National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for health risk assessment

  1. Health_and_safety/Risk Assessment/2012/Workstation_Risk_Assessment_Form_Aug-2012 Workstation Risk Assessment Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Health_and_safety/Risk Assessment/2012/Workstation_Risk_Assessment_Form_Aug-2012 Workstation Risk No Is the noise level acceptable? Yes No Notes: #12;Health_and_safety/Risk Assessment/2012/Workstation_Risk_Assessment Assessment Form Workstation user: Location: Assessor: Date of assessment: COMPUTER Screen: Are the characters

  2. Health effects of risk-assessment categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

    1983-10-01

    Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

  3. A new approach to criteria for health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery; Katscherian, Dianne; Goh, Yang Miang

    2012-01-15

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a developing component of the overall impact assessment process and as such needs access to procedures that can enable more consistent approaches to the stepwise process that is now generally accepted in both EIA and HIA. The guidelines developed during this project provide a structured process, based on risk assessment procedures which use consequences and likelihood, as a way of ranking risks to adverse health outcomes from activities subjected to HIA or HIA as part of EIA. The aim is to assess the potential for both acute and chronic health outcomes. The consequences component also identifies a series of consequences for the health care system, depicted as expressions of financial expenditure and the capacity of the health system. These more specific health risk assessment characteristics should provide for a broader consideration of health consequences and a more consistent estimation of the adverse health risks of a proposed development at both the scoping and risk assessment stages of the HIA process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more objective approach to health risk assessment is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences for chronic and acute impacts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences on the health care system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for event frequency that could impact on health. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The approach presented is currently being trialled in Australia.

  4. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R.

    1990-12-31

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  5. Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S.

    1990-12-31

    Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality M. Valari(1), L risk assessment #12;Pollutants concentrations [c] Population exposure [c] x dt Air pollution health

  7. Information resources used in health risk assessment by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, G.B.; Baratta, M.; Wolfson, S.; McGeorge, L.

    1990-12-31

    The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection`s responsibilities related to health-based risk assessment are described, including its research projects and its development of health based compound specific standards and guidance levels. The resources used by the agency to support health risk assessment work are outlined.

  8. Assessment of public health risk associated with viral contamination in harvested urban stormwater for domestic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    Assessment of public health risk associated with viral contamination in harvested urban stormwater non-potable uses of treated stormwater are modeled. · Crop irrigation poses the highest risk, followed Keywords: Adenovirus Disease burden Health risk Norovirus QMRA Stormwater harvesting Capturing stormwater

  9. A risk assessment software tool for evaluating potential risks to human health and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drendel, G.; Allen, B.; Gentry, R.; Shipp, A.; Van Landingham, C.

    1994-12-31

    The Ecology and National Environmental Policy Act Division (END), is providing a sitewide evaluation of alternative strategies for the final disposition of the Rocky Flats Plant material inventory. This analysis is known as the Systems Engineering Analysis (SEA) for the Rocky Flats Plant. The primary intent of the SEA is to support the Rocky Flats Plant decision-making. As part of the SEA project, a risk assessment software tool has been developed which will assist in the analysis by providing an evaluation of potential risks to human health and the environment for the purpose of augmenting future decisions at the site.

  10. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15

    RAGS Risk Assessment Guidance For Superfund RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act SD Sum of Squared Deviation TCDD 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin TEF Toxic Equivalency Factor TEF B Bioassay Based Toxic Equivalency... Amendments (HSWA) of 1984 further strengthened the EPA?s ability to regulate waste disposal. The HSWA was responsible for the eventual removal of land disposal of hazardous wastes. Cancers, renal disease, circulatory disorders, reproductive disorders...

  11. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Human health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purucker, S.T.; Douthat, D.M.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow- up information to the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that could cause potential human health risk and ecological risk within WAG2 at ORNL. The purpose of this report is to present a summary of the human health risk assessment results based on the data collected for the WAG 2 Phase 1 RI. Estimates of risk are provided based on measured concentrations in the surface water, floodplain soil, and sediment of White Oak Creek, Melton Branch, and their tributaries. The human health risk assessment methodology used in this risk assessment is based on Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS). First, the data for the different media are elevated to determine usability for risk assessment. Second, through the process of selecting chemicals of potential concern (COPCs), contaminants to be considered in the risk assessment are identified for each assessment of exposure potential is performed, and exposure pathways are identified. Subsequently, exposure is estimated quantitatively, and the toxicity of each of the COPCs is determined. The results of these analyses are combined and summarized in a risk characterization.

  12. Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-04-29

    The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem ({plus_minus}2.4) to 0.04 mrem ({plus_minus}0.13) and translate to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments to about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site.

  13. A macro environmental risk assessment methodology for establishing priorities among risks to human health and the environment in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gernhofer, S.; Oliver, T.J.; Vasquez, R.

    1994-12-31

    A macro environmental risk assessment (ERA) methodology was developed for the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) as part of the US Agency for International Development Industrial Environmental Management Project. The DENR allocates its limited resources to mitigate those environmental problems that pose the greatest threat to human health and the environment. The National Regional Industry Prioritization Strategy (NRIPS) methodology was developed as a risk assessment tool to establish a national ranking of industrial facilities. The ranking establishes regional and national priorities, based on risk factors, that DENR can use to determine the most effective allocation of its limited resources. NRIPS is a systematic framework that examines the potential risk to human health and the environment from hazardous substances released from a facility, and, in doing so, generates a relative numerical score that represents that risk. More than 3,300 facilities throughout the Philippines were evaluated successfully with the NRIPS.

  14. USDOE study: Human health and ecological risk assessment for produced water discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.; Hamilton, L.D.

    1994-12-31

    Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain high concentrations of radionuclides, organics and heavy metals. There are concerns about potential human health and ecological impacts from the discharge of these contaminants to the Gulf of Mexico. Data collected in the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) field study are being used in a series of human health and ecological risk assessments. These assessments will support scientifically-based regulation and risk management. This presentation: summarizes risk assessments performed for produced water discharges; describes how uncertainties in these assessments are guiding data collection efforts in the USDOE field study; and outlines ongoing risk assessment studies. In these studies, risk assessment is treated as an iterative process. An initial screening-level assessment is performed to identify important contaminants, transport and exposure pathways, and parameters. These intermediate results are used to guide data collection efforts and refinements to the analysis. At this stage in the analysis, risk is described in terms of probabilities; the uncertainties in each measured or modeled parameter are considered explicitly.

  15. SCHIFFERT HEALTH CENTER TUBERCULOSIS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM (REQUIRED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    symptoms? ___ NO If YES, check all that apply. Persistent cough for more than 3 weeks ___ Yes Unexplained weight loss ___ Yes Productive cough with bloody sputum ___ Yes Exposure Risks

  16. Health risk assessment: WTE (waste-to-energy) vs. peanut butter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaels, R.A. (RAM TRAC Corp., Long Island, NY (USA))

    1988-10-01

    The degree to which society will come to accept potential health risks associated with municipal waste-to-energy plants depends on three factors: the reliability with which exposure and adverse health effects associated with facility emissions can be described, quantified, and gradually reduced; the relative magnitude of the risks compared with those of other waste management options, especially landfilling and recycling; and the relative magnitude of the risks compared with those of more familiar activities, such as driving, flying, smoking, and eating peanut butter sandwiches. Progress in risk assessment has already improved quantification of human exposure to emissions through the food chain, as well as through other pathways within the general categories of inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact. Where does this progress leave municipal refuse incineration relative to other risks This article explores that issue.

  17. Human and animal health risk assessments of chemicals in the food chain: Comparative aspects and future perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorne, J.L.C.M.; Fink-Gremmels, J.

    2013-08-01

    Chemicals from anthropogenic and natural origins enter animal feed, human food and water either as undesirable contaminants or as part of the components of a diet. Over the last five decades, considerable efforts and progress to develop methodologies to protect humans and animals against potential risks associated with exposure to such potentially toxic chemicals have been made. This special issue presents relevant methodological developments and examples of risk assessments of undesirable substances in the food chain integrating the animal health and the human health perspective and refers to recent Opinions of the Scientific Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). This introductory review aims to give a comparative account of the risk assessment steps used in human health and animal health risk assessments for chemicals in the food chain and provides a critical view of the data gaps and future perspectives for this cross-disciplinary field. - Highlights: ? Principles of human and animal health risk assessment. ? Data gaps for each step of animal health risk assessment. ? Implications of animal risk assessment on human risk assessment. ? Future perspectives on chemical risk assessment.

  18. Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    Health risk assessment is based on access to comprehensive information about potentially hazardous agents in question. Relevant information is scattered throughout the literature, and often is not readily accessible. To be useful in assessment efforts, emerging scientific findings, risk assess parameters, and associated data must be compiled and evaluated systemically. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are among the federal agencies heavily involved in this effort. This symposium was a direct response by EPA and ORNL to the expressed needs of individuals involved in assessing risks from chemical exposure. In an effort to examine the state of the risk assessment process, the availability of toxicological information, and the future development and transfer of this information, the symposium provided an excellent cadre of speakers and participants from state and federal agencies, academia and research laboratories to address these topics. This stimulating and productive gathering discussed concerns associated with (1) environmental contamination by chemicals; (2) laws regulating chemicals; (3) information needs and resources; (4) applications; (5) challenges and priorities; and (6)future issues. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  19. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  20. An assessment of mercury emissions and health risks from a coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.M.; Lipfert, F.; Moskowitz, P.

    1994-12-01

    Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) mandated that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluate the need to regulate mercury emissions from electric utilities. In support of this forthcoming regulatory analysis the U.S. DOE, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the US MeHg is the predominant way of exposure to mercury originated in the atmosphere. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1,000 MW coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. This study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Even at these more elevated exposure levels, the attributable incidence in mild neurological symptoms was estimated to be quite small, especially when compared with the estimated background incidence in the population. The current paper summarizes the basic conclusions of this assessment and highlights issues dealing with emissions control and environmental transport.

  1. Method of assessing a lipid-related health risk based on ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2010-12-14

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  2. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment: Climate Change Risk Assessment Elevensectors(forinitial analysis) Health Energy Transport Built

  3. Why Risk Assessment? Because ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Střlen, Ketil

    Why Risk Assessment? Because ... CORAS is committed to supporting international industry can take advantage of the CORAS technology in order to give their mission critical risk assessment assessment methodology integrating techniques and features from partly complementary risk assessment methods

  4. Phase 1 data summary report for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: Health risk and ecological risk screening assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Longman, R.C.; McGinn, C.W.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.; Williams, L.F.

    1992-12-01

    The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants released from the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. The contaminants released since the early 1940s include a variety of radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of Phase 1 of the CRRI. Phase 1 was designed to (1) obtain high-quality data to confirm existing historical data for contaminant levels in fish, sediment, and water from the CR/WBR; (2) determine the in the range of contaminant concentrations present river-reservoir system; (3) identify specific contaminants of concern; and (4) establish the reference (background) concentrations for those contaminants.

  5. Neighborhood level health risk assessment of lead paint removal activities from elevated steel bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, R.F.; Cohen, J.T.; Bowers, T.

    1999-07-01

    The New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) has adopted strict containment and monitoring procedures during paint removal activities on its bridges because of the increasing awareness about lead poisoning in children in urban environments and the potential risk of lead-based paint releases during those activities. NYCDOT owns nearly 800 bridges scattered throughout New York City. Before undertaking paint removal activities as part of its ongoing preventive maintenance and rehabilitation program, NYCDOT recently conducted an analysis to determine the public health risk posed to children living near them. The analysis the first of its kind to assess the actual public health risk potential during both routine operations and upset conditions, or accidental releases evaluated the total and incremental blood lead levels from paint removal activities on more than 5,000 children from 6 months to 6 years old. Increases in baseline blood lead levels were estimated using several models, including EPA's Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) Model. This model estimates steady-state blood lead levels in children, reflecting exposure to lead in multiple media over an extended period of time. Increases in lead exposure from paint removal activities in the area surrounding the bridges was estimated using EPA's Industrial Source Complex (ISC3) model to calculate ambient air and deposition levels. Potential releases from the containment and ancillary equipment used in the paint removal process were modeled based on different release scenarios ranging from routine operations to complete failure of containment. To estimate the paint removal activities' contribution to long-term exterior dust lead levels (and its related interior component), a stochastic simulation model was developed for each block in the study area.

  6. Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

    2012-01-01

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

  7. Risk Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A set of issues that state and local governments should carefully consider, with the goal of helping them assess and anticipate solutions for some worst case or unfortunate case scenarios as they...

  8. Risk Assessment Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Risk Assessment ® Fact Sheet U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Building Strong ® Buffalo District June 2012 Risk Assessment A risk assessment is performed for hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste sites and chemicals in the environment. Information from the risk assessment is used to determine whether action

  9. Risk assessment in international operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricklin, Daniela L.

    2008-11-15

    During international peace-keeping missions, a diverse number of non-battle hazards may be encountered, which range from heavily polluted areas, endemic disease, toxic industrial materials, local violence, traffic, and even psychological factors. Hence, elevated risk levels from a variety of sources are encountered during deployments. With the emphasis within the Swedish military moving from national defense towards prioritization of international missions in atypical environments, the risk of health consequences, including long term health effects, has received greater consideration. The Swedish military is interested in designing an optimal approach for assessment of health threats during deployments. The Medical Intelligence group at FOI CBRN Security and Defence in Umea has, on request from and in collaboration with the Swedish Armed Forces, reviewed a variety of international health threat and risk assessment models for military operations. Application of risk assessment methods used in different phases of military operations will be reviewed. An overview of different international approaches used in operational risk management (ORM) will be presented as well as a discussion of the specific needs and constraints for health risk assessment in military operations. This work highlights the specific challenges of risk assessment that are unique to the deployment setting such as the assessment of exposures to a variety of diverse hazards concurrently.

  10. Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Health Risk and Environmental Analysis SHARE Human Health Risk and Environmental Analysis Help decision makers assess emerging technologies and methods for identifying and...

  11. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-18

    Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

  12. Sandia Energy - Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Probabilistic Risk Assessment Probabilistic...

  13. Hazardous waste transportation risk assessment for the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement -- human health endpoints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Lazaro, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    In this presentation, a quantitative methodology for assessing the risk associated with the transportation of hazardous waste (HW) is proposed. The focus is on identifying air concentrations of HW that correspond to specific human health endpoints.

  14. Risk Assessment Sally Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    or publicly owned treatment works) whose regulations and rule enforcement work to make sure that the risksRisk Assessment Sally Brown University of Washington Risk in our day to day routines One could argue that every thing that we do, every day is fraught with risks and that the safest approach is just

  15. Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

    2012-05-01

    Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

  16. Sandia Energy - Security Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Risk Assessment Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Security Risk Assessment Security Risk Assessmentcwdd2015-05-04T21:...

  17. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P.

    2013-09-15

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) — i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on “augmentation” of weight of evidence — using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards “integration” of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for “expansion” of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual “reorientation” of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  18. Assessing Coronary Risk Assessment: What's Next?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiscella, Kevin; Franks, Peter

    2010-01-01

    KZ, Steinman MA. Coronary risk assessment by point-based vs.Educa- tion Program risk assessment and potential for riskrecord-based cardiac risk assessment and identification of

  19. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    risk from surface CO2 seeps. Data were elicited from Googas (17), a web-based catalogue of degassing

  20. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS PRACTICES TRENDS AUDITS policies #12;2 Privacy & Information Security Annual Update Thursday, June 20, 2013 of Breach statistics Plan to comply with requirements · Training and Education Information Security · Risk

  1. Phase 1 data summary report for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: Health risk and ecological risk screening assessment. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Longman, R.C.; McGinn, C.W.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.; Williams, L.F.

    1992-12-01

    The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants released from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. The contaminants released since the early 1940s include a variety of radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of Phase 1 of the CRRI. Phase 1 was designed to (1) obtain high-quality data to confirm existing historical data for contaminant levels in fish, sediment, and water from the CR/WBR; (2) determine the in the range of contaminant concentrations present river-reservoir system; (3) identify specific contaminants of concern; and (4) establish the reference (background) concentrations for those contaminants.

  2. Health Assessment Requirements Candidate Waiver Request Health Assessment Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    Health Assessment Requirements Candidate Waiver Request Health Assessment Management System Please: To Position #: Position Title: Environmental Health & Safety Use Only Reviewer Name: ___________________ Effective Date: _______________ Comments: Revised: May 14, 2012 #12;Health Assessment Requirements Candidate

  3. "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Environmental Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Appendixes Environmental Impact Statement NESHAPS for Radionuclides for Hazardous Air Pollutants Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS Radionuclides VOLUME 2 for Hazardous Air Pollutants EPA 520.1'1.-89-006,-2 Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS

  4. Sandia Energy - Risk and Safety Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk and Safety Assessment Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Risk and Safety AssessmentTara...

  5. Health and environmental risks of energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper gives four examples of health risk assessments of energy systems: (1) Comparative risk assessment of the health effects of the coal and nuclear fuel cycles. Estimates differ from previous values chiefly by inclusion of ranges of uncertainty, but some coal-cycle numbers were re-estimated. Upper-boundary public disease risks of air pollution from coal-fired plants dominate. Reactors probably account for most of the potential effect of major nuclear accidents. Accidental death rates in electricity generation are low for reactors and higher for coal. (2) Upper boundary air pollution health risks of existing fossil-based energy technologies in the United States. Preliminary mortality estimates were obtained combining potential impacts of three index pollutants - SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 2/, and CO - as independent measures of risk. Four fuel cycle trajectories leading to three end-uses were analyzed. Example results: domestic wood burning has substantial potential impact, with an upper boundary exceeding that of coal; upper-boundary air pollution impacts of gas can exceed those of oil, because of NO/sub 2/. (3) Health risks of acid deposition and other transported air pollutants, carried out as part of an assessment of the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) Acid Rain and Transported Air Pollutants - Implications for Public Policy. Three scenarios were examined, leading to estimates of 40,000 to 50,000 annual premature deaths, depending on year (1978 vs 2000) and scenario (holding total emissions constant vs 30% reduction). (4) health effects of uranium mill tailings piles. Mortality risk is estimated to be minuscule (8.7 x 10/sup -9/ average individual lifetime cancer risk from a model mill, compared with 9.5 x 10/sup -4/ for background radiation). Methods that sum risks over the indefinite future are shown to be to be unrealistic. 39 references, 7 figures, 15 tables.

  6. State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mission Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State...

  7. Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID INSECTICIDE risk assessments, the authors performed a probabilistic aquatic ecological risk assessment. The present study is the first ecological risk assessment for pyrethroids to quantitatively integrate

  8. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies. Revision 5/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which man is routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies. This report is not a risk assessment; nor does it contain instructions on how to do a risk assessment. Rather, it provides background information on how most of us think about risks and why it is difficult to do it rationally, it provides a philosophy and data with which to do a better job of judging risks more rationally, and it provides an overview of where risks of energy technologies fit within the spectrum of all risks. Much of the quantitative information provided here is on relative risk of dying of various causes. This is not because risk of dying is seen as the most important kind of risk, but because the statistics on mortality rates by cause are the highest quality data available on health risks in the general population.

  9. A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartjes, Frank A. Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

    2013-10-15

    Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plant–soil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plant–soil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a ‘conservative’ vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a ‘realistic worst case’ site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: • A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. • Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. • Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

  10. Information needs for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRosa, C.T.; Choudhury, H.; Schoeny, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    Risk assessment can be thought of as a conceptual approach to bridge the gap between the available data and the ultimate goal of characterizing the risk or hazard associated with a particular environmental problem. To lend consistency to and to promote quality in the process, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Carcinogenicity, Developmental Toxicity, Germ Cell Mutagenicity and Exposure Assessment, and Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures. The guidelines provide a framework for organizing the information, evaluating data, and for carrying out the risk assessment in a scientifically plausible manner. In the absence of sufficient scientific information or when abundant data are available, the guidelines provide alternative methodologies that can be employed in the risk assessment. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and...

  12. United States Environmental Protection Agency: Use of risk assessment and risk management methodologies. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamuro, R.J.

    1992-09-30

    Make a full investigation of the policy implications and appropriate uses of risk assessment and risk management in regulatory programs under various Federal laws to prevent cancer and other chronic health effects which may result from exposure to hazardous substances. This is the primary mission of the Risk Assessment and Management Commission (Risk Commission). The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), created the Risk Commission reflecting Congress' concern over agency use of risk assessment and risk management techniques and methodologies to implement federal laws protective of human health. The Risk Commission is to consider: methods for measuring and describing risks of chronic health effects from hazardous substances; methods to reflect uncertainties associated with estimation techniques, and whether it is possible or desirable to develop a consistent risk assessment methodology or a consistent standard of acceptable risk for various federal programs.

  13. Resources for global risk assessment: The International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) and Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) databases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullenweber, Andrea Kroner, Oliver; Kohrman, Melissa; Maier, Andrew; Dourson, Michael; Rak, Andrew; Wexler, Philip; Tomljanovic, Chuck

    2008-11-15

    The rate of chemical synthesis and use has outpaced the development of risk values and the resolution of risk assessment methodology questions. In addition, available risk values derived by different organizations may vary due to scientific judgments, mission of the organization, or use of more recently published data. Further, each organization derives values for a unique chemical list so it can be challenging to locate data on a given chemical. Two Internet resources are available to address these issues. First, the International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) database ( (www.tera.org/iter)) provides chronic human health risk assessment data from a variety of organizations worldwide in a side-by-side format, explains differences in risk values derived by different organizations, and links directly to each organization's website for more detailed information. It is also the only database that includes risk information from independent parties whose risk values have undergone independent peer review. Second, the Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) is a database of in progress chemical risk assessment work, and includes non-chemical information related to human health risk assessment, such as training modules, white papers and risk documents. RiskIE is available at (http://www.allianceforrisk.org/RiskIE.htm), and will join ITER on National Library of Medicine's TOXNET ( (http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/)). Together, ITER and RiskIE provide risk assessors essential tools for easily identifying and comparing available risk data, for sharing in progress assessments, and for enhancing interaction among risk assessment groups to decrease duplication of effort and to harmonize risk assessment procedures across organizations.

  14. Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS as required under the CONTROL OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH REGULATIONS (COSHH) and the DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES AND EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERES Involving the Use of Hazardous Chemicals. COSHH requires health risks to be assessed and controlled

  15. Risk Assessment of Diesel-Fired

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlllet, Dylan B.

    Risk Assessment of Diesel-Fired Back-up Electric Generators Operating in California Prepared of the toxicity of various hazardous air pollutants in diesel emissions. Wayne Miller, the Director discussions on diesel back-up generators and, more broadly, the environmental health impacts of electricity

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & High Tan + CFV 3D Risk Profile All FV-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  18. AVLIS Criticality risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.J., LLNL

    1998-04-29

    Evaluation of criticality safety has become an important task in preparing for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) uranium enrichment runs that will take place during the Integrated Process Demonstration (IPD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This integrated operation of AVLIS systems under plant-like conditions will be used to verify the performance of process equipment and to demonstrate the sustained integrated enrichment performance of these systems using operating parameters that are similar to production plant specifications. Because of the potential criticality concerns associated with enriched uranium, substantial effort has been aimed towards understanding the potential system failures of interest from a criticality standpoint, and evaluating them in detail. The AVLIS process is based on selective photoionization of uranium atoms of atomic weight 235 (U-235) in a vapor stream, followed by electrostatic extraction. The process is illustrated in Figure 1. Two major subsystems are involved: the uranium separator and the laser system. In the separator, metallic uranium is fed into a crucible where it is heated and vaporized by an electron beam. The atomic U-235/U-238 vapor stream moves away from the molten uranium and is illuminated by precisely tuned beams of dye laser light. Upon absorption of the tuned dye laser light, the U-235 atoms become excited and eject electrons (become photoionized), giving them a net positive charge. The ions of U-235 are moved preferentially by an electrostatic field to condense on the product collector, forming the enriched uranium product. The remaining vapor, which is depleted in U-235 (tails), passes unaffected through the photoionization/extractor zone and accumulates on collectors in the top of the separator. Tails and product collector surfaces operate at elevated temperatures so that deposited materials flow as segregated liquid streams. The separated uranium condensates (uranium enriched in U-235 and uranium depleted in U-235) are cooled and accumulated in solid metallic form in canisters. The collected product and tails material is weighed and transferred into certified, critically safe, shipping containers (DOT specification 6M with 2R containment vessel). These will be temporarily stored, and then shipped offsite either for use by a fuel fabricator, or for disposal. Tails material will be packaged for disposal. A criticality risk assessment was performed for AVLIS IPD runs. In this analysis, the likelihood of occurrence of a criticality was examined. For the AVLIS process, there are a number of areas that have been specifically examined to assess whether or not the frequency of occurrence of a criticality is credible (frequency of occurrence > 10-6/yr). In this paper, we discuss only two of the areas: the separator and canister operations.

