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1

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

2

Uranium: Environmental Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium is found ubiquitously in nature in low concentrations in soil, rock, and water. Naturally occurring uranium contains three isotopes, namely 238U, 235U, and 234U. All uranium isotopes have the same chemical properties, but they have different radiological properties. The main civilian use of uranium is to fuel nuclear power plants, whereas high enriched (in 235U) uranium is used in the military sector as nuclear explosives and depleted uranium (DU) as penetrators or tank shielding. Exposure to uranium may cause health problems due to its radiological (uranium is predominantly emitting alpha-particles) and chemical actions (heavy metal toxicity). Uranium uptake may occur by ingestion, inhalation, contaminated wounds, and embedded fragments especially for soldiers. Inhalation of dust is considered the major pathway for uranium uptake in workplaces. Soluble uranium compounds tend to quickly pass through the body, whereas insoluble uranium compounds pose a more serious inhalation exposure hazard. The kidney is the most sensitive organ for uranium chemotoxicity. An important indirect radiological effect of uranium is the increased risk of lung cancers from inhalation of the daughter products of radon, a noble gas in the uranium decay chains that transports uranium-derived radioactivity from soil into the indoor environment. No direct evidence about the carcinogenic effect of DU in humans is available yet.

D. Melo; W. Burkart

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2006 research-article Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War...Medicine) Gulf War and health. In Depleted uranium, pyridostigmine bromide...McDiarmid, M.A , Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed Gulf War...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The health effects of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There has been a substantial amount of public discussion on the health effects of the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. In response to this concern the Royal Society set up an independent, expert working group to investigate the health effects of DU munitions. The Royal Society has now produced two reports, and this summary covering the key conclusions and recommendations from both reports. The part I report considered the increased risks of radiation-induced cancer from exposures to DU on the battlefield. Part II dealt with the risks from the chemical toxicity of uranium, non-malignant radiation effects from DU intakes, the long-term environmental consequences of the deployment of DU munitions and responses to part I including issues arising at a public meeting to discuss the part I report.

The Royal Society Working Group on the Health Hazards of

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Depleted Uranium: Exposure and Possible Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the enrichment process of 235U used for fission in nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. It has both civilian and military applications. The military use of DU is of defensive as well as of offensive nature, being mainly employed as armor-piercing ammunition. So far, the usage of ammunitions containing DU has been officially confirmed in four military conflicts: Iraq (1991), Bosnia (1994), Kosovo (1999), and again Iraq (2003). During their deployment in the military actions, most penetrators are thought to have missed their intended targets. Therefore, a substantial amount of DU is still present in the environment and may act as a source of contamination for the environment and the population. The possible effects of this radioactive and chemically toxic material have attracted particular notice. To evaluate these consequences, it is important to have accurate methods to assess the exposure to DU in both environmental and biological samples. This article is therefore intended to point out the problematic nature of the experimental techniques and of the analytical methods so far used to quantify the exposure to DU in the light of possible health effects of DU.

U. Oeh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) has been claimed to contribute to health problems both in military personnel directly involved in war actions as well in military and civilian individuals who resided in areas where DU ammunition was expended. Due to the low specific radioactivity and the dominance of alpha-radiation, no acute health risk can be attributed to external exposure to DU. Internalised DU is both chemo- and radio-toxic. The major risk is from inhalation of DU dust or particles with less than 10 ?m aerodynamic-equivalent diameter, formed when DU ammunitions hit hard targets (aerosol formation) or during weathering of DU penetrators. One major conclusion is that for all post-conflict situations, the inhaled DU quantities (central estimates) produced radiation doses that would be only a fraction of those normally received by the lung from natural radiation. Hence no long term lung effects due to these DU amounts can be expected. These conclusions also hold for whole-body exposure from ingestion of DU in local food and water.

W. Burkart; P.R. Danesi; J.H. Hendry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Environmental Management Project (Fernald Environmental Management Project 1997; McDiarmid...Lyon, France:International Agency for Research...following exposure to radon daughters and uranium...Environmental Management Project (FEMP). 1997...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU), a waste product of uranium enrichment, has several civilian and military applications. It was used as armor-piercing ammunition in international military conflicts and was claimed to contribute to health problems, known as the Gulf War Syndrome and recently as the Balkan Syndrome. This led to renewed efforts to assess the environmental consequences and the health impact of the use of DU. The radiological and chemical properties of DU can be compared to those of natural uranium, which is ubiquitously present in soil at a typical concentration of 3 mg/kg. Natural uranium has the same chemotoxicity, but its radiotoxicity is 60% higher. Due to the low specific radioactivity and the dominance of alpha-radiation no acute risk is attributed to external exposure to DU. The major risk is DU dust, generated when DU ammunition hits hard targets. Depending on aerosol speciation, inhalation may lead to a protracted exposure of the lung and other organs. After deposition on the ground, resuspension can take place if the DU containing particle size is sufficiently small. However, transfer to drinking water or locally produced food has little potential to lead to significant exposures to DU. Since poor solubility of uranium compounds and lack of information on speciation precludes the use of radioecological models for exposure assessment, biomonitoring has to be used for assessing exposed persons. Urine, feces, hair and nails record recent exposures to DU. With the exception of crews of military vehicles having been hit by DU penetrators, no body burdens above the range of values for natural uranium have been found. Therefore, observable health effects are not expected and residual cancer risk estimates have to be based on theoretical considerations. They appear to be very minor for all post-conflict situations, i.e. a fraction of those expected from natural radiation.

A Bleise; P.R Danesi; W Burkart

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Methodology for comparing the health effects of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels  

SciTech Connect

A methodology was developed for comparing the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels. The health effects attributable to the construction, operation, and decommissioning of each facility in the two fuel cycle were considered. The methodology is based on defining (1) requirement variables for the materials, energy, etc., (2) effluent variables associated with the requirement variables as well as with the fuel cycle facility operation, and (3) health impact variables for effluents and accidents. The materials, energy, etc., required for construction, operation, and decommissioning of each fuel cycle facility are defined as primary variables. The materials, energy, etc., needed to produce the primary variable are defined as secondary requirement variables. Each requirement variable (primary, secondary, etc.) has associated effluent variables and health impact variables. A diverging chain or tree is formed for each primary variable. Fortunately, most elements reoccur frequently to reduce the level of analysis complexity. 6 references, 11 figures, 6 tables.

Rhyne, W.R.; El-Bassioni, A.A.

1981-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

10

The potential human health effect(s) of the metal uranium in the environment. Report on the known human health effects associated with the exposure to the metal uranium  

SciTech Connect

Concern over the levels of the metal uranium in the environment as a result of industrial activities has been expressed by several Federal and State agencies. This concern is associated with potential human health effects of this metal on kidney function and bone formation. Although limits for the Metal uranium in the environment remain to be set, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently in the process of establishing guidance limits for this metal in water and soil. These limits will be established for both the metal and the associated radioactivity. The suggested limits currently being considered for water and soil are, 20 pCi/liter and 10 pCi/gram wet weight, respectively. For naturally occurring uranium EPA assumes that 1 ug of uranium metal equals 0.67 pCi at equilibrium (i.e. at equilibrium the mass ratio of {sup 234}uranium to {sup 238}uranium is small but their activities are equal). Thus the limits for water and soil on weight basis for the uranium metal would be 30 ug/liter and 15 ug/gram wet weight, respectively. These limits are being established based on the potential increase in cancer death in populations that exceed this limit. Since there does not appear to be a significant correlation between cancer deaths and.uranium metal exposure (see discussion below), these limits will probably be established based on the known association between radionuclides exposure and cancer deaths. The exposure limits for other health effects such as kidney damage and retardation in bone formation apparently are not being considered by EPA.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Identification of Health Risks in Workers Staying and Working on the Terrains Contaminated with Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ionizing radiation. Health risks|Depleted uranium|Chromosome aberrations...and Jadranko SIMIC2 Health risks/Depleted uranium/Chromosome aberrations...Institute symposia "The Health Effects of Depleted Uranium." Remarks and slides......

Snezana Milacic; Jadranko Simic

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Reproductive Effects in Rats after Chronic Oral Exposure to Low-dose Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Fairlie I (2009) Depleted uranium: properties, military use and health risks. Med Confl...et al (2002) Health effects of embedded depleted uranium. Mil Med 167...et al (2000) Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed Gulf......

Yuhui Hao; Rong Li; Yanbing Leng; Jiong Ren; Jing Liu; Guoping Ai; Hui Xu; Yongping Su; Tianmin Cheng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Depleted Uranium Report from the Health Council of the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Health Council of the Netherlands, which is an independent scientific advisory body established in 1902 `to advise the government and Parliament on the current level of knowledge with respect to public health issues', has recently published an overview report on depleted uranium. The title of the report is `Health risks of exposure to depleted uranium' and it is freely available in both English and the original Dutch language. A brief summary of the report that was published on 16 May 2001 is presented here. The use of ammunition containing depleted uranium (DU) in Kosovo and elsewhere in the Balkans has provoked disquiet in Europe. In the Netherlands, concern over the release of this material had already been aroused previously following the crash of the El-Al airliner in the Bijlmermeer district of Amsterdam in 1992. It was against this background that the President of the Health Council decided to set up a Committee charged with the task of reviewing the health risks of exposure to DU and the preventive measures required for individuals present in areas where DU has been released into the environment. After reviewing the properties of uranium in general and depleted uranium in particular, and presenting data on the occurrence of the element in the environment and biological tissues, the committee assessed the chemical and radiological health effect of uranium and uranium compounds. The Health Council Committee concludes that radioactive contamination of the lungs is the principal health risk to be considered in connection with exposure to slightly soluble uranium compounds in the atmosphere. For soluble compounds, the chemical toxic effect in the kidneys is the primary consideration. The toxicological effects are to some extent concordant with those of other heavy metals. For relevant exposure scenarios the Committee does not anticipate that exposure to DU will result in a demonstrable increased risk of diseases and symptoms among exposed individuals as a result of a radiological or chemical toxic effect exerted by this substance. Cancer In view of the fact that DU emits ionising radiation in the form of alpha particles, the induction of cancer, in principle, needs to be taken into account in relation to individuals exhibiting internal contamination with DU. In case of inhalation of slightly soluble DU compounds, attention will in particular need to be focused on the lungs. The radiation dose caused by incidental exposure to DU in the exposure scenarios considered is limited compared with the radiation dose received during a lifetime of exposure to natural uranium. As at the common levels of exposure to natural uranium a contribution to the induction of cancer in the population cannot be demonstrated, the Committee concludes that the same is true for exposure to DU. This general conclusion is also valid for the appearance of lung cancer and for the appearance of leukaemia after the inhalation of dust containing slightly soluble uranium compounds. Renal damage For soluble compounds, the risk posed by exposure to DU is principally of a chemical toxic nature. In the case of increasing exposure, abnormalities will first of all appear in the kidneys. Exposure to small amounts (milligrams) of uranium over short periods will therefore result in changes in the kidneys, which lead to acute, usually reversible, renal impairment. No such dose-dependency has been observed, however, in the frequency of chronic renal disorders among population groups who are chronically exposed to enhanced quantities of natural uranium. Nor have studies involving workers in the uranium industry and ex-military personnel (including the group with shrapnel in the body) to date produced any evidence that uranium can cause renal impairment. Thus the present body of scientific data tends to suggest an absence of irreparable renal damage as a result of the intake of DU in the exposure scenarios considered. Prevention Although the risks associated with exposure to DU for the exposure scenarios considered appear to be very limited, the fundamental prin

W F Passchier; J W N Tuyn

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Depleted uranium is uranium that has had some of its U-235 content removed. Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce uranium having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the 0.72% that occurs naturally (called "enriched" uranium) for use in U.S. national defense and civilian applications. "Depleted" uranium is also a product of the enrichment process. However, depleted uranium has been stripped of some of its natural uranium-235 content. Most of the Department of Energy's (DOE) depleted uranium inventory contains between 0.2 to 0.4 weight-percent uranium-235, well

15

Radiological health aspects of uranium milling  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized.

Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Accumulation and Distribution of Uranium in Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Environmental and health consequences of depleted uranium use in the 1991 Gulf...Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general...J. (2002). Health effects of embedded depleted uranium. Mil Med. 167......

Guoying Zhu; Mingguang Tan; Yulan Li; Xiqiao Xiang; Heping Hu; Shuquan Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Neurotoxicity of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the enrichment process of uranium for its more radioactive isotopes to be ... neurotoxicity of DU. This review reports on uranium uses and its published health effects, wit...

George C. -T. Jiang; Michael Aschiner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

What is Depleted Uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is Uranium? What is Uranium? Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects What is Uranium? Physical and chemical properties, origin, and uses of uranium. Properties of Uranium Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in varying but small amounts in soil, rocks, water, plants, animals and all human beings. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes, which are identified by the total number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus: uranium-238, uranium-235, and uranium-234. (Isotopes of an element have the

19

Inositol hexaphosphate: a potential chelating agent for uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and staining pigments. Depleted uranium, a by-product of uranium...177-193. 2 World Health Organization (WHO). Uranium in drinking-water...the lethal effect of oral uranium poisoning. Health Phys. (2000) 78(6......

D. Cebrian; A. Tapia; A. Real; M. A. Morcillo

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Identification of Health Risks in Workers Staying and Working on the Terrains Contaminated with Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the Terrains Contaminated with Depleted Uranium Snezana Milacic 1 * Jadranko...originated from ammunition containing depleted uranium (DU). The studied population...ionizing radiation. Health risks|Depleted uranium|Chromosome aberrations| J......

Snezana Milacic; Jadranko Simic

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Monte Carlo analysis of possible cell dose enhancement effects by uranium microparticles in photon fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......dangers from depleted uranium have focused...significant health risk(1...studies on depleted uranium have not found...detrimental to health(1). One...R. L. The health hazards of depleted uranium munitions......

J. S. Eakins; J. Th. M. Jansen; R. J. Tanner

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation dose around uranium microparticles in the human body  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surrounded the adverse health effects of depleted uranium (DU) munitions...Society. 2001 The health hazards of depleted uranium munitions-Part 1...Society. 2002 The health effects of depleted uranium munitions-Part 2...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Radiological and Depleted Uranium Weapons: Environmental and Health Consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of nuclear weapons are due to the release of blast and thermal energy and the immediate and residual ionizing radiation energy. Most of the short-term damages to the environment and the human health are caused by the blast and thermal energies. Ionizing radiation energy received in large doses at high dose rates (victims of nuclear explosions) can produce acute radiation sickness and can even be lethal. Individuals having received lower radiation doses, or even high doses at low dose rates, may suffer from stochastic effects, primarily, the induction of cancer. Studies of exposed populations suggest the probability of developing a lethal cancer following low dose rate exposure is increased by approximately 5% for each Sv the whole-body receives. This risk is added, of course, to the risk of dying from cancer without exposure to radiation, which is more than 20% worldwide. For radiological weapons (radiological dispersion devices or dirty bombs), the health effects due to radiation are expected to be minor in most cases. Casualties will mainly occur due to the conventional explosive. Fear, panic, and decontamination costs will be the major effects. Significant radiation damage to individuals would likely be limited to very few persons. Depleted uranium (DU) weapons leave in the battlefield fragmented or intact DU penetrators as well as DU dust. The latter, if inhaled, could represent a radiological risk, especially to individuals spending some time in vehicles hit by DU munitions. All studies conducted so far have shown the outdoors doses to be so low not to represent a significant risk. For those spending 10 h per year in vehicles hit by DU munitions, the risk of developing a lethal cancer is slightly higher (?0.2%).

P.R. Danesi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Daily uranium excretion in German peacekeeping personnel serving on the Balkans compared to ICRP model prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......assess a possible health risk of depleted uranium (DU) for residents...119-122. 10 WHO. Depleted uranium: Sources, exposure and health effects. (2001...assess a possible health risk of depleted uranium (DU) for residents......

U. Oeh; W. B. Li; V. Höllriegl; A. Giussani; P. Schramel; P. Roth; H. G. Paretzke

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Clinical diagnostic indicators of renal and bone damage in rats intramuscularly injected with depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Abou-Donia, M. Depleted and natural uranium: chemistry...Environ. Health B Crit...et al. Health effects of embedded depleted uranium. Mil. Med...determinations in depleted uranium exposed Gulf...veterans. Health Phys. 77......

S. Fukuda; M. Ikeda; M. Chiba; K. Kaneko

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Health Effects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers research programs and monitoring activities, both domestic and international, that support the protection and promotion of the health of DOE workers, their families, and residents of neighboring communities near DOE sites, affected by exposure to hazardous materials from DOE sites or a result of nuclear weapons testing, use or accident.

