R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    theory of risk. Geneva Pap. Risk Insurance Theory 25, 141–A. : Two-persons ef?cient risk-sharing and equilibria for36(2), 189–223 (2008) Optimal risk sharing under distorted

  12. Capillary electrophoresis-fluorescence line narrowing system (CE-FLNS) for on-line structural characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowiak, R.J.; Small, G.J.; Shields, P.A.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is interfaced with low temperature fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy for on-line structural characterization of separated molecular analytes. 21 figs.

  13. Capillary electrophoresis-fluorescence line narrowing system (CE-FLNS) for on-line structural characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowiak, Ryszard J. (Ames, IA); Small, Gerald J. (Ames, IA); Shields, Peter A. (Reading, MA)

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is interfaced with low temperature fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy for on-line structural characterization of separated molecular analytes.

  14. Roadmap: Public Health Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science in Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    and Control of Diseases 3 PH 30012 Communicable Diseases 3 PH 30015 United States Health Care System 3 42086 Economics of Health Care 3 PHIL 40005 Health Care Ethics 3 PH 40092 Internship in Public Health* 3 Sociology of Health and Health Care 3 *Fulfills ELR Ken

  15. Performing Probabilistic Risk Assessment Through RAVEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENviroment (RAVEN) code is a software tool that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing engine for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. RAVEN is now a multi-purpose Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) software framework that allows dispatching different functionalities: Derive and actuate the control logic required to simulate the plant control system and operator actions (guided procedures), allowing on-line monitoring/controlling in the Phase Space Perform both Monte-Carlo sampling of random distributed events and Dynamic Event Tree based analysis Facilitate the input/output handling through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a post-processing data mining module

  16. Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

  17. Risk Management RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -DepartmentRetail DemandEnergyRisk Management Review

  18. AMERIND Risk Annual Conference and Trade Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the AMERIND Risk, this three-day conference includes risk management training, workers' safety, human resources, and more.

  19. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  20. Chromospheric Dynamics and Line Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Hammer; P. Ulmschneider

    2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar chromosphere is very dynamic, due to the presence of large amplitude hydrodynamic waves. Their propagation is affected by NLTE radiative transport in strong spectral lines, which can in turn be used to diagnose the dynamics of the chromosphere. We give a basic introduction into the equations of NLTE radiation hydrodynamics and describe how they are solved in current numerical simulations. The comparison with observation shows that one-dimensional codes can describe strong brightenings quite well, but the overall chromospheric dynamics appears to be governed by three-dimensional shock propagation.

  1. Line-focus sun trackers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, R.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sun trackers have been a troublesome component for line-focus concentrating collector systems. The problems have included poor accuracy, component failures, false locks on clouds, and restricted tracker operating ranges. In response to these tracking difficulties, a variety of improved sun trackers have been developed. A testing program is underway at SERI to determine the tracking accuracy of this new generation of sun trackers. The three major types of trackers are defined, some recent sun tracker developments are described, and the testing that is underway is outlined.

  2. Radiative transfer in molecular lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Asensio Ramos; J. Trujillo Bueno; J. Cernicharo

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly convergent iterative methods developed by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho (1995) for radiative transfer (RT) applications are generalized to spherical symmetry with velocity fields. These RT methods are based on Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel (GS), and SOR iteration and they form the basis of a new NLTE multilevel transfer code for atomic and molecular lines. The benchmark tests carried out so far are presented and discussed. The main aim is to develop a number of powerful RT tools for the theoretical interpretation of molecular spectra.

  3. ShaRE Credit Line

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-Organic FrameworksCredit Line

  4. Line Management Perspective: National Nuclear Security Administration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Line Management Perspective: National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Addthis Description Slide Presentation by Jim...

  5. Methods of Using Existing Wire Lines (power lines, phone lines, internet lines) for Totally Secure Classical Communication Utilizing Kirchoff's Law and Johnson-like Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laszlo B. Kish

    2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline some general solutions to use already existing and currently used wire lines, such as power lines, phone lines, internet lines, etc, for the unconditionally secure communication method based on Kirchoff's Law and Johnson-like Noise (KLJN). Two different methods are shown. One is based on filters used at single wires and the other one utilizes a common mode voltage superimposed on a three-phase powerline.

  6. Methods of Using Existing Wire Lines (power lines, phone lines, internet lines) for Totally Secure Classical Communication Utilizing Kirchoff's Law and Johnson-like Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kish, L B

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline some general solutions to use already existing and currently used wire lines, such as power lines, phone lines, internet lines, etc, for the unconditionally secure communication method based on Kirchoff's Law and Johnson-like Noise (KLJN). Two different methods are shown. One is based on filters used at single wires and the other one utilizes a common mode voltage superimposed on a three-phase powerline.