  19. Incinerator thermal release valve risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J.B.

    1998-12-31

    Human health risk assessments were conducted on emissions from several types of incinerators--a hazardous waste combustor, a medical waste/tire combustor, and a refuse derived fuel combustor in three different states. As part of these studies, the short-term emissions from thermal release valves operating during upset conditions were additionally evaluated. The latter assessments addressed two specific risk-related questions: (1) what are the incremental long-term risks/hazards associated with these short-term emissions; (2) what are the acute health hazards associated with these emissions? For each study, emission estimates for both the incinerator stack and the thermal release valve were obtained from the facility. Stack testing was utilized to obtain stack gas concentrations of emissions at one facility; engineering estimates were used to ascertain emissions from the thermal release valve. The two facilities were proposed incinerators, so literature-derived emissions were used throughout.

  20. Utility View of Risk Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bickham, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper will address a utility perspective in regard to risk assessment, reliability, and impact on the utility system. Discussions will also include the critical issues for utilities when contracting for energy and capacity from cogenerators...

  1. Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.

    2010-01-01

    carbon sequestration risk assessment, in Carbon Dioxidecarbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy Procedia,Risk Assessment Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;11/21/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  5. Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services 3-107 Research Transition of Insurance Policy Standards Department of Management Services Protective Services Management & Risk Management & Risk Assessment Office Resource Planning Tel: 780.248.1147 Tel: 780.492.5050 Tel: 780

  6. Assessing Uncertainty in Simulation Based Maritime Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    Assessing Uncertainty in Simulation Based Maritime Risk Assessment #12;Abstract Recent work in the assessment of risk in maritime transportation systems has used simulation-based probabilistic risk assessment techniques. In the Prince William Sound and Washington State Ferries risk assessments, the studies

  7. Risk assessment activities at NIOSH: Information resources and needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stayner, L.T.; Meinhardt, T.; Hardin, B.

    1990-12-31

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health, and Mine Safety and Health Acts, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is charged with development of recommended occupational safety and health standards, and with conducting research to support the development of these standards. Thus, NIOSH has been actively involved in the analysis of risk associated with occupational exposures, and in the development of research information that is critical for the risk assessment process. NIOSH research programs and other information resources relevant to the risk assessment process are described in this paper. Future needs for information resources are also discussed.

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile What-If FV - Oil

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC & DH100 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time Exposure: 100 Draft #12;11/18/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;R: KM 348 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile What-If FV - Oil Time

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;11/20/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile What-If FV - Oil Time

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;R: KM 348 3D RiskVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision;11/22/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP & ER 3D Risk Profile All

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision;11/22/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/22/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP & ER 3D Risk Profile All FV

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP & ER 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time

  19. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science Network Requirements ReportEESEcological Risk

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/13/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL

  1. St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RISK ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RISK ASSESSMENT "Gateway to Excellence" U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Louis District WHAT IS A RISK ASSESSMENT? The risk assessment is a method used to quantify threats). By examining the potential adverse effects caused by a hazardous substance, the risk assessment can help decide

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION FREQUENCY - PCF Draft #12;12/13/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL

  3. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  4. Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F. M.

    2003-06-03

    An environmental risk assessment associated with the disposal of projected Immobilized Low-Activity Waste, solid wastes and failed or decommissioned melters in an Integrated Disposal Facility was performed. Based on the analyses all performance objectives associated with the groundwater, air, and intruder pathways were met.

  5. CLIMATE CHANGE A RISK ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    CLIMATE CHANGE A RISK ASSESSMENT David King, Daniel Schrag, Zhou Dadi, Qi Ye and Arunabha Ghosh/JAROS, and U.S./JapanASTER Science Team. China National Expert Committee on Climate Change Hosts of the project for Climate Change, and was formerly the UK Government's Chief Scientific Adviser. He has authored over 500

  6. Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butt, Talib E. Lockley, Elaine; Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K.

    2008-07-01

    A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/18/2013 2 GW-VCU Draft #12;P: BC & DH100 3D Risk Profile All FV - Pot. Ground. Oil OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/18/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr;11/18/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft #12;11/18/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15 WATERWAY

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/21/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/21/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC & OB HE100 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time Exposure: 100% of Base;11/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 OIL TIME EXPOSURE- OTE Draft #12;11/19/2013 5 GW

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max. Speed-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision T ­ GW ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1) Draft #12;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding T ­ GW ­ KM ­ DP & 6 RMM's Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1) Draft #12;11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS

  2. HEALTH AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    1 HEALTH AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE The information on this form will be kept strictly the property of the University Health Service of the University of Newcastle. The University of Newcastle is committed to achieving a safe and healthy workplace for its staff. Based on the completed Health and Hazard

  3. Risk Assessment Using Local Outlier Factor Algorithm Bozidara Cvetkovi1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu?trek, Mitja

    Risk Assessment Using Local Outlier Factor Algorithm Bozidara Cvetkovi1,2 , Mitja Lustrek1,2 1 the unsupervised machine-learning algorithm named Local Outlier Factor (LOF), for health risk assessment machine-learning, LOF, nominal attributes, health risk assessment 1 Introduction The purpose

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR HOSPITAL SYSTEMS SERVING MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK 2012 Lakeside Health System Rochester General Health System Unity Health System Memorial Hospital Developed Collaboratively with Finger Lakes Health System Agency Monroe County Department

  5. COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR HOSPITAL SYSTEMS SERVING MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK 2013 Lakeside Health System Rochester General Health System Unity Health System Memorial Hospital Developed Collaboratively with Finger Lakes Health System Agency Monroe County Department

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;R: KM 348 3D-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;S: DP 415 3D-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3D-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  9. Experimental Validation of a Risk Assessment Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieringa, Roel

    Experimental Validation of a Risk Assessment Method Eelco Vriezekolk1,3(B) , Sandro Etalle2, that is, that methods can be repeated with the same results. Risk assessments methods, however, often have. [Question/problem] Our goal is to assess the reliability of an availability risk assessment method

  10. MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT A Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Deployed Military Personnel After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT A Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Deployed a retrospective probabilistic risk assessment for military personnel potentially exposed to insecticides during, and cypermethrin used for residual sprays. We used the risk quotient (RQ) method for our risk assessment (estimated

  11. Risk Assessment Coherent Risks: An Axiomatic Approach Relation with Cooperative Game Concluding Remarks Risk, Coherency and Cooperative Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    Risk Assessment Coherent Risks: An Axiomatic Approach Relation with Cooperative Game Concluding 2011 1 / 30 #12;Risk Assessment Coherent Risks: An Axiomatic Approach Relation with Cooperative Game Concluding Remarks Outline 1 Risk Assessment Risk = Volatility? Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT) Risk

  12. Health impact assessment in Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Eunjeong; Lee, Youngsoo; Harris, Patrick; Koh, Kwangwook; Kim, Keonyeop

    2011-07-15

    Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

  13. RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) is established to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) with the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear...

  14. GPS RISK ASSESSMENT STUDY FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    GPS RISK ASSESSMENT STUDY FINAL REPORT VS-99-007 JANUARY 1999 M8A01 REVISED Sponsor: Mr. J. R. Ryan PHYSICS LABORATORY 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, Maryland 20723-6099 #12;GPS RISK ASSESSMENT STUDY

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR FV 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;U : GW - KM - DP & VAR 3D Risk Profile All FV - Oil Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;Q: GW 487 & NB GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC & LOW GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/19/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  1. EPA`s risk assessment guidelines: Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, D.E.

    1990-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment guidelines for cancer, quantification, and exposure issues are discussed.

  2. PERFORMANCE AND RISK ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    --- Topic: Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice Webinar Date: Thursday, February 20, 2014 Time: 11:00 am,...

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO #12;T: GW) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO #12;12/23/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 9 GW

  5. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO #12;12/23/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/12/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;12/12/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;P-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;11/21/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/21/2013 6 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;T ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/21/2013 10 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/13/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL;12/13/2013 8 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    -VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3 RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15 WATERWAY

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;11/17/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/17/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;T-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO #12;12/23/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO #12;12/23/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;12/12/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;12/12/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;P TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15 WATERWAY

  13. BIOSAFETY LEVELS AND RISK ASSESSMENT POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    BIOSAFETY LEVELS AND RISK ASSESSMENT POLICY Procedure: 2.2 Created: 3/7/2014 Version: 1.0 A risk assessment to account for the characteristics of the agent being used, the procedures of infection, a risk assessment is required in all cases to initially establish the appropriate biocontainment

  14. Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.

    2010-01-01

    Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment Christina E. Cowan-implications for chemical risk assessment. J Environ MonitJM. 2006. Screening level risk assessment model for chemical

  15. Careful risk assessment needed to evaluate transgenic fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Olin, Paul G.

    2006-01-01

    for environmental risk assessments of transgenic ?sh. TrendsREVIEW ARTICLE Careful risk assessment needed to evaluatetive populations, and careful risk assessment is required to

  16. Risk Assessment 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ISSUES IN SEX OFFENDER RISK ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grove, William M.

    Risk Assessment 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ISSUES IN SEX OFFENDER RISK ASSESSMENT Prediction Issues and the Role of Incremental Validity in Sex Offender Risk Assessment Martin D. Lloyd University of Minnesota #12;Risk Assessment 2 Abstract We review issues of prediction and discuss their relevance

  17. Spatial Analysis of Health Risk Perception, Agenda and Position Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Spatially Integrated Social Science

    2003-01-01

    Risk perception. Ch 5 of Risk Analysis, Perception andworkplace methodology. Risk Analysis, 23, 311-324. Henwood,classic dilemmas in risk analysis. The perception of health

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/12/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING FREQUENCY

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12;12/23/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING FREQUENCY

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Q: GW 487 & NB & OH

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision: GW ­ KM ­ DP & +1 Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P: BC/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/12/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  4. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  5. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU Draft #12-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P-2 0-1 12/19/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/19/2013 4 GW

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-2 0-1 12/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T : GW - KM - DP & +VAR-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/23/2013 4 GW

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/13/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr & +1 Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding ­ KM ­ DP & +1 Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM/21/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/21/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/21/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;P-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/18/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision Oil Loss Dr. J. Rene van Dorp and Dr. Jason R.W Merrick 11/18/2013 1 GW-VCU November 2013 CASE P: BASE

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ) 2010 Draft #12;11/18/2013 4 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OILVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding Oil Loss Dr. J. Rene van Dorp and Dr. Jason R.W Merrick 11/18/2013 1 GW-VCU November 2013 CASE P: BASE

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    COLLISION OIL LOSS - PCO Draft #12;11/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision Oil Loss Dr. J. Rene van Dorp and Dr. Jason R.W Merrick 11/19/2013 1 GW-VCU November 2013 CASE P: BASE

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/19/2013 5 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIALVESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding Oil Loss Dr. J. Rene van Dorp and Dr. Jason R.W Merrick 11/19/2013 1 GW-VCU November 2013 CASE P: BASE

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure Escort for all Focus Vessels on Haro Routes Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-BOUNDARY ROUTES (GREEN

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125% of Base Case VTE 23-24 22-23 21-22 20-21 19-20 18-19 17-18 16

  2. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure GW-VCU Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 RMM 1: Max. Speed of Container Vessels at 17 knots. RMM 2: Reduce Human Error incident on Oil Barges by 50% RMM 3: No Bunkering

  3. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure Escort Cape Size Draft #12;11/21/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 DEFINITION OF ASSUMED LOCATIONS FOR ADDED ESCORT VESSEL FOR HARO-BOUNDARY ROUTES (GREEN) AND FOR ROSARIO ROUTES (ORANGE

  4. Application of the bioecological model and health belief model to self-reported health risk behaviors of adolescents in the united states 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleary, Sasha A.

    2009-05-15

    . Adolescents from a suburban Indiana area were asked to complete the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey which assessed egocentrism, self-esteem, social norms, risk perceptions, and the incidence and prevalence of health endangering behaviors. Hierarchical...

  5. D&D and Risk Assessment Tools

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ORISE and PNNL both developed tools to assist in the risk assessment and planning of D&D activities. PNNL developed a Risk D&D tool, a rapid prototype computerbased model, to evaluate...

  6. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure & No Bunkering Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 113% of Base Case VTE 23-24 22-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;Q: GW 487 & NB

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Bunkering Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base Case VTE 23-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;S: DP 415 3

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure & No Bunkering & Only Haro Draft #12;Q: GW 487 & NB 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 108% of Base-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Cargo FV set at High December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Bunkering Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base Case VTE 23-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;R: KM 348 3

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure ­ DP & Tankers set Low #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125% of Base-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12;T

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure GW-VCU Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base Case VTE 23-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;T: GW - KM

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Bunkering Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base Case VTE 23-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;Q: GW 487 3

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure + Cargo FV set Low December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure set at High December 2013 Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure and Cargo FV set at High Draft #12;P: Base Case 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 100% of Base-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure Way ATB's Rosario #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125% of Base Case-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12;T: GW

  18. Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana Open Bays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1995-06-23

    Data were collected prior to termination of discharge at three sites (including two open bay sites at Delacroix Island and Bay De Chene) for the risk assessments. The Delacroix Island Oil and Gas Field has been in production since the first well drilling in 1940; the Bay De Chene Field, since 1942. Concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Po, and 228Th were measured in discharges. Radium conc. were measured in fish and shellfish tissues. Sediment PAH and metal conc. were also available. Benthos sampling was conducted. A survey of fishermen was conducted. The tiered risk assessment showed that human health risks from radium in produced water appear to be small; ecological risk from radium and other radionuclides in produced water also appear small. Many of the chemical contaminants discharged to open Louisiana bays appear to present little human health or ecological risk. A conservative screening analysis suggested potential risks to human health from Hg and Pb and a potential risk to ecological receptors from total effluent, Sb, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Ag, Zn, and phenol in the water column and PAHs in sediment; quantitiative risk assessments are being done for these contaminants.

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/22/2013 6 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12;11/22/2013 7 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 T: GW - KM;11/22/2013 9 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 POTENTIAL GROUNDING OIL LOSS - PGO Draft #12

  20. Criteria for assessing the quality of nuclear probabilistic risk assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yingli, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    The final outcome of a nuclear Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is generally inaccurate and imprecise. This is primarily because not all risk contributors are addressed in the analysis, and there are state-of-knowledge ...

  1. State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mission Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative OE is leading a State Energy Risk...

  2. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Seismic Risk Assessment Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Risk Assessment Project: Implementation of Proposed Methodology at INL and Associated Risk Studies Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Implementation...

  3. Advanced Test Reactor outage risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, T.A.; Atkinson, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    Beginning in 1997, risk assessment was performed for each Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) outage aiding the coordination of plant configuration and work activities (maintenance, construction projects, etc.) to minimize the risk of reactor fuel damage and to improve defense-in-depth. The risk assessment activities move beyond simply meeting Technical Safety Requirements to increase the awareness of risk sensitive configurations, to focus increased attention on the higher risk activities, and to seek cost-effective design or operational changes that reduce risk. A detailed probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) had been performed to assess the risk of fuel damage during shutdown operations including heavy load handling. This resulted in several design changes to improve safety; however, evaluation of individual outages had not been performed previously and many risk insights were not being utilized in outage planning. The shutdown PRA provided the necessary framework for assessing relative and absolute risk levels and assessing defense-in-depth. Guidelines were written identifying combinations of equipment outages to avoid. Screening criteria were developed for the selection of work activities to receive review. Tabulation of inherent and work-related initiating events and their relative risk level versus plant mode has aided identification of the risk level the scheduled work involves. Preoutage reviews are conducted and post-outage risk assessment is documented to summarize the positive and negative aspects of the outage with regard to risk. The risk for the outage is compared to the risk level that would result from optimal scheduling of the work to be performed and to baseline or average past performance.

  4. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Quantification issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dourson, M.L.

    1990-12-31

    The quantitative procedures associated with noncancer risk assessment include reference dose (RfD), benchmark dose, and severity modeling. The RfD, which is part of the EPA risk assessment guidelines, is an estimation of a level that is likely to be without any health risk to sensitive individuals. The RfD requires two major judgments: the first is choice of a critical effect(s) and its No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL); the second judgment is choice of an uncertainty factor. This paper discusses major assumptions and limitations of the RfD model.

  5. Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

  6. Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 79-102,1996 Noncancer Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 79-102,1996 Noncancer Risk Assessment uncertainty in noncancer risk assessment will be useful to risk managers who face complex trade-offs between, noncancer risk assessment INTRODUCTION The USEPA's current approach to noncancer risk assessment is coming

  7. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;11/17/2013 4 GW

  8. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU Draft #12-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/12/2013 4 GW

  9. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

  10. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/20/2013 3 GW-VCU #12

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12;12/12/2013 4 GW

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/17/2013 2 GW-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/17/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  15. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  16. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Oil Time Exposure Dr-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/13/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  17. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-12 10-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12

  18. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/19/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  19. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Collision-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/23/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 #12

  20. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 12/12/2013 3 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Draft #12

  1. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Potential Grounding-11 9-10 8-9 7-8 6-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 11/20/2013 2 GW-VCU VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA-7 5-6 4-5 3-4 2-3 1-2 0-1 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 11/20/2013 3 GW-VCU #12

  2. Modelling risk and risking models: the diffusive boundary between science and policy in volcanic risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Amy R.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2014-11-27

    This article examines the science-policy interface in volcanic risk assessment. It analyses empirical data from research on Montserrat, where new volcanic risk assessment methodologies were pioneered. We discuss the ways in which these methods...

  3. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-03-01

    The Gasbuggy site is in northern New Mexico in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County (Figure 1-1). The Gasbuggy experiment was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation, a tight, gas-bearing sandstone formation. The 29-kiloton-yield nuclear device was placed in a 17.5-inch wellbore at 4,240 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), approximately 40 ft below the Pictured Cliffs/Lewis shale contact, in an attempt to force the cavity/chimney formed by the detonation up into the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The test was conducted below the southwest quarter of Section 36, Township 29 North, Range 4 West, New Mexico Principal Meridian. The device was detonated on December 10, 1967, creating a 335-ft-high chimney above the detonation point and a cavity 160 ft in diameter. The gas produced from GB-ER (the emplacement and reentry well) during the post-detonation production tests was radioactive and diluted, primarily by carbon dioxide. After 2 years, the energy content of the gas had recovered to 80 percent of the value of gas in conventionally developed wells in the area. There is currently no technology capable of remediating deep underground nuclear detonation cavities and chimneys. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must continue to manage the Gasbuggy site to ensure that no inadvertent intrusion into the residual contamination occurs. DOE has complete control over the 1/4 section (160 acres) containing the shot cavity, and no drilling is permitted on that property. However, oil and gas leases are on the surrounding land. Therefore, the most likely route of intrusion and potential exposure would be through contaminated natural gas or contaminated water migrating into a producing natural gas well outside the immediate vicinity of ground zero. The purpose of this report is to describe the current site conditions and evaluate the potential health risks posed by the most plausible contaminant exposure scenario, drilling of natural gas wells near the site. The results of this risk evaluation will guide DOE's future surveillance and monitoring activities in the area to ensure that site conditions are adequately protective of human health. This evaluation is not a comprehensive risk assessment for the site; it is intended to provide assurance that DOE's monitoring approach can detect the presence of site-related contamination at levels well below those that would pose an unacceptable risk to human health.

  4. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, SAFETY, AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, SAFETY, AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL Table of Contents Mission Manual Chapter VIII - Radiation Safety Technical Manual Chapter IX - Risk Management Technical Manual public. For this reason, the Environmental Health, Safety and Risk Management Department (EHSRM

  6. School of Engineering Guidance on Completing a Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neri, Peter

    April 2013 School of Engineering Guidance on Completing a Risk Assessment Based on HSE Five steps to risk assessment INDG163(rev2) What is risk assessment? A risk assessment is simply a careful if necessary When thinking about your risk assessment, remember: A hazard is anything that may cause harm

  7. Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

    2008-10-10

    This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required...

  8. Dynamic Operational Risk Assessment with Bayesian Network 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barua, Shubharthi

    2012-10-19

    dependencies of equipment/components and timing of safety system operations, all of which are time dependent criteria that can influence dynamic processes. The conventional risk assessment methodologies can quantify dynamic changes in processes with limited...

  9. Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

    2009-05-15

    This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required...

  10. Approaches to cancer assessment in EPA's Integrated Risk Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehlhaus, Martin W.; Gift, Jeffrey S.; Hogan, Karen A.; Kopylev, Leonid; Schlosser, Paul M.; Kadry, Abdel-Razak

    2011-07-15

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program develops assessments of health effects that may result from chronic exposure to chemicals in the environment. The IRIS database contains more than 540 assessments. When supported by available data, IRIS assessments provide quantitative analyses of carcinogenic effects. Since publication of EPA's 2005 Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment, IRIS cancer assessments have implemented new approaches recommended in these guidelines and expanded the use of complex scientific methods to perform quantitative dose-response assessments. Two case studies of the application of the mode of action framework from the 2005 Cancer Guidelines are presented in this paper. The first is a case study of 1,2,3-trichloropropane, as an example of a chemical with a mutagenic mode of carcinogenic action thus warranting the application of age-dependent adjustment factors for early-life exposure; the second is a case study of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, as an example of a chemical with a carcinogenic action consistent with a nonlinear extrapolation approach. The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to quantify interindividual variability and account for human parameter uncertainty as part of a quantitative cancer assessment is illustrated using a case study involving probabilistic PBPK modeling for dichloromethane. We also discuss statistical issues in assessing trends and model fit for tumor dose-response data, analysis of the combined risk from multiple types of tumors, and application of life-table methods for using human data to derive cancer risk estimates. These issues reflect the complexity and challenges faced in assessing the carcinogenic risks from exposure to environmental chemicals, and provide a view of the current trends in IRIS carcinogenicity risk assessment.

  11. A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoudi, Hossein; Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. ; Renn, Ortwin; Vanclay, Frank; Hoffmann, Volker; Karami, Ezatollah

    2013-11-15

    An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, ‘risk and social impact assessment’ (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the social impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: • A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. • RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. • RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. • For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.

  12. Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO2 Storage Project in Saskatchewan, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houseworth, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Framework Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO 2Risk Assessment..confidence in the risk assessment. . Potential Sequestration

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 3D Relative Risk Profile Comparison Vessel Time Exposure & Additional Variability of Case T What-If Focus Vessel Arrivals Draft #12;T: GW - KM - DP 3D Risk Profile All FV - Vessel Time Exposure: 125% of Base Case VTE 23-24 22-23 21-22 20-21 19-20 18-19 17-18 16-17 15

  14. Policy Analysis Risk Assessment for Polycyclic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    Policy Analysis Risk Assessment for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon NAPLs Using Component Fractions not capture the variation in NAPL composition over time and as such do not consider changes in risk over time analysis of a lumped parameter approach. The fractions and priority pollutants are modeled as NAPL

  15. Creating a Culture of Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Creating a Culture of Risk Assessment Creating a Culture of Risk Assessment Decisions regarding how to secure and invest in the Nation's energy infrastructure are often complex....

  16. Improving Risk Assessment to Support State Energy Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving Risk Assessment to Support State Energy Infrastructure Decision Making Improving Risk Assessment to Support State Energy Infrastructure Decision Making May 22, 2015 -...

  17. List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Discussion List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of...

  18. Annual Report: National Risk Assessment Partnership (30 September...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Risk Assessment Partnership (30 September 2012) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Annual Report: National Risk Assessment Partnership (30 September 2012) The U.S....

  19. The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for Addressing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for Addressing DOE Order 420.1C & A Proposed Generic Methodology The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for...

  20. Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.

    2010-01-01

    Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

  1. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5: Appendix F -- Baseline human health risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix F documents potential risks and provides information necessary for making remediation decisions. A quantitative analysis of the inorganic, organic, and radiological site-related contaminants found in various media is used to characterize the potential risks to human health associated with exposure to these contaminants.