27

Reproductive health of Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...B2005Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols...Environ. Health. 4, 17...Surveillance of depleted uranium exposed Gulf...veterans: health effects observed...exposed to depleted uranium. Int. Arch...Environ. Health. 79, 11-21...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Long-term accumulation of uranium in bones of Wistar rats as a function of intake dosages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1997). 2. Depleted uranium: sources, exposures and health effects. WHO...Society. The health hazards of depleted uranium munitions, Part...Society. The health hazards of depleted uranium munitions, Part......

J. D. T. Arruda-Neto; M. V. Manso Guevara; G. P. Nogueira; M. Saiki; A. C. Cestari; K. Shtejer; A. Deppman; J. W. Pereira Filho; F. Garcia; L. P. Geraldo; A. N. Gouveia; F. Guzmán; J. Mesa; O. Rodriguez; R. Semmler; V. R. Vanin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem ({plus_minus}2.4) to 0.04 mrem ({plus_minus}0.13) and translate to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments to about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

30

Environmental and health consequences of depleted uranium use in the 1991 Gulf War  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the 235U radionuclide enrichment processes for nuclear reactors or nuclear weapons. DU in the metallic form has high density and hardness as well as pyrophoric properties, which makes it superior to the classical tungsten armour-piercing munitions. Military use of DU has been recently a subject of considerable concern, not only to radioecologists but also public opinion in terms of possible health hazards arising from its radioactivity and chemical toxicity. In this review, the results of uranium content measurements in different environmental samples performed by authors in Kuwait after Gulf War are presented with discussion concerning possible environmental and health effects for the local population. It was found that uranium concentration in the surface soil samples ranged from 0.3 to 2.5 ?g g?1 with an average value of 1.1 ?g g?1, much lower than world average value of 2.8 ?g g?1. The solid fallout samples showed similar concentrations varied from 0.3 to 1.7 ?g g?1 (average 1.47 ?g g?1). Only the average concentration of U in solid particulate matter in surface air equal to 0.24 ng g?1 was higher than the usually observed values of ?0.1 ng g?1 but it was caused by the high dust concentration in the air in that region. Calculated on the basis of these measurements, the exposure to uranium for the Kuwait and southern Iraq population does not differ from the world average estimation. Therefore, the widely spread information in newspapers and Internet (see for example: [CADU NEWS, 2003. http://www.cadu.org.uk/news/index.htm (3–13)]) concerning dramatic health deterioration for Iraqi citizens should not be linked directly with their exposure to DU after the Gulf War.

Henryk Bem; Firyal Bou-Rabee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

32

The Reproductive Effects in Rats after Chronic Oral Exposure to Low-dose Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Oral Exposure to Low-dose Depleted Uranium Yuhui Hao Rong Li * Yanbing...study evaluated the effects of depleted uranium (DU) on reproduction in rats...effects were obvious in F1 rats. Depleted uranium|Ingestion|Reproductive effects......

Yuhui Hao; Rong Li; Yanbing Leng; Jiong Ren; Jing Liu; Guoping Ai; Hui Xu; Yongping Su; Tianmin Cheng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hexafluoride (UF6) Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Physical and chemical properties of UF6, and its use in uranium processing. Uranium Hexafluoride and Its Properties Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. UF6 crystals in a glass vial image UF6 crystals in a glass vial. Uranium hexafluoride does not react with oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or dry air, but it does react with water or water vapor. For this reason,

34

Case Study/ Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Case Study/ Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium: Central Valley, California, USA Abstract Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley products sold (U.S. Department of 1Corresponding author: U.S. Geological Survey, California Water Science

35

Distribution of uranium and some selected trace metals in human scalp hair from Balkans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1023/A:1016031726512 . 2 World Health Organization report. Depleted uranium: sources, exposure and health effects. (2001) Department of...3 Birchard K. Does Iraq's depleted uranium pose a health risk? Lancet (1998) 351:657......

Z. S. Zunic; S. Tokonami; S. Mishra; H. Arae; R. Kritsananuwat; S. K. Sahoo

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Monte Carlo analysis of possible cell dose enhancement effects by uranium microparticles in photon fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......R. L. The health hazards of depleted uranium munitions - Part I. J. Radiol...2001) 21:331. 2 Busby C. Depleted uranium weapons, metal particles, and...O. How war debris could cause cancer. New Scientist (2008) 195......

J. S. Eakins; J. Th. M. Jansen; R. J. Tanner

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Biological effects of embedded depleted uranium (DU): summary of Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Persian Gulf War resulted in injuries of US Coalition personnel by fragments of depleted uranium (DU). Fragments not immediately threatening the health of the individuals were allowed to remain in place, based on long-standing treatment protocols designed for other kinds of metal shrapnel injuries. However, questions were soon raised as to whether this approach is appropriate for a metal with the unique radiological and toxicological properties of DU. The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) is investigating health effects of embedded fragments of DU to determine whether current surgical fragment removal policies remain appropriate for this metal. These studies employ rodents implanted with DU pellets as well as cultured human cells exposed to DU compounds. Results indicate uranium from implanted DU fragments distributed to tissues far-removed from implantation sites, including bone, kidney, muscle, and liver. Despite levels of uranium in the kidney that were nephrotoxic after acute exposure, no histological or functional kidney toxicity was observed. However, results suggest the need for further studies of long-term health impact, since DU was found to be mutagenic, and it transformed human osteoblast cells to a tumorigenic phenotype. It also altered neurophysiological parameters in rat hippocampus, crossed the placental barrier, and entered fetal tissue. This report summarizes AFRRI's depleted uranium research to date.

D.E McClain; K.A Benson; T.K Dalton; J Ejnik; C.A Emond; S.J Hodge; J.F Kalinich; M.A Landauer; A.C Miller; T.C Pellmar; M.D Stewart; V Villa; J Xu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Evaluation of Environmental and Health Consequences of Depleted Uranium Armor use in Yugoslavia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the paper there is discussed a possible radiation effect a combat application of armor - piercing ammunitions with a “depleted uranium” (DU) in Iraqian and Yugoslavian conflicts ... a noticeable additional inf...

V. A. Vetrov; O. A. Pavlovsky

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

40

Depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential health effects arising from exposure to depleted uranium have been much in the news of late. Naturally occurring uranium contains the radioisotopes 238U (which dominates, at a current molar proportion of 99.3%), 235U and a small amount of 234U. Depleted uranium has an isotopic concentration of 235U that is below the 0.7% found naturally. This is either because the uranium has passed through a nuclear reactor which uses up some of the fissile 235U that fuels the fission chain-reaction, or because it is the uranium that remains when enriched uranium with an elevated concentration of 235U is produced in an enrichment plant, or because of a combination of these two processes. Depleted uranium has a lower specific activity than naturally occurring uranium because of the lower concentrations of the more radioactive isotopes 235U and 234U, but account must be taken of any contaminating radionuclides or exotic radioisotopes of uranium if the uranium has been irradiated. Uranium is a particularly dense element (about twice as dense as lead), and this property makes it useful in certain military applications, such as armour-piercing munitions. Depleted uranium, rather than natural uranium, is used because of its availability and, since the demise of the fast breeder reactor programme, the lack of alternative use. Depleted uranium weapons were used in the Gulf War of 1990 and also, to a lesser extent, more recently in the Balkans. This has led to speculation that depleted uranium may be associated with `Gulf War Syndrome', or other health effects that have been reported by military and civilian personnel involved in these conflicts and their aftermath. Although, on the basis of present scientific knowledge, it seems most unlikely that exposure to depleted uranium at the levels concerned could produce a detectable excess of adverse health effects, and in such a short timescale, the issue has become one of general concern and contention. As a consequence, any investigation needs to be thorough to produce sufficiently comprehensive evidence to stand up to close scrutiny and gain the support of the public, whatever the conclusions. Unfortunately, it is the nature of such inquiries that they take time, which is frustrating for some. In the UK, the Royal Society has instigated an independent investigation into the health effects of depleted uranium by a working group chaired by Professor Brian Spratt. This inquiry has been underway since the beginning of 2000. The working group's findings will be reviewed by a panel appointed by the Council of the Royal Society, and it is anticipated that the final report will be published in the summer of 2001. Further details can be found at www.royalsoc.ac.uk/templates/press/showpresspage.cfm?file=2001010801.txt. Nick Priest has summarised current knowledge on the toxicity (both radiological and chemical) of depleted uranium in a commentary in The Lancet (27 January 2001, 357 244-6). For those wanting to read a comprehensive review of the literature, in 1999 RAND published `A Review of the Scientific Literature as it Pertains to Gulf War Illnesses, Volume 7: Depleted Uranium' by Naomi Harley and her colleagues, which can be found at www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1018.7/MR1018.7.html. An interesting article by Jan Olof Snihs and Gustav Akerblom entitled `Use of depleted uranium in military conflicts and possible impact on health and environment' was published in the December 2000 issue of SSI News (pp 1-8), and can be found at the website of the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute: www.ssi.se/tidningar/PDF/lockSSIn/SSI-news2000.pdf. Last year, a paper was published in the June issue of this Journal that is of some relevance to depleted uranium. McGeoghegan and Binks (2000 J. Radiol. Prot. 20 111-37) reported the results of their epidemiological study of the health of workers at the Springfields uranium production facility near Preston during 1946-95. This study included almost 14 000 radiation workers. Although organ-specific doses due to uranium are not yet available for these worker

Richard Wakeford

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Total effective dose equivalent associated with fixed uranium surface contamination  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical basis for establishing a uranium fixed-contamination action level, a fixed uranium surface contamination level exceeding the total radioactivity values of Appendix D of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, part 835 (10CFR835), but below which the monitoring, posting, and control requirements for Radiological Areas are not required for the area of the contamination. An area of fixed uranium contamination between 1,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} and that level corresponding to an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 100 mrem requires only routine monitoring, posting to alert personnel of the contamination, and administrative control. The more extensive requirements for monitoring, posting, and control designated by 10CFR835 for Radiological Areas do not have to be applied for these intermediate fixed-contamination levels.

Bogard, J.S.; Hamm, R.N.; Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; England, C.A.; Swenson, D.E.; Brown, K.S.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Percutaneous penetration of uranium in rats after a contamination on intact or wounded skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Hoover M. D. Implanted depleted uranium fragments cause soft...muscles of rats. Environ. Health Perspect (2002) 110...Biokinetics and dosimetry of depleted uranium (DU) in rats implanted...international conference on Health Effects of Incorporated......

F. Petitot; C. Gautier; A. M. Moreels; S. Frelon; F. Paquet

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The challenges of exposure assessment in health studies of Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...veterans with health outcomes in military...as pesticide or depleted uranium (DU) exposure...preventing ill health arising from war...2004Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed Gulf...Toxicol. Environ. Health A. 67, 277-296...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effects of depleted uranium after short-term exposure on vitamin D metabolism in rat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium is a natural radioactive heavy metal. Its ... brain. Effects of an acute contamination by depleted uranium (DU) were investigated in vivo on...3 biosynthetic pathway. Rats received an intragastric adminis...

E. Tissandie; Y. Guéguen; J. M. A. Lobaccaro; F. Paquet…

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effects of Depleted Uranium on Oxidative Stress, Detoxification, and Defence Parameters of Zebrafish Danio rerio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated the effects of depleted uranium (DU), the by-product of nuclear enrichment of uranium, on several parameters related to oxidative stress...Danio rerio. Several parameters were recor...

Beatrice Gagnaire; Isabelle Cavalie…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Assessment of the effectiveness of mixed uranium-plutonium fuel in VVÉR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An assessment of the cost-effectiveness of burning mixed uranium-plutonium fuel in VVÉR reactors is made as a function of the price of natural uranium. It is shown that for the present price structure, based on t...

N. N. Ponomarev-Stepnoi; V. F. Tsibul’skii

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion The successful implementation of the HEU Agreement remains a high priority of the U.S. Government. The agreement also serves U.S. and Russian commercial interests. HEU Agreement deliveries are an important source of supply in meeting requirements for U.S. utility uranium, conversion, and

48

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion The successful implementation of the HEU Agreement remains a high priority of the U.S. Government. The agreement also serves U.S. and Russian commercial interests. HEU Agreement deliveries are an important source of supply in meeting requirements for U.S. utility uranium, conversion, and

49

SHOCKWAVE PROFILE AND BAUSCHINGER EFFECT IN DEPLETED URANIUM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic damage evolution in materials is of growing interest in particular the role of defect structure on material strength during a dynamic experiment. Many studies in the past have seen strong correlations between the shockwave profile and the defect structure during dynamic experiments such as quasi?elastic release behavior. Bauschinger effect is a microstructurally controlled process in which a material displays a change in stress?strain characterisitics due to a change in the defect structure. Studies on depleted uranium have revealed indications of Bauschinger effect being a mechanism present during quasi?static experiments which could be a result of the large amount of twinning observed in these materials. As work continues to improve strength models it becomes imperitive to understand the role of defect structure on the properties of materials under dynamic conditions. The study reported here is an observation of the release wave behavior in depleted uranium that first undergoes compressive shock loading followed by a reversal of the loading direction upon release.

D. D. Koller; G. T. Gray III; R. S. Hixson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments.

Ebinger, M.H.; Beckman, R.J.; Myers, O.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.; Bestgen, H.T. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Methodology and a preliminary data base for examining the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels  

SciTech Connect

An analytical model was developed to assess and examine the health effects associated with the production of electricity from uranium and coal fuels. The model is based on a systematic methodology that is both simple and easy to check, and provides details about the various components of health risk. A preliminary set of data that is needed to calculate the health risks was gathered, normalized to the model facilities, and presented in a concise manner. Additional data will become available as a result of other evaluations of both fuel cycles, and they should be included in the data base. An iterative approach involving only a few steps is recommended for validating the model. After each validation step, the model is improved in the areas where new information or increased interest justifies such upgrading. Sensitivity analysis is proposed as the best method of using the model to its full potential. Detailed quantification of the risks associated with the two fuel cycles is not presented in this report. The evaluation of risks from producing electricity by these two methods can be completed only after several steps that address difficult social and technical questions. Preliminary quantitative assessment showed that several factors not considered in detail in previous studies are potentially important. 255 refs., 21 figs., 179 tabs.

El-Bassioni, A.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Effects of Solid-to-Solution Ratio on Uranium(VI) Adsorption and Its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Solid-to-Solution Ratio on Uranium(VI) Adsorption and Its Implications T A O C H E N G, and Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1215 West Dayton Street, Madison interacting ligands. Introduction The migration of uranium(VI), as well as other radionuclides and metal

Roden, Eric E.

53

Identification of Health Risks in Workers Staying and Working on the Terrains Contaminated with Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......p 105185. 5. UNEP. (2001) Depleted Uranium in Kosovo. Post Conflict Environmental...pp 98115. 6. UNEP. (2002) Depleted Uranium in Serbia and Montenegro Post...Lundin, A. (2004) Incidence of cancer among Swedish military and civil......

Snezana Milacic; Jadranko Simic

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Air Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The quality of the air we breathe is still a major concern to human health. Notwithstanding the air pollution mitigation efforts that have been pursued since ... be attributed to the effects of urban outdoor air

Ana Isabel Miranda; Joana Valente…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Excess Uranium Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department is issuing a Request for Information on the effects of DOE transfers of excess uranium on domestic uranium mining, conversion, and enrichment industries.

56

Examination of the health status of populations from depleted-uranium-contaminated regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the NATO air strikes on the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) in 1999, depleted-uranium ammunition was used on 112 locations, mainly Kosovo, in the south of Serbia, and one location in Montenegro. Blood samples of residents from depleted-uranium-contaminated areas were gathered and blood cell and chromosomal aberrations were analyzed. During the last 3 years blood samples from 21 residents of Kosovo (Štrpce), from 29 residents from the south of Serbia (the Vranje and Bujanovac regions), and from 19 technical television workers from the site of Plja?kovica, in the vicinity of Vranje, were collected. Blood samples from 33 residents of central Serbia and 46 occupational workers exposed to X-rays were used as controls. All subjects studied were without any clinical symptoms of disease. The examinations included general clinical assessment; urine samples for ?-and ?-spectrometry analysis; complete blood counts; ratio-percentages of blood cells in stained (Giemsa) capillary smears, individual leukocyte line elements; morphological changes observed under a microscope; the presence of immature forms or blasts; and leukocyte enzyme activity [alkaline phosphatase leukocyte (APL)]. Chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in 200 peripheral blood lymphocytes in mitosis. An increased incidence of rogue cells and chromosomal aberrations was found in the blood of the residents of Vranje and Bujanovac, but this was below the incidence of chromosomal aberrations in individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing irradiation. Blast cells were not found. Blood counts were decreased in only a few samples, while morphological changes of both nuclei and cytoplasm were marked in individuals in south and central Serbia. Enzymatic activity (as measured by the APL score) was decreased in samples with chromosomal aberrations and cyto-morphological changes in subjects from the south of Serbia. The contamination level measured by this examination was low. Because of the presence of depleted uranium (uranium-238) in the soil and in plants, the prevention of consequences necessitates the identification of the initial biological effects on sensitive tissues. Early identification of serious blood cell changes is important for appropriate medical treatment.