  7. Discontinuities in transmission lines and wave guides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Harold Fletcher

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DISCONTINUITIES IN TRANSMISSION LINES AND WAVEGUIDES H. F. MATHIS DISCONTINUITIES IN TRANSMISSION LINES AND liVAVNGUIDBS A Thesis By Harola Fletcher htathis Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee DISCONTINUITIES... Subject. Electrical Engineering COHERENT S PAGE I Introduct ion, II Dl. scontlnuit les in Transmission Lines 2 1. Some Seneral char aeter 1 st 1 ca of the transmission lines. . . , . . . , ~ 5 2 ~ 2. Types of dlscontlnuitles ln transmls- sl...

  8. Risk Management Policy Category: Strategic Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Risk Management Policy Category: Strategic Management 1. PURPOSE To support the University will be encouraged to speak openly and honestly. (iii) Managers will monitor risk and will disclose risks identified's risk appetite. 2.3. Risk management standards 2.3.1 The University's risk management framework

  9. Building-related risk factors and work-related lower respiratory symptoms in 80 office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Naco, G.M.; Wilcox, T.G.; Sieber, W.K.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We assessed building-related risk factors for lower respiratory symptoms in office workers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in 1993 collected data during indoor environmental health investigations of workplaces. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess relationships between lower respiratory symptoms in office workers and risk factors plausibly related to microbiologic contamination. Among 2,435 occupants in 80 office buildings, frequent, work-related multiple lower respiratory symptoms were strongly associated, in multivariate models, with two risk factors for microbiologic contamination: poor pan drainage under cooling coils and debris in outside air intake. Associations tended to be stronger among those with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. These findings suggest that adverse lower respiratory health effects from indoor work environments, although unusual, may occur in relation to poorly designed or maintained ventilation systems, particularly among previously diagnosed asthmatics. These findings require confirmation in more representative buildings.

  10. A Roundtable Overview Driving the Top Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Roundtable Overview Driving the Top Line #12;© 2012 Glassmeyer/McNamee Center for Digital of the Center for Digital Strategies. Driving the Top Line A Thought Leadership Roundtable on Digital, Switzerland for a discussion on how information technology can help companies drive top-line revenue. In many

  11. Occupational Health Nurse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Occupational Health Nurse position is located in the Talent Sustainment group within the Human Capital Management (HCM) organization. The Talent Sustainment organization ensures that effective...

  12. Cross delay line sensor characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, Israel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Remelius, Dennis K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tiee, Joe J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Buck, Steven E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whittemore, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shirey, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a wealth of information in the scientific literature on the physical properties and device characterization procedures for complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS), charge coupled device (CCD) and avalanche photodiode (APD) format detectors. Numerous papers and books have also treated photocathode operation in the context of photomultiplier tube (PMT) operation for either non imaging applications or limited night vision capability. However, much less information has been reported in the literature about the characterization procedures and properties of photocathode detectors with novel cross delay line (XDL) anode structures. These allow one to detect single photons and create images by recording space and time coordinate (X, Y & T) information. In this paper, we report on the physical characteristics and performance of a cross delay line anode sensor with an enhanced near infrared wavelength response photocathode and high dynamic range micro channel plate (MCP) gain (> 10{sup 6}) multiplier stage. Measurement procedures and results including the device dark event rate (DER), pulse height distribution, quantum and electronic device efficiency (QE & DQE) and spatial resolution per effective pixel region in a 25 mm sensor array are presented. The overall knowledge and information obtained from XDL sensor characterization allow us to optimize device performance and assess capability. These device performance properties and capabilities make XDL detectors ideal for remote sensing field applications that require single photon detection, imaging, sub nano-second timing response, high spatial resolution (10's of microns) and large effective image format.