  2. Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana open bays. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1996-03-22

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) has a program of research in the environmental aspects of oil and gas extraction. This sampling project will characterize the environmental impacts associated with the discharge of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), metals and organics in produced water. This report is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico, supported by the USDOE. These assessments are being coordinated with the field study, using the collected data to perform human health and ecological risk assessments. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the development and use of appropriate discharge practices. The initial human health and ecological risk assessments consist of conservative screening analyses meant to identify potentially important contaminants, and to eliminate others from further consideration. More quantitative assessments were done for contaminants identified, in the screening analysis, as being of potential concern. Section 2 gives an overview of human health and ecological risk assessment to help put the analyses presented here in perspective. Section 3 provides the hazard assessment portion of the risk assessment, and identifies the important receptors and pathways of concern. Section 3 also outlines the approach taken to the risk assessments presented in the rest of the report. The remaining sections (4 through 9) present the human health and ecological risk assessments for discharges of produced water to open bays in Louisiana.

  3. Health risks from indoor formaldehyde exposures in northwest weatherized residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Sever, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    Conflicting opinions on the potential hazards associated with formaldehyde exposure triggered a national workshop to address the toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. Since quantitative human data are not available to derive a dose-response curve for formaldehyde risk assessment, nonhuman data are used. In the case of formaldehyde, data from animals exposed to high concentrations are used to estimate human risk at much lower concentrations. This study presents the several steps that make up a risk assessment and examines any additional data that might alter significantly the risk estimates presented in the 1984 EIS. Rat inhalation chronic bioassay data from a study sponsored by the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) have been used to develop a risk equation that was subsequently used by BPA in its EIS. The CIIT data base remains the only acceptable animal data that can support the estimation of a dose-response curve. The development of mathematical models continues with a great deal of energy, and the use of different models is largely responsible for the great variability of the formaldehyde risk estimates. While one can calculate different values for carcinogenic risk associated with formaldehyde exposure than were presented earlier in the BPA EIS, they are not likely to be any better.

  4. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-27

    Measurements of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the {sup 226}Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m{sup ?3} to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m{sup ?3}, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m{sup ?3} to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m{sup ?3}, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m{sup ?3} to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m{sup ?3}, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m{sup ?3} to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m{sup ?3} and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m{sup ?3} to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m{sup ?3}, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m{sup ?3}, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m{sup ?3}, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m{sup ?3} and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m{sup ?3}, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m{sup ?3} proposed by EPA except monazite 0.15 kg, struverite 0.15 kg and 0.25 kg. Whereas, all building material samples have exceeded the radon concentration in concrete and building materials of 3 to 7 Bq m{sup ?3} estimated by ICRP. The annual effective dose, effective dose equivalent, and radon exhalation rates in tin tailings were calculated to be in the range of 2.47 to 11.46 mSv, 5.94 to 1090.56 mSv y{sup ?1}, and 0.23 to 1.18 mBq kg{sup ?1} h{sup ?1}. For building materials, the calculated risk assessment of the annual effective dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk were 0.72 to 10.00 mSv, 1.73 to 24.00 mSv y{sup ?1}, 0.010 to 0.06 mBq kg{sup ?1} h{sup ?1} and 40 to 550 chances of persons will suffer the cancer per million (1 × 10{sup 6}), respectively.

  5. Risk assessment as a framework for decisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, Robert Paul; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Borns, David James

    2010-12-01

    The risk assessment approach has been applied to support numerous radioactive waste management activities over the last 30 years. A risk assessment methodology provides a solid and readily adaptable framework for evaluating the risks of CO2 sequestration in geologic formations to prioritize research, data collection, and monitoring schemes. This paper reviews the tasks of a risk assessment, and provides a few examples related to each task. This paper then describes an application of sensitivity analysis to identify important parameters to reduce the uncertainty in the performance of a geologic repository for radioactive waste repository, which because of importance of the geologic barrier, is similar to CO2 sequestration. The paper ends with a simple stochastic analysis of idealized CO2 sequestration site with a leaking abandoned well and a set of monitoring wells in an aquifer above the CO2 sequestration unit in order to evaluate the efficacy of monitoring wells to detect adverse leakage.

  6. Hanford waste vitrification systems risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, W.C.; Hamilton, D.W.; Holton, L.K.; Bailey, J.W.

    1991-09-01

    A systematic Risk Assessment was performed to identify the technical, regulatory, and programmatic uncertainties and to quantify the risks to the Hanford Site double-shell tank waste vitrification program baseline (as defined in December 1990). Mitigating strategies to reduce the overall program risk were proposed. All major program elements were evaluated, including double-shell tank waste characterization, Tank Farms, retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and grouting. Computer-based techniques were used to quantify risks to proceeding with construction of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant on the present baseline schedule. Risks to the potential vitrification of single-shell tank wastes and cesium and strontium capsules were also assessed. 62 refs., 38 figs., 26 tabs.

  7. The Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    Risk Management and Associated Techniques Provide the Predicted Benefits? Chris. W. Johnson, Glasgow: Johnson@dcs.gla.ac.uk; http://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~johnson Keywords: Safety; Composite Risk Management, ERAM, Risk Assessment; Military Systems Engineering. Abstract Risk management provides the most important

  8. UNBC Project Risk Assessment Plan -Page 1 of 9 Project Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    UNBC Project Risk Assessment Plan - Page 1 of 9 Project Risk Assessment Plan Risk & Safety Office, and Crew member (1). #12;UNBC Project Risk Assessment Plan - Page 2 of 9 3. LOCATIONS IDENTIFIED to identify with this project #12;UNBC Project Risk Assessment Plan - Page

  9. Air quality resolution for health impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air quality resolution for health impact assessment: influence of regional characterstics* T to: discover new interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts

  10. Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

  11. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  12. Improving pandemic influenza risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Colin A.; Kasson, Peter M.; Donis, Ruben O.; Riley, Steven; Dunbar, John; Rambaut, Andrew; Asher, Jason; Burke, Stephen; Davis, C. Todd; Garten, Rebecca J.; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Hay, Simon I.; Herfst, Sander; Lewis, Nicola S.; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Macken, Catherine A.; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Neuhaus, Elizabeth; Suarez, David L.; Trock, Susan C.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; George, Dylan B.; Lipsitch, Marc; Bloom, Jesse D.

    2014-10-16

    to Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP) (Moult et al., 2011). In a CASP-like exercise, one or more experimental groups would generate quantita- tive phenotype data for a set of viruses, for exam- ple the relative binding of ?2... al. 2012. A long neglected world malaria map: Plasmodium vivax endemicity in 2010. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases 6:e1814. doi:10.1371/ journal.pntd.0001814. Gething PW, Patil AP, Smith DL, Guerra CA, Elyazar IR, Johnston GL, Tatem AJ, Hay SI...

  13. A total risk assessment methodology for security assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar, Richard; Pless, Daniel J.; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Silva, Consuelo Juanita; Rhea, Ronald Edward; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

    2009-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a new collaborative risk assessment method to enable decision makers to fully consider the interrelationships between threat, vulnerability, and consequence. A five-step Total Risk Assessment Methodology was developed to enable interdisciplinary collaborative risk assessment by experts from these disciplines. The objective of this process is promote effective risk management by enabling analysts to identify scenarios that are simultaneously achievable by an adversary, desirable to the adversary, and of concern to the system owner or to society. The basic steps are risk identification, collaborative scenario refinement and evaluation, scenario cohort identification and risk ranking, threat chain mitigation analysis, and residual risk assessment. The method is highly iterative, especially with regard to scenario refinement and evaluation. The Total Risk Assessment Methodology includes objective consideration of relative attack likelihood instead of subjective expert judgment. The 'probability of attack' is not computed, but the relative likelihood for each scenario is assessed through identifying and analyzing scenario cohort groups, which are groups of scenarios with comparable qualities to the scenario being analyzed at both this and other targets. Scenarios for the target under consideration and other targets are placed into cohort groups under an established ranking process that reflects the following three factors: known targeting, achievable consequences, and the resources required for an adversary to have a high likelihood of success. The development of these target cohort groups implements, mathematically, the idea that adversaries are actively choosing among possible attack scenarios and avoiding scenarios that would be significantly suboptimal to their objectives. An adversary who can choose among only a few comparable targets and scenarios (a small comparable target cohort group) is more likely to choose to attack the specific target under analysis because he perceives it to be a relatively unique attack opportunity. The opposite is also true. Thus, total risk is related to the number of targets that exist in each scenario cohort group. This paper describes the Total Risk Assessment Methodology and illustrates it through an example.

  14. Clinical practice of risk assessment of sexual violence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judge, Joseph Gerard

    2012-11-28

    Background: Risk assessment of sexual violence involves evidence based evaluation of the risks posed by sexual offenders. It informs risk management; the provision of treatment that reduces the risk of future sexual ...

  15. Risk Assessment and Management for Interconnected and Interactive Critical Flood Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamedifar, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    useful is quantitative risk assessment? Risk Analysis Vol.172. Bea, R. G. (2001). "Risk Assessment and Management ofAchieving step change in risk assessment and management (

  16. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabala, Dana; Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia

    2013-11-13

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  17. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  18. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  19. HANFORD SAFETY ANALYSIS & RISK ASSESSMENT HANDBOOK (SARAH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EVANS, C B

    2004-12-21

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 2 and 3 (HC-2 and 3) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management''. Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements.'' Consistent with DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 2, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'' (STD-3009), and DOE-STD-3011-2002, ''Guidance for Preparation of Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) Documents'' (STD-3011), the Hanford SARAH describes methodology for performing a safety analysis leading to development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of Technical Safety Requirements (TSR), and provides the information necessary to ensure a consistently rigorous approach that meets DOE expectations. The DSA and TSR documents, together with the DOE-issued Safety Evaluation Report (SER), are the basic components of facility safety basis documentation. For HC-2 or 3 nuclear facilities in long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M), for decommissioning activities, where source term has been eliminated to the point that only low-level, residual fixed contamination is present, or for environmental remediation activities outside of a facility structure, DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities'' (STD-1120), may serve as the basis for the DSA. HC-2 and 3 environmental remediation sites also are subject to the hazard analysis methodologies of this standard.

  20. Page 1 of 6 Risk Assessment and Control Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Page 1 of 6 Risk Assessment and Control Form Current Version: 3.3, 7/03/2011 For additional information refer to the OHS Risk Assessment and Control Procedure, the OHS Risk Rating Procedure Issue date Current version Current Version Issue date Next review date Risk assessment name Step 1

  1. Improving Risk Assessment to Support State Energy Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is leading a State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative to help States better understand risks to their energy infrastructure...

  2. State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State and Regional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    OE is leading a State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative to help States better understand risks to their energy infrastructure so they can be better prepared to make informed...

  3. Deciding which chemical mixtures risk assessment methods work best for what mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teuschler, Linda K.

    2007-09-01

    The most commonly used chemical mixtures risk assessment methods involve simple notions of additivity and toxicological similarity. Newer methods are emerging in response to the complexities of chemical mixture exposures and effects. Factors based on both science and policy drive decisions regarding whether to conduct a chemical mixtures risk assessment and, if so, which methods to employ. Scientific considerations are based on positive evidence of joint toxic action, elevated human exposure conditions or the potential for significant impacts on human health. Policy issues include legislative drivers that may mandate action even though adequate toxicity data on a specific mixture may not be available and risk assessment goals that impact the choice of risk assessment method to obtain the amount of health protection desired. This paper discusses three important concepts used to choose among available approaches for conducting a chemical mixtures risk assessment: (1) additive joint toxic action of mixture components; (2) toxicological interactions of mixture components; and (3) chemical composition of complex mixtures. It is proposed that scientific support for basic assumptions used in chemical mixtures risk assessment should be developed by expert panels, risk assessment methods experts, and laboratory toxicologists. This is imperative to further develop and refine quantitative methods and provide guidance on their appropriate applications. Risk assessors need scientific support for chemical mixtures risk assessment methods in the form of toxicological data on joint toxic action for high priority mixtures, statistical methods for analyzing dose-response for mixtures, and toxicological and statistical criteria for determining sufficient similarity of complex mixtures.

  4. Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RECHARD,ROBERT P.

    2000-07-14

    This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

  5. Risk assessment meta tool LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a risk analysis meta tool--a tool that enables security analysts both to combine and analyze data from multiple other risk assessment tools on demand. Our approach was based on the innovative self-assembling software technology under development by the project team. This technology provides a mechanism for the user to specify his intentions at a very high level (e.g., equations or English-like text), and then the code self-assembles itself, taking care of the implementation details. The first version of the meta tool focused specifically in importing and analyzing data from Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation (JCATS) force-on-force simulation. We discuss the problem, our approach, technical risk, and accomplishments on this project, and outline next steps to be addressed with follow-on funding.

  6. How information resources are used by federal agencies in risk assessment application: Rapporteur summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenner-Crisp, P.

    1990-12-31

    The application of information available for risk assessment from the federal perspective is described. Different federal agencies conduct varying degrees of hazard evaluation, and some also generate empirical data. The role of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in hazard assessments of potential public health impacts of Superfund sites includes identification of the 275 most significant substances. ATSDR is responsible for preparing toxicological profiles. ATSDR also identifies data gaps and needs critical to adequately assessing human health impacts.

  7. Status Updates on the Performance and Risk Assessment Community...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updates on the Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Status Updates on the Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Ming Zhu,...

  8. High Performance Lipoprotein Profiling for Cardiovascular Risk Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larner, Craig

    2012-10-19

    With the severity of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the related mortality rate to this disease, new methods are necessary for risk assessment and treatment prior to the onset of the disease. The current paradigm in CVD risk assessment has shifted...

  9. Interagency Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interagency Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Charter Interagency Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Charter Charter...

  10. FLOOD RISK ASSESSMENT FOR THE TOWN OF SAN SEBASTIAN IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLOOD RISK ASSESSMENT FOR THE TOWN OF SAN SEBASTIAN IN GUATEMALA Graciela Peters Guarin March, 2003 #12;FLOOD RISK ASSESSMENT FOR THE TOWN OF SAN SEBASTIAN IN GUATEMALA by Graciela Peters Guarin Thesis

  11. Prof. Yacov Y. Haimes Systems-Based Risk Assessment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Prof. Yacov Y. Haimes Systems-Based Risk Assessment and Management Presented at SI4000 Summer AY?" - "What are the consequences?" Risk Assessment: A Physician Metaphor #12;12 Prof. Yacov Y. Haimes Mrs, but there might be some side effects. My recommendation is to do both. So, what shall I do? Risk Assessment

  12. Training Package on National Scale Multi Hazard Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Training Package on National Scale Multi Hazard Risk Assessment Theory Book National Scale Multi Hazard Risk Assessment By Cees van Westen, Michiel Damen and Wim Feringa University Twente, Faculty-EAST National Scale Multi-Hazard Risk Assessment Date: 2013-11-18 2 Note about the PPRD EAST project This manual

  13. Risk management of undesirable substances in feed following updated risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verstraete, Frans

    2013-08-01

    Directive 2002/32/EC of 7 May 2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council on undesirable substances in animal feed is the framework for the EU action on undesirable substances in feed. This framework Directive provides: ?that products intended for animal feed may enter for use in the Union from third countries, be put into circulation and/or used in the Union only if they are sound, genuine and of merchantable quality and therefore when correctly used do not represent any danger to human health, animal health or to the environment or could adversely affect livestock production. ?that in order to protect animal and public health and the environment, maximum levels for specific undesirable substances shall be established where necessary. ?for mandatory consultation of a scientific body (EFSA) for all provisions which may have an effect upon public health or animal health or on the environment. ?that products intended for animal feed containing levels of an undesirable substance that exceed the established maximum level may not be mixed for dilution purposes with the same, or other, products intended for animal feed and may not be used for the production of compound feed. Based on the provisions and principles laid down in this framework Directive, maximum levels for a whole range of undesirable substances have been established at EU level. During the discussions in view of the adoption of Directive 2002/32/EC, the European Commission made the commitment to review all existing provisions on undesirable substances on the basis of updated scientific risk assessments. Following requests of the European Commission, the Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has completed a series of 30 risk assessments undertaken over the last 5 years on undesirable substances in animal feed reviewing the possible risks for animal and human health due to the presence of these substances in animal feed. EU legislation on undesirable substances has undergone recently several changes to take account of these most recent scientific opinions. Furthermore EFSA has assessed the risks for public and animal health following the unavoidable carry-over of coccidiostats into non target feed. Maximum levels for the unavoidable carry-over have been established for the non-target feed and the food of animal origin from non-target animal species.

  14. Seismic Risk Assessment of Transportation Network Systems, Journal of Earthquake Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiremidjian, A.; Moore, James Elliott II; Fan, Yueyue; Yazlali, O.; Basoz, N.; Williams, M.

    2008-01-01

    A. [2002] “Earthquake risk assessment for transportationA. [1996] “Risk assessment of highway transportation1–12 Engineering, Seismic Risk Assessment of Transportation

  15. EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS). A human health risk assessment conducted by Peterson et al. (2006) for truck-mounted ultra-low volume (ULV to epidemic levels and dispersed to all 58 counties in the state, and was associated with low

  16. Application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in Establishing Perchlorate and Goitrogen Risk Mitigation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford-Brown, Douglas

    2015-08-26

    This paper applies probabilistic risk assessment in quantifying risks from cumulative and aggregate risk pathways for selected goitrogens in water and food. Results show that the percentages of individuals with a Hazard Index (HI) value above 1...

  17. The need for health impact assessment in China: Potential benefits for public health and steps forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Liming; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia

    2011-07-15

    Health impact assessment (HIA) is a useful tool to predict and estimate the potential health impact associated with programs, projects, and policies by comprehensively identifying relevant health determinants and their consequences. China is undergoing massive and rapid socio-economic changes leading to environment and population health challenges such as a large increase in non-communicable diseases, the emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases, new health risks associated with environmental pollutants and escalating health inequality. These health issues are affected by multiple determinants which can be influenced by planned policies, programs, and projects. This paper discusses the needs for health impact assessment in China in order to minimize the negative health consequences from projects, programs and policies associated with rapid social and economic development. It first describes the scope of China's current impact assessment system and points out its inadequacy in meeting the requirements of population health protection and promotion. It then analyses the potential use of HIA and why China needs to develop and apply HIA as a tool to identify potential health impacts of proposed programs, projects and policies so as to influence decision-making early in the planning process. Thus, the paper recommends the development of HIA as a useful tool in China to enhance decision-making for the protection and promotion of population health. For this to happen, the paper outlines steps necessary for the establishment and successful implementation of HIA in China: beginning with the establishment of a HIA framework, followed by workforce capacity building, methodology design, and intersectoral collaboration and stakeholder engagement.

  18. PRELIMINARY ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT ON THE INTEGRATION OF A PROCESS UTILIZING LOW-ENERGY SOLVENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE ENABLED BY A COMBINATION OF ENZYMES AND VACUUM REGENERATION WITH A SUBCRITICAL PC POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, David; Vidal, Rafael; Russell, Tania; Babcock, Doosan; Freeman, Charles; Bearden, Mark; Whyatt, Greg; Liu, Kun; Frimpong, Reynolds; Lu, Kunlei; Salmon, Sonja; House, Alan; Yarborough, Erin

    2014-12-31

    The results of the preliminary environmental, health and safety (EH&S) risk assessment for an enzyme-activated potassium carbonate (K2CO3) solution post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) plant, integrated with a subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant, are presented. The expected emissions during normal steady-state operation have been estimated utilizing models of the PCC plant developed in AspenTech’s AspenPlus® software, bench scale test results from the University of Kentucky, and industrial experience of emission results from a slipstream PCC plant utilizing amine based solvents. A review of all potential emission species and their sources was undertaken that identified two credible emission sources, the absorber off-gas that is vented to atmosphere via a stack and the waste removed from the PCC plant in the centrifuge used to reclaim enzyme and solvent. The conditions and compositions of the emissions were calculated and the potential EH&S effects were considered as well as legislative compliance requirements. Potential mitigation methods for emissions during normal operation have been proposed and solutions to mitigate uncontrolled releases of species have been considered. The potential emissions were found to pose no significant EH&S concerns and were compliant with the Federal legislation reviewed. The limitations in predicting full scale plant performance from bench scale tests have been noted and further work on a larger scale test unit is recommended to reduce the level of uncertainty.

  19. Sandia Energy - Risk and Safety Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal EnergyRenewable Energy IntegrationRisk and Safety Assessment

  20. Risk Assessment & Management This chapter presents the Council's approach to addressing uncertainty and managing risk. After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Assessment & Management This chapter presents the Council's approach to addressing uncertainty in this power plan require an analytical approach that addresses such rare but extreme events. Risk assessment favor going ahead. In this plan, the Council further integrates risk assessment and management into its

  1. Utilizing toxicogenomic data to understand chemical mechanism of action in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Vickie S.; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Hester, Susan; Segal, Deborah; Chiu, Weihsueh; Thompson, Chad M.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    The predominant role of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment, thus far, has been one of augmentation of more traditional in vitro and in vivo toxicology data. This article focuses on the current available examples of instances where toxicogenomic data has been evaluated in human health risk assessment (e.g., acetochlor and arsenicals) which have been limited to the application of toxicogenomic data to inform mechanism of action. This article reviews the regulatory policy backdrop and highlights important efforts to ultimately achieve regulatory acceptance. A number of research efforts on specific chemicals that were designed for risk assessment purposes have employed mechanism or mode of action hypothesis testing and generating strategies. The strides made by large scale efforts to utilize toxicogenomic data in screening, testing, and risk assessment are also discussed. These efforts include both the refinement of methodologies for performing toxicogenomics studies and analysis of the resultant data sets. The current issues limiting the application of toxicogenomics to define mode or mechanism of action in risk assessment are discussed together with interrelated research needs. In summary, as chemical risk assessment moves away from a single mechanism of action approach toward a toxicity pathway-based paradigm, we envision that toxicogenomic data from multiple technologies (e.g., proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, supportive RT-PCR studies) can be used in conjunction with one another to understand the complexities of multiple, and possibly interacting, pathways affected by chemicals which will impact human health risk assessment.

  2. Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    URMIA Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template 2008 URMIA Journal Reprint Howard N. Apsan, Ph.D. The City University of New York University Risk Management CUNY and other universities to upgrade their risk management efforts? It is easy to suggest

  3. Hydrogen quantitative risk assessment workshop proceedings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groth, Katrina M.; Harris, Aaron P.

    2013-09-01

    The Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) Toolkit Introduction Workshop was held at Energetics on June 11-12. The workshop was co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and HySafe, the International Association for Hydrogen Safety. The objective of the workshop was twofold: (1) Present a hydrogen-specific methodology and toolkit (currently under development) for conducting QRA to support the development of codes and standards and safety assessments of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and fueling stations, and (2) Obtain feedback on the needs of early-stage users (hydrogen as well as potential leveraging for Compressed Natural Gas [CNG], and Liquefied Natural Gas [LNG]) and set priorities for %E2%80%9CVersion 1%E2%80%9D of the toolkit in the context of the commercial evolution of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). The workshop consisted of an introduction and three technical sessions: Risk Informed Development and Approach; CNG/LNG Applications; and Introduction of a Hydrogen Specific QRA Toolkit.

  4. Advances in exposure and toxicity assessment of particulate matter: An overview of presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunasekar, Palur G.; Stanek, Lindsay W.

    2011-07-15

    The 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference (TRAC) session on 'Advances in Exposure and Toxicity Assessment of Particulate Matter' was held in April 2009 in West Chester, OH. The goal of this session was to bring together toxicology, geology and risk assessment experts from the Department of Defense and academia to examine issues in exposure assessment and report on recent epidemiological findings of health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) exposure. Important aspects of PM exposure research are to detect and monitor low levels of PM with various chemical compositions and to assess the health risks associated with these exposures. As part of the overall theme, some presenters discussed collection methods for sand and dust from Iraqi and Afghanistan regions, health issues among deployed personnel, and future directions for risk assessment research among these populations. The remaining speakers focused on the toxicity of ultrafine PM and the characterization of aerosols generated during ballistic impacts of tungsten heavy alloys.

  5. The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Risk Assessment Factsheet environmental health Background · Localpublichealthprotectionrequiresidentifyingandprioritizingneedsthroughrisk.Environmentalandhealthdepartmentofficialsshould developcommunity-specificcriteriaforconductingtheriskmanagementphaseof hazardandriskreduction. Board of Health

  6. Risk Assessment and Management for Interconnected and Interactive Critical Flood Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamedifar, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    risk assessment and management (RAM), Centre for Oil and GasRisk Assessment & Management (RAM), Centre for Oil and Gas

  7. Eielson Air Force Base OU-1 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, M.T.; Jarvis, T.T.; Van Houten, N.C.; Lewis, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment report is the second volume in a set of three volumes for operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The companion documents contain the Remedial Investigation and the Feasibility Study. Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) is one of several groups of hazardous waste sites located at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, Alaska. The operable units at Eielson are typically characterized by petroleum, oil, lubricant/solvent contamination, and by the presence of organics floating at the water table. In 1989 and 1990, firms under contract to the Air Force conducted field studies to gather information about the extent of chemical contamination in soil, groundwater, and soil air pore space (soil gas) at the site. This report documents the results of a baseline risk assessment, which uses the 1989 and 1991 site characterization database to quantify the potential human health risk associated with past Base industrial activities in the vicinity of OU-1. Background data collected in 1992 were also used in the preparation of this report.