Snežana Mila?i?; Dragana Petrovi?; Dubravka Jovi?i?; Radomir Kova?evi?; Jadranko Simi?

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and radiological health concerns involved with depleted uranium in the environment. This technical brief was developed to address the common misconception that depleted uranium represents only a radiological healthDepleted Uranium Technical Brief United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air

58

Effect of catechins and tannins on depleted uranium-induced DNA strand breaks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of polyphenols on plasmid DNA strand breaks by depleted uranium were studied using four catechins: (+)...2 2+) with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were strongly enhanced by EGC, EGCG, MMT, a...

Emiko Matsuda; Akira Nakajima

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Effects of hydroxyl radicals generated from the depleted uranium-hydrogen peroxide systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A complementary study of hydroxyl radical formation in the depleted uranium (DU)-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) system and the effect of biosubstances on the system were examined using the spin-trapping method. Hydroxy...

A. Nakajima; Y. Ueda

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Effect of Co-solutes on the Products and Solubility of Uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JG Catalano, and DE Giammar.2014."Effect of Co-solutes on the Products and Solubility of Uranium(VI) Precipitated with Phosphate."Chemical Geology 364:66-75. doi:10.1016...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

Health effects of smokeless tobacco  

SciTech Connect

Pharmacologic and physiologic effects of snuff and chewing tobacco include the gamut of cardiovascular, endocrinologic, neurologic, and psychological effects that are associated with nicotine. A review of studies appearing in the scientific literature involving various populations and approaches indicates that the use of snuff or chewing tobacco is associated with a variety of serious adverse effects and especially with oral cancer. The studies suggest that snuff and chewing tobacco also may affect reproduction, longevity, the cardiovascular system, and oral health. The Council on Scientific Affairs concludes there is evidence demonstrating that use of snuff or chewing tobacco is associated with adverse health effects such as oral cancer, urges the implementation of well-planned and long-term studies that will further define the risks of using snuff and chewing tobacco, and recommends that the restrictions applying to the advertising of cigarettes also be applied to the advertising of snuff and chewing tobacco.

Not Available

1986-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

63

The socioeconomic effects of uranium development in south Texas: a human ecological approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and organizational effects of such developments. Finally, through a combination of participant observation and inter- viewing of community leaders, an attempt will be made to determine the socioeconomic ramifications of uranium de- velopments on communities...THE SOCIOECONOMIC FFFECTS OF URANIUM DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH TEXAS: A HUMAN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH A Thesis by PAMELA CHRIS HOPKINS Submitted to tne Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

Hopkins, Pamela Chris

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effects of environmental change on wildlife health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effects of environmental change on wildlife health Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse 1 * Amanda...Living organisms will strive to maintain health by recognizing and resolving abnormal...additional pressure on immunocompetence and health maintenance, which may seriously impact...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization  

SciTech Connect

In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

66

Assessing the Renal Toxicity of Capstone Depleted Uranium Oxides and Other Uranium Compounds  

SciTech Connect

The primary target for uranium toxicity is the kidney. The most frequently used guideline for uranium kidney burdens is the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) value of 3 µg U/g kidney, a value that is based largely upon chronic studies in animals. In the present effort, we have developed a risk model equation to assess potential outcomes of acute uranium exposure. Twenty-seven previously published case studies in which workers were acutely exposed to soluble compounds of uranium (as a result of workplace accidents) were analyzed. Kidney burdens of uranium for these individuals were determined based on uranium in the urine, and correlated with health effects observed over a period of up to 38 years. Based upon the severity of health effects, each individual was assigned a score (- to +++) and then placed into an Effect Group. A discriminant analysis was used to build a model equation to predict the Effect Group based on the amount of uranium in the kidneys. The model equation was able to predict the Effect Group with 85% accuracy. The risk model was used to predict the Effect Group for Soldiers exposed to DU as a result of friendly fire incidents during the 1991 Gulf War. This model equation can also be used to predict the Effect Group of new cases in which acute exposures to uranium have occurred.

Roszell, Laurie E.; Hahn, Fletcher; Lee, Robyn B.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

67

A-Bomb Tests; Three Mile Island and Other Incidents; NPPs Under Normal Operation; Depleted Uranium Bombs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A few more examples will be given here on the health effects of radiation due to nuclear weapons...14 Bq per year. The health effects of depleted uranium munitions are also serious, and are likely due to radiatio...

Eiichiro Ochiai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Health effects of risk-assessment categories  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Effect of Gadolinium Doping on the Air Oxidation of Uranium Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigated the effects of gadolinia concentration on the air oxidization of gadolinia-doped uranium dioxide using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry to determine if such doping could improve uranium dioxide's stability as a nuclear fuel during potential accident scenarios in a nuclear reactor or during long-term disposal. We undertook this study to determine whether the resistance of the uranium dioxide to oxidation to the orthorhombic U3O8 with its attendant crystal expansion could be prevented by addition of gadolinia. Our studies found that gadolinium has little effect on the thermal initiation of the first step of the reported two-step air oxidation of UO2; however, increasing gadolinia content does stabilize the initial tetragonal or cubic product allowing significant oxidation before the second expansive step to U3O8 begins.

Scheele, Randall D.; Hanson, Brady D.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Snow, Lanee A.

2004-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ingestion of natural uranium in food and drink, and...for the measurement of uranium in urine samples, DU...respect to potential health hazards can be detected...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Höllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal administration of CBMIDA for removing uranium in rats after parenteral injections of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......after parenteral injections of depleted uranium S. Fukuda 1 * M. Ikeda 1 M...intramuscular (i.m.) injections of depleted uranium (DU) was examined and the...with uranium. INTRODUCTION Depleted uranium (DU) can affect human health......

S. Fukuda; M. Ikeda; M. Nakamura; X. Yan; Y. Xie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Health effects of air pollution: some historical notes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that was his first air pollution health effects committeeand direction of air pollution health effects research inof community air pollution, including health ef- fects, has

Whittenberger, J L

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Short-term hepatic effects of depleted uranium on xenobiotic and bile acid metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes in the rat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The toxicity of uranium has been demonstrated in different organs, including ... few works have investigated the biological effects of uranium contamination on important metabolic function in the ... in the rat l...

Y. Guéguen; M. Souidi; C. Baudelin; N. Dudoignon; S. Grison…

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal administration of CBMIDA for removing uranium in rats after parenteral injections of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......contaminated accidentally with uranium. INTRODUCTION Depleted uranium (DU) can affect human health via chemical and radiation...B. Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: a review from...perspective. Environ. Health (2005) 4:17-35......

S. Fukuda; M. Ikeda; M. Nakamura; X. Yan; Y. Xie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Depleted uranium contamination by inhalation exposure and its detection after ? 20 years: Implications for human health assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inhaled depleted uranium (DU) aerosols are recognised as a distinct human health hazard and DU has been suggested to be responsible in part for illness in both military and civilian populations that may have been exposed. This study aimed to develop and use a testing procedure capable of detecting an individual's historic milligram-quantity aerosol exposure to DU up to 20 years after the event. This method was applied to individuals associated with or living proximal to a DU munitions plant in Colonie New York that were likely to have had a significant DU aerosol inhalation exposure, in order to improve DU-exposure screening reliability and gain insight into the residence time of DU in humans. We show using sensitive mass spectrometric techniques that when exposure to aerosol has been unambiguous and in sufficient quantity, urinary excretion of DU can be detected more than 20 years after primary DU inhalation contamination ceased, even when DU constitutes only ? 1% of the total excreted uranium. It seems reasonable to conclude that a chronically DU-exposed population exists within the contamination ‘footprint’ of the munitions plant in Colonie, New York. The method allows even a modest DU exposure to be identified where other less sensitive methods would have failed entirely. This should allow better assessment of historical exposure incidence than currently exists.

Randall R. Parrish; Matthew Horstwood; John G. Arnason; Simon Chenery; Tim Brewer; Nicholas S. Lloyd; David O. Carpenter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effect of twinning on texture evolution of depleted uranium using a viscoplastic self-consistent model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Texture evolution of depleted uranium is investigated using a viscoplastic self-consistent model. Depleted uranium, which has the same structure as alpha-uranium, is difficult to model… (more)

Ho, John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Reproductive Effects in Rats after Chronic Oral Exposure to Low-dose Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......I (2009) Depleted uranium: properties, military...Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: a review...expression in female breast cancer among an Iraqi population exposed to depleted uranium. J Carcinog 7: 8......

Yuhui Hao; Rong Li; Yanbing Leng; Jiong Ren; Jing Liu; Guoping Ai; Hui Xu; Yongping Su; Tianmin Cheng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the Government of the United States and the Government of the Russian Federation has on the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Operation of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant 2008 Information Date: December 31, 2008 1 Introduction The Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation Concerning the Disposition of Highly Enriched Uranium Extracted from Nuclear Weapons (HEU Agreement) was signed on February 18, 1993. The HEU Agreement provides for the purchase over a 20-year period (1994-2013) of 500 metric tons (MT) of weapons-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) from the Russian Federation

79

Effects of Phosphate on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Phosphate on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand T A O C H E N G , M A R K O natural and contaminated environments. We studied U(VI) adsorption on goethite-coated sand (to mimic of increase in U(VI) adsorption. Phosphate was strongly bound by the goethite surface in the low pH range

Roden, Eric E.

80

Estimating the lung burden from exposure to aerosols of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Society. The Health Hazards of Depleted Uranium Munitions-Part...Carpenter D. O. Depleted uranium contamination...implications for health assessment...Sunder S. Depleted uranium dust from fired...properties. Health Phys (2004......

Marcelo Valdés

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......UK The impact of depleted uranium (DU) on human health has been the subject...977-985. 11 World Health Organization. Depleted uranium: sources, exposure...Royal Society. The health hazards of depleted uranium munitions-Part I......

R. J. Tanner; J. S. Eakins; J. T. M. Jansen; J. D. Harrison

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The reliability of dose coefficients for inhalation and ingestion of uranium by members of the public  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of bioassay data for depleted uranium. (2007) Health Protection Agency. Report...doses from inhalation of depleted uranium. Health Phys. (2008) 95...of bioassay data for depleted uranium. (2007) Health Protection Agency. Report......

M. Puncher; G. Burt

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Normalisation of spot urine samples to 24-h collection for assessment of exposure to uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......exposed to depleted uranium. Intern...Environ. Health (2006...concentrations of depleted uranium and radiation...shrapnel. Health Phys (2005...Haldimann M. Depleted uranium in Kosovo...workers. Health Phys (2002......

R. Marco; E. Katorza; R. Gonen; U. German; A. Tshuva; O. Pelled; O. Paz-Tal; A. Adout; Z. Karpas

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Reassessment of individual dosimetry of long-lived alpha radionuclides of uranium miners through experimental determination of urinary excretion of uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......iranium in urine of uranium miners as a tool for...230Th in excreta of uranium mill crushermen. Health Phys. (1983) 45...Measurement of daily urinary uranium excretion in German...potential intakes of depleted uranium(DU). Sci......

I. Malátová; V. Becková; L. Tomásek; M. Slezáková-Marusiaková; J. Hulka

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Bioaccumulation and biological effects in the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to natural and depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The accumulations of both natural (U) and depleted (DU) uranium in the earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were studied to evaluate corresponding biological effects. Concentrations of metals in the experimental soil ranged from 1.86 to 600 mg kg?1. Five biological endpoints: mortality, animals’ weight increasing, lysosomal membrane stability by measuring the neutral red retention time (the NRRT), histological changes and genetic effects (Comet assay) were used to evaluate biological effects in the earthworms after 7 and 28 days of exposure. No effects have been observed in terms of mortality or weight reduction. Cytotoxic and genetic effects were identified at quite low U concentrations. For some of these endpoints, in particular for genetic effects, the dose (U concentration)-effect relationships have been found to be non-linear. The results have also shown a statistically significant higher level of impact on the earthworms exposed to natural U compared to depleted U.

Anna Giovanetti; Sergey Fesenko; Maria L. Cozzella; Lisbet D. Asencio; Umberto Sansone

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions 2005...

87

Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel...

88

Leukemic transformation of hematopoietic cells in mice internally exposed to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal ... have been wounded by DU shrapnel. The health effects of embedded DU are unknown. Published...in vitro can transform immortalized human osteoblast cells (HOS) to th...

Alexandra C. Miller; Catherine Bonait-Pellie…

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Selected Studies. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,of Selected Stu&es. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,and Health Effects. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,

McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......higher fraction of depleted uranium (DU). These...in mandibular cancer patients following...Reprocessed uranium exposure and lung cancer risk. Health...and risks from uranium are not increased...The impact of depleted uranium (DU......

R. J. Tanner; J. S. Eakins; J. T. M. Jansen; J. D. Harrison

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND CURRENT;EPA. National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Arsenic and Clarification to Compliance and New National Occurrence and Exposure to Arsenic in Public Drinking Water Supplies (Revised Draft). Washington

92

New Findings Allay Concerns Over Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...least some of the uranium had been irradiated...not represent a health threat,” says Danesi...VISAR KRYEZIU/AP Depleted uranium is what's left...not represent a health threat, says...VISAR KRYEZIU/AP Depleted uranium is what's left...

Richard Stone

2002-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

93

Protective effects of ion-imprinted chitooligosaccharides as uranium-specific chelating agents against the cytotoxicity of depleted uranium in human kidney cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Occupational internal contamination with depleted uranium (DU) compounds can induce radiological and chemical toxicity, and an effective and specific uranium-chelating agent for clinical use is urgently needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a series of synthesized water-soluble metal-ion-imprinted chitooligosaccharides can be used as uranium-specific chelating agents, because the chitooligosaccharides have excellent heavy metal ion chelation property and the ion-imprinting technology can improve the selective recognition of template ions. DU-poisoned human renal proximal tubule epithelium cells (human kidney 2 cells, HK-2) were used to assess the detoxification of these chitooligosaccharides. The DU-chelating capacity and selectivity of the chitooligosaccharides were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Cell viability, cellular accumulation of DU, membrane damage, DNA damage, and morphological changes in the cellular ultrastructure were examined to assess the detoxification of these chitooligosaccharides. The results showed that the Cu2+-imprinted chitooligosaccharides, especially the Cu2+-imprinted glutaraldehyde-crosslinked carboxymethyl chitooligosaccharide (Cu-Glu-CMC), chelated DU effectively and specifically, and significantly reduced the loss of cell viability induced by DU and reduced cellular accumulation of DU in a dose-dependent manner, owing to their chelation of DU outside cells and their prevention of DU internalization. The ultrastructure observation clearly showed that Cu-Glu-CMC-chelated-DU precipitates, mostly outside cells, were grouped in significantly larger clusters, and they barely entered the cells by endocytosis or in any other way. Treatment with Cu-Glu-CMC also increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and reduced membrane damage and DNA damage induced by DU oxidant injury. Cu-Glu-CMC was more effective than the positive control drug, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), in protection of HK-2 cells against DU cytotoxicity, as a result of its chelation of UO22+ to prevent the DU internalization and its antioxidant activity.

Xiao-fei Zhang; Chun-lei Ding; He Liu; Li-hong Liu; Chang-qi Zhao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A study Assessing the Genotoxicity in Rats after Chronic Oral Exposure to a Low Dose of Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......A. (2001) Depleted uranium and public health. BMJ. 322...phenotype by depleted uranium-uranyl chloride. Environ. Health Perspect 106...radiological risk from depleted uranium in war scenarious. Health Phys. 82: 1420......