  13. Chapter 1: What is Health Psychology Health Psychology &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    ) and correlations of health, illness and dysfunction 4. Improving the health care system and formulating health #12 Descartes: Interactionism #12;Models of Health Care: Biomedical Model Focus on illness Dominant model Health Care Costs Outcomes Research Rise of the Biopsychosocial Model #12;The Mind-Body Relationship

  14. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    and ideas concerning the organization of the public health and medical care systems COURSE of the health care system and the interaction of providers (hospitals, physicians, etc), patients, and sources of health care financing (Medicaid, private health insurance etc) The historical development of the health

  15. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    ; and translating and disseminating research findings to health care providers, researchers, policymakersDCP - 1 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Drug Control Programs ..................................................................................................................................2 #12;DCP - 2 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Resource Summary

  16. Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahay, Sundeep

    Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation Elaine Byrne in supporting primary health care functioning, the design, development and implementation of these systems information systems, human rights 1. Introduction: Primary health care is a crucial element of national health

  17. Re-Visiting Health Informatics What is Health Informatics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    and the quality of care Facilitate remote healthcare at a patient's home #12;What do Health Informaticians DoRe-Visiting Health Informatics HINF1100 Fall 2008 #12;What is Health Informatics? · Health the effective organization, analysis, management and use of health information to improve the delivery

  18. Chapter 1: What is Health Psychology Health Psychology &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    of health, illness and dysfunction 4. Improving the health care system and formulating health #12;The Mind of Health Care: Biomedical Model ! Focus on illness ! Dominant model for the past 300 years ! All illness://www.sas.upenn.edu/~hatfield/ #12;! Changing Patterns of Illness! ! Escalating Health Care Costs! ! ! Outcomes Research! Rise

  19. Chapter 1: What is Health Psychology Health Psychology &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    . Improving the health care system and formulating health #12;The Mind-Body Relationship: A Brief History basis for diagnosis #12;Rene Descartes: Interactionism #12;Models of Health Care: Biomedical Model FocusChapter 1: What is Health Psychology Health Psychology & Behavioral Medicine Psyc 360 Dr. Meagher

  20. Health and Wellness @ U.Va. Department of Student Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Health and Wellness @ U.Va. Department of Student Health Counseling and Psychological Services "Without health there is no happiness. An attention to health, then, should take the place of every other on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations 2013 Parents Handbook p. 36-41 #12;Student Health Services · 12:30am-2

  1. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), Correctional Managed Health Care (CMHC) shall establish and maintain in Prisons (P-B-01). 2008. National Commission on Correctional Health Care. Chicago, IL. Approved: UCHC

  2. Risk assessment in environmental management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asante-Duah, D.K.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a straightforward exposition of US EPA-based procedures for the risk assessment and risk management of contaminated land, interwoven with discussions on some of the key fundamentals on the fate and transport of chemicals in the environment and the toxic action of environmental chemicals. The book is logically structured, commencing with a general overview of the principles of risk assessment and the interface with environmental legislation. There follows an introduction to environmental fate and transport, modeling, toxicology and uncertainty analysis, and a discussion of the elements of a risk assessment (site characterization, exposure analysis, toxic action and risk characterization), intake of a chemical with its environmental concentration and activity-related parameters such as inhalation rate and exposure time. The book concludes with a discussion on the derivation of risk-based action levels and remediation goals.

  3. Information needs for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRosa, C.T.; Choudhury, H.; Schoeny, R.S.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk assessment can be thought of as a conceptual approach to bridge the gap between the available data and the ultimate goal of characterizing the risk or hazard associated with a particular environmental problem. To lend consistency to and to promote quality in the process, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Carcinogenicity, Developmental Toxicity, Germ Cell Mutagenicity and Exposure Assessment, and Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures. The guidelines provide a framework for organizing the information, evaluating data, and for carrying out the risk assessment in a scientifically plausible manner. In the absence of sufficient scientific information or when abundant data are available, the guidelines provide alternative methodologies that can be employed in the risk assessment. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Optimization of Convex Risk Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megiddo

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Key words: Convex analysis; Stochastic optimization; Risk measures; Duality. MSC2000 Subject Classification: Primary: 90C15,90C48; Secondary: 91B30, ...

  5. Section 10: Risk Management Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 2, 2014 ... In this lesson we will discuss some concepts from risk management and insurance. We will go over the basic definitions and discuss some ...

  6. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment IV. Health and safety aspects of the eucalypt biomass to methanol energy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic eucalyptus-to-methanol energy process is described and possible health and safety risks are identified at all steps of the process. The toxicology and treatment for exposure to these substances are described and mitigating measures are proposed. The health and safety impacts and risks of the wood gasification/methanol synthesis system are compared to those of the coal liquefaction and conversion system. The scope of this report includes the health and safety risks of workers (1) in the laboratory and greenhouse, where eucalyptus seedlings are developed, (2) at the biomass plantation, where these seedlings are planted and mature trees harvested, (3) transporting these logs and chips to the refinery, (4) in the hammermill, where the logs and chips will be reduced to small particles, (5) in the methanol synthesis plant, where the wood particles will be converted to methanol, and (6) transporting and dispensing the methanol. Finally, the health and safety risks of consumers using methanol is discussed.