  8. An Application of Qualitative Risk Assessment in Park Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgman, Mark

    An Application of Qualitative Risk Assessment in Park Management Janet M. Carey, Mark A. Burgman of the risk analysis protocol from the Australian Standard for Risk Management, AS/NZS 4360, was used value (SA/SNZ 2000). It provides a basis for comparing and ranking risks, so that managers can focus

  9. Probabilistic Risk Assessment for dairy waste management systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, Edward Marshall

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques were used to evaluate the risk of contamination of surface and ground water with wastewater from an open lot dairy in Erath County, Texas. The dairy supported a complex waste management system...

  10. Risk assessment of hurricane storm surge for New York City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, N,

    Hurricane storm surge presents a major hazard for the United States. We apply a model-based risk assessment methodology to investigate hurricane storm surge risk for New York City (NYC). We couple a statistical/deterministic ...

  11. Schiffert Health Center TUBERCULOSIS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    · Persistent cough of unknown etiology for more than 3 weeks · Productive cough with bloody sputum Section 2

  12. Performing Probabilistic Risk Assessment Through RAVEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita

    2013-06-01

    The Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENviroment (RAVEN) code is a software tool that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing engine for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. RAVEN is now a multi-purpose Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) software framework that allows dispatching different functionalities: Derive and actuate the control logic required to simulate the plant control system and operator actions (guided procedures), allowing on-line monitoring/controlling in the Phase Space Perform both Monte-Carlo sampling of random distributed events and Dynamic Event Tree based analysis Facilitate the input/output handling through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a post-processing data mining module

  13. Risk Communication - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EpidemiologyHealth Data Analysis Human Reliability Program (HRP) Industrial Rehabilitation & Ergonomics Infection Control & Immunizations Influenza Immunization Program...

  14. Risk Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2004 Assessing the Risk of Invasive Spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    With, Kimberly A.

    Risk Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2004 Assessing the Risk of Invasive Spread in Fragmented Landscapes in the field of landscape ecology, provide a tool for assessing the risk of invasive spread in fragmented landscapes. A percolation-based analysis of the potential for invasive spread in fragmented landscapes

  15. DOE (Department of Energy) risk assessment worksheets: A structured approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This volume consists of the worksheets for each step in completing the guideline. This guideline outlines the approach to conducting risk assessments of computer security. (JEF)

  16. Security Risk Assessment Methodologies (RAM) for Critical Infrastructu...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Energy Efficiency Find More Like This Return to Search Security Risk Assessment Methodologies (RAM) for Critical Infrastructures Sandia National Laboratories...

  17. DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE Nuclear Safety Applications (draft), December 2010 DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic...

  18. Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

  19. Approved Module Information for EC214C, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Health, Safety & Risk Module Code: EC214C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Outcomes: * Intellecutal skills Assess the risks associated with workplaces, machinery, processes, and work the principles and application of health safety and risk management practices within the construction workApproved Module Information for EC214C, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Health, Safety & Risk Module Code

  20. Risk Assessment Scheme of Infection Transmission Indoors Incorporating the Impact of Resuspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    tive microbial risk assessment. Risk Analysis, 2009; 29(3):2003; 37(39):5597– A Risk Assessment Scheme of InfectionCP. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment. New York: John

  1. Biological Risk Assessment Worksheet Tracking # ______________ Building/Lab Room # ___________ PI Name _____________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Biological Risk Assessment Worksheet Tracking # ______________ Building/Lab Room # ___________ PI in the protocol needs an agent-specific Biological Risk Assessment. Once an agent-specific Biological Risk ______________________________________________________________________________ Note: *Vaccines and respirators require separate risk assessments. Biosafety Officer's Signature Save

  2. Embedding climate change risk assessment within a governance context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2011-01-01

    Climate change adaptation is increasingly being framed in the context of climate risk management. This has contributed to the proliferation of climate change vulnerability and/or risk assessments as means of supporting institutional decision-making regarding adaptation policies and measures. To date, however, little consideration has been given to how such assessment projects and programs interact with governance systems to facilitate or hinder the implementation of adaptive responses. An examination of recent case studies involving Australian local governments reveals two key linkages between risk assessment and the governance of adaptation. First, governance systems influence how risk assessment processes are conducted, by whom they are conducted, and whom they are meant to inform. Australia s governance system emphasizes evidence-based decision-making that reinforces a knowledge deficit model of decision support. Assessments are often carried out by external experts on behalf of local government, with limited participation by relevant stakeholders and/or civil society. Second, governance systems influence the extent to which the outputs from risk assessment activities are translated into adaptive responses and outcomes. Technical information regarding risk is often stranded by institutional barriers to adaptation including poor uptake of information, competition on the policy agenda, and lack of sufficient entitlements. Yet, risk assessments can assist in bringing such barriers to the surface, where they can be debated and resolved. In fact, well-designed risk assessments can contribute to multi-loop learning by institutions, and that reflexive problem orientation may be one of the more valuable benefits of assessment.

  3. Assessment of the risk of transporting liquid chlorine by rail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, W.B.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the risk of shipping liquid chlorine by rail. While chlorine is not an energy material, there are several benefits to studying chlorine transportation risks. First, chlorine, like energy materials, is widely used as a feedstock to industry. Second, it is the major purification agent in municipal water treatment systems and therefore, provides direct benefits to the public. Finally, other risk assessments have been completed for liquid chlorine shipments in the US and Europe, which provide a basis for comparison with this study. None of the previous PNL energy material risk assessments have had other studies for comparison. For these reasons, it was felt that a risk assessment of chlorine transportation by rail could provide information on chlorine risk levels, identify ways to reduce these risks and use previous studies on chlorine risks to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the PNL risk assessment methodology. The risk assessment methodology used in this study is summarized. The methodology is presented in the form of a risk assessment model which is constructed for ease of periodic updating of the data base so that the risk may be reevaluated as additional data become available. The report is sectioned to correspond to specific analysis steps identified in the model. The transport system and accident environment are described. The response of the transport system to accident environments is described. Release sequences are postulated and evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a direct comparison with other reports in this series.

  4. Guidance Document Quick Guide to Assess Risk for Hazardous Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Document Quick Guide to Assess Risk for Hazardous Chemicals The following outline provides a summary of the steps that laboratory workers should use to assess the risks of handling toxic chemicals with each chemical involved in the proposed work. Are any of the chemicals carcinogens or suspected

  5. Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01

    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment 13. Macedo,limitations of life-cycle assessment. Journal of Industrial35. Owens, J. W. , Life-cycle assessment in relation to risk

  6. Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board(DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009?1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. Thisrecommendation focused on the...

  7. Use of information resources by the state of Tennessee in risk assessment applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashor, B.S.

    1990-12-31

    The major resources used by the Bureau of Environment, and Environmental Epidemiology (EEP) for risk assessment are: the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), Health and Environmental Effects Summary Table (HEAST), Agency for Toxic Substances and disease Registry (ATSDR) Toxicological Profiles, databases at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), World Health Organization (WHO) ENvironmental Criteria, and documents that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published on Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) risk assessment activities. The Risk Assessment Review has been helpful in providing information about availability of new documents or information. No systematic method has been made available to us to locate information resources. IRIS User`s Support has been helpful in making appropriate and timely referrals. Most other EPA resources were located by serendipity and persistence. The CERCLA methodology for risk assessments is being used in environmental programs, and at present, one person is responsible for all risk assessment activities in the department, but plans are underway to train one or two people from each program area. 2 figs.

  8. Environmental Health & Safety Department New Employee Exposure Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    Environmental Health & Safety Department New Employee Exposure Assessment PURPOSE: The purpose of the assessment questions, Environmental Health & Safety will inform you and your supervisor of any additional of this assessment is to determine your required health & safety training by evaluating your use of and exposure

  9. Risk assessment compatible fire models (RACFMs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Sherman, M.P.

    1998-07-01

    A suite of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Compatible Fire Models (RACFMs) has been developed to represent the hazard posed by a pool fire to weapon systems transported on the B52-H aircraft. These models represent both stand-off (i.e., the weapon system is outside of the flame zone but exposed to the radiant heat load from fire) and fully-engulfing scenarios (i.e., the object is fully covered by flames). The approach taken in developing the RACFMs for both scenarios was to consolidate, reconcile, and apply data and knowledge from all available resources including: data and correlations from the literature, data from an extensive full-scale fire test program at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) at China Lake, and results from a fire field model (VULCAN). In the past, a single, effective temperature, T{sub f}, was used to represent the fire. The heat flux to an object exposed to a fire was estimated using the relationship for black body radiation, {sigma}T{sub f}{sup 4}. Significant improvements have been made by employing the present approach which accounts for the presence of temperature distributions in fully-engulfing fires, and uses best available correlations to estimate heat fluxes in stand-off scenarios.

  10. Baseline biological risk assessment for aquatic populations occurring near Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.; Brandt, C.; Lewis, R.; Smith, R.

    1995-12-31

    Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska was listed as a Superfund site in November 1989 with 64 potential source areas of contamination. As part of a sitewide remedial investigation, baseline risk assessments were conducted in 1993 and 1994 to evaluate hazards posed to biological receptors and to human health. Fish tissue, aquatic invertebrates, aquatic vegetation, sediment, and surface water data were collected from several on-site and off-site surface water bodies. An initial screening risk assessment indicated that several surface water sites along two major tributary creeks flowing through the base had unacceptable risks to both aquatic receptors and to human health because of DDTs. Other contaminants of concern (i.e., PCBs and PAHs) were below screening risk levels for aquatic organisms, but contributed to an unacceptable risk to human health. Additional samples was taken in 1994 to characterize the site-wide distribution of PAHs, DDTs, and PCBs in aquatic biota and sediments. Concentrations of PAHs were invertebrates > aquatic vegetation > fish, but concentrations were sufficiently low that they posed no significant risk to biological receptors. Pesticides were detected in all fish tissue samples. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were also detected in most fish from Garrison Slough. The pattern of PCB concentrations in Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) was related to their proximity to a sediment source in lower Garrison Slough. Ingestion of PCB-contaminated fish is the primary human-health risk driver for surface water bodies on Eielson AFB, resulting in carcinogenic risks > 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for future recreational land-use at some sites. Principal considerations affecting uncertainty in the risk assessment process included spatial and temporal variability in media contaminant concentrations and inconsistencies between modelled and measured body burdens.

  11. Is California Different? State-Specific Risk Adjustment Needs under Health Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulton, Brent D.; Dow, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Adjustment Needs under Health Reform Brent D. Fulton andinsurance market under reform is the use of risk adjustmentplans. Keywords: health care reform, The Affordable Health

  12. Risk Assessment Techniques and Survey Method for COTS Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    The Rational Unified Process a software engineering process is gaining popularity nowadays. RUP delivers best software practices for component software Development life cycle It supports component based software development. Risk is involved in every component development phase .neglecting those risks sometimes hampers the software growth and leads to negative outcome. In Order to provide appropriate security and protection levels, identifying various risks is very vital. Therefore Risk identification plays a very crucial role in the component based software development This report addresses incorporation of component based software development cycle into RUP phases, assess several category of risk encountered in the component based software. It also entails a survey method to identify the risk factor and evaluating the overall severity of the component software development in terms of the risk. Formula for determining risk prevention cost and finding the risk probability is also been included. The overall go...

  13. Cavity degradation risk insurance assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampson, C.; Neill, P.; de Bivort, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study examined the risks and risk management issues involved with the implementation by electric power utilities of compressed air energy storage and underground pumped hydro storage systems. The results are listed in terms of relative risks for the construction and operation of these systems in different geologic deposits, with varying amounts of pressurization, with natural or man-made disasters in the vicinity of the storage equipment, and with different modes of operating the facilities. (LCL)

  14. Assessing Risk and Driving Risk Mitigation for First-of-a-Kind Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Collins

    2011-09-01

    Planning and decision making amidst programmatic and technological risks represent significant challenges for projects. This presentation addresses the four step risk-assessment process needed to determine clear path forward to mature needed technology and design, license, and construct advanced nuclear power plants, which have never been built before, including Small Modular Reactors. This four step process has been carefully applied to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. STEP 1 - Risk Identification Risks are identified, collected, and categorized as technical risks, programmatic risks, and project risks, each of which result in cost and schedule impacts if realized. These include risks arising from the use of technologies not previously demonstrated in a relevant application. These risks include normal and accident scenarios which the SMR could experience including events that cause the disablement of engineered safety features (typically documented in Phenomena Identification Ranking Tables (PIRT) as produced with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission) and design needs which must be addressed to further detail the design. Product - Project Risk Register contained in a database with sorting, presentation, rollup, risk work off functionality similar to the NGNP Risk Management System . STEP 2 - Risk Quantification The risks contained in the risk register are then scored for probability of occurrence and severity of consequence, if realized. Here the scoring methodology is established and the basis for the scoring is well documented. Product - Quantified project risk register with documented basis for scoring. STEP 3 - Risk Handling Strategy Risks are mitigated by applying a systematic approach to maturing the technology through Research and Development, modeling, test, and design. A Technology Readiness Assessment is performed to determine baseline Technology Readiness Levels (TRL). Tasks needed to mature the technology are developed and documented in a roadmap. Product - Risk Handling Strategy. STEP 4 - Residual Risk Work off The risk handling strategy is entered into the Project Risk Allocation Tool (PRAT) to analyze each task for its ability to reduce risk. The result is risk-informed task prioritization. The risk handling strategy is captured in the Risk Management System, a relational database that provides conventional database utility, including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. The tool's Hierarchy Tree allows visualization and analyses of complex relationships between risks, risk mitigation tasks, design needs, and PIRTs. Product - Project Risk Allocation Tool and Risk Management System which depict project plan to reduce risk and current progress in doing so.

  15. The Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S. Y.; Kapoor, A. K.

    2003-02-27

    In an attempt to bring forth increased efficiency and effectiveness in assessing transportation risks associated with radioactive materials or wastes, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Transportation Program (NTP) published a resource handbook in 2002. The handbook draws from the broad technical expertise among DOE national laboratories and industry, which reflects the extensive experience gained from DOE's efforts in conducting assessments (i.e., environmental impact assessments) within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in the past 20 years. The handbook is intended to serve as a primary source of information regarding the approach and basis for conducting transportation risk assessments under normal or accidental conditions that are associated with shipping radioactive materials or wastes. It is useful as a reference to DOE managers, NEPA assessors, technical analysts, contractors, and also stakeholders. It provides a summary of pertinent U.S. policies and regulations on the shipment of radioactive materials, existing guidance on preparing transportation risk assessments, a review of previous transportation risk assessments by DOE and others, a description of comprehensive and generally accepted transportation risk assessment methodologies, and a compilation of supporting data, parameters, and assumptions. The handbook also provides a discussion paper on an issue that has been identified as being important in the past. The discussion paper focuses on cumulative impacts, illustrating the ongoing evolution of transportation risk assessment. The discussion may be expanded in the future as emerging issues are identified. The handbook will be maintained and periodically updated to provide current and accurate information.

  16. Development of Improved Caprock Integrity and Risk Assessment Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Michael

    2014-09-30

    GeoMechanics Technologies has completed a geomechanical caprock integrity analysis and risk assessment study funded through the US Department of Energy. The project included: a detailed review of historical caprock integrity problems experienced in the natural gas storage industry; a theoretical description and documentation of caprock integrity issues; advanced coupled transport flow modelling and geomechanical simulation of three large-scale potential geologic sequestration sites to estimate geomechanical effects from CO? injection; development of a quantitative risk and decision analysis tool to assess caprock integrity risks; and, ultimately the development of recommendations and guidelines for caprock characterization and CO? injection operating practices. Historical data from gas storage operations and CO? sequestration projects suggest that leakage and containment incident risks are on the order of 10-1 to 10-2, which is higher risk than some previous studies have suggested for CO?. Geomechanical analysis, as described herein, can be applied to quantify risks and to provide operating guidelines to reduce risks. The risk assessment tool developed for this project has been applied to five areas: The Wilmington Graben offshore Southern California, Kevin Dome in Montana, the Louden Field in Illinois, the Sleipner CO? sequestration operation in the North Sea, and the In Salah CO? sequestration operation in North Africa. Of these five, the Wilmington Graben area represents the highest relative risk while the Kevin Dome area represents the lowest relative risk.

  17. NGNP Risk Management through Assessing Technology Readiness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Collins

    2010-08-01

    Throughout the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project life cycle, technical risks are identified, analyzed, and mitigated and decisions are made regarding the design and selection of plant and sub-system configurations, components and their fabrication materials, and operating conditions. Risk resolution and decision making are key elements that help achieve project completion within budget and schedule constraints and desired plant availability. To achieve this objective, a formal decision-making and risk management process was developed for NGNP, based on proven systems engineering principles that have guided aerospace and military applications.

  18. Using Tropos Methodology to Model an Integrated Health Assessment System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health assessment of health and social care needs of older people is used as the case study throughoutUsing Tropos Methodology to Model an Integrated Health Assessment System Haralambos Mouratidis 1 of Trento, Italy pgiorgini@dit.unit.it Abstract. This paper presents a case study to illustrate the features

  19. HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT Clark County Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT Clark County Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan October, 2010 Brendon Haggerty, Clark County Public Health Brendon.haggerty@clark.wa.gov #12;Overview · Introduction to HIA · Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan HIA · Lessons learned #12;Health Impact Assessment Screening · Scoping

  20. Coronary Risk Assessment by Point-Based vs. Equation-Based Framingham Models: Significant Implications for Clinical Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, William J.; Polansky, Jesse M.; John Boscardin, W.; Fung, Kathy Z.; Steinman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Educa- tion Program risk assessment and potential for riskapproaches of coronary risk assessment–do they work? Am JRESEARCH Coronary Risk Assessment by Point-Based vs.

  1. Coronary Artery Calcium Improves Risk Assessment in Adults with a Family History of Premature Coronary Heart Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Artery Calcium Improves Risk Assessment in Adults With aKhoury MJ. Familial risk assessment for early-onset coronaryreclassify, ASCVD risk assessment for adults in whom the

  2. A stochastic approach to risk assessment of hazardous waste sites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arangath, Vishwanathan Vasu

    1995-01-01

    A deterministic risk assessment model was evaluated for the variability in its input parameters, Information on these variables was gathered to characterize the variability. Statistical distributions were assigned to the variables based...

  3. A Review of Risk Factors Assessed in Child Protective Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Thomas P.; Marks, Jill

    1991-01-01

    Evaluating the likelihood of future maltreatment is a critical component of decision making in the child protective service process. A relatively recent phenomenon is the use of formal risk-assessment instruments for the collection of specific...

  4. INTERAGENCY PERFORMANCE AND RISK ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Introduction (Dr. Ming Zhu, DOE EM) 2:05 am - 2:55 pm Presentation - EPA Radiation Risk Assessment Approach (PRG and DSS Calculators) (Mr. Stuart Walker, EPA). Time will be...

  5. Risk Assessment Revision for 40 CPR Part 61 Subpart W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Assessment Revision for 40 CPR Part 61 Subpart W ­ Radon Emissions from Operating Mill-II............................................................................................................13 2.9 GENII-NESHAPS and Indoor Air (ORIA) promulgated National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs

  6. Emerging contaminants: Presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murnyak, George; Vandenberg, John; Yaroschak, Paul J.; Williams, Larry; Prabhakaran, Krishnan; Hinz, John

    2011-07-15

    A session entitled 'Emerging Contaminants' was held in April 2009 in Cincinnati, OH at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference. The purpose of the session was to share information on both programmatic and technical aspects associated with emerging contaminants. Emerging contaminants are chemicals or materials that are characterized by a perceived or real threat to human health or environment, a lack of published health standards or an evolving standard. A contaminant may also be 'emerging' because of the discovery of a new source, a new pathway to humans, or a new detection method or technology. The session included five speakers representing the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and each of the military services. The DoD created the Emerging Contaminant Directorate to proactively address environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with emerging contaminants. This session described the scan-watch-action list process, impact assessment methodology, and integrated risk management concept that DoD has implemented to manage emerging contaminants. EPA presented emerging trends in health risk assessment. Researchers made technical presentations on the status of some emerging contaminates in the assessment process (i.e. manganese, RDX, and naphthalene).

  7. Prediction markets for cost and risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Taroon

    2011-01-01

    Several temporal and political factors can sometimes limit the effectiveness of traditional methods of project tracking and cost estimation. A large organization is susceptible to internal and external risks that are ...

  8. Model-based Risk Assessment What does model-based mean?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Střlen, Ketil

    Model-based Risk Assessment What does model-based mean? Model-based means based on modelling keeping a good overview at the same time. What does Risk Assessment mean? A risk assessment is a process to change the system in order to reduce these indicated risks. Why Risk Assessment? IT-systems get bigger

  9. Risk Assessment and Management for Interconnected and Interactive Critical Flood Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamedifar, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    Loss of life estimation in flood risk assessment: Theory andand flow velocity Because flood risk depends on uncertaintheir study: storm-based flood risk. The study is resource-

  10. Low Power and Shutdown Risk Assessment Benchmarking Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.Mitman, J. Julius, R. Berucio, M. Phillips, J. Grobbelaaar, D. Bley, R. Budniz

    2002-12-15

    (B204)Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) insights are now used by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to confirm the level of safety for plant operations and to justify changes in nuclear power plant operating requirements, both on an exception basis and as changeds to a plant's licensing basis. This report examines qualitative and quantitative risk assessments during shutdown plant states, providing feedback to utilities in the use of qualitative models for outage risk management, and also providing input to the development of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) Low Power and Shutdown PRA Standard.

  11. An Assessment of Integrated Health Management Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lybeck, Nancy; Coble, Jamie B.; Tawfik, Magdy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-05-18

    In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging NPPs presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging NPPs. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of an NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of an NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system development tools, deployable architectures, and peripheral tools.

  12. Bridge Functionality Relationships for Improved Seismic Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padgett, Jamie Ellen

    Bridge Functionality Relationships for Improved Seismic Risk Assessment of Transportation Networks Jamie E. Padgett,a... M.EERI, and Reginald DesRoches,b... M.EERI Relationships between bridge damage and the resulting loss of functionality of the bridge are critical to assessing the impact of an earthquake event

  13. UC Davis Health System -Computer Workstation Self Evaluation Assessment Date: ______________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    UC Davis Health System - Computer Workstation Self Evaluation Assessment Date Ergonomics Program at 734-6180 #12;UCDHS ERGONOMICS PROGRAM Adjusting your Computer Workstation to Fit

  14. Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Protocol...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    March 2015 (Revision 1) - PROTOCOL - EA-30-01 Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Protocol for the Development and Maintenance of Criteria Review and...

  15. Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Protocol...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    April 2015 (Revision 1) - PROTOCOL - EA-30-02 Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Protocol for Required Reading, April 2015 (Revision 1) - PROTOCOL -...

  16. Assessment of risks and costs associated with transportation of US Department of Energy radioactively contaminated carbon steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.-Y.; Arnish, J.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.; Nieves, L.A.; Folga, S.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.

    1996-09-01

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of potential human health risks and develops unit risks and costs for transporting radioactively contaminated carbon steel (RCCS) scrap between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The RCCS would be generated from DOE activities (current or future) and from decontamination and decommissioning of DOE facilities. The estimates of transportation system risk reflect preliminary information regarding the quantities of RCCS at some sites and the spectrum of activity in RCCS at various types of DOE facilities.

  17. Preliminary Risk Assessment Associated with IGSCC of BWR Vessel Internals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Ware; K. Morton; M. Nitzel; N. Chokshi; T-Y. Chang

    1999-08-01

    BWR core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. The paper presents an overview of the program, discusses the results of a preliminary qualitative assessment, and summarizes a simplified risk assessment that was conducted on sequences resulting from failures of jet pump components of a BWR/4 plant.