Yuhui Hao; Rong Li; Yanbing Leng; Jiong Ren; Jing Liu; Guoping Ai; Hui Xu; Yongping Su; Tianmin Cheng

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

recycled_uranium.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Their Relationship to Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Introduction Historical Perspective On August 8, 1999, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson announced a comprehensive set of actions to address issues raised at the Paducah, Kentucky, Gaseous Diffusion Plant that may have had the potential to affect the health of the workers. One of the issues addressed the need to determine the extent and significance of radioactive fission products and transuranic elements in the uranium feed and waste products throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national complex. Subsequently, a DOE agency-wide Recycled Uranium Mass Balance Project (RUMBP) was initiated. For the Weldon Spring Uranium Feed Materials Plant (WSUFMP or later referred to as Weldon Spring),

96

29 Towards Equity Effectiveness in Health Interventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Côte d'Ivoire, environmental sanitation in Vietnam, and health and demographic surveillance of mobile; equity effectiveness; HIV/AIDS; environmental sanitation; drinking water; mobile pastoralists; Côte d in rich and poor countries. Where resources are lim- ited, priority in public budgetary allocation tends

Richner, Heinz

97

A Bayesian analysis of uncertainties on lung doses resulting from occupational exposures to uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......dose coefficients of uranium compounds handled during...fabrication in France. Health Phys. (2002) 82...bioassays measurements: uranium dose assessment: a...doses from inhalation of depleted uranium. Health Phys. (2008) 95......

M. Puncher; A. Birchall; R. K. Bull

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Measuring aerosols generated inside armoured vehicles perforated by depleted uranium ammunition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......War about the health significance of exposure to depleted uranium (DU), the...perforated by depleted uranium ammunition...War about the health significance of exposure to depleted uranium (DU), the......

M. A. Parkhurst

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Abstract B41: Depleted uranium-induced oxidative stress in human bronchial epithelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Science of Cancer Health Disparities- Feb...AZ Abstract B41: Depleted uranium-induced oxidative...Science of Cancer Health Disparities- Feb...high deposits of uranium or tailings. There...occupational exposures to depleted uranium via military...

Monica Yellowhair; Leigh A. Henricksen; Aneesha Hossain; Kathleen Dixon; and R. Clark Lantz

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Assessment of occupational exposure to uranium by indirect methods needs information on natural background variations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......contamination is due to natural, depleted or enriched uranium. The exposure to natural...Gastrointestinal absorption of uranium in humans. Health Phys. (2002) 83...indicators for ingestion of uranium in drinking water. Health Phys. (2005) 88......

M. Muikku; T. Heikkinen; M. Puhakainen; T. Rahola; L. Salonen

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) AREVA NC, Inc. (was COGEMA, Inc.) American Fuel Resources, LLC American Fuel Resources, LLC BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. CAMECO BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ConverDyn CAMECO CAMECO Denison Mines Corp. ConverDyn ConverDyn Energy Resources of Australia Ltd. Denison Mines Corp. Energy Fuels Resources Energy USA, Inc. Effective Energy N.V. Energy Resources of Australia Ltd.

102

Effect of short-term material balances on the projected uranium measurement uncertainties for the gas centrifuge enrichment plant  

SciTech Connect

A program is under way to design an effective International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards system that could be applied to the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP). This system would integrate nuclear material accountability with containment and surveillance. Uncertainties in material balances due to errors in the measurements of the declared uranium streams have been projected on a yearly basis for GCEP under such a system in a previous study. Because of the large uranium flows, the projected balance uncertainties were, in some cases, greater than the IAEA goal quantity of 75 kg of U-235 contained in low-enriched uranium. Therefore, it was decided to investigate the benefits of material balance periods of less than a year in order to improve the sensitivity and timeliness of the nuclear material accountability system. An analysis has been made of projected uranium measurement uncertainties for various short-term material balance periods. To simplify this analysis, only a material balance around the process area is considered and only the major UF/sub 6/ stream measurements are included. That is, storage areas are not considered and uranium waste streams are ignored. It is also assumed that variations in the cascade inventory are negligible compared to other terms in the balance so that the results obtained in this study are independent of the absolute cascade inventory. This study is intended to provide information that will serve as the basis for the future design of a dynamic materials accounting component of the IAEA safeguards system for GCEP.

Younkin, J.M.; Rushton, J.E.

1980-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorptiondesorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size...

104

Effect of twinning on texture evolution of depleted uranium using a viscoplastic self-consistent model  

SciTech Connect

Ductility and fracture toughness is a major stumbling block in using depleted uranium as a structural material. The ability to correctly model deformation of uranium can be used to create process path methods to improve its structural design ability. The textural evolution of depleted uranium was simulated using a visco-plastic self consistent model and analyzed by comparing pole figures of the simulations and experimental samples. Depleted uranium has the same structure as alpha uranium, which is an orthorhombic phase of uranium. Both deformation slip and twin systems were compared. The VPSC model was chosen to simulate this material because the model encompasses both low-symmetry materials as well as twinning in materials. This is of particular interest since depleted uranium has a high propensity for twinning, which dominates deformation and texture evolution. Simulated results were compared to experimental results to measure the validity of the model. One specific twin system, the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin, was of specific notice. The VPSC model was used to simulate the influence of this twin on depleted uranium and was compared with a mechanically shocked depleted uranium sample. Under high strain rate shock deformation conditions, the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin system appears to be a dominant deformation system. By simulating a compression process using the VPSC model with the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin as the dominant deformation mode, a favorable comparison could be made between the experimental and simulated textures. (authors)

Ho, J.; Garmestani, H. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Burrell, R.; Belvin, A. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Li, D. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); McDowell, D. [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Rollett, A. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke Elsa Nielsen, Marianne Dybdahl HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PARTICLES FROM WOOD SMOKE 7 HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS 8 Human non-cancer health effects from exposure to particles from wood smoke 8 Human carcinogenic effects from exposure to particles from

106

Radon: An Overview of Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radon is one of the most comprehensively studied human carcinogens. It is a naturally occurring noble gas, and due to current construction methods, radon concentrations often become enhanced indoors. Radon is the largest single contributor to the natural radiation exposure to the general public. Two of its radioactive decay products, polonium-218 and polonium-214, impart the majority of radiation dose to the lungs, rather than the radon gas itself. In fact, protracted exposure to radon and its decay products is one of the greatest environmental health threats. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in North America and the leading cause of lung cancer for individuals who have never smoked. Overall, radon is also the leading environmental cause of cancer mortality in North America. In vitro studies, controlled studies of radon-exposed animals, a variety of radiobiological analyses, 15 retrospective cohort studies of radon-exposed underground miners, and analyses of 22 pooled residential epidemiologic studies from North America, China, and Europe convincingly demonstrate that radon is a human lung carcinogen even at concentrations commonly encountered in the residential setting. Because of the significant health risks related to residential radon exposure, the World Health Organization (WHO) instituted an international initiative in 2005, the International Radon Project, to reduce indoor radon risks. This article and the following articles on radon provide a general overview of its characteristics, sources, occurrence, and health effects, as well as guidance on both radon measurement and mitigation.

R.W. Field

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurred during the nuclear accident, and probably noHEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT MILE ISLAND JacobENG-48 HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT A T THREE MILE

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

HEALTH CARE REFORM AND ITS EFFECT ON STUDENT HEALTH PLANS INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOPIC: HEALTH CARE REFORM AND ITS EFFECT ON STUDENT HEALTH PLANS INTRODUCTION: The Patient the initial impact of the Act on college and university- sponsored employee health care plans [1]. This Note-sponsored student health plans ("SHPs"). After the Affordable Care Act was enacted, many within the higher education

Martinez, Tony R.

109

Health Hazards Evaluation Report No. HETA-81-055-954, Cotter Corporation, Canon City, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

In October 1980, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was asked by the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union and its Local 2-844 to evaluate the health effects of exposure to uranium ore dust and to yellowcake at The Cotter Uranium Mill, Canon City, Colorado.

Thun, M.J.; Baker, D.B.; Smith, A.B.; Halperin, W.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Content of uranium in urine of uranium miners as a tool for estimation of intakes of long-lived alpha radionuclides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......238U and 230Th in excreta of uranium mill crushermen. Health Phys. (1983) 45(3...Measurement of daily urinary uranium excretion in German peacekeeping...assess potential intakes of depleted uranium(DU). Sci. Total Environ......

I. Malátová; V. Becková; L. Tomásek; J. Hulka

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION DEVICES: EFFECTIVENESS IN IMPROVING SAFEGUARDS AT GAS-CENTRIFUGE URANIUM-ENRICHMENT PLANTS.  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs) have engendered a growing interest among international safeguards experts. Potentially, RFIDs could reduce inspection work, viz. the number of inspections, number of samples, and duration of the visits, and thus improve the efficiency and effectiveness of international safeguards. This study systematically examined the applications of RFIDs for IAEA safeguards at large gas-centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). These analyses are expected to help identify the requirements and desirable properties for RFIDs, to provide insights into which vulnerabilities matter most, and help formulate the required assurance tests. This work, specifically assesses the application of RFIDs for the ''Option 4'' safeguards approach, proposed by Bruce Moran, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for large gas-centrifuge uranium-enrichment plants. The features of ''Option 4'' safeguards include placing RFIDs on all feed, product and tails (F/P/T) cylinders, along with WID readers in all FP/T stations and accountability scales. Other features of Moran's ''Option 4'' are Mailbox declarations, monitoring of load-cell-based weighing systems at the F/P/T stations and accountability scales, and continuous enrichment monitors. Relevant diversion paths were explored to evaluate how RFIDs improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards. Additionally, the analysis addresses the use of RFIDs in conjunction with video monitoring and neutron detectors in a perimeter-monitoring approach to show that RFIDs can help to detect unidentified cylinders.

JOE,J.

2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Jean Carletta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Care Teams Jean Carletta Human Communication.Carletta@edinburgh.ac.uk ABSTRACT Primary health care team members need to communicate effectively with each other in order of cross-disciplinary team meetings, we describe communication in primary health care teams, explore

Carletta, Jean

114

Thermal Properties of Uranium-Molybdenum Alloys: Phase Decomposition Effects of Heat Treatments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to generate computational estimates of the alloys specific heat and thermal conductivity. Section 2 describes the technical background in which this thesis is based, including uranium metal alloy theory and properties. Section 3 describes the experimental... the phases and distorted phases that occur during phase decomposition. The authors conducted numerous experiments involving uranium, plutonium, and neptunium, as well as alloys with other metals. In the a0 = 3.4808 ! 0.00314 xMo !" Mox ? 10 case...

Creasy, John Thomas

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute health effects Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; effects of context on health and health-related behavior; disparities in children's health care access... College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing health effects Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; effects of context on health and health-related behavior; disparities in children's health care access... , personal and social costs of cancer, dynamics of health insurance...

117

Toxicity of ionic liquids to Clostridium sp. and effects on uranium biosorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Hazardous Materials 264 (2014) 246- 253 of Hazardous Materials 264 (2014) 246- 253 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal of Hazardous Materials j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / j h a z m a t Toxicity of ionic liquids to Clostridium sp. and effects on uranium biosorption C. Zhang a,b,∗ , S.V. Malhotra b,1 , A.J. Francis c,d a College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin, China 300071 b Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07104 USA c Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 USA d Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 South Korea h i g h l i g h t s * Three ILs showed varying degrees of toxicity to Clostridium sp.

118

Inhibition Effect of Secondary Phosphate Mineral Precipitation on Uranium Release from Contaminated Sediments  

SciTech Connect

The inhibitory effect of phosphate mineral precipitation on uranium release was evaluated using a U(VI)-contaminated sediment collected from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The sediment contained U(VI) that was associated with diffusion-limited intragrain regions within its mm-size granitic lithic fragments. The sediment was first treated to promote phosphate mineral precipitation in batch suspensions spiked with 1 and 50 mM aqueous phosphate, and calcium in a stoichiometric ratio of mineral hydroxyapatite. The phosphate-treated sediment was then leached to solubilize contaminant U(VI) in a column system using a synthetic groundwater that contained chemical components representative of Hanford groundwater. Phosphate treatment significantly decreased the extent of U(VI) release from the sediment. Within the experimental duration of about 200 pore volumes, the effluent U(VI) concentrations were consistently lower by over one and two orders of magnitude after the sediment was treated with 1 and 50 mM of phosphate, respectively. Measurements of solid phase U(VI) using various spectroscopes and chemical extraction of the sediment collectively indicated that the inhibition of U(VI) release from the sediment was caused by: 1) U(VI) adsorption to the secondary phosphate precipitates and 2) the transformation of initially present U(VI) mineral phases to less soluble forms.

Shi, Zhenqing; Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Deng, Baolin

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Sizing particles of natural uranium and nuclear fuels using poly-allyl-diglycol carbonate autoradiography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......University Health Center, Montreal...Biology and Health Physics Branch...enriched, depleted and natural uranium and also aged...fiberglass filter. Health Phys (2000...of natural uranium and nuclear...enriched, depleted and natural......

G. Hegyi; R. B. Richardson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An assessment of the radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East district, Jharkhand, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East...The Health Hazards of Depleted Uranium Munitions (2001) The...in soil and lifetime cancer risk due to gamma radioactivity...radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East......

R. M. Tripathi; S. K. Sahoo; S. Mohapatra; A. C. Patra; P. Lenka; J. S. Dubey; V. N. Jha; V. D. Puranik

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Bayesian analysis of uncertainties on lung doses resulting from occupational exposures to uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......lung dose and lung cancer incidence resulting...occupational exposures to uranium. These calculations...from inhalation of uranium ignore significant...estimates of lung cancer are based on PEs...from inhalation of depleted uranium. Health Phys......

M. Puncher; A. Birchall; R. K. Bull

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Radon levels and doses in dwellings in two villages in Kosovo, affected by depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Kosovo, affected by depleted uranium G. Nafezi 1 A. Gregoric...the study was hit by depleted uranium projectiles during...M. , Haldimann M. Depleted uranium in Kosovo: an assessment...exposure for aid workers. Health Phys. (2002) 82......

G. Nafezi; A. Gregoric; J. Vaupotic; M. Bahtijari; M. Kuqali

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Uranium extremophily is an adaptive, rather than intrinsic, feature for extremely thermoacidophilic Metallosphaera species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2005 ) Oxidation states of uranium in depleted uranium particles from Kuwait . J Environ...HDTR-09-0300 and National Institutes of Health Grant R01 GM090209-01. The...Supporting Information (PDF) Uranium extremophily is an adaptive...

Arpan Mukherjee; Garrett H. Wheaton; Paul H. Blum; Robert M. Kelly

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

An assessment of the radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East district, Jharkhand, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East district...radiological scenario around uranium-mining sites in the Singhbhum...3 The Royal Society. The Health Hazards of Depleted Uranium Munitions (2001) The Royal......

R. M. Tripathi; S. K. Sahoo; S. Mohapatra; A. C. Patra; P. Lenka; J. S. Dubey; V. N. Jha; V. D. Puranik

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Abstract B41: Depleted uranium-induced oxidative stress in human bronchial epithelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Association for Cancer Research 1 February...The Science of Cancer Health Disparities...Abstract B41: Depleted uranium-induced oxidative...Carefree, AZ Cancer and mortality...deposits of uranium or tailings...exposures to depleted uranium via...

Monica Yellowhair; Leigh A. Henricksen; Aneesha Hossain; Kathleen Dixon; and R. Clark Lantz

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Holgate S. 2002. Air pollution and health. Lancet Brunekreef2006. Bayesian modeling of air pollution health effects withExposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Depleted uranium residual radiological risk assessment for Kosovo sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the recent conflict in Yugoslavia, depleted uranium rounds were employed and were left in the battlefield. Health concern is related to the risk arising from contamination of areas in Kosovo with depleted uranium penetrators and dust. Although chemical toxicity is the most significant health risk related to uranium, radiation exposure has been allegedly related to cancers among veterans of the Balkan conflict. Uranium munitions are considered to be a source of radiological contamination of the environment. Based on measurements and estimates from the recent Balkan Task Force UNEP mission in Kosovo, we have estimated effective doses to resident populations using a well-established food-web mathematical model (RESRAD code). The UNEP mission did not find any evidence of widespread contamination in Kosovo. Rather than the actual measurements, we elected to use a desk assessment scenario (Reference Case) proposed by the UNEP group as the source term for computer simulations. Specific applications to two Kosovo sites (Planeja village and Vranovac hill) are described. Results of the simulations suggest that radiation doses from water-independent pathways are negligible (annual doses below 30 ?Sv). A small radiological risk is expected from contamination of the groundwater in conditions of effective leaching and low distribution coefficient of uranium metal. Under the assumptions of the Reference Case, significant radiological doses (>1 mSv/year) might be achieved after many years from the conflict through water-dependent pathways. Even in this worst-case scenario, DU radiological risk would be far overshadowed by its chemical toxicity.