  7. Tapping into social resources to address occupational health : a network analysis of Vietnamese-owned nail salons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doan, Tam Minh-Thi, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Social networks in the Vietnamese nail salon industry were studied for their utility in addressing occupational health risks. Major findings include heavy reliance on family networks for fundamental needs, an extensive ...

  8. counselling health promotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health and counselling services health promotion 10 Ways to get active Most people find that power into your day. 1. take it outside. Ride a bike, go skating, fly a kite, throw a frisbee, kick chats for a power walk with friends and catch up face to face. 6. get involved locally. Join sports

  9. Health sciences Postgraduatecourses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    47 Cancer Care 47 Gerontological Nursing 48 Mental Health 49 Midwifery 51 Nursing 52 Palliative Care20 10 Health sciences Postgraduatecourses #12; Contents SCHOOL OF DENTAL SCIENCE 3 Named Degree Dentistry 6 Periodontics 6 Prosthodontics 7 Special Care Dentistry 8 Postgraduate Diplomas 9 Clinical

  10. Postgraduate Courses Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Cancer Care 49 Gerontological Nursing 50 Mental Health 51 Midwifery 53 Nursing 52 Palliative Care 552011 Postgraduate Courses Health Sciences #12; SCHOOL OF DENTAL SCIENCE 3 Named Degree Courses 4 Periodontics 6 Prosthodontics 7 Special Care Dentistry 8 Postgraduate Diplomas 9 Clinical Dental Technology 9

  11. Environmental Public Health Performance Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (Version 2.0) Updated May 2014 National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services #12;#12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (Version 2.0) Updated May 2014 #12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards

  12. Primary Health Faculty of Medicine,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, David

    School of Primary Health Care Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences Central Clinical Hospital Centre for Inflammatory Diseases School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine Australasian Disability Health Victoria School of Psychology and Psychiatry Centre for Rural Mental Health (in abeyance

  13. A Heart Health Alaska Natives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart Health Educator's Manual for Alaska Natives U . S . D E Health Service Office of Prevention, Education, and Control #12;Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Indian Health Service NIH Publication No. 06-5218 Revised

  14. Health Care Services Harvard Pilgrim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahav, Galit

    Health Care Services Harvard Pilgrim Health Care HMO 866-874-0817 www.harvardpilgrim.org Harvard Pilgrim Health Care POS 866-874-0817 www.harvardpilgrim.org Harvard University Group Health Program (HUGHP) HMO 617-495-2008 hughp.harvard.edu Harvard University Group Health Program (HUGHP) POS 617

  15. Unsplit bipolar pulse forming line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Mark A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A bipolar pulse forming transmission line module and system for linear induction accelerators having first, second, third, and fourth planar conductors which form a sequentially arranged interleaved stack having opposing first and second ends, with dielectric layers between the conductors. The first and second planar conductors are connected to each other at the first end, and the first and fourth planar conductors are connected to each other at the second end via a shorting plate. The third planar conductor is electrically connectable to a high voltage source, and an internal switch functions to short at the first end a high voltage from the third planar conductor to the fourth planar conductor to produce a bipolar pulse at the acceleration axis with a zero net time integral. Improved access to the switch is enabled by an aperture through the shorting plate and the proximity of the aperture to the switch.

  16. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bacon, Larry D. (Albuquerque, NM); Ballard, William P. (Albuquerque, NM); Clark, M. Collins (Albuquerque, NM); Marder, Barry M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields arfe produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap.

  17. Gamma-Ray Burst Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Briggs

    1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The evidence for spectral features in gamma-ray bursts is summarized. As a guide for evaluating the evidence, the properties of gamma-ray detectors and the methods of analyzing gamma-ray spectra are reviewed. In the 1980's, observations indicated that absorption features below 100 keV were present in a large fraction of bright gamma-ray bursts. There were also reports of emission features around 400 keV. During the 1990's the situation has become much less clear. A small fraction of bursts observed with BATSE have statistically significant low-energy features, but the reality of the features is suspect because in several cases the data of the BATSE detectors appear to be inconsistent. Furthermore, most of the possible features appear in emission rather than the expected absorption. Analysis of data from other instruments has either not been finalized or has not detected lines.