  18. \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments DEPARTMENT: Andrew Wiles March 2015 Brief description of area and location Roof tops, walkways, and Fire Route. Sedum' Roof Area

  19. National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Services wastewater system. Protocol for Assessing Community Excellence in Environmental Health: Tool for Community Environmental Health Assessment Many communities face disproportionate health risks. Environmental for Assessing Community Excellence in Environmental Health PACE EH is a community involvement tool. The National

  20. Risk Assessment using Image-Based Hemodynamic Modeling of Patients with Coronary Artery Aneurysms caused by Kawasaki Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Dibyendu

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Risk Assessment using Image-BasedOF THE DISSERTATION Risk Assessment using Image-Based

  1. Risk Assessment in Healthcare Collaborative Settings: A Case Study Using SHELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antunes, Pedro

    Risk Assessment in Healthcare Collaborative Settings: A Case Study Using SHELL Pedro Antunes1 nbaloian@gmail.com Abstract. This paper describes a case study addressing risk assessment in a hospital: SHELL, Risk Assessment, Collaborative Settings, Hospitals. 1 Introduction Risk assessment in healthcare

  2. Public Health Assessment Gopher State Ethanol, City of St. Paul

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Public Health Assessment Gopher State Ethanol, City of St. Paul Ramsey County, Minnesota September 19, 2003 Prepared by The Minnesota Department of Health Under Cooperative Agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry #12;Foreword This document summarizes health concerns associated

  3. Rapid Risk Assessment: FY05 Annual Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Millard, W. David; Gelston, Gariann M.; Pelton, Mitch A.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Strenge, Dennis L.; Lee, Cheegwan; Sivaraman, Chitra; Simpson, Mary J.; Young, Joan K.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Downing, Timothy R.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Hachmeister, Lon E.

    2006-03-06

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing decision support tools that will assist in the transition of incident information into Protective Action Recommendations (PARs) that are understandable and can be executed in a real-world, operational environment. During emergencies, responders must rapidly assess risks and decide on the best course of action—all within minutes to hours. PNNL is blending existing modeling and decision support technology to develop new methods for transitioning science-based threat assessment to PARs. The rapid risk assessment tool will be both understandable and applicable to the emergency management community and would be a valuable tool during any water security-related incident. In 2005, PNNL demonstrated the integration of the multi-thematic modeling with emergency management decision support tools to create a Rapid Risk Assessment (RRA) tool that will transition risk to PARs that assist in responding to or mitigating the direct and indirect impacts of the incident(s). The RRA tool does this by aligning multi-thematic modeling capabilities with real-world response zones established by emergency and site operations managers. The RRA tool uses the risk assessment tool to drive prognostic models that use the type of incident, time of impact, severity of impact, and duration of impact to select the most appropriate PAR. Because PARs (and the thresholds by which they are selected) are jointly established by the technologists and the emergency management and operations decision makers, the science-based risk assessment can transition into a recommendation that can be understood and executed by people in the field.

  4. Level 3 Baseline Risk Assessment for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollert, D.A.; Cretella, F.M.; Golden, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The baseline risk assessment for the Fission Product Pilot Plant (Building 3515) at the Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) provides the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program at ORNL and Building 3515 project managers with information concerning the results of the Level 3 baseline risk assessment performed for this building. The document was prepared under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.2.01 (Activity Data Sheet 3701, Facilities D&D) and includes information on the potential long-term impacts to human health and the environment if no action is taken to remediate Building 3515. Information provided in this document forms the basis for the development of remedial alternatives and the no-action risk portion of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis report.

  5. Information Uncertainty to Compare Qualitative Reasoning Security Risk Assessment Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Gregory M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Key, Brian P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zerkle, David K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shevitz, Daniel W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The security risk associated with malevolent acts such as those of terrorism are often void of the historical data required for a traditional PRA. Most information available to conduct security risk assessments for these malevolent acts is obtained from subject matter experts as subjective judgements. Qualitative reasoning approaches such as approximate reasoning and evidential reasoning are useful for modeling the predicted risk from information provided by subject matter experts. Absent from these approaches is a consistent means to compare the security risk assessment results. Associated with each predicted risk reasoning result is a quantifiable amount of information uncertainty which can be measured and used to compare the results. This paper explores using entropy measures to quantify the information uncertainty associated with conflict and non-specificity in the predicted reasoning results. The measured quantities of conflict and non-specificity can ultimately be used to compare qualitative reasoning results which are important in triage studies and ultimately resource allocation. Straight forward extensions of previous entropy measures are presented here to quantify the non-specificity and conflict associated with security risk assessment results obtained from qualitative reasoning models.

  6. Risk Level Based Management System: a control banding model for occupational health and safety risk management in a highly regulated environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Kamerzell, R; Paik, S; Kapp, J; Harrington, D; Swuste, P

    2009-05-27

    The Risk Level Based Management System (RLBMS) is an occupational risk management (ORM) model that focuses occupational safety, hygeiene, and health (OSHH) resources on the highest risk procedures at work. This article demonstrates the model's simplicity through an implementation within a heavily regulated research institution. The model utilizes control banding strategies with a stratification of four risk levels (RLs) for many commonly performed maintenance and support activities, characterizing risk consistently for comparable tasks. RLBMS creates an auditable tracking of activities, maximizes OSHH professional field time, and standardizes documentation and control commensurate to a given task's RL. Validation of RLs and their exposure control effectiveness is collected in a traditional quantitative collection regime for regulatory auditing. However, qualitative risk assessment methods are also used within this validation process. Participatory approaches are used throughout the RLBMS process. Workers are involved in all phases of building, maintaining, and improving this model. This work participation also improves the implementation of established controls.

  7. Data banks for risk assessment at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, W.S.; Townsend, C.S.; Baughman, D.F.; Hang, P.

    1992-01-01

    One of the lessons learned from many years of risk assessment experience is that mistakes of the past are soon forgotten if no method is available to retrieve and review these events. Savannah River Site has maintained a computerized data bank system for recording, retrieving and reviewing its incident history. The system is based on a series of compilations developed primarily for risk assessment but has been found to be invaluable for many other uses such as equipment reliability, project justification, and incident investigations.

  8. Data banks for risk assessment at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, W.S.; Townsend, C.S.; Baughman, D.F.; Hang, P.

    1992-11-01

    One of the lessons learned from many years of risk assessment experience is that mistakes of the past are soon forgotten if no method is available to retrieve and review these events. Savannah River Site has maintained a computerized data bank system for recording, retrieving and reviewing its incident history. The system is based on a series of compilations developed primarily for risk assessment but has been found to be invaluable for many other uses such as equipment reliability, project justification, and incident investigations.

  9. Risk assessment of climate systems for national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick; Brown, Theresa Jean; Cai, Ximing; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Constantine, Paul; Dalbey, Keith R.; Debusschere, Bert J.; Fields, Richard; Hart, David Blaine; Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Kerstein, Alan R.; Levy, Michael; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Najm, Habib N.; Overfelt, James Robert; Parks, Mancel Jordan; Peplinski, William J.; Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Taylor, Mark A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Villa, Daniel L.

    2012-10-01

    Climate change, through drought, flooding, storms, heat waves, and melting Arctic ice, affects the production and flow of resource within and among geographical regions. The interactions among governments, populations, and sectors of the economy require integrated assessment based on risk, through uncertainty quantification (UQ). This project evaluated the capabilities with Sandia National Laboratories to perform such integrated analyses, as they relate to (inter)national security. The combining of the UQ results from climate models with hydrological and economic/infrastructure impact modeling appears to offer the best capability for national security risk assessments.

  10. PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1 , Andrew M. Parsons2 , Loren R. Anderson3 and Terry F. Glover4 ABSTRACT This paper summarises the Portfolio Risk Assessment (PRA a reconnaissance-level engineering assessment and risk assessment. These assessments were performed for floods

  11. Overview of DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadasivan, Pratap

    2012-08-24

    Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning. The PTRA program supports DOE-NE's goal of using risk information to inform R&D program planning. The FY12 PTRA program is focused on terrorism risk. The program includes a mix of innovative methods that support the general practice of risk assessments, and selected applications.

  12. Risk Assessment Scheme of Infection Transmission Indoors Incorporating the Impact of Resuspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    dose-response modeling. Risk Analysis, 2007; 27(6):1581– 18.Uncertainty analysis. Risk Analysis 2011; 21. Jones RM,microbial risk assessment. Risk Analysis, 2009; 29(3):355–

  13. Adaptation strategies for health impacts of climate change in Western Australia: Application of a Health Impact Assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery T.; Brown, Helen L.; Katscherian, Dianne

    2011-04-15

    Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing the globe and there is substantial evidence that this will result in a number of health impacts, regardless of the level of greenhouse gas mitigation. It is therefore apparent that a combined approach of mitigation and adaptation will be required to protect public health. While the importance of mitigation is recognised, this project focused on the role of adaptation strategies in addressing the potential health impacts of climate change. The nature and magnitude of these health impacts will be determined by a number of parameters that are dependent upon the location. Firstly, climate change will vary between regions. Secondly, the characteristics of each region in terms of population and the ability to adapt to changes will greatly influence the extent of the health impacts that are experienced now and into the future. Effective adaptation measures therefore need to be developed with these differences in mind. A Health Impact Assessment (HIA) framework was used to consider the implications of climate change on the health of the population of Western Australia (WA) and to develop a range of adaptive responses suited to WA. A broad range of stakeholders participated in the HIA process, providing informed input into developing an understanding of the potential health impacts and potential adaptation strategies from a diverse sector perspective. Potential health impacts were identified in relation to climate change predictions in WA in the year 2030. The risk associated with each of these impacts was assessed using a qualitative process that considered the consequences and the likelihood of the health impact occurring. Adaptations were then developed which could be used to mitigate the identified health impacts and provide responses which could be used by Government for future decision making. The periodic application of a HIA framework is seen as an ideal tool to develop appropriate adaptation strategies to address the potential health impacts of climate change.

  14. Leakage Risk Assessment of CO2 Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzoldi, A.

    2014-01-01

    begins with a review of pipeline risk assessment includingPipeline Leakage Risk .We have carried out pipeline leakage risk assessment for the

  15. Scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    A National Research Council study panel, convened by the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, has examined the scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings and issued this final report containing a number of recommendations. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the problem. Chapter 2 examines the processes of uranium extraction and the mechanisms by which radionuclides and toxic chemicals contained in the ore can enter the environment. Chapter 3 is devoted to a review of the evidence on health risks associated with radon and its decay products. Chapter 4 provides a consideration of conventional and possible new technical alternatives for tailings management. Chapter 5 explores a number of issues of comparative risk, provides a brief history of uranium mill tailings regulation, and concludes with a discussion of choices that must be made in mill tailing risk management. 211 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1996-06-01

    This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

  17. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  18. Sitewide biological risk assessment Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska: Risks to terrestrial receptors from diverse contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Becker, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) is located southeast of Fairbanks, Alaska. Eielson AFB was listed by the US Environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List with a total of 64 potential terrestrial and aquatic source areas. Contaminants of concern include fuel and fuel components, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and lead. As part of the remedial investigations of these sites, a biological risk assessment (BRA) was conducted to estimate the risk of ecological effects on terrestrial receptors posed by contaminants in the Eielson environment. There are 32 mammal species, 117 bird species, 17 fish species, and 1 amphibian species known to inhabit Eielson AFB and vicinity. The BRA screened source areas based on completed biological exposure pathways, selected receptors for analysis, estimated exposure of receptors to contaminants, and compared these exposures to known toxicological effects. Lower Garrison Slough and Flightline Pond posed a substantial risk for shrikes and goshawks. Ingestion of PCBs constituted the primary pathway/contaminant combination contributing to this risk. The effects of the various sources of uncertainty in the ingestion exposure calculations for these sites were evaluated in a probabilistic risk assessment using Monte Carlo methods. There was an 11% risk of reproductive effects from PCBs for goshawks feeding from Flightline Pond and a 25 % risk from lower Garrison Slough. There was an 81 % risk of reproductive effects from PCB exposure for shrikes feeding near lower Garrison Slough.

  19. Int. J. Risk Assessment and Management, Vol. X, No. X, xxxx 1 Copyright 200x Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Int. J. Risk Assessment and Management, Vol. X, No. X, xxxx 1 Copyright © 200x Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. Risk assessment and management of animal disease- related biosecurity Yanhong Jin* Department threats; preparedness; prevention; recovery; response; risk assessment; risk management; vulnerability

  20. Non-indigenous microorganisms in the Antarctic: assessing the risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    Non-indigenous microorganisms in the Antarctic: assessing the risks Don A. Cowan1 , Steven L. Chown wastes at these sites, little has been done to prevent the introduction of non-indigenous microorganisms largely restricted to the impacts of human and animal pathogens (including viruses) [7,8,13] and organisms

  1. Eutrophication risk assessment in coastal embayments using simple statistical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    Eutrophication risk assessment in coastal embayments using simple statistical models G. Arhonditsis was the development of regression models relating the levels of chlorophyll a (Chl) with the concentration of the limiting nutrient­­usually nitrogen­­and the renewal rate of the systems. The method was applied

  2. Hanford Waste Vitrification Systems Risk Assessment action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, W.C.

    1990-11-01

    Recent events in the Hanford waste storage tanks and delays in the startup of US Department of Energy vitrification plans suggest that the schedule for waste vitrification activities at the Hanford Site should be reexamined. As a result, a Hanford Waste Vitrification Systems Risk Assessment will be performed to identify significant risks associated with the vitrification of Hanford high-level and transuranic wastes. This document defines the purpose, scope, plan of execution, responsibilities, reporting requirements, and preliminary schedule and cost estimate to complete this assessment. The study will identify and evaluate uncertainties, quantify potential consequences from these uncertainties, and identify the risks to successful completion of the Hanford vitrification mission. Waste characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification will be addressed. Uncertainties associated with the vitrification of double-shell and single-shell tank wastes and cesium and strontium capsules, as well as a limited assessment of the grouting of low-level wastes, will be defined. Technical, regulatory (safety and environmental), and programmatic (cost and schedule) uncertainties will be defined. Recommendations for mitigating strategies and assessments of technical alternatives will be made to reduce substantial risks. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Information resource use and need in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turturro, A.

    1990-12-31

    The manner in which the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses information resources comprises an interesting illustration of federal agency information use. A description of the context in which risk assessment occurs within the FDA is followed by a discussion of information access and use, as well as a practical example.

  4. Guidance Document Quick Guide to Assess Risk for Hazardous Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Document Quick Guide to Assess Risk for Hazardous Chemicals The following outline provides) or other sources of information. In cases where substances with significant or unusual potential hazards of experience and the degree of potential hazard associated with the proposed experiment, it may be necessary

  5. Generalized event tree algorithm and software for dam safety risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Generalized event tree algorithm and software for dam safety risk assessment Anurag Srivastava 1 an event tree risk model for dam safety risk assessment in a highly flexible manner. This paper describes and a summary of plans for its further development. Keywords: Event tree analysis, dam safety risk assessment

  6. Gross national happiness as a framework for health impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, Michael; Ura, Karma

    2011-01-15

    The incorporation of population health concepts and health determinants into Health Impact Assessments has created a number of challenges. The need for intersectoral collaboration has increased; the meaning of 'health' has become less clear; and the distinctions between health impacts, environmental impacts, social impacts and economic impacts have become increasingly blurred. The Bhutanese concept of Gross National Happiness may address these issues by providing an over-arching evidence-based framework which incorporates health, social, environmental and economic contributors as well as a number of other key contributors to wellbeing such as culture and governance. It has the potential to foster intersectoral collaboration by incorporating a more limited definition of health which places the health sector as one of a number of contributors to wellbeing. It also allows for the examination of the opportunity costs of health investments on wellbeing, is consistent with whole-of-government approaches to public policy and emerging models of social progress.

  7. Ecological risk assessment and the Endangered Species Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, S.G.; Abood, K.A. [Lawler, Matusky and Skelly Engineers, Pearl River, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The presence of a threatened or endangered species (TES) at a CERCLA site requires that applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) to protect the species and its habitat be included in the remedial investigation/feasibility study process. In such cases there is a propensity to use the species as an endpoint in the ecological assessment of the site. This approach ensures the inclusion of the TES-related ARAR and provides for cost efficiency, but may not result in a thorough assessment of risks associated with remedial alternatives, especially if the TES is a state-listed rather than a federal species. This paper explores the importance of identifying ARARs related to TES, and the values and limitations of using TES as endpoints. In doing so it explores the technical vs emotional basis for TES-based risk assessments.

  8. Stakeholder position paper: The need for antimicrobial use data for risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Randall

    Stakeholder position paper: The need for antimicrobial use data for risk assessment Scott A. Mc of Minnesota, 1971 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, MN 55108, USA Abstract Risk assessment seeks to estimate to assessment have been developed. This paper provides some examples of risk assessments that have been

  9. NAS/NRC Report:NAS/NRC Report: Health Risks from Dioxin and RelatedHealth Risks from Dioxin and Related

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    NAS/NRC Report:NAS/NRC Report: Health Risks from Dioxin and RelatedHealth Risks from Dioxin Provost for Research University of WashingtonUniversity of Washington #12;Dioxins, Dibenzofurans and PCBs · Chlorinated Dioxins represent a class of compounds, of which 7 are included in EPA regulations (Contaminants

  10. Environmental Health and Safety Chemical Hygiene Laboratory Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health and Safety Chemical Hygiene Laboratory Assessment PI or environmental concerns were identified. B. Items of safety or environmental concerns were identified. C. Uncorrected repeated safety or environmental items were identified. Compressed Gas Cylinders / Distribution

  11. An assessment of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sequeira, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    An exploration of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations is made by assessing the results of a study of aviation's effects on United States air quality mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The ...

  12. Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Protocol...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 2015 Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Protocol for Site Leads, April 2015 (Revision 1) - PROTOCOL - EA-31-01 The purpose of this protocol is to establish...

  13. Survey of tools for risk assessment of cascading outages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papic, Milorad; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Dobson, Ian; Fonte, Louis; Haq, Enamul; Hines, Paul; Kirschen, Daniel; Luo, Xiaochuan; Miller, Stephen; Samaan, Nader A.; Vaiman, Marianna; Varghese, Matthew; Zhang, Pei

    2011-10-01

    Abstract-This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Understanding, Prediction, Mitigation and Restoration of Cascading Failures Task Force under IEEE Computer Analytical Methods Subcommittee (CAMS). The task force's previous papers [1, 2] are focused on general aspects of cascading outages such as understanding, prediction, prevention and restoration from cascading failures. This is the second of two new papers, which extend this previous work to summarize the state of the art in cascading failure risk analysis methodologies and modeling tools. The first paper reviews the state of the art in methodologies for performing risk assessment of potential cascading outages [3]. This paper describes the state of the art in cascading failure modeling tools, documenting the view of experts representing utilities, universities and consulting companies. The paper is intended to constitute a valid source of information and references about presently available tools that deal with prediction of cascading failure events. This effort involves reviewing published literature and other documentation from vendors, universities and research institutions. The assessment of cascading outages risk evaluation is in continuous evolution. Investigations to gain even better understanding and identification of cascading events are the subject of several research programs underway aimed at solving the complexity of these events that electrical utilities face today. Assessing the risk of cascading failure events in planning and operation for power transmission systems require adequate mathematical tools/software.

  14. Risk Assessment of Cascading Outages: Methodologies and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaiman, Marianna; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Chowdhury, Badrul; Dobson, Ian; Hines, Paul; Papic, Milorad; Miller, Stephen; Zhang, Pei

    2012-05-31

    Abstract- This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Understanding, Prediction, Mitigation and Restoration of Cascading Failures Task Force under IEEE Computer Analytical Methods Subcommittee (CAMS). The task force's previous papers are focused on general aspects of cascading outages such as understanding, prediction, prevention and restoration from cascading failures. This is the first of two new papers, which extend this previous work to summarize the state of the art in cascading failure risk analysis methodologies and modeling tools. This paper is intended to be a reference document to summarize the state of the art in the methodologies for performing risk assessment of cascading outages caused by some initiating event(s). A risk assessment should cover the entire potential chain of cascades starting with the initiating event(s) and ending with some final condition(s). However, this is a difficult task and heuristic approaches and approximations have been suggested. This paper discusses different approaches to this and suggests directions for future development of methodologies. The second paper summarizes the state of the art in modeling tools for risk assessment of cascading outages.

  15. Risk assessment for physical and cyber attacks on critical infrastructures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Bryan J.; Sholander, Peter E.; Phelan, James M.; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Varnado, G. Bruce; Depoy, Jennifer Mae

    2005-08-01

    Assessing the risk of malevolent attacks against large-scale critical infrastructures requires modifications to existing methodologies. Existing risk assessment methodologies consider physical security and cyber security separately. As such, they do not accurately model attacks that involve defeating both physical protection and cyber protection elements (e.g., hackers turning off alarm systems prior to forced entry). This paper presents a risk assessment methodology that accounts for both physical and cyber security. It also preserves the traditional security paradigm of detect, delay and respond, while accounting for the possibility that a facility may be able to recover from or mitigate the results of a successful attack before serious consequences occur. The methodology provides a means for ranking those assets most at risk from malevolent attacks. Because the methodology is automated the analyst can also play 'what if with mitigation measures to gain a better understanding of how to best expend resources towards securing the facilities. It is simple enough to be applied to large infrastructure facilities without developing highly complicated models. Finally, it is applicable to facilities with extensive security as well as those that are less well-protected.

  16. Defining resilience within a risk-informed assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Holter, Gregory M.; Bass, Robert B.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2011-08-01

    The concept of resilience is the subject of considerable discussion in academic, business, and governmental circles. The United States Department of Homeland Security for one has emphasised the need to consider resilience in safeguarding critical infrastructure and key resources. The concept of resilience is complex, multidimensional, and defined differently by different stakeholders. The authors contend that there is a benefit in moving from discussing resilience as an abstraction to defining resilience as a measurable characteristic of a system. This paper proposes defining resilience measures using elements of a traditional risk assessment framework to help clarify the concept of resilience and as a way to provide non-traditional risk information. The authors show various, diverse dimensions of resilience can be quantitatively defined in a common risk assessment framework based on the concept of loss of service. This allows the comparison of options for improving the resilience of infrastructure and presents a means to perform cost-benefit analysis. This paper discusses definitions and key aspects of resilience, presents equations for the risk of loss of infrastructure function that incorporate four key aspects of resilience that could prevent or mitigate that loss, describes proposed resilience factor definitions based on those risk impacts, and provides an example that illustrates how resilience factors would be calculated using a hypothetical scenario.

  17. Review of the Diablo Canyon probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozoki, G.E.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Bohn, M.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sabek, M.G. [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Regulatory and Safety Center, Cairo (Egypt); Ravindra, M.K.; Johnson, J.J. [EQE Engineering, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    This report details the review of the Diablo Canyon Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DCPRA). The study was performed under contract from the Probabilistic Risk Analysis Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Research, USNRC by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The DCPRA is a full scope Level I effort and although the review touched on all aspects of the PRA, the internal events and seismic events received the vast majority of the review effort. The report includes a number of independent systems analyses sensitivity studies, importance analyses as well as conclusions on the adequacy of the DCPRA for use in the Diablo Canyon Long Term Seismic Program.

  18. EVMS Training Snippet: 5.3 PARSII Analysis: Schedule Health Assessment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5.3 PARSII Analysis: Schedule Health Assessment EVMS Training Snippet: 5.3 PARSII Analysis: Schedule Health Assessment This EVMS Training Snippet, sponsored by the Office of...

  19. Assessment of Individual Risk of Death Using Self-report Data: an Artificial Neural Network Compared to a Frailty Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitnitski, Arnold B.

    1 Assessment of Individual Risk of Death Using Self-report Data: an Artificial Neural Network,4 and Kenneth Rockwood, MD1,4 1 Geriatric Medicine Research Unit, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre rate over 10 simulations in predicting the probability of individual survival was 79.2 ± 0

  20. Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.

    1998-03-05

    In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

  1. Overview of Navy marine ecological risk assessment projects in Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracey, G.A. [Science Applications International Corp., Narragansett, RI (United States); King, J.; Quinn, J. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States); Hahn, S. [Navy, Lester, PA (United States). Northern Div.