Marco Durante; Mariagabriella Pugliese

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Economic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax Increase in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Services May 26, 2006 Economic and Health Effects ofS.A. Glantz. Health and economic effects of two proposals toEconomic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax

California Department of Health Services, Tobacco Control Section

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Depleted uranium - induced malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...transmission of genetic damage by depleted uranium and tungsten alloy Alexandra Miller...The radioactive heavy metal, depleted uranium (DU), an alpha-particle emitter...fragments will affect the long-term health of offspring conceived by these...

Aldona A. Karaczyn; Hong Xie; and John P. Wise

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

8 - Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of uranium (U) to the environment is mainly through the nuclear fuel cycle. In oxic waters, U(VI) is the predominant redox state, while U(IV) is likely to be encountered in anoxic waters. The free uranyl ion ( UO 2 2 + ) dominates dissolved U speciation at low pH while complexes with hydroxides and carbonates prevail in neutral and alkaline conditions. Whether the toxicity of U(VI) to fish can be predicted based on its free ion concentration remains to be demonstrated but a strong influence of pH has been shown. In the field, U accumulates in bone, liver, and kidney, but does not biomagnify. There is certainly potential for uptake of U via the gill based on laboratory studies; however, diet and/or sediment may be the major route of uptake, and may vary with feeding strategy. Uranium toxicity is low relative to many other metals, and is further reduced by increased calcium, magnesium, carbonates, phosphate, and dissolved organic matter in the water. Inside fish, U produces reactive oxygen species and causes oxidative damage at the cellular level. The radiotoxicity of enriched U has been compared with chemical toxicity and it has been postulated that both may work through a mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species. In practical terms, the potential for chemotoxicity of U outweighs the potential for radiotoxicity. The toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of U are well understood in mammals, where bone is a stable repository and the kidney the target organ for toxic effects from high exposure concentrations. Much less is known about fish, but overall, U is one of the less toxic metals.

Richard R. Goulet; Claude Fortin; Douglas J. Spry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Comparative Effectiveness and Health Care Spending — Implications for Reform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...correlation at the aggregate level between health spending and outcomes does not disprove the existence of a positive association within a hospital or other health care delivery organization. Moreover, a negative association does not imply that more spending is harmful. That said, there are undoubtedly... In this Sounding Board article, the authors argue that health care costs can be reduced without a negative effect on quality by reducing spending on interventions that are not cost-effective.

Weinstein M.C.; Skinner J.A.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

133

Determination of uranium concentration in surface soil samples of Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of uranium-tipped antitank shells during the Iraq war (2003) caused serious concerns in Iran and the international media over possible contamination of the Iranian environment and consequent long-term health effects. After a shell explosion, uranium is discharged by fire into the air in the form of oxidised particles, which can be dispersed over a radius of several kilometres. Gamma ray spectrometry was used to determine uranium concentrations in soil samples collected from ten sites in Iranian sectors near the Iraqi border. All surface soil samples were taken from the top 5 cm from each site. The concentrations of 238U were assessed from 63 keV and 92 keV emissions of its first daughter nuclide, 234Th. To assess the isotopic ratio of 238U/235U, a secular equilibrium was ensured and the concentration of 235U under 186 keV was deduced. The 226Ra was determined through 295 keV and 352 keV gamma rays of 214Pb. The concentrations of 238U and activity ratios of 238U/235U were determined. The average of measurement activity ratio was 20.0, very close to the value of 21.5 for natural uranium, while the activity ratio of depleted uranium can be as high as 76.9. The analysis of ten surface soil samples from Iranian sites near the Iraqi border showed that uranium isotopes are in natural abundances.

A.A. Fathivand; J. Amidi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

D0 Decomissioning : Storage of Depleted Uranium Modules Inside D0 Calorimeters after the Termination of D0 Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Dzero liquid Argon calorimeters contain hadronic modules made of depleted uranium plates. After the termination of DO detector's operation, liquid Argon will be transferred back to Argon storage Dewar, and all three calorimeters will be warmed up. At this point, there is no intention to disassemble the calorimeters. The depleted uranium modules will stay inside the cryostats. Depleted uranium is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. It is slightly radioactive, emits alpha, beta and gamma radiation. External radiation hazards are minimal. Alpha radiation has no external exposure hazards, as dead layers of skin stop it; beta radiation might have effects only when there is a direct contact with skin; and gamma rays are negligible - levels are extremely low. Depleted uranium is a pyrophoric material. Small particles (such as shavings, powder etc.) may ignite with presence of Oxygen (air). Also, in presence of air and moisture it can oxidize. Depleted uranium can absorb moisture and keep oxidizing later, even after air and moisture are excluded. Uranium oxide can powder and flake off. This powder is also pyrographic. Uranium oxide may create health problems if inhaled. Since uranium oxide is water soluble, it may enter the bloodstream and cause toxic effects.

Sarychev, Michael; /Fermilab

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Introduction. The health of Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Society addressing the health risks of depleted uranium. However, what has...on Gulf Veterans' health, and those who have...smoke pollution, depleted uranium and the like can be damaging to health. And there is no...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenland," in Uranium Exploration Geology, Int. AtomicOklahoma," 1977 Nure Geology Uranium Symposium, Igneous HostMcNeil, M. , 1977. "Geology of Brazil's Uranium and Thorium

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Assessment of age-dependent uranium intake due to drinking water in Hyderabad, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......60 microg d1. The mean daily uranium intake through tap water, which...Dr A. K. Ghosh, Director, Health, Safety and Environment Group...colleagues. REFERENCES 1 US DOE. Depleted Uranium. Human Health Fact Sheet (2001) ANL. 2 Essien......

A. Y. Balbudhe; S. K. Srivastava; K. Vishwaprasad; G. K. Srivastava; R. M. Tripathi; V. D. Puranik

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Uranium isotopic ratio determination in urine using flow-injection ICP-MS: a tool for emergency monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Biological monitoring of uranium exposure in south central...determination of low uranium isotopes ratios in small...Carpenter D. O. Depleted uranium contamination by inhalation...implication for human health assessment. Sci. Total......

Maria Luiza D. P. Godoy; Ligia M. Q. C. Julião; José Marcus Godoy

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Long-term accumulation of uranium in bones of Wistar rats as a function of intake dosages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......consequence of the military use of depleted uranium (DU) weapons by NATO and other...221 , 97-104 (1997). 2. Depleted uranium: sources, exposures and health...information/radiation/depleted_uranium.htm (2001). 3. The Royal......

J. D. T. Arruda-Neto; M. V. Manso Guevara; G. P. Nogueira; M. Saiki; A. C. Cestari; K. Shtejer; A. Deppman; J. W. Pereira Filho; F. Garcia; L. P. Geraldo; A. N. Gouveia; F. Guzmán; J. Mesa; O. Rodriguez; R. Semmler; V. R. Vanin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

Boyer, Edmond

143

Measuring Aerosols Generated Inside Armoured Vehicles Perforated by Depleted Uranium Ammunition  

SciTech Connect

In response to questions raised after the Gulf War about the health significance of exposure to depleted uranium (DU), a study was initiated to provide an improved scientific basis for assessment of possible health effects of soldiers in vehicles struck by these munitions. As part of this experimental study, a series of DU penetrators were fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle, and the aerosols generated by vehicle perforation were collected and characterized. The aerosol sampling system designed for these tests consisted of filter cassettes, cascade impactors, a five-stage cyclone, and a moving filter. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. The aerosol samples were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and in vitro solubility. These data will provide input for use in future prospective and retrospective dose and health risk assessments of DU aerosols.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Uranium Mining and Enrichment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in the earth's surface. Uranium is used as a fuel for nuclear reactors. Uranium-bearing ores are mined, and the uranium is processed to make reactor fuel. In nature, uranium atoms exist in several forms called isotopes - primarily uranium-238, or U-238, and uranium-235, or U-235. In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.3%) would consist of atoms of U-238, and a very small portion of the total mass (0.7%) would consist of atoms of U-235. Uranium Isotopes Isotopes of Uranium Using uranium as a fuel in the types of nuclear reactors common in the United States requires that the uranium be enriched so that the percentage of U-235 is increased, typically to 3 to 5%.

145

Corrosion-resistant uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

Hovis, Jr., Victor M. (Kingston, TN); Pullen, William C. (Knoxville, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, Richard T. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Corrosion-resistant uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

1981-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

147

Health effects of synfuels technology: a review  

SciTech Connect

This document contains annotated synopses of available information pertinent to health impacts of synthetic fuel technologies under development, and identifies needs for further information. The report focuses on carcinogenesis, which appears to be a special problem with coal conversion technologies. This review is intended to serve as a reference for the NEPA Affairs Division of DOE in its evaluation of the overall synthetic fuel program and specific projects in the program. Updated versions of this document are expected to be prepared annually or semiannually as new information becomes available.

Sanathanan, L.P.; Reilly, C.A.; Marshall, S.A.; Wilzbach, K.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Evaluation of the effect of implanted depleted uranium on male reproductive success, sperm concentration, and sperm velocity  

SciTech Connect

Depleted uranium (DU) projectiles have been used in battle in Iraq and the Balkans and will continue to be a significant armor-penetrating munition for the US military. As demonstrated in the Persian Gulf War, battle injury from DU projectiles and shrapnel is a possibility, and removal of embedded DU fragments from the body is not always practical because of their location in the body or their small size. Previous studies in rodents have demonstrated that implanted DU mobilizes and translocates to the gonads, and natural uranium may be toxic to spermatazoa and the male reproductive tract. In this study, the effects of implanted DU pellets on sperm concentration, motility, and male reproductive success were evaluated in adult (P1) Sprague-Dawley rats implanted with 0, 12, or 20, DU pellets of 1x2 mm or 12 or 20 tantalum (Ta) steel pellets of 1x2 mm. Twenty DU pellets of 1x2 mm (760 mg) implanted in a 500-g rat are equal to approximately 0.2 pound of DU in a 154-lb (70-kg) person. Urinary analysis found that male rats implanted with DU were excreting uranium at postimplantation days 27 and 117 with the amount dependent on dose. No deaths or evidence of toxicity occurred in P1 males over the 150-day postimplantation study period. When assessed at postimplantation day 150, the concentration, motion, and velocity of sperm isolated from DU-implanted animals were not significantly different from those of sham surgery controls. Velocity and motion of sperm isolated from rats treated with the positive control compound {alpha}-chlorohydrin were significantly reduced compared with sham surgery controls. There was no evidence of a detrimental effect of DU implantation on mating success at 30-45 days and 120-145 days postimplantation. The results of this study suggest that implantation of up to 20 DU pellets of 1x2 mm in rats for approximately 21% of their adult lifespan does not have an adverse impact on male reproductive success, sperm concentration, or sperm velocity.

Arfsten, Darryl P. [Naval Health Research Center Detachment, Environmental Health Effects Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States)]. E-mail: darryl.arfsten@wpafb.af.mil; Schaeffer, David J. [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Johnson, Eric W. [Naval Health Research Center Detachment, Environmental Health Effects Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Robert Cunningham, J. [Naval Health Research Center Detachment, Environmental Health Effects Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Still, Kenneth R. [Naval Health Research Center Detachment, Environmental Health Effects Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Wilfong, Erin R. [Naval Health Research Center Detachment, Environmental Health Effects Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the radiological burden due to the battle-field use of circa 400 tons of depleted-uranium munitions in Iraq (and of about 40 tons in Yugoslavia) is comparable to that arising from the hypothetical battle-field use of more than 600 kt (respectively 60 kt) of high-explosive equivalent pure-fusion fourth-generation nuclear weapons. Despite the limited knowledge openly available on existing and future nuclear weapons, there is sufficient published information on their physical principles and radiological effects to make such a comparison. In fact, it is shown that this comparison can be made with very simple and convincing arguments so that the main technical conclusions of the paper are undisputable -- although it would be worthwhile to supplement the hand calculations presented in the paper by more detailed computer simulations in order to consolidate the conclusions and refute any possible objections.

Gsponer, A; Vitale, B; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Vitale, Bruno

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Microbiological and Geochemical Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field...and microbiology of a uranium-contaminated subsurface...oxides were highly depleted, groundwater sulfate...populations to in situ uranium bioremediation. Uranium...serious threat to human health and the natural environment...

Helen A. Vrionis; Robert T. Anderson; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; Kathleen R. O'Neill; Charles T. Resch; Aaron D. Peacock; Richard Dayvault; David C. White; Philip E. Long; Derek R. Lovley

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Uranium dose assessment: a Bayesian approach to the problem of dietary background  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......03-1.05 19.8-22.2 Depleted uranium 0.15-0.37 10-19...material is assumed to be depleted uranium, with an assumed isotopic...uranium lung clearance at a uranium processing plant. Health Phys (1995) 68:661-669......

Tom Little; Guthrie Miller; Raymond Guilmette; Luiz Bertelli

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality M. Valari(1), L (food, water etc.) -Population exposure: [c] x dt -Health data & air pollution health effects Health risk assessment #12;Pollutants concentrations [c] Population exposure [c] x dt Air pollution health

Menut, Laurent

154

An alternative for cost-effective remediation of depleted uranium (DU) at certain environmental restoration sites  

SciTech Connect

Numerous sites in the United States and around the world are contaminated with depleted uranium (DU) in various forms. A prevalent form is fragmented DU originating from various scientific tests involving high explosives and DU during weapon development programs, at firing practice ranges, or war theaters where DU was used in armor-piercing projectiles. The contamination at these sites is typically very heterogeneous, with discreet, visually identifiable DU fragments mixed with native soil. That is, the bulk-averaged DU activity is quite low, while specific DU fragments, which are distinct from the soil matrix, have much higher specific activity. DU is best known as a dark, black metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead, but DU in the environment readily weathers to a distinctive bright yellow color that is readily visible. While the specific activity of DU is relatively low and presents only a minor radiological hazard, the fact that it is radioactive and visually identifiable makes it desirable to remove the DU contamination from the environment.

Miller, M.; Galloway, B.; VanDerpoel, G.; Johnson, E.; Copland, J.; Salazar, M.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Depleted uranium hexafluoride – technogenic raw material for obtaining high-purity inorganic fluorides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of handling depleted uranium hexafluoride is discussed. An effective and ecologically safe variant of complex recycling of depleted uranium hexafluoride with uranium oxides, organic compounds, and hig...

E. P. Magomedbekov; S. V. Chizhevskaya; O. M. Klimenko; A. V. Davydov…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The End of Cheap Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a worldwide nuclear energy phase-out is in order. If such a slow global phase-out is not voluntarily effected, the end of the present cheap uranium supply situation will be unavoidable. The result will be that some countries will simply be unable to afford sufficient uranium fuel at that point, which implies involuntary and perhaps chaotic nuclear phase-outs in those countries involving brownouts, blackouts, and worse.

Michael Dittmar

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

157

Effects of depleted uranium on the reproductive success and F1 generation survival of zebrafish (Danio rerio)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Despite the well-characterized occurrence of uranium (U) in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the chronic exposure of fish to low levels of U and its potential effect on reproduction. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of environmental concentrations of depleted U on the reproductive output of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and on survival and development of the F1 embryo-larvae following parental exposure to U. For that purpose, sexually mature male and female zebrafish were exposed to 20 and 250 ?g/L of U for 14 days and allowed to reproduce in clean water during a further 14-day period. At all sampling times, whole-body vitellogenin concentrations and gonad histology were analyzed to investigate the effects of U exposure on these reproductive endpoints. In addition, accumulation of U in the gonads and its genotoxic effect on male and female gonad cells were quantified. The results showed that U strongly affected the capability of fish to reproduce and to generate viable individuals as evidenced by the inhibition of egg production and the increased rate of mortality of the F1 embryos. Interestingly, U exposure resulted in decreased circulating concentrations of vitellogenin in females. Increased concentrations of U were observed in gonads and eggs, which were most likely responsible for the genotoxic effects seen in fish gonads and in embryos exposed maternally to U. Altogether, these findings highlight the negative effect of environmentally relevant concentrations of U which alter the reproductive capability of fish and impair the genetic integrity of F1 embryos raising further concern regarding its effect at the population level.

Stéphanie Bourrachot; François Brion; Sandrine Pereira; Magali Floriani; Virginie Camilleri; Isabelle Cavalié; Olivier Palluel; Christelle Adam-Guillermin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse health effects Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adverse health effects Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Regulation of Animal Health Products FDACVM:...

159

Radioactivity and X-rays Applications and health effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the release of radioactivity from reactor accidents and fallout from nuclear explosions in the atmosphereRadioactivity and X-rays Applications and health effects by Thormod Henriksen #12;Preface ­ 7 Chapter 2. What is radioactivity page 8 ­ 27 Chapter 3. Radioactive decay laws page 28 ­ 35

Sahay, Sundeep

160

Simulation of the effects of geochemical reactions on groundwater quality during planned flooding of the Königstein uranium mine, Saxony, Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Uranium mining in southeastern Germany resulted in significant environmental risks. Closure of the mines and subsequent rises of water levels may result in heavy-metal and radionuclide-bearing mine waters pen...