  18. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kenneth E. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  19. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  20. Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management Supervisor's Vehicle Incident Report-Employee Volunteer Drivers License No. State of Issue UO Certification Date UO Driver Training Date Vehicle Information: License No. Make Model Year UO Vehicle # Motorpool Outside Rental Personal Vehicle Incident

  1. Health Status and Health Literacy in Older Adults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulton, Daphne Saxon

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between health literacy and the health status of older adults. The first section of the study consisted of a comprehensive literature review of prior research regarding cognitive, health, and behavioral...

  2. Health Insurance Marketplace Notice New Health Insurance Marketplace...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Options and Your Health Coverage PART A: General Information When key parts of the health care law take effect in 2014, there will be a new way to buy health insurance: the...

  3. Risk-based approach for controlling beryllium exposure in a manufacturing environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, W. E. (Walter E.); Clawson, C. D. (Chris D.); Ellis, K. K. (Kimberly K.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many diverse uses for beryllium in both military and industrial applications. Unfortunately, there are certain worker health risks associated with the manufacture and production of beryllium products. Respiratory illnesses due to prolonged contact with beryllium particulate are of paramount concern. However, these health risks can be controlled provided that the appropriate protective measures to prevent worker exposure from beryllium are in place. But it is no1 always a straightforward process to identify exactly what the beryllium protective measures should be in order to realize a true risk savings. Without prudent attention to a systematic inquiry and suitable evaluative criteria, a program for controlling beryllium health risks can be lacking in completeness and overall effectiveness. One approach that took into account the necessary ingredients for risk-based determination of beryllium protective measures was developed for a beryllium operation at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. The methodological framework that was applied at this facility, as well as a discussion of the final beryllium protective measures that were determined by this approach will be presented. Regulatory aspects for working with beryllium, as well as a risk-assessment strategy for ranking beryllium-handling activities with respect to exposure potential will also be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a synopsis of lessons-learned as gleaned from this case study, as well as providing the participants with a constructive blueprint that can be adapted to other processes involving beryllium.

  4. How information resources are used by federal agencies in risk assessment application: Rapporteur summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenner-Crisp, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of information available for risk assessment from the federal perspective is described. Different federal agencies conduct varying degrees of hazard evaluation, and some also generate empirical data. The role of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in hazard assessments of potential public health impacts of Superfund sites includes identification of the 275 most significant substances. ATSDR is responsible for preparing toxicological profiles. ATSDR also identifies data gaps and needs critical to adequately assessing human health impacts.

  5. Collective Risk Control And Group Security: The Unexpected Consequences of Differential Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Martin C; Ihori, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003) Group formation in risk-sharing arrangements, Reviewof Tokyo, Conference on risk management, August 2, 2002.2002) Collective international risk control: failure of the

  6. READ AND SIGN THE PARTIAL ASSUMPTION OF RISK ON REVERSE Risk Management 12/2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    READ AND SIGN THE PARTIAL ASSUMPTION OF RISK ON REVERSE Risk Management 12/2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management: riskmanagement ___________________________________________ (name/title of department supervisor) and the Office of Risk Management, (541) 346-8316, within 24 hours

  7. About the relevance ofthe concept of risk acceptability in the risk analysis and risk management process: A decisional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    About the relevance ofthe concept of« risk acceptability » in the risk analysis and risk management analysis and risk management are taken. This can be introduced by: ft) giving an image ofwhat are involved and participate to the risk management process. In France, the Toulouse disaster has revealed

  8. Roadmap: Public Health Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science in Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Diseases 3 PH 30015 United States Health Care System 3 General Elective 6 Semester Seven: [15 CreditRoadmap: Public Health ­ Health Services Administration ­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-HSVA] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 29-May-13/LNHD This roadmap

  9. Joint Seminar Risk Management Institute &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Joint Seminar Risk Management Institute & Department of Decision Sciences Details of Seminar Date and statistics is leading to a greatly broadened theory of regression which draws on tools of convex analysis with factor analysis in finance and economics. Risk Management Institute Joint Seminar #12;

  10. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  11. Faculty of Health York University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Health York University Integrated Resource Plan 2012 ­ 2015 #12;Faculty of Health Integrated Resource Plan: 2012 ­ 2015 | Executive Summary Page 2 of 20 .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Faculty of Health Strategic Initiatives Summary

  12. Princeton University Health Services *** CONFIDENTIAL***

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    Princeton University Health Services *** CONFIDENTIAL*** Medical Profile and Consent for Care Give/program abroad sponsor and to be provided to health care personnel in the event that I require medical care: ____________________________________________________________________ Health Insurance: Company: ________________________ Policy No.: ______________________________ Group No

  13. Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ................................................................................................................ 42 I. Access to Health Care Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report A Report to the West Virginia Bureau for Medical of Health and Human Resources, Bureau for Medical Services. #12; 1 Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE

  14. Comparing and Contrasting Health and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    / private partnership Institutional Change In Health: · The Affordable Care Act (ACA) · The recognitionComparing and Contrasting Health and Transportation as Complex Sociotechnical Systems System: Comparing and Contrasting Health and Transportation as Complex Sociotechnical Systems Ideas about

  15. Health-Compromising Behaviors characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    , cognitive impairments, 15% of health care costs = Etoh abuse treatment, underestimate of health costsHealth-Compromising Behaviors characteristics substance abuse and dependence ­ opponent process theory ­ incentive salience ­ frontal executive effects alcohol abuse and dependence smoking #12

  16. Public health and economic impact of dampness and mold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudarri, David; Fisk, William J.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures was assessed using current asthma as a health endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes from Fisk et al. (2007), and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of U.S. current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21% (95% confidence internal 12-29%). An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings, which is summarized in the appendix, suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Of the 21.8 million people reported to have asthma in the U.S., approximately 4.6 (2.7-6.3) million cases are estimated to be attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home. Estimates of the national cost of asthma from two prior studies were updated to 2004 and used to estimate the economic impact of dampness and mold exposures. By applying the attributable fraction to the updated national annual cost of asthma, the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1-4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks in the U.S. These findings are compatible with public policies and programs that help control moisture and mold in buildings.

  17. NSLS-II Transport Line Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

  18. DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichhorn, Andreas

    DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION VIA POLYHEDRAL RISK FUNCTIONALS the dynamic decision structure appropriately. In energy risk management, which is typically carried out ex, for integrating risk management into a stochastic optimization framework, risk has to be quantified in a definite

  19. RMI 357e spring 2013 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    RMI 357e ­ spring 2013 1 Risk Management R M 357e Professor: Christopher McClellan Office: CBA 3 thomaspjacob@utexas.edu Syllabus ­ spring 2013 Textbook Risk Management for Enterprises and Individuals, v.1://students.flatworldknowledge.com/course/1112649 Risk Management: 357E. Risk Management - Upper-Division Course Principles of risk management

  20. DOT`s perspective on in-line inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, L.W. [Dept. of Transportation, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Pipeline Safety

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Transportation (DOT) and its Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS) have been involved with in-line inspection (ILI) pigs since the construction of the Alaska crude oil pipeline. Congressionally mandated reports concerning ILI pigs, and a regulation requiring new and replaced pipe and components be designed and constructed to accommodate ILI pigs, were issued by DOT. DOT also may mandate ILI pigs to be run on some pipelines. There is no current federal requirement to run ILI pigs. They are required by OPS in selected compliance cases. DOT supports future ILI pig research. The use of ILI pig surveys, incorporated in pipeline operators` future risk management plans developed as safety alternatives to the established pipeline safety regulations, will be supported.

  1. DOT`s perspective on in-line inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, L.W. [Dept. of Transportation, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Pipeline Safety

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Transportation and its Office of Pipeline Safety have been involved with in-line inspection (ILI) pigs since the construction of the Alaska crude oil pipeline in the early 1970s. Two Congressionally mandated reports concerning ILI pigs and a regulation requiring new and replaced pipe and components to be designed and constructed to accommodate ILI pigs have been issued by the Department. Although there is no present federal requirement to run ILI pigs, they are required by the Office of Pipeline Safety in selected compliance cases. The Department will continue to use ILI pigs in compliance cases. It also supports future ILI pig research, and the use of ILI pig surveys incorporated in any pipeline operator`s future risk management plans developed as safety alternatives to the established pipeline safety regulations. The Department also in the future may require ILI pigs to be run on some pipelines.

  2. Estimate of the risks of disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Assuming a single, generic salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, the best-estimate excess cancer risks ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} to 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} and hazard indices (referring to noncancer health effects) ranged from 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. Under worse-case conditions in which the probability of cavern failure is 1.0, excess cancer risks ranged from 4.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} to 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and hazard indices ranged from 7.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 0.07. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks are within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can, therefore, provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.