    1995-12-31

    The US Navy has had a long and prominent role in shaping the shoreline of Narragansett Bay, R.I. During times of war, Navy bases in this area, as well as elsewhere, commonly used seaside landfill and/or conduits to the sea to dispose of wastes, including construction materials, solvents, spent fuels, and electrical components. Recognizing that the disposal areas may pose risks to the environment and human health, the Navy has been actively pursuing remediation options based on input from Ecological Risk Assessments (ERAs). In Narragansett Bay, four sites have been targeted for ecological risk assessments; one at the Naval Construction Battalion Center in western Narragansett Bay and three sites at the Naval Education and Training Center (NETC) in the Lower East Passage of Narragansett Bay. To streamline the process of ERA scoping, OA/QC and reporting procedures, a Master Plan was developed to encompass all general aspects of these projects, and were augmented by site-specific study plans for each ERA. This approach has dramatically reduced the time and cost which would have been required had each study been developed separately. This presentation will include an overview of each project, including conceptual approach, problem formulation, exposure and effects characterization and risk assessment summary.

  2. Hanford safety analysis and risk assessment handbook (SARAH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GARVIN, L.J.

    2003-01-20

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 1,2, and 3 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. SARAH describes currently acceptable methodology for development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of technical safety requirements (TSR) based on 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management,'' Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' and provides data to ensure consistency in approach.

  3. Annual Report: National Risk Assessment Partnership (30 September 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bromhal, Grant; Guthrie, George

    2014-01-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is conducting research to advance the science and engineering knowledge base for technologies that will accelerate the business case for CO{sub 2} capture and storage, including prediction and quantification of risks that may relate to potential liabilities. As part of this effort, NETL, through its Office of Research and Development (ORD), is leading a multi-laboratory effort that leverages broad technical capabilities across the DOE complex: the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP). NRAP involves five DOE national laboratories: NETL, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This team is working together to develop a science-based method for quantifying the likelihood of risks (and associated potential liabilities) for CO{sub 2} storage sites. NRAP is an effort that harnesses the breadth of capabilities across the DOE National Laboratory (NL) system into a mission-focused platform that will develop the integrated science base that can be applied to risk assessment for long-term storage of CO{sub 2}.

  4. An Ecological Risk Assessment for Insecticides Used in Adult Mosquito Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    An Ecological Risk Assessment for Insecticides Used in Adult Mosquito Management Ryan S Davis: Risk assessment Mosquito management Insecticides Synergists Nontarget receptors INTRODUCTION West Nile the largest arboviral encephalitis epidemic in US history. Vector control management programs have been

  5. Risk assessment of complex mixtures: development of toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Erica Dawn

    2001-01-01

    Risk assessment is a very valuable tool with which to frame complex environmental problems. Although risk assessment is a very valuable tool it does have significant limitations. There are many aspects of the process ...

  6. Development and Implementation of a Statistical Risk Assessment Method for New Aircraft Performance at XYZ Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Christopher R.

    2009-12-18

    arose. Although a myriad of risk assessment techniques exist in literature, a specific technique for performance guarantees was not available. This research develops a specific statistical risk assessment method (SRAM) that fits with XYZ’s tools...

  7. Risk Assessment Form (This is an active document and must be maintained)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Risk Assessment Form (This is an active document and must be maintained) Materials Science the people identified on the document. Detailed risk assessments for individual procedures other than office

  8. Preferences, Knowledge, and Citizen Probability Assessments of the Terrorism Risk of Nuclear Power 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Quan; Fuhrmann, Matthew; Early, Bryan R.; Vedlitz, Arnold

    How does the American public assess risk when it comes to national security issues? This paper addresses this question by analyzing variation in citizen probability assessments of the terrorism risk of nuclear power plants. Drawing on the literature...

  9. COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS ­ EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD assessment of contaminated aquatic sediments has to consider both sediment hydraulics and ecology. Since layers of contaminated sediments are often buried under less polluted deposits, the risk of erosion

  10. Seismic Risk Assessment of Port Facilities Ung Jin Na, Samit Ray Chaudhuri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Seismic Risk Assessment of Port Facilities Ung Jin Na, Samit Ray Chaudhuri Faculty Advisor : Prof Estimation Methodology Applications (in progress) Port of Long Beach · Seismic Risk Assessment, Decision & Vertical movement, Settlement of Apron Seismic Vulnerability - quay Wall

  11. Health impact assessment in planning: Development of the design for health HIA tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsyth, Ann; Slotterback, Carissa Schively; Krizek, Kevin J.

    2010-01-15

    How can planners more systematically incorporate health concerns into practical planning processes? This paper describes a suite of health impact assessment tools (HIAs) developed specifically for planning practice. Taking an evidence-based approach the tools are designed to fit into existing planning activities. The tools include: a short audit tool, the Preliminary Checklist; a structured participatory workshop, the Rapid HIA; an intermediate health impact assessment, the Threshold Analysis; and a set of Plan Review Checklists. This description provides a basis for future work including assessing tool validity, refining specific tools, and creating alternatives.

  12. Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Steven Prescott; Tony Koonce

    2014-04-01

    A key area of the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) strategy is the development of methodologies and tools that will be used to predict the safety, security, safeguards, performance, and deployment viability of SMRs. The goal of the SMR PRA activity will be to develop quantitative methods and tools and the associated analysis framework for assessing a variety of risks. Development and implementation of SMR-focused safety assessment methods may require new analytic methods or adaptation of traditional methods to the advanced design and operational features of SMRs. We will need to move beyond the current limitations such as static, logic-based models in order to provide more integrated, scenario-based models based upon predictive modeling which are tied to causal factors. The development of SMR-specific safety models for margin determination will provide a safety case that describes potential accidents, design options (including postulated controls), and supports licensing activities by providing a technical basis for the safety envelope. This report documents the progress that was made to implement the PRA framework, specifically by way of demonstration of an advanced 3D approach to representing, quantifying and understanding flooding risks to a nuclear power plant.

  13. POTENTIAL HEALTH RISK REDUCTION ARISING FROM REDUCED MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T. M.; Lipfert, F. W.; Morris, S. C.; Moskowitz, P. D.

    2001-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants. EPA has not prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. To address this issue, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in human health risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. The primary pathway for Hg exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to Hg exposure is the fetus. Therefore the risk assessment focused on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Dose response factors were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions. Three scenarios for reducing Hg emissions from coal plants were considered: (1) A base case using current conditions; (2) A 50% reduction; and, (3) A 90% reduction. These reductions in emissions were assumed to translate linearly into a reduction in fish Hg levels of 8.6% and 15.5%, respectively. Population risk estimates were also calculated for two subsistence fisher populations. These groups of people consume substantially more fish than the general public and, depending on location, the fish may contain higher Hg levels than average. Risk estimates for these groups were calculated for the three Hg levels used for the general population analyses. Analysis shows that the general population risks for exposure of the fetus to Hg are small. Estimated risks under current conditions (i.e., no specific Hg controls) ranged from 5.7 x 10{sup -6} in the Midwest to 2 x 10{sup -5} in the Southeast. Reducing emissions from coal plants by 90% reduced the estimated range in risk to 5 x 10{sup -6} in the Midwest and 1.5 x 10{sup -5} in Southeast, respectively. The population risk for the subsistence fisher using the Southeast regional fish Hg levels was 3.8 x 10{sup -3}, a factor of 200 greater than the general population risk. For the subsistence fishers and the Savannah River Hg levels, the population risk was 4.3 x 10{sup -5}, a factor of 2 greater than for the general population. The estimated risk reductions from a 90% reduction in coal plant Hg emissions ranged from 25%-68%, which is greater than the assumed reduction in Hg levels in fish, (15.5%). To place this risk in perspective, there are approximately 4 x 10{sup 6} births/year in the U.S (National Vital Statistics Report, 2000). Assuming that the Southeast risk level (the highest of the regions) is appropriate for the entire U.S., an estimate of 80 newborn children per year have a 5% chance of realizing any of the 16 adverse effects used to generate the DRF. If Hg emissions from power plants are reduced 90%, the number of children at risk is reduced to 60.

  14. A mathematically guided strategy for risk assessment and management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, James Arlin

    2005-03-01

    Strategies for risk assessment and management of high consequence operations are often based on factors such as physical analysis, analysis of software and other logical processing, and analysis of statistically determined human actions. Conventional analysis methods work well for processing objective information. However, in practical situations, much or most of the data available are subjective. Also, there are potential resultant pitfalls where conventional analysis might be unrealistic, such as improperly using event tree and fault tree failure descriptions where failures or events are soft (partial) rather than crisp (binary), neglecting or misinterpreting dependence (positive, negative, correlation), and aggregating nonlinear contributions linearly. There are also personnel issues that transcend basic human factors statistics. For example, sustained productivity and safety in critical operations can depend on the morale of involved personnel. In addition, motivation is significantly influenced by 'latent effects', which are pre-occurring influences. This paper addresses these challenges and proposes techniques for subjective risk analysis, latent effects risk analysis and a hybrid analysis that also includes objective risk analysis. The goal is an improved strategy for risk management.

  15. Risk assessment for uncertain cash flows: Model ambiguity, discounting ambiguity, and the role of bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Föllmer, Hans

    Risk assessment for uncertain cash flows: Model ambiguity, discounting ambiguity, and the role of bubbles Beatrice Acciaio Hans F¨ollmer Irina Penner August 26, 2010 Abstract We study the risk assessment penalization, and how they cause a breakdown of asymptotic safety of the risk assessment procedure. Mathematics

  16. A Visual Analytics Process for Maritime Resource Allocation and Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Ross

    A Visual Analytics Process for Maritime Resource Allocation and Risk Assessment Abish Malik Ross provide mar- itime risk assessment tools that allow analysts to explore Coast Guard coverage for SAR by analysts at the Coast Guard Atlantic Area. Keywords: Visual analytics, risk assessment, Coast Guard 1

  17. COBRA: A Hybrid Method for Software Cost Estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briand, Lionel C.

    COBRA: A Hybrid Method for Software Cost Estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment approaches (referred to as COBRA, COst estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment). We find through a case usable for benchmarking and risk assessment purposes. 1 Introduction Project and program managers require

  18. Modelling of Stochastic Hybrid Systems with Applications to Accident Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Moral , Pierre

    Modelling of Stochastic Hybrid Systems with Applications to Accident Risk Assessment #12;The SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS TO ACCIDENT RISK ASSESSMENT DISSERTATION to obtain the doctor's degree promotor Prof. dr. A. Bagchi #12;Contents 1 Introduction 3 1.1 Accident risk assessment

  19. PRIOR RISK ASSESSMENT 005 Bradley / adapted by UoE URPO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearhop, Stuart

    PRIOR RISK ASSESSMENT 005 Version 002 Author Bradley / adapted by UoE URPO Date of version 1 issue the University to undertake a prior risk assessment before commencing a new work activity involving ionising a review of existing risk assessments at appropriate intervals to ensure that they remain suitable

  20. Risk Assessment as an Argumentation Game Henry Prakken1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieringa, Roel

    Risk Assessment as an Argumentation Game Henry Prakken1,2 , Dan Ionita3 , and Roel Wieringa3 1@student.utwente.nl,r.j.wieringa@ewi.utwente.nl Abstract. This paper explores the idea that IT security risk assessment can be formalized is always partial and involves a risk assessment of the assessors. The game is dynamic in that the players

  1. Using the `Internet of Things' to Support Dynamic Risk Assessment in Future Concepts of Operation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    Using the `Internet of Things' to Support Dynamic Risk Assessment in Future://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~johnson Keywords: Internet of Things, Area Navigation (RNAV), Dynamic Risk Assessment. Abstract. The `Internet. In contrast, this paper uses concepts from the Internet of Things to inform the dynamic risk assessments

  2. Cancer Risk Assessment: Should New Science be Applied? Workgroup summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard J. Bull; Antone L. Brooks

    2002-12-15

    OAK-B135 A symposium discussing the implications of certain phenomena observed in radiation biology for cancer risk assessment in general. In July of 2002 a workshop was convened that explored some of the intercellular phenomena that appear to condition responses to carcinogen exposure. Effects that result from communication between cells that appear to either increase the sphere of damage or to modify the sensitivity of cells to further damage were of particular interest. Much of the discussion focused on the effects of ionizing radiation that were transmitted from cells directly hit to cells not receiving direct exposure to radiation (bystander cells). In cell culture, increased rates of mutation, chromosomal aberration, apoptosis, genomic instability, and decreased clonogenic survival have all been observed in cells that have experienced no direct radiation. In addition, there is evidence that low doses of radiation or certain chemicals give rise to adaptive responses in which the treated cells develop resistance to the effects of high doses given in subsequent exposures. Data were presented at the workshop indicating that low dose exposure of animals to radiation and some chemicals frequently reduces the spontaneous rate of mutation in vitro and tumor responses in vivo. Finally, it was concluded that considerable improvement in understanding of how genetic variation may modify the impact of these phenomena is necessary before the risk implications can be fully appreciated. The workshop participants discussed the substantive challenge that these data present with respect to simple linear methodologies that are currently used in cancer risk assessment and attempted to identify broad strategies by which these phenomena may start to be used to refine cancer risk assessment methods in the future.

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  4. Leakage risk assessment of the In Salah CO2 storage project: Applying the Certification Framework in a dynamic context.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Leakage risk assessment of the In Salah CO 2 storageCF) is a simple risk assessment approach for evaluating CO 2system including two risk assessment efforts, one before

  5. Recent advances in the risk assessment of melamine and cyanuric acid in animal feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorne, Jean Lou; Vandenbroeck, Marc; Mennes, Wim; Knutsen, Helle K.; Vernazza, Francesco; Edler, Lutz; Benford, Diane

    2013-08-01

    Melamine can be present at low levels in food and feed mostly from its legal use as a food contact material in laminates and plastics, as a trace contaminant in nitrogen supplements used in animal feeds, and as a metabolite of the pesticide cyromazine. The mechanism of toxicity of melamine involves dose-dependent formation of crystals with either endogenous uric acid or a structural analogue of melamine, cyanuric acid, in renal tubules resulting in potential acute kidney failure. Co-exposure to melamine and cyanuric acid in livestock, fish, pets and laboratory animals shows higher toxicity compared with melamine or cyanuric acid alone. Evidence for crystal formation between melamine and other structural analogs i.e. ammelide and ammeline is limited. Illegal pet food adulterations with melamine and cyanuric acid and adulteration of milk with melamine resulted in melamine–cyanuric acid crystals, kidney damage and deaths of cats and dogs and melamine–uric acid stones, hospitalisation and deaths of children in China respectively. Following these incidents, the tolerable daily intake for melamine was re-evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the World Health Organisation, and the Scientific Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). This review provides an overview of toxicology, the adulteration incidents and risk assessments for melamine and its structural analogues. Particular focus is given to the recent EFSA risk assessment addressing impacts on animal and human health of background levels of melamine and structural analogues in animal feed. Recent research and future directions are discussed. - Highlights: ? Melamine in food and feed. ? Forms crystals in kidney with uric acid or cyanuric acid. ? Toxicity higher with cyanuric acid. ? Recent EFSA risk assessment. ? Animal and human health.

  6. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidential Permit authorizingAwardOccupational Safety & Health -

  7. Risk Assessment of Cascading Outages: Part I - Overview of Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaiman, Marianna; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Chowdhury, Badrul; Dobson, Ian; Hines, Paul; Papic, Milorad; Miller, Stephen; Zhang, Pei

    2011-07-31

    This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Understanding, Prediction, Mitigation and Restoration of Cascading Failures Task Force under IEEE Computer Analytical Methods Subcommittee (CAMS). The task force's previous papers are focused on general aspects of cascading outages such as understanding, prediction, prevention and restoration from cascading failures. This is the first of two new papers, which will extend this previous work to summarize the state of the art in cascading failure risk analysis methodologies and modeling tools. This paper is intended to be a reference document to summarize the state of the art in the methodologies for performing risk assessment of cascading outages caused by some initiating event(s). A risk assessment should cover the entire potential chain of cascades starting with the initiating event(s) and ending with some final condition(s). However, this is a difficult task and heuristic approaches and approximations have been suggested. This paper discusses diffeent approaches to this and suggests directions for future development of methodologies.

  8. Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.; McLachlan, Michael S.; Arnot, Jon A.; MacLeod, Matthew; McKone, Thomas E.; Wania, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Fate and exposure modeling has not thus far been explicitly used in the risk profile documents prepared to evaluate significant adverse effect of candidate chemicals for either the Stockholm Convention or the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. However, we believe models have considerable potential to improve the risk profiles. Fate and exposure models are already used routinely in other similar regulatory applications to inform decisions, and they have been instrumental in building our current understanding of the fate of POP and PBT chemicals in the environment. The goal of this paper is to motivate the use of fate and exposure models in preparing risk profiles in the POP assessment procedure by providing strategies for incorporating and using models. The ways that fate and exposure models can be used to improve and inform the development of risk profiles include: (1) Benchmarking the ratio of exposure and emissions of candidate chemicals to the same ratio for known POPs, thereby opening the possibility of combining this ratio with the relative emissions and relative toxicity to arrive at a measure of relative risk. (2) Directly estimating the exposure of the environment, biota and humans to provide information to complement measurements, or where measurements are not available or are limited. (3) To identify the key processes and chemical and/or environmental parameters that determine the exposure; thereby allowing the effective prioritization of research or measurements to improve the risk profile. (4) Predicting future time trends including how quickly exposure levels in remote areas would respond to reductions in emissions. Currently there is no standardized consensus model for use in the risk profile context. Therefore, to choose the appropriate model the risk profile developer must evaluate how appropriate an existing model is for a specific setting and whether the assumptions and input data are relevant in the context of the application. It is possible to have confidence in the predictions of many of the existing models because of their fundamental physical and chemical mechanistic underpinnings and the extensive work already done to compare model predictions and empirical observations. The working group recommends that modeling tools be applied for benchmarking PBT/POPs according to exposure-to-emissions relationships, and that modeling tools be used to interpret emissions and monitoring data. The further development of models that couple fate, long-range transport, and bioaccumulation should be fostered, especially models that will allow time trends to be scientifically addressed in the risk profile.

  9. Health assessment for Northwest Transformer (South Harkness), Everson, Whatcom County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD027315621. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-21

    In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has prepared Health Assessment reports for sites currently on, or proposed for, the National Priorities List. In the report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available to ATSDR that is relevant to a determination of potential risks to public health.

  10. Risk Analysis and Probabilistic Survivability Assessment (RAPSA): An Assessment Approach for Power Substation Hardening1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Axel W.

    Substation Hardening1 Carol Taylor, Axel Krings and Jim Alves-Foss Computer Science Department University is currently being developed for power industry cyber security assessment and hardening. A substation example is presented, with hypothetical risks and costs from several attack scenarios. Our technique features self

  11. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site, in Richland, Washington. The assessment, which was conducted from May 11 through May 22, 1992, included a selective-review of the ES&H management systems and programs of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices the DOE Richland Field Office, and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the Hanford Site ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H problems and requirements. They are not intended to be comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at the Hanford Site was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of the Hanford Site, which was conducted from May 21 through July 18, 1990. A summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management is included.

  12. Advanced Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Demonstration Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justin Coleman

    2014-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratories (INL) has an ongoing research and development (R&D) project to remove excess conservatism from seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRA) calculations. These risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. This report presents a plan for improving our current traditional SPRA process using a seismic event recorded at a nuclear power plant site, with known outcomes, to improve the decision making process. SPRAs are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in general this approach has been conservative, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it was not the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility).

  13. The Dempster-Schafer Theory of Belief Functions for Managing Uncertainties: An Introduction and Fraud Risk Assessment Illustration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Rajendra P.; Mock, Theodore J.; Gao, Lei

    2011-01-01

    fraud risk assessment formula for a simplified version of a model developed by Srivastava, Mock, and Turner (2007). In our formulation, fraud risk is the normalized product of four risks: risk that management has incentives to commit fraud, risk...

  14. Survey of Tools for Risk Assessment of Cascading Outages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papic, Milorad; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Dobson, Ian; Fonte, Louis; Haq, Enamul; Hines, Paul; Kirschen, Daniel; Luo, Xiaochuan; Miller, Stephen; Samaan, Nader A.; Vaiman, Marianna; Varghese, Matthew; Zhang, Pei

    2011-10-17

    Cascading failure can cause large blackouts, and a variety of methods are emerging to study this challenging topic. In parts 1 and 2 of this paper, the IEEE task force on cascading failure seeks to consolidate and review the progress of the field towards methods and tools of assessing the risk of cascading failure. Part 2 summarizes and discusses the state of the art in the available cascading failure modeling tools. The discussion integrates industry and research perspectives from a variety of institutions. Strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in current approaches are indicated.

  15. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Baxter, S.L.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Rowe, M.D.; Sun, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Anspaugh, L.; Layton, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Two important environmental problems at the USDOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) facility in Fernald, Ohio were studied in this human health risk assessment. The problems studied were radon emissions from the K-65 waste silos, and offsite contamination of ground water with uranium. Waste from the processing of pitchblende ore is stored in the K-65 silos at the FEMP. Radium-226 in the waste decays to radon gas which escapes to the outside atmosphere. The concern is for an increase in lung cancer risk for nearby residents associated with radon exposure. Monitoring data and a gaussian plume transport model were used to develop a source term and predict exposure and risk to fenceline residents, residents within 1 and 5 miles of the silos, and residents of Hamilton and Cincinnati, Ohio. Two release scenarios were studied: the routine release of radon from the silos and an accidental loss of one silo dome integrity. Exposure parameters and risk factors were described as distributions. Risks associated with natural background radon concentrations were also estimated.

  16. Assessment of methodologies for analysis of the dungeness B accidental aircraft crash risk.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-09-01

    The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has requested Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to review the aircraft crash methodology for nuclear facilities that are being used in the United Kingdom (UK). The scope of the work included a review of one method utilized in the UK for assessing the potential for accidental airplane crashes into nuclear facilities (Task 1) and a comparison of the UK methodology against similar International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) methods (Task 2). Based on the conclusions from Tasks 1 and 2, an additional Task 3 would provide an assessment of a site-specific crash frequency for the Dungeness B facility using one of the other methodologies. This report documents the results of Task 2. The comparison of the different methods was performed for the three primary contributors to aircraft crash risk at the Dungeness B site: airfield related crashes, crashes below airways, and background crashes. The methods and data specified in each methodology were compared for each of these risk contributors, differences in the methodologies were identified, and the importance of these differences was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. The bases for each of the methods and the data used were considered in this assessment process. A comparison of the treatment of the consequences of the aircraft crashes was not included in this assessment because the frequency of crashes into critical structures is currently low based on the existing Dungeness B assessment. Although the comparison found substantial differences between the UK and the three alternative methodologies (IAEA, NRC, and DOE) this assessment concludes that use of any of these alternative methodologies would not change the conclusions reached for the Dungeness B site. Performance of Task 3 is thus not recommended.

  17. Methodology and a preliminary data base for examining the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Bassioni, A.A.

    1980-08-01

    An analytical model was developed to assess and examine the health effects associated with the production of electricity from uranium and coal fuels. The model is based on a systematic methodology that is both simple and easy to check, and provides details about the various components of health risk. A preliminary set of data that is needed to calculate the health risks was gathered, normalized to the model facilities, and presented in a concise manner. Additional data will become available as a result of other evaluations of both fuel cycles, and they should be included in the data base. An iterative approach involving only a few steps is recommended for validating the model. After each validation step, the model is improved in the areas where new information or increased interest justifies such upgrading. Sensitivity analysis is proposed as the best method of using the model to its full potential. Detailed quantification of the risks associated with the two fuel cycles is not presented in this report. The evaluation of risks from producing electricity by these two methods can be completed only after several steps that address difficult social and technical questions. Preliminary quantitative assessment showed that several factors not considered in detail in previous studies are potentially important. 255 refs., 21 figs., 179 tabs.

  18. Scientific contestations over "toxic trespass"ť: health and regulatory implications of chemical biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamasunder, Bhavna; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    assessment or risk management evaluations, and perhaps as adeveloping BEs. or risk management evaluations. for use as aHealth risks from dioxin and related compounds: evaluation

  19. Applications of Risk Assessment in the Development of Climate Change Adaptation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalak, Anna M.

    an evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of present climate change risk assessment methods in terms1 Applications of Risk Assessment in the Development of Climate Change Adaptation Policy A future risks of climate change. Future impacts and the vulnerability of the impacted system are used

  20. Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.