Daniel Biehler; W. Eberhard Falck

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effects of Depleted Uranium on Soil Microbial Activity: A Bioassay Approach Using 14C-labeled Glucose  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The short and long term influence of depleted uranium (DU) on soil microbial populations remains...14C-labeled glucose. Two soils of contrasting texture (Eurtic cambisol and Haplic podzol) were amended with incre...

Rizwan Ahmad; David L. Jones

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Estimation of distribution coefficient of natural radionuclides in soil around uranium mines and its effect with ionic strength of water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......which may contaminate the soil and ground water around uranium mining areas, have been considered. Soil and ground water samples were collected from a...release, accidental, disposal or remediation scenarios requires the availability......

S. Mishra; S. Maity; G. G. Pandit

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

so on. 11.1.2 Air pollution and health effects Weestimateavailabihty of air pollution and health data in a particularRelationships of Air Pollution Health: Results Prom the

McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Feeding the world healthily: the challenge of measuring the effects of agriculture on health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...measuring the effects of agriculture on health Sophie Hawkesworth 1 2 Alan D. Dangour...lshtm.ac.uk ). 1 Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Research Unit, London School...Intergrative Research in Agriculture and Health London International Development Centre...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners  

SciTech Connect

This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

Samet, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Uranium Industry Annual, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

Not Available

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Transgenerational transmission of genetic damage by depleted uranium and tungsten alloy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Epigenetic mechanism is involved in depleted uranium-induced transformation in human...Southern Maine, Portland, ME. Depleted uranium (DU) is commonly used in military...research information on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. In our...

Alexandra Miller

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Assessment of uranium exposure from total activity and 234U:238U activity ratios in urine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......9 Priest N. D. Toxicity of depleted uranium. Lancet (2001) 357:244-245. 10 Betti M. Civil use of depleted uranium. J. Environ. Radioact. (2003...the kidney: a reassessment. Health Phys. (1989) 57:365-383......

T. Nicholas; D. Bingham

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Effects of various uranium leaching procedures on soil: Short-term vegetation growth and physiology. Progress report, April 1994  

SciTech Connect

Significant volumes of soil containing elevated levels of uranium exist in the eastern United States. The contamination resulted from the development of the nuclear industry in the United States requiring a large variety of uranium products. The contaminated soil poses a collection and disposal problem of a magnitude that justifies the development of decontamination methods. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program to address the problem. The fundamental goal of the USID task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than what can be done using current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics and without generating waste that is difficult to manage and/or dispose of. However, procedures developed for removing uranium from contaminated soil have involved harsh chemical treatments that affect the physicochemical properties of the soil. The questions are (1) are the changes in soil properties severe enough to destroy the soil`s capacity to support and sustain vegetation growth and survival? and (2) what amendments might be made to the leached soil to return it to a reasonable vegetation production capacity? This study examines the vegetation-support capacity of soil that had been chemically leached to remove uranium. The approach is to conduct short-term germination and phytotoxicity tests for evaluating soils after they are subjected to various leaching procedures followed by longer term pot studies on successfully leached soils that show the greatest capacity to support plant growth. This report details the results from germination and short-term phytotoxicity testing of soils that underwent a variety of leaching procedures at the bench scale at ORNL and at the pilot plant at Fernald.

Edwards, N.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Colorimetric detection of uranium in water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods, materials and systems that can be used to determine qualitatively or quantitatively the level of uranium contamination in water samples. Beneficially, disclosed systems are relatively simple and cost-effective. For example, disclosed systems can be utilized by consumers having little or no training in chemical analysis techniques. Methods generally include a concentration step and a complexation step. Uranium concentration can be carried out according to an extraction chromatographic process and complexation can chemically bind uranium with a detectable substance such that the formed substance is visually detectable. Methods can detect uranium contamination down to levels even below the MCL as established by the EPA.

DeVol, Timothy A. (Clemson, SC); Hixon, Amy E. (Piedmont, SC); DiPrete, David P. (Evans, GA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

171

Estimation of internal exposure to uranium with uncertainty from urinalysis data using the InDEP computer code  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Uranium (Bq d1) Depleted Uranium (Bq d1) Enriched...the current NIOSH uranium mortality study...industrial hygiene, and health physics. A single chronic exposure to uranium over the course...facility varied between depleted and less than 2-wt......

Jeri L. Anderson; A. Iulian Apostoaei; Brian A. Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effect of catechins and tannins on hydroxyl radical formation in depleted uranium-hydrogen peroxide systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of catechins and tannins on the uranyl ion (UO2 2+)-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) system were examined using the spin-trapping method. Epigallocatechin (EGC), having low •OH-scavenging abil...

Akira Nakajima; Emiko Matsuda…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Uranium ores and depleted uranium in the environment, with a reference to uranium in the biosphere from the Erzgebirge/Sachsen, Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Erzgebirge (‘Ore Mountains’) area in the eastern part of Germany was a major source of uranium for Soviet nuclear programs between 1945 and 1989. During this time, the former German Democratic Republic became the third largest uranium producer in the world. The high abundance of uranium in the geological formations of the Erzgebirge are mirrored in the discovery of uranium by M. Klaproth close to Freiberg City in 1789 and the description of the so-called ‘Schneeberg’ disease, lung cancer caused in miners by the accumulation of the uranium decay product, radon, in the subsurfaces of shafts. Since 1991, remediation and mitigation of uranium at production facilities, rock piles and mill tailings has taken place. In parallel, efforts were initiated to assess the likely adverse effects of uranium mining to humans. The costs of these activities amount to about 6.5 109 Euro. A comparison with concentrations of depleted uranium at certain sites is given.

A Meinrath; P Schneider; G Meinrath

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

HEALTH EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST: AN HEI PERSPECTIVE  

SciTech Connect

Diesel engines have many advantages, including good fuel economy, power, durability, lower emissions of some pollutants (such as carbon monoxide) and of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). However, there are a number of concerns that need to be addressed: (1) emissions of nitrogen oxides (which contribute to ozone formation) and of particulate matter (PM); (2) questions about cancer and other health effects from exposure to diesel PM; and (3) as efforts to decrease emissions progress, a need to understand whether the nature and toxicity of the PM emitted has changed. This paper focuses on (1) carcinogenicity data, (2) noncancer effects, and (3) diesel as part of the complex ambient mixture of PM.

Warren, Jane

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

178

Comprehensive Investigation of the Uranium-Zirconium Alloy System: Thermophysical Properties, Phase Characterization and Ion Implantation Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) alloys comprise a class of metallic nuclear fuel that is regularly considered for application in fast nuclear energy systems. The U-10wt%Zr alloy has been demonstrated to very high burnup without cladding breach...

Ahn, Sangjoon

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

ASA conference on radiation and health: Health effects of electric and magnetic fields: Statistical support for research strategies. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a collection of papers documenting presentations made at the VIII ASA (American Statistical Association) Conference on Radiation and Health entitled Health Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields: Statistical Support for Research Strategies. Individual papers are abstracted and indexed for the database.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Effects of Ecotourism on the Behavior and Health of Red Howler Monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) in Suriname.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ecological changes and habitat degradation have measurable effects on nonhuman primate group size, but little is known about their effects on the behavior and health… (more)

Westin, Jessica L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for for DUF 6 Conversion Project Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Meetings November/December 2001 Overview Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 2 DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart EM-10 Policy EM-40 Project Completion EM-20 Integration EM-50 Science and Technology EM-31 Ohio DUF6 Management Program EM-32 Oak Ridge EM-33 Rocky Flats EM-34 Small Sites EM-30 Office of Site Closure Office of Environmental Management EM-1 DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 3 DUF 6 Management Program DUF 6 Management Program * Mission: Safely and efficiently manage the DOE inventory of DUF 6 in a way that protects the health and safety of workers and the public, and protects the environment DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 4 DUF 6 Inventory Distribution

182

Health and environmental effects document for direct coal liquefaction - 1981.  

SciTech Connect

This document presents initial estimates of potential human health effects from inhalation of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) that may be released from a future hypothetical industry producing about 600,000 bb1/day of synthetic fuel by direct liquefaction of coal. The assessment approach starts wth general assumptions that are then refined in a tiered sequence that considers available epidemiological, environmental and chemical data. The uncertainties involved in such an evaluation have been quantified where possible at this early stage of health risk analysis. Many surrogate data bases were considered for application to coal liquefaction including coke oven, British gas retort, roofing tar and asphalts, and cigarette smoke. The coke oven data base was selected for this assessment because the chemical and physical nature of coke oven emissions are judged to more closely approximate potential coal liquefaction emissions. Utilizing the extensive epidemiological data base for coke oven workers as a surrogate model, health effects from release of coal liquefaction NMHC may be quantified. This method results in estimates of about 1 x 10/sup -3/ excess cancer deaths/yr to an industrial work force of 7800 persons and 5 x 10/sup -2/ excess cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole from NMHC that boil above 600/sup 0/F. Sources of uncertainty in the estimates are listed. Using these uncertainties, it is estimated that from 2 x 10/sup -4/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ lung cancer deaths/yr may occur in the industrial work force and from 1 x 10/sup -2/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole. On an individual basis, the excess lifetime risk to occupationally exposed workers is estimated to be 500 times greater than to members of the U.S. public.

Mellinger, P.J.; Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Sever, L.E.; Olsen, A.R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Using flow through reactors to study the non-reductive biomineralization of uranium phosphate minerals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Uranium contaminations of the subsurface in the vicinity of nuclear materials processing sites pose a health risk as the uranyl ion in its oxidized state,… (more)

Williams, Anna Rachel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effect of the militarily-relevant heavy metals, depleted uranium and heavy metal tungsten-alloy on gene expression in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) and heavy-metal tungsten alloys ... in military applications. Chemically similar to natural uranium, but depleted of the higher activity 235U and 234U...in vitro. Using insoluble DU-UO2 and ...

Alexandra C. Miller; Kia Brooks; Jan Smith…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Uranium industry annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

WORKING PAPER N 2007 -40 The distortionary effect of health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, health care, public/private, compulsory/voluntary insurance PARIS-JOURDAN SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES for modeling the impact of insurance on health- care demand extending some of the results of the two-risk model and still consume healthcare. Keywords: Health insurance, Adverse selection, Health care, Public

Boyer, Edmond

187

Abstract 3464: Epigenetic mechanism is involved in depleted uranium-induced transformation in human lung epithelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Epigenetic mechanism is involved in depleted uranium-induced transformation in human...Southern Maine, Portland, ME. Depleted uranium (DU) is commonly used in military...research information on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. In our...

Hong Xie; Carolyne LaCerte; and John P. Wise

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

189

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages an inventory of depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), and low-enriched uranium (LEU) that is currently stored in large cylinders as depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), natural uranium hexafluoride (NUF6), and low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (LEUF6) at the DOE Paducah site in western Kentucky (DOE Paducah) and the DOE Portsmouth site near Piketon in south-central Ohio (DOE Portsmouth)1. This inventory exceeds DOE's current and projected energy and defense program needs. On March 11, 2008, the Secretary of Energy issued a policy statement (the

190

WHAT GOOD IS WEALTH WITHOUT HEALTH? THE EFFECT OF HEALTH ON THE MARGINAL UTILITY OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate how the marginal utility of consumption varies with health. To do so, we develop a simple model in which the impact of health on the marginal utility of consumption can be estimated from data on permanent income, ...

Finkelstein, Amy

191

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado: Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

Title 1 of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial action at the inactive Naturita, Colorado, uranium processing site to reduce the potential health effects from the radioactive materials at the site and at vicinity properties associated with the site. Title 2 of the UMTRCA authorized the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or agreement state to regulate the operation and eventual reclamation of active uranium processing sites. The uranium mill tailings at the site were removed and reprocessed from 1977 to 1979. The contaminated areas include the former tailings area, the mill yard, the former ore storage area, and adjacent areas that were contaminated by uranium processing activities and wind and water erosion. The Naturita remedial action would result in the loss of 133 acres (ac) of contaminated soils at the processing site. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and the state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac of steeply sloped contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. Cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Selection of a management strategy for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the uranium enrichment process used in the United States (US) is the accumulation of a significant amount of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Currently, approximately 560,000 metric tons of the material are stored at three different sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently initiated a program to consider alternative strategies for the cost-effective and environmentally safe long-term management of this inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}. The program involves a technology and engineering assessment of proposed management options (use/reuse, conversion, storage, or disposal) and an analysis of the potential environmental impacts and life-cycle costs of alternative management strategies. The information obtained from the studies will be used by the DOE to select a preferred long-term management strategy. The selection and implementation of a management strategy will involve consideration of a number of important issues such as environmental, health, and safety effects; the balancing of risks versus costs in a context of reduced government spending; socioeconomic implications, including effects on the domestic and international uranium industry; the technical status of proposed uses or technologies; and public involvement in the decision making process. Because of its provisions for considering a wide range of relevant issues and involving the public, this program has become a model for future DOE materials disposition programs. This paper presents an overview of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. Technical findings of the program to date are presented, and major issues involved in selecting and implementing a management strategy are discussed.

Patton, S.E.; Hanrahan, E.J.; Bradley, C.E.

1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possible links between environmental problems like air pollution and chronic diseases like asthma part of CDC's Environmental Public Health Tracking Program since 2002. Massachusetts began building itsCS227358_A National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental Hazards and Health

194

Brain accumulation of depleted uranium in rats following 3- or 6-month treatment with implanted depleted uranium pellets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is used to reinforce armor ... were weighed weekly as a measure of general health, with no statistically significant differences observed among ... midbrain, hippocampus, striatum, and corte...

Vanessa A. Fitsanakis; Keith M. Erikson…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Welding of uranium and uranium alloys  

SciTech Connect

The major reported work on joining uranium comes from the USA, Great Britain, France and the USSR. The driving force for producing this technology base stems from the uses of uranium as a nuclear fuel for energy production, compact structures requiring high density, projectiles, radiation shielding, and nuclear weapons. This review examines the state-of-the-art of this technology and presents current welding process and parameter information. The welding metallurgy of uranium and the influence of microstructure on mechanical properties is developed for a number of the more commonly used welding processes.

Mara, G.L.; Murphy, J.L.

1982-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

FAQ 1-What is uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is uranium? What is uranium? What is uranium? Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in low concentrations (a few parts per million) in soil, rock, and surface and groundwater. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. Uranium in its pure form is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes: primarily uranium-238, uranium-235, and a very small amount of uranium-234. (Isotopes are different forms of an element that have the same number of protons in the nucleus, but a different number of neutrons.) In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.27%) consists of atoms of uranium-238. About 0.72% of the mass consists of atoms of uranium-235, and a very small amount (0.0055% by mass) is uranium-234.

197

DOE Releases Excess Uranium Inventory Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Excess Uranium Inventory Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Plan DOE Releases Excess Uranium Inventory Plan December 16, 2008 - 8:51am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) today issued its Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan (the Plan), which outlines the Department's strategy for the management and disposition of its excess uranium inventories. The Plan highlights DOE's ongoing efforts to enhance national security and promote a healthy domestic nuclear infrastructure through the efficient and cost-effective management of its excess uranium inventories. The Department has a significant inventory of uranium that is excess to national defense needs and is expensive both to manage and secure. "The Plan provides the general public and interested stakeholders more

198

Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan The 2013 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan describes a framework for the effective management of the Energy Department's surplus uranium inventory in support of meeting its critical environmental cleanup and national security missions. The Plan is not a commitment to specific activities beyond those that have already been contracted nor is it a restriction on actions that the Department may undertake in the future as a result of changing conditions. It replaces an earlier plan issued in 2008 and reflects updated information on the Department of Energy's management and disposition of its excess uranium inventories. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan More Documents & Publications

199

EPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for underground uranium mining operations (Subpart B) EPA regulatory requirements for operating uranium mill for Underground Uranium Mining Operations (Subpart B) #12;5 EPA Regulatory Requirements for Underground Uranium uranium mines include: · Applies to 10,000 tons/yr ore production, or 100,000 tons/mine lifetime · Ambient

200

Uranium hexafluoride public risk  

SciTech Connect

The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Uranium purchases report 1992  

SciTech Connect

Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B ``Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data.