  3. Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

  4. Utilizing toxicogenomic data to understand chemical mechanism of action in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Vickie S., E-mail: wilson.vickie@epa.gov [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Keshava, Nagalakshmi [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hester, Susan [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Segal, Deborah; Chiu, Weihsueh [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Thompson, Chad M. [ToxStrategies, Inc., 23501 Cinco Ranch Blvd., Suite G265, Katy, TX 77494 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The predominant role of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment, thus far, has been one of augmentation of more traditional in vitro and in vivo toxicology data. This article focuses on the current available examples of instances where toxicogenomic data has been evaluated in human health risk assessment (e.g., acetochlor and arsenicals) which have been limited to the application of toxicogenomic data to inform mechanism of action. This article reviews the regulatory policy backdrop and highlights important efforts to ultimately achieve regulatory acceptance. A number of research efforts on specific chemicals that were designed for risk assessment purposes have employed mechanism or mode of action hypothesis testing and generating strategies. The strides made by large scale efforts to utilize toxicogenomic data in screening, testing, and risk assessment are also discussed. These efforts include both the refinement of methodologies for performing toxicogenomics studies and analysis of the resultant data sets. The current issues limiting the application of toxicogenomics to define mode or mechanism of action in risk assessment are discussed together with interrelated research needs. In summary, as chemical risk assessment moves away from a single mechanism of action approach toward a toxicity pathway-based paradigm, we envision that toxicogenomic data from multiple technologies (e.g., proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, supportive RT-PCR studies) can be used in conjunction with one another to understand the complexities of multiple, and possibly interacting, pathways affected by chemicals which will impact human health risk assessment.

  5. Historical Disability Outcomes of Enrollees in the Kansas High Risk Pool: A White Paper presented to CMS by the Kansas DMIE Project January, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper reports the historical rates of disability outcomes (e.g., transition to Social Security disability status) for people enrolled in Kansas' state high-risk health insurance pool.

  6. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vukelich, S.E. [Golder Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 operable unit on the Hanford Reservation. 100-HR-3 is a ground water unit. The purpose of the QRA at the 100-HR-3 operable unit is to focus on a predefined set of human and environmental exposure scenarios in order to provides sufficient information that will assist the Tri-Party signatories (Washington State Department of Ecology, EPA and US DOE) in making defensible decisions on the necessity of Interim Remedial Measures. Frequent- and occasional-use exposure scenarios are evaluated in the human health risk assessment to provide bounding estimates of risk. The ecological risk assessment consists of an evaluation of the risks to riparian and aquatic receptors which live in or near the Columbia River.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  8. DOE Sustainability Reporting Open Line Help Call

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) sponsors open line help calls to assist DOE sites and national laboratories with the annual sustainability reporting process. Representatives from the...

  9. Rubber linings answer to many problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehra, L. [Quality Linings Co., Aurora, CO (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The uses of rubber linings in different fields industries are discussed.The physical properties of rubber both natural and synthetic rubber are listed and their importance is evaluated. The aging of rubber is discussed in detail, including effects of temperature on aging of rubber. By virtue of its inherent elasticity and chemical resistance, rubber linings have found many uses in the protection of mining equipment, water treatment tanks and vessels, flue gas desulfurization equipment in power plants and varied process and storage vessels in chemical industries. Rubber has found extensive use in civil engineering field as expansion joints and bladders in dams. Electrical resistance of rubber is useful for its application as an insulating material. Rubber is chemically resistant to acids, alkalies and many salt solutions. Rubber linings are therefore used for protection of steel against these acids, alkalies or salt solutions. The extreme elasticity of rubber has been found useful in its application as a lining material in areas subject to high abrasion. Frequently rubber linings are the linings of choice when a combination of abrasion and chemical attack are to be protected against. Constantly, new formulations of rubber lining compounds are being developed just as new chemical processes are being made. The flexibility of compounding and the relative ease of putting layers of different rubber formulations together in multilayered formulations of rubber lining compounds is leading to new uses of this lining material.

  10. Transmission Line Security Monitor: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Svoboda

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Transmission Line Security Monitor System Operational Test is a project funded by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). TSWG operates under the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office that functions under the Department of Defense. The Transmission Line Security Monitor System is based on technology developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The technology provides a means for real-time monitoring of physical threats and/or damage to electrical transmission line towers and conductors as well as providing operational parameters to transmission line operators to optimize transmission line operation. The end use is for monitoring long stretches of transmission lines that deliver electrical power from remote generating stations to cities and industry. These transmission lines are generally located in remote transmission line corridors where security infrastructure may not exist. Security and operational sensors in the sensor platform on the conductors take power from the transmission line and relay security and operational information to operations personnel hundreds of miles away without relying on existing infrastructure. Initiated on May 25, 2007, this project resulted in pre-production units tested in realistic operational environments during 2010. A technology licensee, Lindsey Manufacturing of Azusa California, is assisting in design, testing, and ultimately production. The platform was originally designed for a security monitoring mission, but it has been enhanced to include important operational features desired by electrical utilities.