    1998-03-10

    Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

  1. DAM SAFETY DECISION-MAKING: COMBINING ENGINEERING ASSESSMENTS WITH RISK INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    DAM SAFETY DECISION-MAKING: COMBINING ENGINEERING ASSESSMENTS WITH RISK INFORMATION David S. Bowles breaching a dam; so drop the matter before a dispute breaks out. Proverbs 17:14 (NIV) ABSTRACT A decision assessments and risk assessments. The approach can be adapted to any dam owner's unique decision context

  2. River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment (RCBRA) Human Health Risk Assessment (Volume 2)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100NationalquestionnairesDrought-induced forest mortalityEnergySands Jim

  3. Stakeholder participation in health impact assessment: A multicultural approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negev, Maya; Davidovitch, Nadav; Garb, Yaakov; Tal, Alon

    2013-11-15

    The literature on impact assessment (HIA) registers the importance of stakeholder participation in the assessment process, but still lacks a model for engaging stakeholders of diverse ethnic, professional and sectorial backgrounds. This paper suggests that the multicultural approach can contribute to HIA through a revision of the generic 5-step HIA model, and its implementation in a metropolitan plan in Southern Israel. The health issue scoped by the stakeholders in the HIA is related to land uses in the vicinity of the national hazardous industry and hazardous waste site. The stakeholders were representatives of the diverse populations at stake, including rural Bedouins and Jewish city dwellers, as well as representatives from the public sector, private sector, non-governmental organizations and academia. The case study revealed that a multicultural stakeholder participation process helps to uncover health issues known to the community which were not addressed in the original plan, and provides local knowledge regarding health conditions that is especially valuable when scientific data is uncertain or absent. It enables diverse stakeholders to prioritize the health issues that will be assessed. The case study also reveals ways in which the model needs revisions and improvements such as in recruitment of diverse participants. This paper presents a multicultural model of HIA and discusses some of the challenges that are faced when HIA is implemented in the context of current decision-making culture. -- Highlights: • We revised the generic HIA model in light of the multicultural approach. • We tested the model in a case study of zoning a hazardous industry site. • Multicultural stakeholder participation uncovers health issues known to communities. • It enables community prioritization of health issues. • We present a model for multicultural stakeholder participation in HIA.

  4. Guidance Manual for Conducting Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessments at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; R. C. Morris

    1995-06-01

    This document presents reference material for conducting screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERAs)for the waste area groups (WAGs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included in this document are discussions of the objectives of and processes for conducting SLERAs. The Environmental Protection Agency ecological risk assessment framework is closely followed. Guidance for site characterization, stressor characterization, ecological effects, pathways of contaminant migration, the conceptual site model, assessment endpoints, measurement endpoints, analysis guidance, and risk characterization are included.

  5. Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) Conference Call Minutes, March 8, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group Charter – The steeringcommittee discussed the draft charter. Two recommended changes were agreed upon:• A sentence will be added to identify that the...

  6. Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call Minutes, February 20, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group Charter – discussed whoshould sign and at what level the charter should be authorized. It was concluded thatthe Under Secretaries as the Central...

  7. Qualitative Risk Assessment For An LNG Refueling Station And Review Of Relevant Safety Issues, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, Nathan; Herring, J Stephen; Cadwallader, Lee; Reece, Wendy; Byers, James

    2014-06-25

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of liquefied natural gas vehicle refueling facility.

  8. Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01

    to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

  9. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Holly M.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  11. Postgraduate Certificate in Risk Analysis in Health and Food Safety: Programme Specification 1. Awarding institution The Royal Veterinary College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Monica A.

    Postgraduate Certificate in Risk Analysis in Health and Food Safety: Programme Specification 1 Title Postgraduate Certificate in Risk Analysis in Health and Food Safety 6. Date of First Intake March understanding of the principles and methods of risk analysis in health and food safety, and develop skills

  12. Research Risk Assessment Guidelines Research projects that meet the Tri-Council definition of minimal risk are eligible for delegated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    1 Research Risk Assessment Guidelines Research projects that meet the Tri-Council definition Member and the Chair of the Research Ethics Board (REB). To help determine whether your research project: Ethical Conduct of Research Involving Humans, chapter 2, part b. Definition of Minimal Risk According

  13. Baseline Risk Assessment Supporting Closure at Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site Washington - 15332

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, Kristin M.

    2015-01-07

    The Office of River Protection under the U.S. Department of Energy is pursuing closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C under the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO). A baseline risk assessment (BRA) of current conditions is based on available characterization data and information collected at WMA C. The baseline risk assessment is being developed as a part of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS) at WMA C that is mandatory under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and RCRA corrective action. The RFI/CMS is needed to identify and evaluate the hazardous chemical and radiological contamination in the vadose zone from past releases of waste from WMA C. WMA C will be under Federal ownership and control for the foreseeable future, and managed as an industrial area with restricted access and various institutional controls. The exposure scenarios evaluated under these conditions include Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Method C, industrial worker, maintenance and surveillance worker, construction worker, and trespasser scenarios. The BRA evaluates several unrestricted land use scenarios (residential all-pathway, MTCA Method B, and Tribal) to provide additional information for risk management. Analytical results from 13 shallow zone (0 to 15 ft. below ground surface) sampling locations were collected to evaluate human health impacts at WMA C. In addition, soil analytical data were screened against background concentrations and ecological soil screening levels to determine if soil concentrations have the potential to adversely affect ecological receptors. Analytical data from 12 groundwater monitoring wells were evaluated between 2004 and 2013. A screening of groundwater monitoring data against background concentrations and Federal maximum concentration levels was used to determine vadose zone contamination impacts on groundwater. Waste Management Area C is the first of the Hanford tank farms to begin the closure planning process. The current baseline risk assessment will provide valuable information for making corrective actions and closure decisions for WMA C, and will also support the planning for future tank farm soil investigation and baseline risk assessments.

  14. The role of Health Impact Assessment in the setting of air quality standards: An Australian perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery; Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia ; Katscherian, Dianne; Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia ; Harris, Patrick

    2013-11-15

    The approaches used for setting or reviewing air quality standards vary from country to country. The purpose of this research was to consider the potential to improve decision-making through integration of HIA into the processes to review and set air quality standards used in Australia. To assess the value of HIA in this policy process, its strengths and weaknesses were evaluated aligned with review of international processes for setting air quality standards. Air quality standard setting programmes elsewhere have either used HIA or have amalgamated and incorporated factors normally found within HIA frameworks. They clearly demonstrate the value of a formalised HIA process for setting air quality standards in Australia. The following elements should be taken into consideration when using HIA in standard setting. (a) The adequacy of a mainly technical approach in current standard setting procedures to consider social determinants of health. (b) The importance of risk assessment criteria and information within the HIA process. The assessment of risk should consider equity, the distribution of variations in air quality in different locations and the potential impacts on health. (c) The uncertainties in extrapolating evidence from one population to another or to subpopulations, especially the more vulnerable, due to differing environmental factors and population variables. (d) The significance of communication with all potential stakeholders on issues associated with the management of air quality. In Australia there is also an opportunity for HIA to be used in conjunction with the NEPM to develop local air quality standard measures. The outcomes of this research indicated that the use of HIA for air quality standard setting at the national and local levels would prove advantageous. -- Highlights: • Health Impact Assessment framework has been applied to a policy development process. • HIA process was evaluated for application in air quality standard setting. • Advantages of HIA in the air quality standard setting process are demonstrated.

  15. Bayesian and Belief-Functions Formulas for Auditor Independence Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Rajendra P.; Mock, Theodore J.; Turner, Jerry L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper illustrates two formulas for assessing independence risk based on the Bayesian and belief-functions frameworks. These formulas can be used to assess the role of threats to auditor independence as well as the role of threat...

  16. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level mixed waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers both the radioactive and chemical hazards associated with LLMW transportation. Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment methods and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS. This report presents additional information that is not included in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLMW. Included are definitions of the LLMW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS; data related to the inventory and to the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of WM LLMW; an overview of the risk assessment methods; and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLMW case considered.

  17. Technical Needs for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Equipment Condition Assessment for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Berglin, Eric J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2013-04-04

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can provide the United States with a safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The controllable day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operation and maintenance costs. Health and condition assessment coupled with online risk monitors can potentially enhance affordability of aSMRs through optimized operational planning and maintenance scheduling. Currently deployed risk monitors are an extension of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). For complex engineered systems like nuclear power plants, PRA systematically combines event likelihoods and the probability of failure (POF) of key components, so that when combined with the magnitude of possible adverse consequences to determine risk. Traditional PRA uses population-based POF information to estimate the average plant risk over time. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a PRA that reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant; this model is updated periodically, typically once a year. Risk monitors expand on living PRA by incorporating changes in the day-by-day plant operation and configuration (e.g., changes in equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions). However, population-based POF (or population- and time-based POF) is still used to populate fault trees. Health monitoring techniques can be used to establish condition indicators and monitoring capabilities that indicate the component-specific POF at a desired point in time (or over a desired period), which can then be incorporated in the risk monitor to provide a more accurate estimate of the plant risk in different configurations. This is particularly important for active systems, structures, and components (SSCs) proposed for use in aSMR designs. These SSCs may differ significantly from those used in the operating fleet of light-water reactors (or even in LWR-based SMR designs). Additionally, the operating characteristics of aSMRs can present significantly different requirements, including the need to operate in different coolant environments, higher operating temperatures, and longer operating cycles between planned refueling and maintenance outages. These features, along with the relative lack of operating experience for some of the proposed advanced designs, may limit the ability to estimate event probability and component POF with a high degree of certainty. Incorporating real-time estimates of component POF may compensate for a relative lack of established knowledge about the long-term component behavior and improve operational and maintenance planning and optimization. The particular eccentricities of advanced reactors and small modular reactors provide unique challenges and needs for advanced instrumentation, control, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) techniques such as enhanced risk monitors (ERM) in aSMRs. Several features of aSMR designs increase the need for accurate characterization of the real-time risk during operation and maintenance activities. A number of technical gaps in realizing ERM exist, and these gaps are largely independent of the specific reactor technology. As a result, the development of a framework for ERM would enable greater situational awareness regardless of the specific class of reactor technology. A set of research tasks are identified in a preliminary research plan to enable the development, testing, and demonstration of such a framework. Although some aspects of aSMRs, such as specific operational characteristics, will vary and are not now completely defined, the proposed framework is expected to be relevant regardless of such uncertainty. The development of an ERM framework will provide one of the key technical developments necessary to ensure the economic viability of aSMRs.

  18. A framework for assessing ecological risks of petroleum-derived materials in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1997-05-01

    Ecological risk assessment estimates the nature and likelihood of effects of human actions on nonhuman organisms, populations, and ecosystems. It is intended to be clearer and more rigorous in its approach to estimation of effects and uncertainties than previously employed methods of ecological assessment. Ecological risk assessment is characterized by a standard paradigm that includes problem formulation, analysis of exposure and effects, risk characterization, and communication with a risk manager. This report provides a framework that applies the paradigm to the specific problem of assessing the ecological risks of petroleum in soil. This type of approach requires that assessments be performed in phases: (1) a scoping assessment to determine whether there is a potential route of exposure for potentially significant ecological receptors; (2) a screening assessment to determine whether exposures could potentially reach toxic levels; and (3) a definitive assessment to estimate the nature, magnitude, and extent of risks. The principal technical issue addressed is the chemically complex nature of petroleum--a complexity that may be dealt with by assessing risks on the basis of properties of the whole material, properties of individual chemicals that are representative of chemical classes, distributions of properties of the constituents of chemical classes, properties of chemicals detected in the soil, and properties of indicator chemicals. The advantages and feasibility of these alternatives are discussed. The report concludes with research recommendations for improving each stage in the assessment process.

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Source, distribution, and health risk assessment of polycyclic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    .51, averag- ing 0.38; and IcdP/(IcdP+BghiP) from 0.07 to 0.37, averaging 0.22. The biomass combustion, coal, and other incomplete combustions such as vehicle exhaust, coal-fired heating, and straw and fuel wood and sink for Responsible editor: Philippe Garrigues Electronic supplementary material The online version

  20. Assessing the health risk of solar development on contaminated lands |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and Biofuels BiomassAssembly of aCloudArgonne

  1. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Cancer classification issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltse, J.

    1990-12-31

    Issues presented are related to classification of weight of evidence in cancer risk assessments. The focus in this paper is on lines of evidence used in constructing a conclusion about potential human carcinogenicity. The paper also discusses issues that are mistakenly addressed as classification issues but are really part of the risk assessment process. 2 figs.

  2. VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT FOR SEISMIC AND FLOOD HAZARD IN TURIALBA CITY, COSTA RICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT FOR SEISMIC AND FLOOD HAZARD IN TURIALBA CITY, COSTA and Earth Observation (ITC) Enschede Netherlands Figure 5.4. Damage maps for #12;Vulnerability Analysis And Risk Assessment For Seismic And Flood Hazard In Turialba City, Costa Rica By Muh Aris Marfai and Jacob

  3. A new risk assessment tool for multimodal transport of Dangerous Goods.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2001-93 A new risk assessment tool for multimodal transport of Dangerous Goods. Raphaël DEFERT security issues are to be addressed when Dangerous Goods go through densely populated areas, others where ongoing research project relative to the assessment of the risk induced by the transport of Dangerous

  4. GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferry Risk Assessment Appendix I The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    © GWU, RPI, VCU ­ All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferry Risk Assessment ­ Appendix I The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Appendix I: Historical Data Analysis Results JULY 1, 1999 Prepared for: Blue Ribbon Panel on Washington State Ferry Safety and Washington State Transportation Commission

  5. Cancer risks attributable to low doses of ionizing radiation: Assessing what we really know

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Cancer risks attributable to low doses of ionizing radiation: Assessing what we really know David J low radiation doses the situation is much less clear, but the risks of low-dose radiation terrorism. We review the difficulties involved in quantifying the risks of low-dose radiation and address

  6. Using Risk Analysis to Assess User Trust A Net-Bank Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Střlen, Ketil

    Using Risk Analysis to Assess User Trust ­ A Net-Bank Scenario ­ Gyrd Brćndeland1 and Ketil Střlen1 advocates asset-oriented risk analysis as a means to help defend user trust. The paper focuses on a net approach defines user trust as an asset and makes use of asset-oriented risk analysis to identify treats

  7. Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Causal model for flood risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenave, Charles

    Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Title: Causal model for flood risk assessment Thesis supervisor: The thesis aims to provide an operational tool for the anticipation of flood risk in mountain areas. The work for the anticipation of flood risk in mountain areas. The work will lead to the establishment of a model

  8. REVIEWS AND SYNTHESIS TEASIng apart alien species risk assessments: a framework for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    REVIEWS AND SYNTHESIS TEASIng apart alien species risk assessments: a framework for best practices and Montserrat Vila`13 Abstract Some alien species cause substantial impacts, yet most are innocuous. Given limited resources, forecasting risks from alien species will help prioritise management. Given that risk

  9. An equity tool for health impact assessments: Reflections from Mongolia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Jeremy; Wagler, Meghan; Lkhagvasuren, Oyun; Laing, Lory; Davison, Colleen; Janes, Craig

    2012-04-15

    A health impact assessment (HIA) is a tool for assessing the potential effects of a project or policy on a population's health. In this paper, we discuss a tool for successfully integrating equity concerns into HIAs. This discussion is the product of collaboration by Mongolian and Canadian experts, and it incorporates comments and suggestions of participants of a workshop on equity focused HIAs that took place in Mongolia in October, 2010. Our motivation for discussing this tool is based on the observation that existing HIAs tend either to fail to define equity or use problematic accounts of this concept. In this paper we give an overview of socio-demographic and health indicators in Mongolia and briefly discuss its mining industry. We then review three accounts of equity and argue for the importance of developing a consensus understanding of this concept when integrating considerations of equity into an HIA. Finally, we present findings from the workshop in Mongolia and outline a tool, derived from lessons from this workshop, for critically considering and integrating the concept of equity into an HIA.

  10. Final Report: Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana open bays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1996-03-01

    Potential human health and environmental impacts from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico are of concern to regulators at the State and Federal levels, the public, environmental interest groups and industry. Current and proposed regulations require a zero discharge limit for coastal facilities, based primarily on studies in low energy, poorly flushed environments. However, produced water discharges in coastal Louisiana include a number of open bay sites, where potential human health and environmental impacts are likely to be smaller than those demonstrated for low energy canal environments, but greater than the minimal impacts associated with offshore discharges. Additional data and assessments are needed to support risk managers at the State and Federal levels in the development of regulations that protect human health and the environment without unnecessary cost to the economic welfare of the region and the nation. This project supports the Natural Gas and Oil Initiative objectives to: (1) improve coordination on environmental research; (2) streamline State and Federal regulation; (3) enhance State, and Federal regulatory decision making capability; (4) enhance dialogue through industry/government/public partnerships; and (5) work with States and Native American Tribes.

  11. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, J.I.

    1993-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of [sup 239,24O]Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual [sup 239]Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with [sup 239,24O]Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10[sup [minus]6], 6 x 10[sup [minus]5], and 5 x 10[sup [minus]4], respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  12. Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation: 1994 revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1994-08-01

    This report provides guidance for planning and performing ecological risk assessments on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The tiered approach to ecological risk assessment has been implemented, generic conceptual models have been developed, and a general approach for developing ecological assessment endpoints and measurement endpoints has been agreed upon. The document also includes changes in terminology to agree with the terminology in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) framework for ecological risk assessment. Although ecological risks are equal in regulatory importance to human health risks, formal procedures for ecological risk assessment are poorly developed. This report will provide specific guidance and promote the use of consistent approaches for ecological risk assessments at individual sites on the ORR. The strategy discussed in this report is consistent with the overall strategy for site management and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) compliance and with relevant EPA guidance. The general approach and strategy presented herein was developed for the ORR, but it should be applicable to other complex CERCLA sites that possess significant ecological resources.

  13. Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program Principal Investigators responsibilities. This Laboratory Assessment Program identifies four processes to evaluate safety and environmental to modify an assessment checklist that best addresses specific safety and environmental compliance needs

  14. Architectural Level Risk Assessment Tool Based on UML Specifications 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goseva-Popstojanova, Katerina

    level of a failure of component/connector is estimated using FMEA [12]. Estimate scenario risk factor

  15. Preventing Disability Among Working Participants in Kansas’ High-risk Insurance Pool: Implications for Health Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.; Welch, Greg W.

    2011-01-01

    Health conditions that prevent individuals from working full time can restrict their access to health insurance. For people living in the 35 states that offer high-risk pools, coverage is available but premiums are 125–200% of standard rates...

  16. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

  17. Use of hazard assessments to achieve risk reduction in the USDOE Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Bott, T.; Eisenhawer, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DeYoung, L.; Hockert, J. [Odgen Environmental and Energy Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This paper summarizes the nuclear explosive hazard assessment activities performed to support US Department of Energy (DOE) Stockpile Stewardship Demonstration Project SS-21, better known as the ``Seamless Safety`` program. Past practice within the DOE Complex has dictated the use of a significant number of post-design/fabrication safety reviews to analyze the safety associated with operations on nuclear explosives and to answer safety questions. These practices have focused on reviewing-in or auditing-in safety vs incorporating safety in the design process. SS-21 was proposed by the DOE as an avenue to develop a program to ``integrate established, recognized, verifiable safety criteria into the process at the design stage rather than continuing the reliance on reviews, evaluations and audits.`` The entire Seamless Safety design and development process is verified by a concurrent hazard assessment (HA). The primary purpose of the SS-21 Demonstration Project HA was to demonstrate the feasibility of performing concurrent HAs as part of an engineering design and development effort and then to evaluate the use of the HA to provide an indication in the risk reduction or gain in safety achieved. To accomplish this objective, HAs were performed on both baseline (i.e., old) and new (i.e. SS-21) B61-0 Center Case Section disassembly processes. These HAs were used to support the identification and documentation of weapon- and process-specific hazards and safety-critical operating steps. Both HAs focused on identifying accidents that had the potential for worker injury, public health effects, facility damage, toxic gas release, and dispersal of radioactive materials. A comparison of the baseline and SS-21 process risks provided a semi-quantitative estimate of the risk reduction gained via the Seamless Safety process.

  18. LAVA/CIS Version 2. 0: A software system for vulnerability and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.T.

    1990-01-01

    LAVA (the Los Alamos Vulnerability/Risk Assessment system) is an original systematic approach to risk assessment developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is an alternative to existing quantitative methods, providing an approach that is both objective and subjective, and producing results that are both quantitative and qualitative. LAVA was developed as a tool to help satisfy federal requirements for periodic vulnerability and risk assessments of a variety of systems and to satisfy the resulting need for an inexpensive, reusable, automated risk assessment tool firmly rooted in science. LAVA is a three-part systematic approach to risk assessment that can be used to model a variety of application systems such as computer security systems, communications security systems, information security systems, and others. The first part of LAVA is the mathematical model based on classical risk assessment, hierarchical multilevel system theory, decision theory, fuzzy possibility theory, expert system theory, utility theory, and cognitive science. The second part is the implementation of the mathematical risk model as a general software engine executed on a large class of personal computers. The third part is the application data sets written for a specific application system. The user of a LAVA application is not required to have knowledge of formal risk assessment techniques. All the technical expertise and specialized knowledge are built into the software engine and the application system itself. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Safety Training Self-Assessment The UC Irvine Safety Training Self-Assessment (STSA) is provided by Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Marcelo A.

    by Environmental Health Safety (EH&S). The Safety Training Self-Assessment is required for: · All UC employeesSafety Training Self-Assessment The UC Irvine Safety Training Self-Assessment (STSA) is provided the Safety Training Self-Assessment: 1. Log into the UC Learning Center at http://www.uclc.uci.edu. 2

  20. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  1. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W. [and others] [and others

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report.

  2. Development of an Automated Security Risk Assessment Methodology Tool for Critical Infrastructures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeger, Calvin D.; Roehrig, Nathaniel S.; Torres, Teresa M.

    2008-12-01

    This document presents the security automated Risk Assessment Methodology (RAM) prototype tool developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). This work leverages SNL's capabilities and skills in security risk analysis and the development of vulnerability assessment/risk assessment methodologies to develop an automated prototype security RAM tool for critical infrastructures (RAM-CITM). The prototype automated RAM tool provides a user-friendly, systematic, and comprehensive risk-based tool to assist CI sector and security professionals in assessing and managing security risk from malevolent threats. The current tool is structured on the basic RAM framework developed by SNL. It is envisioned that this prototype tool will be adapted to meet the requirements of different CI sectors and thereby provide additional capabilities.

  3. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

    2011-04-14

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

  4. Contents of risk assessments to support the retrieval and closure of tanks for the Washington State Department of Ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    2003-03-21

    Before the Integrated Mission Acceleration Plan can be performed, risk assessments of various options must be performed for ORP, DOE Headquarters, and the Washington State Dept. of Ecology. This document focuses on the risk assessments for Ecology.

  5. Sensitivity of health risk estimates to air quality adjustment procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R.G.

    1997-06-30

    This letter is a summary of risk results associated with exposure estimates using two-parameter Weibull and quadratic air quality adjustment procedures (AQAPs). New exposure estimates were developed for children and child-occurrences, six urban areas, and five alternative air quality scenarios. In all cases, the Weibull and quadratic results are compared to previous results, which are based on a proportional AQAP.

  6. Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    objective of the PTRA program is to develop new tools and approaches for understanding, limiting, and managing the risks of proliferation and physical security for fuel cycle...

  7. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HCTT-CHE

    2011-04-14

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

  8. Environment, Safety and Health Self-Assessment Report Fiscal Year 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Research Division Earth Day Ergonomics Advanced Light SourceComputer Workstation Ergonomics Review and Update of theDirectorate Assessment of Ergonomics Risk Management New

  9. An approach for integrating toxicogenomic data in risk assessment: The dibutyl phthalate case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euling, Susan Y.; Thompson, Chad M.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Benson, Robert

    2013-09-15

    An approach for evaluating and integrating genomic data in chemical risk assessment was developed based on the lessons learned from performing a case study for the chemical dibutyl phthalate. A case study prototype approach was first developed in accordance with EPA guidance and recommendations of the scientific community. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) was selected for the case study exercise. The scoping phase of the dibutyl phthalate case study was conducted by considering the available DBP genomic data, taken together with the entire data set, for whether they could inform various risk assessment aspects, such as toxicodynamics, toxicokinetics, and dose–response. A description of weighing the available dibutyl phthalate data set for utility in risk assessment provides an example for considering genomic data for future chemical assessments. As a result of conducting the scoping process, two questions—Do the DBP toxicogenomic data inform 1) the mechanisms or modes of action?, and 2) the interspecies differences in toxicodynamics?—were selected to focus the case study exercise. Principles of the general approach include considering the genomics data in conjunction with all other data to determine their ability to inform the various qualitative and/or quantitative aspects of risk assessment, and evaluating the relationship between the available genomic and toxicity outcome data with respect to study comparability and phenotypic anchoring. Based on experience from the DBP case study, recommendations and a general approach for integrating genomic data in chemical assessment were developed to advance the broader effort to utilize 21st century data in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Performed DBP case study for integrating genomic data in risk assessment • Present approach for considering genomic data in chemical risk assessment • Present recommendations for use of genomic data in chemical risk assessment.