Not Available

1993-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

202

Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

203

Measuring Aerosols Generated Inside Armoured Vehicles Perforated by Depleted Uranium Ammunition  

SciTech Connect

In response to questions raised after the Gulf War about the health significance of exposure to depleted uranium (DU), the U.S. Department of Defense initiated a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessment of possible health effects of soldiers in vehicles struck by these munitions. As part of this study, a series of DU penetrators were fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle, and the aerosols generated by vehicle perforation were collected and characterized. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and to monitor continuously the sampler flow rates. Interior aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. These data will provide input for future prospective and retrospective dose and health risk assessments of inhaled or ingested DU aerosols. This paper briefly discusses the target vehicles, firing trajectories, aerosol samplers and instrumentation control systems, and the types of analyses conducted on the samples.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for inflation. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013). UF 6 is uranium hexafluoride. The natural UF 6 and enriched...

205

THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF URANIUM ATOMS SPUTTERED FROM URANIUM METAL AND URANIUM DIOXIDE TARGETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF URANIUM ATOMS SPUTTERED FROM URANIUM METAL AND URANIUM DIOXIDE TARGETS Thesis. I have benefitted from conversations with many persons w~ile engaged in this project. I would like

Winfree, Erik

206

New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage Key parts of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as the health care reform law, go into effect January 1, 2014. When this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as the health care reform law, go into effect January 1, 2014 by the health care reform law (i.e., the plan's share of the total allowed benefit costs covered by the planNew Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage Key parts of the Patient

207

Uranium industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect

Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Bayesian models for elevated disease risk due to exposure to uranium mine and mill waste on the Navajo Nation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ForReview Only Bayesian models for elevated disease risk due to exposure to uranium mine and mill of Pharmacy, Community Environmental Health Program Keywords: abandoned uranium mines, conditionally specified to ex- posure to uranium mine and mill waste on the Navajo Nation Glenn A. Stark University of New

Huerta, Gabriel

209

Microbial release of 226Ra2+ from (Ba,Ra)SO4 sludges from uranium mine wastes.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...overlying water was depleted, Ba2+ and 226Ra2...SO4 sludges from uranium mine wastes...overlying water was depleted, Ba2' and 226Ra2...environment. At many uranium mining and milling...by the National Uranium Tailings Pro- gram...American Public Health Association. 1980...

P M Fedorak; D W Westlake; C Anders; B Kratochvil; N Motkosky; W B Anderson; P M Huck

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Enumeration and Characterization of Iron(III)-Reducing Microbial Communities from Acidic Subsurface Sediments Contaminated with Uranium(VI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bioremediation potential in uranium-contaminated subsurface...reduced. Once nitrate is depleted, U(VI) and Fe(III...bacteria, a study in a uranium-contaminated mill tailing...sludge. American Public Health Association, Washington...detection of trace levels of uranium by laser-induced kinetic...

Lainie Petrie; Nadia N. North; Sherry L. Dollhopf; David L. Balkwill; Joel E. Kostka

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The effects of health coaching on adult patients with chronic diseases: A systematic review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective The aim of this systematic review was to describe the effects of health coaching on adult patients with chronic diseases. Methods The reviewers searched electronic databases and performed a manual search for studies published from 2009 to 2013. The inclusion criteria covered health coaching for adults with chronic diseases by health care professionals. The studies were original, randomized controlled trials or quasi-experimental designs. Results Thirteen studies were selected using the inclusion criteria. The results indicate that health coaching produces positive effects on patients’ physiological, behavioral and psychological conditions and on their social life. In particular, statistically significant results revealed better weight management, increased physical activity and improved physical and mental health status. Conclusion Health coaching improves the management of chronic diseases. Further research into the cost-effectiveness of health coaching and its long-term effectiveness for chronic diseases is needed. Practice implications Health care professionals play key roles in promoting healthy behavior and motivating good care for adults with chronic diseases. Health coaching is an effective patient education method that can be used to motivate and take advantage of a patient's willingness to change their life style and to support the patient's home-based self-care.

Kirsi Kivelä; Satu Elo; Helvi Kyngäs; Maria Kääriäinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Process for recovering uranium from waste hydrocarbon oils containing the same. [Uranium contaminated lubricating oils from gaseous diffusion compressors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the recovery of uranium from uranium-bearing hydrocarbon oils containing carboxylic acid as a degradation product. In one aspect, the invention comprises providing an emulsion of water and the oil, heating the same to a temperature effecting conversion of the emulsion to an organic phase and to an acidic aqueous phase containing uranium carboxylate, and recovering the uranium from the aqueous phase. The process is effective, simple and comparatively inexpensive. It avoids the use of toxic reagents and the formation of undesirable intermediates.

Conrad, M.C.; Getz, P.A.; Hickman, J.E.; Payne, L.D.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

213

Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners. Progress report, March 1, 1991--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

Samet, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Depleted Uranium Disturbs Immune Parameters in Zebrafish, Danio rerio: An Ex Vivo/In Vivo Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated the effects of depleted uranium (DU), the byproduct of nuclear enrichment of uranium, on several parameters related to defence system...Danio rerio, using flow cytometry. Several im...

Béatrice Gagnaire; Anne Bado-Nilles…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate Produced at U.S. Mills (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate...

216

The Health Effects of Exercising in Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The health benefits of exercise are well known. Many of the most accessible forms of exercise, such as walking, cycling, and running often occur outdoors. This means that exercising outdoors may increase exposure...

Luisa V. Giles; Michael S. Koehle

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Uranium Marketing Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2010 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics. Questions about the preparation and content of this report may be directed to Michele Simmons, Team Leader,

218

Effects of Medicare payment reform: Evidence from the home health interim and prospective payment systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Medicare continues to implement payment reforms that shift reimbursement from fee-for-service toward episode-based payment, affecting average and marginal payment. We contrast the effects of two reforms for home health agencies. The home health interim payment system in 1997 lowered both types of payment; our conceptual model predicts a decline in the likelihood of use and costs, both of which we find. The home health prospective payment system in 2000 raised average but lowered marginal payment with theoretically ambiguous effects; we find a modest increase in use and costs. We find little substantive effect of either policy on readmissions or mortality.

Peter J. Huckfeldt; Neeraj Sood; José J. Escarce; David C. Grabowski; Joseph P. Newhouse

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The causal effect of retirement on health: New evidence from Australian pension reform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The causal effect of retirement on health is studied using the Australian 1993 Age Pension reform to isolate exogenous variation in retirement status. Using instrumental variable methods we find that retirement has a positive impact on subjective and objective measures of health.

Kadir Atalay; Garry F. Barrett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide levels inside and outside homes and the implications on health effects research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide levels inside and outside homes and the implications on health effects research ...

John D. Spengler; Benjamin G. Ferris Jr.; Douglas W. Dockery; Frank E. Speizer

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambient air quality standards and health effects research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambient air quality standards and health effects research ...

John D. Spengler; Colin P. Duffy; Richard. Letz; Theodore W. Tibbitts; Benjamin G. Ferris

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

FAQ 37-What are the potential health risks from transportation of depleted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted uranium metal or oxide? depleted uranium metal or oxide? What are the potential health risks from transportation of depleted uranium metal or oxide? In the PEIS, risks associated with transportation of depleted uranium oxide and metal were estimated for transport by either rail or truck. Normal transport of oxide or metal would result in low-level external exposure to radiation for persons in the vicinity of a shipment. Based on estimates in the PEIS, the levels of exposure would result in negligible increased cancer risks. Risks from material released in an accident were also estimated. For a hypothetical railcar accident involving powder U3O8 that was assumed to occur in a highly-populated urban area under stable (nighttime) weather conditions, it was estimated that up to 20 people might experience irreversible adverse effects from chemical toxicity, with no fatalities expected. Approximately 2 potential latent cancer fatalities from radiological hazards are estimated for an accident under the same conditions. The probability of such an accident occurring is very low. The consequences from a truck accident would be lower, because trucks have a smaller shipment capacity. The consequences of transportation accidents involving depleted uranium metal would be much smaller than those involving uranium oxide because uranium metal would be in the form of solid blocks and would not be easily dispersed in an accident.

224

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Biokinetics, Concentrations, and Doses  

SciTech Connect

One of the principal goals of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study was to quantify and characterize DU aerosols generated inside armored vehicles by perforation with a DU penetrator. This study consequently produced a database in which the DU aerosol source terms were specified both physically and chemically for a variety of penetrator-impact geometries and conditions. These source terms were used to calculate radiation doses and uranium concentrations for various scenarios as part of the Capstone DU Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA). This paper describes the scenario-related biokinetics of uranium, and summarizes intakes, chemical concentrations to the organs, and E(50) and HT(50) for organs and tissues based on exposure scenarios for personnel in vehicles at the time of perforation as well as for first responders. For a given exposure scenario (duration time and breathing rates), the range of DU intakes among the target vehicles and shots was not large, about a factor of 10, with the lowest being from a ventilated operational Abrams tank and the highest being for an unventilated Abrams with DU penetrator perforating DU armor. The ranges of committed effective doses were more scenario-dependent than were intakes. For example, the largest range, a factor of 20, was shown for scenario A, a 1-min exposure, whereas, the range was only a factor of two for the first-responder scenario (E). In general, the committed effective doses were found to be in the tens of mSv. The risks ascribed to these doses are discussed separately.

Guilmette, Raymond A.; Miller, Guthrie; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites October 16, 2012 - 1:51pm Addthis LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) co-hosted, with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a week of visits to DOE sites in Colorado and Utah, and a 4-day workshop in Grand Junction, Colorado. More than 30 visitors from 20 countries attended the event in August 2012. The IAEA International Workshop on Management and

227

Adsorption study for uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater  

SciTech Connect

Six adsorbents were studied to determine their effectiveness in removing uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater. The bench column and batch (Kd) tests showed that uranium can be removed (>99.9%) by four adsorbents. Bone Charcoal (R1O22); F-1 Alumina (granular activated alumina); BIOFIX (immobilized biological agent); SOPBPLUS (mixed metal oxide); Filtrasorb 300 (granular activated carbon); and Zeolite (clinoptilolite).

Laul, J.C.; Rupert, M.C. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Harris, M.J. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States); Duran, A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 Mill Owner Mill Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished Denison White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby

229

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-13 person-years Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18...

230

Uranium Marketing Annual Report -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2009-13 thousands pounds U3O8...

231

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2013 million pounds U3O8 equivalent Delivery year Total purchased Purchased from U.S....

232

Uranium Marketing Annual Report -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9. Contracted purchases of uranium by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, signed in 2013, by delivery year, 2014-23 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Year...

233

Uranium purchases report 1993  

SciTech Connect

Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 through 1993 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B,`` Uranium Marketing Activities,`` are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Appendix A contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data. Additional information published in this report not included in Uranium Purchases Report 1992, includes a new data table. Presented in Table 1 are US utility purchases of uranium and enrichment services by origin country. Also, this report contains additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. Table 2 is an update of Table 1 and Table 3 is an update of Table 2 from the previous year`s report. The report contains a glossary of terms.

Not Available

1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

The effect of European contact on the health of indigenous populations in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, however, that overall population health did not decline with European contact; there was, in fact, a slight decline in the frequency of dental disturbances. Several studies are currently being conducted on the effects of European contact on the Maya...THE EFFECT OF EUROPEAN CONTACT ON THE HEALTH OF INDIGENOUS POPULATIONS IN TEXAS A Thesis by ELIZABETH ANN MILLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Miller, Elizabeth Ann

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Uranium purchases report 1994  

SciTech Connect

US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 million pounds U3O8 Forward Cost2 Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s) $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 1 Sixteen respondents reported reserve estimates on 71 mines and properties. These uranium reserve estimates cannot be compared with the much larger historical data set of uranium reserves that were published in the July 2010 report U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates at http://www.eia.gov/cneaf/nuclear/page/reserves/ures.html. Reserves, as reported here, do not necessarily imply compliance with U.S. or Canadian government definitions for purposes of investment disclosure.

237

FAQ 5-Is uranium radioactive?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? All isotopes of uranium are radioactive, with most having extremely long half-lives. Half-life is a measure of the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a particular radionuclide to disintegrate (or decay) into another nuclear form. Each radionuclide has a characteristic half-life. Half-lives vary from millionths of a second to billions of years. Because radioactivity is a measure of the rate at which a radionuclide decays (for example, decays per second), the longer the half-life of a radionuclide, the less radioactive it is for a given mass. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.5 billion years, uranium-235 about 700 million years, and uranium-234 about 25 thousand years. Uranium atoms decay into other atoms, or radionuclides, that are also radioactive and commonly called "decay products." Uranium and its decay products primarily emit alpha radiation, however, lower levels of both beta and gamma radiation are also emitted. The total activity level of uranium depends on the isotopic composition and processing history. A sample of natural uranium (as mined) is composed of 99.3% uranium-238, 0.7% uranium-235, and a negligible amount of uranium-234 (by weight), as well as a number of radioactive decay products.

238

Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poly DU Poly DU Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium Technology Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has completed preliminary work to investigate the feasibility of encapsulating DU in low density polyethylene to form a stable, dense product. DU loadings as high as 90 wt% were achieved. A maximum product density of 4.2 g/cm3 was achieved using UO3, but increased product density using UO2 is estimated at 6.1 g/cm3. Additional product density improvements up to about 7.2 g/cm3 were projected using DU aggregate in a hybrid technique known as micro/macroencapsulation.[1] A U.S. patent for this process has been received.[2] Figure 1 Figure 1: DU Encapsulated in polyethylene samples produced at BNL containing 80 wt % depleted UO3 A recent DU market study by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. for DOE thoroughly identified and rated potential applications and markets for DU metal and oxide materials.[3] Because of its workability and high DU loading capability, the polyethylene encapsulated DU could readily be fabricated as counterweights/ballast (for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships and missiles), flywheels, armor, and projectiles. Also, polyethylene encapsulated DU is an effective shielding material for both gamma and neutron radiation, with potential application for shielding high activity waste (e.g., ion exchange resins, glass gems), spent fuel dry storage casks, and high energy experimental facilities (e.g., accelerator targets) to reduce radiation exposures to workers and the public.

239

Effective CKD Care in European Countries: Challenges and Opportunities for Health Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important global public health problem that is associated with adverse health outcomes and high health care costs. Effective and cost-effective treatments are available for slowing the progression of CKD and preventing its complications, including cardiovascular disease. Although wealthy nations have highly structured schemes in place to support the care of people with kidney failure, less consideration has been given to health systems and policy for the much larger population of people with non–dialysis-dependent CKD. Further, how to integrate such strategies with national and international initiatives for control of other chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) merits attention. We synthesized the various approaches to CKD control across 17 European countries and present our findings according to the key domains suggested by the World Health Organization framework for NCD control. This report identifies opportunities to strengthen CKD-relevant health systems and explores potential mechanisms to capitalize on these opportunities. Across the 17 countries studied, we found a number of common barriers to the care of people with non–dialysis-dependent CKD: limited work force capacity, the nearly complete absence of mechanisms for disease surveillance, lack of a coordinated CKD care strategy, poor integration of CKD care with other NCD control initiatives, and low awareness of the significance of CKD. These common challenges faced by diverse health systems reflect the need for international cooperation to strengthen health systems and policies for CKD care.

Aminu K. Bello; Adeera Levin; Braden J. Manns; John Feehally; Tilman Drueke; Labib Faruque; Brenda R. Hemmelgarn; Charles Kernahan; Johannes Mann; Scott Klarenbach; Giuseppe Remuzzi; Marcello Tonelli

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Challenges dealing with depleted uranium in Germany - Reuse or disposal  

SciTech Connect

During enrichment large amounts of depleted Uranium are produced. In Germany every year 2.800 tons of depleted uranium are generated. In Germany depleted uranium is not classified as radioactive waste but a resource for further enrichment. Therefore since 1996 depleted Uranium is sent to ROSATOM in Russia. However it still has to be dealt with the second generation of depleted Uranium. To evaluate the alternative actions in case a solution has to be found in Germany, several studies have been initiated by the Federal Ministry of the Environment. The work that has been carried out evaluated various possibilities to deal with depleted uranium. The international studies on this field and the situation in Germany have been analyzed. In case no further enrichment is planned the depleted uranium has to be stored. In the enrichment process UF{sub 6} is generated. It is an international consensus that for storage it should be converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The necessary technique is well established. If the depleted Uranium would have to be characterized as radioactive waste, a final disposal would become necessary. For the planned Konrad repository - a repository for non heat generating radioactive waste - the amount of Uranium is limited by the licensing authority. The existing license would not allow the final disposal of large amounts of depleted Uranium in the Konrad repository. The potential effect on the safety case has not been roughly analyzed. As a result it may be necessary to think about alternatives. Several possibilities for the use of depleted uranium in the industry have been identified. Studies indicate that the properties of Uranium would make it useful in some industrial fields. Nevertheless many practical and legal questions are open. One further option may be the use as shielding e.g. in casks for transport or disposal. Possible techniques for using depleted Uranium as shielding are the use of the metallic Uranium as well as the inclusion in concrete. Another possibility could be the use of depleted uranium for the blending of High enriched Uranium (HEU) or with Plutonium to MOX-elements. (authors)

Moeller, Kai D. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BFS, Postfach 10 01 49, D-38201 Salzgitter (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

SciTech Connect

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this booklet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are debed. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns about potential health effects of power lines. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this booklet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Change in Bacterial Community Structure during In Situ Biostimulation of Subsurface Sediment Cocontaminated with Uranium and Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...403-410. 2 American Public Health Association. 1969...604-609. American Public Health Association, Washington...Geobacter species to remove uranium from the groundwater...nitrate, Fe(III), and uranium were extensively reduced...while nitrate was largely depleted. A large diversity of...