  11. Emergency Management Lines of Inquiry, April 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Inspection Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry Functional Area: Hazards Survey (HS) and Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment (EPHA) Inspection Criteria: Emergency...

  12. Detonator comprising a nonlinear transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Detonators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the detonator includes a nonlinear transmission line that has a variable capacitance. Capacitance of the nonlinear transmission line is a function of voltage on the nonlinear transmission line. The nonlinear transmission line receives a voltage pulse from a voltage source and compresses the voltage pulse to generate a trigger signal. Compressing the voltage pulse includes increasing amplitude of the voltage pulse and decreasing length of the voltage pulse in time. An igniter receives the trigger signal and detonates an explosive responsive to receipt of the trigger signal.

  13. Data driven health system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen Ceruolo, Melissa Beth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective use of data is believed to be the key to address systemic inefficiencies in health innovation and delivery, and to significantly enhance value creation for patients and all stakeholders. However, there is no ...

  14. Essays on health economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafrin, Jason T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quarterly Journal of Economics Davidson SM, Manheim LM,The Quarterly Journal of Economics 84(3): 488-500. Atella V,data. Journal of Health Economics 27(3): 770-785. Averett S

  15. Health & Medicine Heart Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    See Also: Health & Medicine Heart Disease· Medical Imaging· Vioxx· Matter & Energy Electronics· Technology· Medical Technology· Reference Artificial heart· Biosensor· Circuit design· Machine· Science and stretchable electronics can map waves of electrical activity in the heart with better resolution and speed

  16. Udaipur Health Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Banerjee

    2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This data set contains data on the health histories of, and access to healthcare facilities for, individuals located in the Udaipur districts of Rajasthan, India. Data was collected at the household level, as well as at ...

  17. HEALTH SCIENCES POSTGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methodology to derive research outcomes will include collaboration with clinical, biomedical sciences and Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. CHIRI adopts a multidisciplinary approach to research in these key areas synthesis and transfer. Key areas include patient safety and health outcomes, pharmacoepidemiology

  18. PRA and Risk Informed Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernsen, Sidney A.; Simonen, Fredric A.; Balkey, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has introduced a risk based approach into Section XI that covers Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components. The risk based approach requires application of the probabilistic risk assessments (PRA). Because no industry consensus standard existed for PRAs, ASME has developed a standard to evaluate the quality level of an available PRA needed to support a given risk based application. The paper describes the PRA standard, Section XI application of PRAs, and plans for broader applications of PRAs to other ASME nuclear codes and standards. The paper addresses several specific topics of interest to Section XI. Important consideration are special methods (surrogate components) used to overcome the lack of PRA treatments of passive components in PRAs. The approach allows calculations of conditional core damage probabilities both for component failures that cause initiating events and failures in standby systems that decrease the availability of these systems. The paper relates the explicit risk based methods of the new Section XI code cases to the implicit consideration of risk used in the development of Section XI. Other topics include the needed interactions of ISI engineers, plant operating staff, PRA specialists, and members of expert panels that review the risk based programs.

  19. Screening Level Risk Assessment for the New Waste Calcining Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. L. Abbott; K. N. Keck; R. E. Schindler; R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; M. B. Heiser

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This screening level risk assessment evaluates potential adverse human health and ecological impacts resulting from continued operations of the calciner at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The assessment was conducted in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report, Guidance for Performing Screening Level Risk Analyses at Combustion Facilities Burning Hazardous Waste. This screening guidance is intended to give a conservative estimate of the potential risks to determine whether a more refined assessment is warranted. The NWCF uses a fluidized-bed combustor to solidify (calcine) liquid radioactive mixed waste from the INTEC Tank Farm facility. Calciner off volatilized metal species, trace organic compounds, and low-levels of radionuclides. Conservative stack emission rates were calculated based on maximum waste solution feed samples, conservative assumptions for off gas partitioning of metals and organics, stack gas sampling for mercury, and conservative measurements of contaminant removal (decontamination factors) in the off gas treatment system. Stack emissions were modeled using the ISC3 air dispersion model to predict maximum particulate and vapor air concentrations and ground deposition rates. Results demonstrate that NWCF emissions calculated from best-available process knowledge would result in maximum onsite and offsite health and ecological impacts that are less then EPA-established criteria for operation of a combustion facility.

  20. Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies -Health Sciences Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies - Health Sciences ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSC] College Updated: 14-May-13/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major Elective (upper division) 3 See note 3 on page 3 #12;Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies - Health Sciences