  10. A critical look at risk assessments for global catastrophes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Kent

    2015-07-24

    Recent papers by Busza et al. (BJSW) and Dar et al. (DDH) argue that astrophysical data can be used to establish small bounds on the risk of a "killer strangelet" catastrophe scenario in the RHIC and ALICE collider experiments. DDH and other commentators (initially including BJSW) suggested that these empirical bounds alone do give sufficient reassurance. This seems unsupportable when the bounds are expressed in terms of expected cost -- a good measure, according to standard risk analysis arguments. For example, DDH's main bound, $p_{\\rm catastrophe} risk bounds by comparing risk policy in other areas. For example, it is noted that, even if highly risk tolerant assumptions are made and no value is placed on the lives of future generations, a catastrophe risk no higher than $\\approx 10^{-15}$ per year would be required for consistency with established policy for radiation hazard risk minimization. It is concluded that the costs of small risks of catastrophe have been significantly underestimated by BJSW (initially), by DDH and by other commentators. Lessons for future policy are proposed.

  11. Baseline risk assessment for exposure to contaminants at the St. Louis Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The St. Louis Site comprises three noncontiguous areas in and near St. Louis, Missouri: the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), the St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS), and the Latty Avenue Properties. The main site of the Latty Avenue Properties includes the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and the Futura Coatings property, which are located at 9200 Latty Avenue. Contamination at the St. Louis Site is the result of uranium processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1970s. Uranium processing took place at the SLDS from 1942 through 1957. From the 1940s through the 1960s, SLAPS was used as a storage area for residues from the manufacturing operations at SLDS. The materials stored at SLAPS were bought by Continental Mining and Milling Company of Chicago, Illinois, in 1966, and moved to the HISS/Futura Coatings property at 9200 Latty Avenue. Vicinity properties became contaminated as a result of transport and movement of the contaminated material among SLDS, SLAPS, and the 9200 Latty Avenue property. This contamination led to the SLAPS, HISS, and Futura Coatings properties being placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the St. Louis Site under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The primary goal of FUSRAP is the elimination of potential hazards to human health and the environment at former Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission (MED/AEC) sites so that, to the extent possible, these properties can be released for use without restrictions. To determine and establish cleanup goals for the St. Louis Site, DOE is currently preparing a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement (RI/FS-EIS). This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is a component of the process; it addresses potential risk to human health and the environment associated wi

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  13. Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call Minutes, May 6, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Risk Assessment Information Notice (IN): HSS provided the draft IN to safety basis experts fromSNL, Y-12 and PNNL for their review and comment. Their comments were addressed and the IN isback into...

  14. Memorandum, Department of Energy Standard for Control and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this memorandum is to distribute for interim use and comment a new draft Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard for Control and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments.

  15. Risk Assessment , David Ehrenfeld, EPA-U. Wash., May 17, 2012 Selected Readings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    Risk Assessment , David Ehrenfeld, EPA-U. Wash., May 17, 2012 Selected Readings Normal Accidents. Drilling Down: The Gulf oil debacle and our energy dilemma, Joseph Tainter & Tadeusz Patzek, Springer, 2012

  16. A quantitative assessment of nuclear weapons proliferation risk utilizing probabilistic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sentell, Dennis Shannon, 1971-

    2002-01-01

    A comparative quantitative assessment is made of the nuclear weapons proliferation risk between various nuclear reactor/fuel cycle concepts using a probabilistic method. The work presented details quantified proliferation ...

  17. Technology maturity analysis for assessing capacity and schedule risk of future automation projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frackleton, Conor J

    2014-01-01

    The need to improve risk assessment methods for automation projects within United States manufacturers exists due to a shift toward increased in factory automation stemming from industry pressure to reduce manufacturing ...

  18. Revisions to US EPA Superfund Risk and Dose Assessment Models and Guidance - 13403

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Stuart A.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program's six Preliminary Remediation Goal (PRG) and Dose Compliance Concentration (DCC) internet based calculators for risk and dose assessment at Superfund sites are being revised to reflect better science, revisions to existing exposure scenarios and new scenarios, and changes to match up more closely with the EPA chemical regional screening level calculator. A revised version of the 1999 guidance document that provides an overview for the Superfund risk assessment process at radioactively contaminated sites, 'Radiation Risk Assessment At CERCLA Sites: Q and A', is being completed that will reflect Superfund recommended guidance and other technical documents issued over the past 13 years. EPA is also issuing a series of fact sheets in the document 'Superfund Radiation Risk Assessment: A Community Tool-kit'. This presentation would go over those changes that are expected to be finished by this spring. (authors)

  19. An Example of Everyday Risk Assessment Peter B. Ladkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    industries which have a signi#12;cant interest, such as transportation and power. 1 Engineering Risk Analysis, Springer- Verlag London Limited, 2000, entry for \\Accident". 2 op. cit., entry for \\Severity". 1 #12

  20. An Example of Everyday Risk Assessment Peter B. Ladkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    industries which have a significant interest, such as transportation and power. 1 Engineering Risk Analysis London Limited, 2000, entry for "Accident". 2op. cit., entry for "Severity". 1 #12;"hazards

  1. State and Regional Energy Risk Assessment Initiative | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    During the Winters of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan...

  2. Health Care Behaviors and Decision-Making Processes Among Enrollees In A State High Risk Insurance Pool: Focus Group Findings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Carroll, Shawna L.; Moore, Janice M.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose-To better understand the relationship between health insurance coverage and health care behaviors of persons with potentially disabling conditions enrolled in a state high risk insurance pool. Approach or Design-Six ...

  3. Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self-assessment Instrument (Version 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self Budget of Public Health Department or Parent Agency:_________________ Total Environmental Health Program Budget:______________ Proportion of Environmental Health Budget from #12;_____ (1) service fees _____ (2

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

  5. An Assessment of Integrated Health Management (IHM) Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Lybeck; M. Tawfik; L. Bond; J. Coble

    2012-05-01

    In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging nuclear power plants presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to the better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging nuclear power plants. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of a NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of a NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system development tools, deployable architectures, and peripheral tools.

  6. Scientific advice on species at risk: a comparative analysis of status assessments of polar bear,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    Scientific advice on species at risk: a comparative analysis of status assessments of polar bear believed to be at heightened risk of extinction must be underpinned by scientific evaluations of past assignations peuvent influencer diffe´remment les bases scientifiques qui me`nent a` l'e´laboration de

  7. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritterbusch, Stanley; Golay, Michael; Duran, Felicia; Galyean, William; Gupta, Abhinav; Dimitrijevic, Vesna; Malsch, Marty

    2003-01-29

    OAK B188 Summary of methods proposed for risk informing the design and regulation of future nuclear power plants. All elements of the historical design and regulation process are preserved, but the methods proposed for new plants use probabilistic risk assessment methods as the primary decision making tool.

  8. Bayesian Networks and Geographical Information Systems for Environmental Risk Assessment for Oil and Gas Site Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela Gonzalez, Patricia Ysolda

    2013-04-03

    of the Environmental Sensibility of Oil and Gas (O&G) developments for a given study area. A Risk index associated with the development of O&G operation activities based on the spatial environmental sensibility was also mapped. To facilitate the Risk assessment...

  9. Biomechanical assessment of the individual risk of rupture of cerebral aneurysms: a proof of concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    Biomechanical assessment of the individual risk of rupture of cerebral aneurysms: a proof Augustin Fliche 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 1 #12;Abstract This study is a step towards a new biomechanical variations may be used as the basis of a biomechanical index of rupture risk. Keywords: FSI, cerebral

  10. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    schemes adopted in life-cycle assessment, such as archetypeshealth response in life-cycle assessment using ED10s andmanagement: Life-cycle assessment: Principles and framework.

  11. DOE EVMS Risk Assessment Matrix | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOEEVMSRISKMATRIX.docx More Documents & Publications Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) - APM Road Show Presentation Slides EVMS...

  12. Health Safety & Environmental Protection Committee Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions for Accidental Releases ofHealthDepartment

  13. Racial discrimination and health among Asian Americans: evidence, assessment, and directions for future research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gee, Gilbert C; Ro, Annie; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Chae, David

    2009-01-01

    DR, Mohammed SA. Discrimination and racial disparities inon Methods for Assessing Discrimination. Washington, DC:JS. Racial/ethnic discrimination and health: findings from

  14. Novel Threat-risk Index Using Probabilistic Risk Assessment and Human Reliability Analysis - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George A. Beitel

    2004-02-01

    In support of a national need to improve the current state-of-the-art in alerting decision makers to the risk of terrorist attack, a quantitative approach employing scientific and engineering concepts to develop a threat-risk index was undertaken at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result of this effort, a set of models has been successfully integrated into a single comprehensive model known as Quantitative Threat-Risk Index Model (QTRIM), with the capability of computing a quantitative threat-risk index on a system level, as well as for the major components of the system. Such a threat-risk index could provide a quantitative variant or basis for either prioritizing security upgrades or updating the current qualitative national color-coded terrorist threat alert.

  15. Risk Assessment Form (This is an active document and must be maintained)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Risk Assessment Form (This is an active document and must be maintained) Materials Science furnace cooling in the air, or quenching in water or oil. Transfer of steel into other furnace is sometime: SECTION 3: Review - This assessment must be reviewed every 12 months or earlier if the basis

  16. Risk Assessment Form (This is an active document and must be maintained)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Risk Assessment Form (This is an active document and must be maintained) Materials Science to several days), might be followed by water/oil quenching. SECTION 1: Identify all significant hazards, who: Review - This assessment must be reviewed every 12 months or earlier if the basis of the original

  17. Risk Assessment Form (This is an active document and must be maintained)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Risk Assessment Form (This is an active document and must be maintained) Materials Science), might be followed by water/oil quenching. SECTION 1: Identify all significant hazards, who or what may of Assessor(s) Date: Signature of Supervisor Date: SECTION 3: Review - This assessment must be reviewed every

  18. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens C to pollutants while using biogas for cooking was assessed following the methodology described by the US - National Research Council. Information of hazardous compounds and compositions of several biogas types were

  19. 1 INTRODUCTION Probabilistic risk (or safety) assessments (PRA) pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    reliability analyses. Finally, a case study in- volving a nuclear reactor is presented in Section 3. Dynamic for managing risks linked to engineering systems, notably in nuclear power plants, aerospace, and chemical of dynamic reliability was established under the name of Con- tinuous Event Tree (CET) theory, (Devooght

  20. Essays on econometric modeling of subjective perceptions of risks in environment and human health 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, To Ngoc

    2009-05-15

    A large body of literature studies the issues of the option price and other ex-ante welfare measures under the microeconomic theory to valuate reductions of risks inherent in environment and human health. However, it does not offer a careful...

  1. Taking Risk Assessment and Management to the Next Level: Program-Level Risk Analysis to Enable Solid Decision-Making on Priorities and Funding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J. G.; Morton, R. L.; Castillo, C.; Dyer, G.; Johnson, N.; McSwain, J. T.

    2011-02-01

    A multi-level (facility and programmatic) risk assessment was conducted for the facilities in the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities (RTBF) Program and results were included in a new Risk Management Plan (RMP), which was incorporated into the fiscal year (FY) 2010 Integrated Plans. Risks, risk events, probability, consequence(s), and mitigation strategies were identified and captured, for most scope areas (i.e., risk categories) during the facilitated risk workshops. Risk mitigations (i.e., efforts in addition to existing controls) were identified during the facilitated risk workshops when the risk event was identified. Risk mitigation strategies fell into two broad categories: threats or opportunities. Improvement projects were identified and linked to specific risks they mitigate, making the connection of risk reduction through investments for the annual Site Execution Plan. Due to the amount of that was collected, analysis to be performed, and reports to be generated, a Risk Assessment/ Management Tool (RAMtool) database was developed to analyze the risks in real-time, at multiple levels, which reinforced the site-level risk management process and procedures. The RAMtool database was developed and designed to assist in the capturing and analysis of the key elements of risk: probability, consequence, and impact. The RAMtool calculates the facility-level and programmatic-level risk factors to enable a side-by-side comparison to see where the facility manager and program manager should focus their risk reduction efforts and funding. This enables them to make solid decisions on priorities and funding to maximize the risk reduction. A more active risk management process was developed where risks and opportunities are actively managed, monitored, and controlled by each facility more aggressively and frequently. risk owners have the responsibility and accountability to manage their assigned risk in real-time, using the RAMtool database.

  2. Photo: Gerard Kuster Climate information in hazard risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2. Human Health 3. Energy Management 4. Climate Change 5. Water Management 6. Weather Forecasting 7 Global level European level Key challenges for earth observation Disaster management overview Flooding OF THE PRESENTATION 2 #12;3 New thinking: Earth as a system "Earth System Science" acknowledges that changes

  3. Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesA Token Requesting AQuestionsRevolving Loan FundsRisk

  4. Establishment of a bioassay system for cancer risk assessment in energy technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ts'o, P.O.P.; Bruce, S.A.; Brown, A. (eds.)

    1983-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 20 papers in this report. For several years the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), has supported a research program aimed at developing new experimental approaches for the improvement of cancer risk assessments. The central issue is to overcome the organizational, species and other barriers that make it difficult to extrapolate laboratory-based data to predict risk to man. Most of the participants at the meeting are involved in research aimed at understanding the mechanism(s) of chemical carcinogenesis. Complex mixtures of chemicals are associated with many energy technologies. DOE's initial program emphasis focused on semi-applied research aimed at quantitative evaluation of carcinogenic activity of complex materials. Since much progress has been made in DOE integrated technology-specific chemical-biological characterization studies, the number and kinds of chemicals of concern has been reduced to a relatively few well-defined classes. Although the classes of compounds seem to be unique to some of the synfuel technologies, they are quite similar to compounds of general interest, for example, poly-nuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Special emphasis was placed on molecular and cellular dosimetry as one of the key requirements for quantitative comparison of effects at the cell level in vivo and in vitro. Although it is relatively easy to measure cell, tissue, organ and whole organism doses associated with radiation exposures, we are just learning how to do this for chemical agents. Several methods have been developed in the past several years which can be used.

  5. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    schemes adopted in life-cycle assessment, such as archetypeshealth response in life-cycle assessment using ED10s andglobal warming in life-cycle assessment based on damages to

  6. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Building 51, Room 3188, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Huang, Shiew-Mei, E-mail: shiewmei.huang@fda.hhs.go [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Building 51, Room 3188, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  7. Waste management project's alternatives: A risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karmperis, Athanasios C.; Sotirchos, Anastasios; Aravossis, Konstantinos; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P.

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a novel risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the RBMCA the evaluation criteria are based on the quantitative risk analysis of the project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preference to the multi-criteria against the one-criterion evaluation process is discussed. - Abstract: This paper examines the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives through a quantitative risk analysis. Cost benefit analysis is a widely used method, in which the investments are mainly assessed through the calculation of their evaluation indicators, namely benefit/cost (B/C) ratios, as well as the quantification of their financial, technical, environmental and social risks. Herein, a novel approach in the form of risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) is introduced, which can be used by decision makers, in order to select the optimum alternative of a waste management project. Specifically, decision makers use multiple criteria, which are based on the cumulative probability distribution functions of the alternatives' B/C ratios. The RBMCA system is used for the evaluation of a waste incineration project's alternatives, where the correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is analyzed and useful conclusions are discussed.

  8. Risk assessment of the retrieval of transuranic waste: Pads 1, 2, and 4, Technical Area-54, Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbert, K.A.; Lyon, B.F.; Hutchison, J.; Holmes, J.A.; Legg, J.L.; Simek, M.P.; Travis, C.C.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Risk Assessment for the Retrieval of Transuranic Waste is a comparative risk assessment of the potential adverse human health effects resulting from exposure to contaminants during retrieval and post-retrieval aboveground storage operations of post-1970 earthen-covered transuranic waste. Two alternatives are compared: (1) Immediate Retrieval and (2) Delayed Retrieval. Under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative, retrieval of the waste is assumed to begin immediately, Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, retrieval is delayed 10 years. The current risk assessment is on Pads 1, 2, and 4, at Technical Area-54, Area-G, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Risks are assessed independently for three scenarios: (1) incident-free retrieval operations, (2) incident-free storage operations, and (3) a drum failure analysis. The drum failure analysis evaluates container integrity under both alternatives and assesses the impacts of potential drum failures during retrieval operations. Risks associated with a series of drum failures are potentially severe for workers, off-site receptors, and general on-site employees if retrieval is delayed 10 years and administrative and engineering controls remain constant. Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, an average of 300 drums out of 16,647 are estimated to fail during retrieval operations due to general corrosion, while minimal drums are predicted to fail under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative. The results of the current study suggest that, based on risk, remediation of Pads 1, 2, and 4 at LANL should not be delayed. Although risks from incident-free operations in the Delayed Retrieval Alternative are low, risks due to corrosion and drum failures are potentially severe.

  9. EPa`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Exposure issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    Three major issues to be dealt with over the next ten years in the exposure assessment field are: consistency in terminology, the impact of computer technology on the choice of data and modeling, and conceptual issues such as the use of time-weighted averages.

  10. Proceedings of the 1998 USCOLD Annual Lecture, Buffalo, New York. August 1998 PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT: A TOOL FOR DAM SAFETY RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    ASSESSMENT: A TOOL FOR DAM SAFETY RISK MANAGEMENT David S. Bowles1 , Loren R. Anderson2 , Terry F. Glover3 on to provide the basis for an effective and efficient program for managing and reducing dam safety risksProceedings of the 1998 USCOLD Annual Lecture, Buffalo, New York. August 1998 PORTFOLIO RISK

  11. Simulations of long-term health risk from shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, C.A.; Fields, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    PRESTO (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code developed under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funding to evaluate possible health effects from shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes. The model is intended to assess radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impact to a static local population for up to 1000 years following the end of burial operations. Human exposure scenarios that may be considered by model include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and near site farming. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include:groundwater transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, resuspension, atmospheric transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, resuspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Off-site population and individual doses and cancer risks may be calculated as well as doses and risks to the intruder and farmer. Data have been compiled for three extant shallow land burial sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. Some simulation results for the Barnwell site are presented. 13 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Quantification of key long-term risks at CO? sequestration sites: Latest results from US DOE's National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pawar, Rajesh; Bromhal, Grant; Carroll, Susan; Chu, Shaoping; Dilmore, Robert; Gastelum, Jason; Oldenburg, Curt; Stauffer, Philip; Zhang, Yingqi; Guthrie, George

    2014-12-31

    Risk assessment for geologic CO? storage including quantification of risks is an area of active investigation. The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is a US-Department of Energy (US-DOE) effort focused on developing a defensible, science-based methodology and platform for quantifying risk profiles at geologic CO? sequestration sites. NRAP has been developing a methodology that centers round development of an integrated assessment model (IAM) using system modeling approach to quantify risks and risk profiles. The IAM has been used to calculate risk profiles with a few key potential impacts due to potential CO? and brine leakage. The simulation results are alsomore »used to determine long-term storage security relationships and compare the long-term storage effectiveness to IPCC storage permanence goal. Additionally, we also demonstrate application of IAM for uncertainty quantification in order to determine parameters to which the uncertainty in model results is most sensitive.« less

  13. Quantification of key long-term risks at CO? sequestration sites: Latest results from US DOE's National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawar, Rajesh; Bromhal, Grant; Carroll, Susan; Chu, Shaoping; Dilmore, Robert; Gastelum, Jason; Oldenburg, Curt; Stauffer, Philip; Zhang, Yingqi; Guthrie, George

    2014-12-31

    Risk assessment for geologic CO? storage including quantification of risks is an area of active investigation. The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is a US-Department of Energy (US-DOE) effort focused on developing a defensible, science-based methodology and platform for quantifying risk profiles at geologic CO? sequestration sites. NRAP has been developing a methodology that centers round development of an integrated assessment model (IAM) using system modeling approach to quantify risks and risk profiles. The IAM has been used to calculate risk profiles with a few key potential impacts due to potential CO? and brine leakage. The simulation results are also used to determine long-term storage security relationships and compare the long-term storage effectiveness to IPCC storage permanence goal. Additionally, we also demonstrate application of IAM for uncertainty quantification in order to determine parameters to which the uncertainty in model results is most sensitive.

  14. Risk Assessment Methodology Based on the NISTIR 7628 Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Hauser, Katie R; Lantz, Margaret W; Mili, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Earlier work describes computational models of critical infrastructure that allow an analyst to estimate the security of a system in terms of the impact of loss per stakeholder resulting from security breakdowns. Here, we consider how to identify, monitor and estimate risk impact and probability for different smart grid stakeholders. Our constructive method leverages currently available standards and defined failure scenarios. We utilize the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Interagency or Internal Reports (NISTIR) 7628 as a basis to apply Cyberspace Security Econometrics system (CSES) for comparing design principles and courses of action in making security-related decisions.

  15. Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2 SpecialSpent Fuel Transportation Risk

  16. Sandia Energy - Hydrogen Risk Assessment Model (HyRAM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy & DrillingNanomaterials HongyouHydrogen Risk

  17. Use of genomic data in risk assessment case study: II. Evaluation of the dibutyl phthalate toxicogenomic data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euling, Susan Y.; White, Lori D.; Kim, Andrea S.; Sen, Banalata; Wilson, Vickie S.; Keshava, Channa; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Hester, Susan; Ovacik, Meric A.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Gaido, Kevin W.

    2013-09-15

    An evaluation of the toxicogenomic data set for dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and male reproductive developmental effects was performed as part of a larger case study to test an approach for incorporating genomic data in risk assessment. The DBP toxicogenomic data set is composed of nine in vivo studies from the published literature that exposed rats to DBP during gestation and evaluated gene expression changes in testes or Wolffian ducts of male fetuses. The exercise focused on qualitative evaluation, based on a lack of available dose–response data, of the DBP toxicogenomic data set to postulate modes and mechanisms of action for the male reproductive developmental outcomes, which occur in the lower dose range. A weight-of-evidence evaluation was performed on the eight DBP toxicogenomic studies of the rat testis at the gene and pathway levels. The results showed relatively strong evidence of DBP-induced downregulation of genes in the steroidogenesis pathway and lipid/sterol/cholesterol transport pathway as well as effects on immediate early gene/growth/differentiation, transcription, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling and apoptosis pathways in the testis. Since two established modes of action (MOAs), reduced fetal testicular testosterone production and Insl3 gene expression, explain some but not all of the testis effects observed in rats after in utero DBP exposure, other MOAs are likely to be operative. A reanalysis of one DBP microarray study identified additional pathways within cell signaling, metabolism, hormone, disease, and cell adhesion biological processes. These putative new pathways may be associated with DBP effects on the testes that are currently unexplained. This case study on DBP identified data gaps and research needs for the use of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment. Furthermore, this study demonstrated an approach for evaluating toxicogenomic data in human health risk assessment that could be applied to future chemicals. - Highlights: ? We evaluate the dibutyl phthalate toxicogenomic data for use in risk assessment. ? We focus on information about the mechanism of action for the developing testis. ? Multiple studies report effects on testosterone and insl3-related pathways. ? We identify additional affected pathways that may explain some testis effects. ? The case study is a template for evaluating toxicogenomic data in risk assessment.

  18. Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

  19. Societal and observational problems in earthquake risk assessments and their delivery to those most at risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilham, Roger

    -0399, United States a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 10 October 2011 Received risk are inappropriate in regions where strain rates are low, and where historical data are short these articles note that deaths and costs will continue to rise in the next century, but that extreme events

  20. Risk Assessment of Geologic Formation Sequestration in The Rocky Mountain Region, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the outcome of a targeted risk assessment of a candidate geologic sequestration site in the Rocky Mountain region of the USA. Specifically, a major goal of the probabilistic risk assessment was to quantify the possible spatiotemporal responses for Area of Review (AoR) and injection-induced pressure buildup associated with carbon dioxide (CO?) injection into the subsurface. Because of the computational expense of a conventional Monte Carlo approach, especially given the likely uncertainties in model parameters, we applied a response surface method for probabilistic risk assessment of geologic CO? storage in the Permo-Penn Weber formation at a potential CCS site in Craig, Colorado. A site-specific aquifer model was built for the numerical simulation based on a regional geologic model.