Nadia N. North; Sherry L. Dollhopf; Lainie Petrie; Jonathan D. Istok; David L. Balkwill; Joel E. Kostka

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation at dose levels helow in rads lack reliable data bases and dose- effect information to derive quantitative estimation

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

BROWN, STEVEN H. [SHB INC., 7505 S. Xanthia Place, Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Health Insurance and Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article reviews the recent literature on the causal effect of health insurance on health outcomes. The focus is mainly on private health insurance in the US. The objective is to illustrate measurement issues for both health insurance and health outcomes, and to discuss the methodological challenges for researchers as they address endogeneity of insurance. Finally, a brief overview of methods and results found in the source studies is provided. Certain patterns emerge: in general, insurance is more pronounced for all-cause mortality and for generic health outcomes as compared with disease-specific outcomes. In addition, vulnerable and medically needy populations are more likely to benefit from health insurance than the general population. Finally, there is some support for the notion that continuous health insurance coverage benefits health more than intermittent insurance, suggesting that sporadic coverage offers limited value.

A. Dor; E. Umapathi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Health Benefits and Cost-Effectiveness of Primary Genetic Screening for Lynch Syndrome in the General Population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 research-article Research Articles Health Benefits and Cost-Effectiveness of Primary...Whether this approach would improve health outcomes in a manner that is cost-effective...5-generation family history model to predict health and economic outcomes of 20 primary screening...

Tuan A. Dinh; Benjamin I. Rosner; James C. Atwood; C. Richard Boland; Sapna Syngal; Hans F. A. Vasen; Stephen B. Gruber; Randall W. Burt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the last decade. Most of their work involves depleted uranium, a more common form of uraniumMarch 2008 Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008 Uranium is an often misunderstood metal uranium research. In reality, uranium presents a wealth of possibilities for funda- mental chemistry. Many

Meyer, Karsten

248

Water chlorination: environmental impact and health effects. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

The papers dealt with the major facets of chlorination and its associated effects. Each has been abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)

Jolley, R.L.; Brungs, W.A.; Cumming, R.B. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The health effects of deployment frequency and duration in US military service members supporting the Global War on Terrorism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Board Task Force on Persian Gulf War Health Effects.Ann Clin Psychiatry. The Iowa Persian Gulf Study Group.health status among Persian Gulf War veterans: a population-

Smith, Besa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

1.0 MAJOR STUDIES SUPPORTING THIS SCOPING RISK The most important period of past U.S. uranium production spanned from approximately 1948  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plants (U.S. DOE/EIA 2003a, 2003b, 2006). Uranium exploration, mining, and ore processing left a legacy of abandoned uranium mines. The major studies supporting this scoping analysis include EPA's 1983 Report to Congress on the Potential Health and Environmental Hazards of Uranium Mine Wastes (U.S. EPA 1983a, b, c

252

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

year, 2009-13 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2009-13). Table 19. Foreign purchases of uranium by U.S. suppliers...

253

Influence of uranyl speciation and iron oxides on uranium biogeochemical redox reactions  

SciTech Connect

Uranium is a pollutant of concern to both human and ecosystem health. Uranium's redox state often dictates its partitioning between the aqueous- and solid-phases, and thus controls its dissolved concentration and, coupled with groundwater flow, its migration within the environment. In anaerobic environments, the more oxidized and mobile form of uranium (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and associated species) may be reduced, directly or indirectly, by microorganisms to U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO{sub 2}. However, various factors within soils and sediments may limit biological reduction of U(VI), inclusive of alterations in U(VI) speciation and competitive electron acceptors. Here we elucidate the impact of U(VI) speciation on the extent and rate of reduction with specific emphasis on speciation changes induced by dissolved Ca, and we examine the impact of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite and hematite) varying in free energies of formation on U reduction. The amount of uranium removed from solution during 100 h of incubation with S. putrefaciens was 77% with no Ca or ferrihydrite present but only 24% (with ferrihydrite) and 14% (no ferrihydrite) were removed for systems with 0.8 mM Ca. Imparting an important criterion on uranium reduction, goethite and hematite decrease the dissolved concentration of calcium through adsorption and thus tend to diminish the effect of calcium on uranium reduction. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) can proceed through different enzyme pathways, even within a single organism, thus providing a potential second means by which Fe(III) bearing minerals may impact U(VI) reduction. We quantify rate coefficients for simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in systems varying in Ca concentration (0 to 0.8 mM), and using a mathematical construct implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, we reveal the predominant influence of uranyl speciation, specifically the formation of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes, and ferrihydrite on the rate and extent of uranium reduction in complex geochemical systems.

Stewart, B.D.; Amos, R.T.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Development of Novel Sorbents for Uranium Extraction from Seawater  

SciTech Connect

As the uranium resource in terrestrial ores is limited, it is difficult to ensure a long-term sustainable nuclear energy technology. The oceans contain approximately 4.5 billion tons of uranium, which is one thousand times the amount of uranium in terrestrial ores. Development of technologies to recover the uranium from seawater would greatly improve the uranium resource availability, sustaining the fuel supply for nuclear energy. Several methods have been previously evaluated including solvent extraction, ion exchange, flotation, biomass collection, and adsorption; however, none have been found to be suitable for reasons such as cost effectiveness, long term stability, and selectivity. Recent research has focused on the amidoxime functional group as a promising candidate for uranium sorption. Polymer beads and fibers have been functionalized with amidoxime functional groups, and uranium adsorption capacities as high as 1.5 g U/kg adsorbent have recently been reported with these types of materials. As uranium concentration in seawater is only ~3 ppb, great improvements to uranium collection systems must be made in order to make uranium extraction from seawater economically feasible. This proposed research intends to develop transformative technologies for economic uranium extraction from seawater. The Lin group will design advanced porous supports by taking advantage of recent breakthroughs in nanoscience and nanotechnology and incorporate high densities of well-designed chelators into such nanoporous supports to allow selective and efficient binding of uranyl ions from seawater. Several classes of nanoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs), meta-organic frameworks (MOFs), and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs), will be synthesized. Selective uranium-binding liagnds such as amidoxime will be incorporated into the nanoporous materials to afford a new generation of sorbent materials that will be evaluated for their uranium extraction efficiency. The initial testing of these materials for uranium binding will be carried out in the Lin group, but more detailed sorption studies will be carried out by Dr. Taylor-Pashow of Savannah River National Laboratory in order to obtain quantitative uranyl sorption selectivity and kinetics data for the proposed materials. The proposed nanostructured sorbent materials are expected to have higher binding capacities, enhanced extraction kinetics, optimal stripping efficiency for uranyl ions, and enhanced mechanical and chemical stabilities. This transformative research will significantly impact uranium extraction from seawater as well as benefit DOE’s efforts on environmental remediation by developing new materials and providing knowledge for enriching and sequestering ultralow concentrations of other metals.

Lin, Wenbin; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

256

TENORM aerosols in the Florida phosphate industry?assessment of lung fluid solubility and annual effective dose to workers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Inhalation studies of uranium trioxide. Health Phys. 23 , 273-280...simulant solution. Health Phys. 43 , 663-668...vitro solubility of depleted uranium (DU) in aerosols produced...on armored vehicles. Health Phys. 82 , S157 (2002......

Kwang Pyo Kim; Chang-Yu Wu; Brian K. Birky; Wesley E. Bolch

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Radiation and Uranium Resources Exposure Control (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The public policy of South Dakota is to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, the proper development of uranium resources, and the control of any associated harmful effects. The disposal of...

258

LOW-LEVEL RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS: PROGRAMS AND PANEL DISCUSSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accident. The report of the Soviet Union to the International Atomic Energy Agency experts' meeting plutonium had been produced in reactors and separated for bomb production for -40 yr (Ref. 1. The reduction was presumably due to the reduced effects at low dose rate. THE DATA SETS In the former USSR

Shlyakhter, Ilya

259

Assessment of age-dependent uranium intake due to drinking water in Hyderabad, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......leaching from natural deposits, combustion of coal and other fuels and the use of...species of radio elements from coal-fired plants. Health Phys. (1986...Ultraviolet Rays Uranium analysis Water chemistry Water Pollutants, Radioactive......

A. Y. Balbudhe; S. K. Srivastava; K. Vishwaprasad; G. K. Srivastava; R. M. Tripathi; V. D. Puranik

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Standard guide for the determination of uranium-232 in uranium hexafluoride  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This method covers the determination of 232U in uranium hexafluoride by alpha spectrometry. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although amendment arrival response data indicate some degree of overlap between the reactive species and thus potential for the formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., apatite formation), the efficiency of this treatment approach was relatively poor. In general, uranium performance monitoring results support the hypothesis that limited long-term treatment capacity (i.e., apatite formation) was established during the injection test. Two separate overarching issues affect the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. In addition, the long-term stability of uranium sequestered via apatite is dependent on the chemical speciation of uranium, surface speciation of apatite, and the mechanism of retention, which is highly susceptible to dynamic geochemical conditions. It was expected that uranium sequestration in the presence of hydroxyapatite would occur by sorption and/or surface complexation until all surface sites have been depleted, but that the high carbonate concentrations in the 300 Area would act to inhibit the transformation of sorbed uranium to chernikovite and/or autunite. Adsorption of uranium by apatite was never considered a viable approach for in situ uranium sequestration in and of itself, because by definition, this is a reversible reaction. The efficacy of uranium sequestration by apatite assumes that the adsorbed uranium would subsequently convert to autunite, or other stable uranium phases. Because this appears to not be the case in the 300 Area aquifer, even in locations near the river, apatite may have limited efficacy for the retention and long-term immobilization of uranium at the 300 Area site..

Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Health Effects Institute assessment of refueling vapors; A case study  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the Health Effects Institute (HEI) published an analysis it conducted of the informational basis for quantifying cancer risks from exposure to unleaded refueling vapors, an exposure that, for the general public, occurs most frequently at the self-service pump. Using the National Research Council's framework for risk assessment, the HEI analysis concluded that important information was lacking in the three areas that lead to the actual quantification of risk. The three are: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, and exposure assessment. The author presents details of the analysis, and a description of the Health Effects Institute.

Kavet, R. (Environmental Research Information, Inc., New York, NY (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Air quality standards: Role of the Health Effects Institute in conducting research  

SciTech Connect

The Health Effects Institute is an independently governed organization, jointly funded by the public and private sectors to conduct scientific research, for regulatory purposes, concerning the health effects on humans of motor vehicle emissions. The consensus is that research HEI is performing is credible and of high quality. GAO believes that future funding should still be considered and that more open dialogue between the Environmental Protection Agency and HEI could help ensure that an increasing number of mutually agreed upon relevant research projects are undertaken.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Effect of temperature on the extraction of uranium(VI) from nitric acid by tri-n-amyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Studies have been carried out on the effect of temperature on the extraction of U(VI) from nitric acid medium by tri-n-amyl phosphate/n-dodecane, measured as a function of the extractant concentration and aqueous phase acidity. The results indicate that the extraction is exothermic as in the case of tri-n-butyl phosphate. From the data available an effort has been made to calculate the equilibrium constant, the Gibbs energy change and the entropy changes of the extraction reaction. 21 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Srinivasan, T.G.; Rao, P.R.V. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Sood, D.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)]|[BARC, Mumbai (India)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

SciTech Connect

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the EMF (electric and magnetic fields) produced by power lines and other electrical devices affect our health. Although no adverse health effects of electric power EMF have been confirmed, there is continued scientific uncertainty about this issue. Research on EMF is ongoing throughout the world. The purpose of this booklet is to answer some common questions that the BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are debed. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns about potential health effects of power lines. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this booklet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater  

SciTech Connect

Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium removal from the sorbent reaches only 80% after 10 hours of leaching. Some information regarding coordination of vanadium with amidoxime molecules and elution of vanadium from amidoxime- based sorbents is also given in the report.

Wai, Chien; Tian, Guoxin; Janke, Christopher

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Alloy of depleted uranium: Material for ?-protection of shipment packing sets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of thermal action on the structure and physical and mechanical properties of an alloy based on depleted uranium and used for biological protection from ionizing...

V. K. Orlov; V. M. Sergeev; A. G. Semenov; V. V. Noskov…

269

The effect of indoor office environment on the work performance, health and well-being of office workers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of indoor environment may have an influence on the performance, productivity health and well-being of office workers.

Komalanathan Vimalanathan…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Accumulation and Distribution of Uranium in Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments Guoying Zhu 1 * Mingguang...and distribution of uranium in depleted uranium (DU) implanted rats. Materials...of chronic exposure to DU. Depleted uranium|Bone|Kidney|Distribution......

Guoying Zhu; Mingguang Tan; Yulan Li; Xiqiao Xiang; Heping Hu; Shuquan Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

SciTech Connect

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this pamphlet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. (BPA is the Pacific Northwest`s Federal electric power marketing agency.) First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are described. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns raised by these studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this pamphlet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The effectiveness of health appraisal processes currently in addressing health and wellbeing during spatial plan appraisal: a systematic review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic review to identify evaluation studies of appraisals or assessments of plans where health issues were considered from 1987...

Selena Gray; Laurence Carmichael; Hugh Barton; Julie Mytton…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Calculating Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Concentrations from Beta Activity Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the depleted uranium (DU) source term for the subsequent human health risk assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Correction factors for the disrupted equilibrium ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Alberth, David P.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Management and Uranium Management and Policy » Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Uranium is a silvery-white metallic chemical element in the periodic table, with atomic number 92. It is assigned the chemical symbol U. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium has the highest atomic weight (19 kg m) of all naturally occurring elements. Uranium occurs naturally in low concentrations in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing minerals such as uraninite. Uranium ore can be mined from open pits or underground excavations. The ore can then be crushed and treated at a mill to separate the valuable uranium from the ore. Uranium may also be dissolved directly from the ore deposits

275

Removal of residual uranium in simulated radwaste solution by TBP extraction  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of uranium in a multicomponent system simulated on the basis of high-level liquid waste was examined in order to find effective conditions for the removal of residual uranium in a simulated radwaste solution by the TBP solvent extraction method. While the conventional semiempirical equation for the distribution coefficient of uranium could be used in a system composed of only uranium and nitric acid, it was found to be unsuitable for a multicomponent system where the concentration of uranium is not dominant. Uranium extractability by TBP was found to be limited in multicomponents systems regardless of high TBP concentration, phase ratio, and extraction times because of the presence of neodymium and iron together with uranium in the systems.

Kim, Kwang-Wook; Lee, Eil-Hee; Shin, Young-Joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado. Draft  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VP) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial actions at the Slick Rock sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

NONE

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Health Effects of Nanoparticles Nanotechnology research is producing remarkable advances for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, measures, and characterizes nanoparticles, including those with special bio-medical properties. For example time. #12;Yet another health application Zachariah examines is the effect of diesel soot on the environment. Diesel soot, a nanoparticle that appears to contribute significantly to global warming, contains

Hill, Wendell T.

278

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60{degree}C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO{sub 4} in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

file://\\\\fs-f1\\shared\\uranium\\uranium.html  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

The initial uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The...

282

Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

Hofman, Gerard L. (Downers Grove, IL); Meyer, Mitchell K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knighton, Gaven C. (Moore, ID); Clark, Curtis R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine  

SciTech Connect

When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

Lucchini, Jean-francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols I: Uranium Concentration in Aerosols as a Function of Time and Particle Size  

SciTech Connect

During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing depleted uranium were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time particularly within the first minute after the shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% 30 min after perforation. In the Bradley vehicle, the initial (and maximum) uranium concentration was lower than those observed in the Abrams tank and decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in the cyclone samplers, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h post perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages from the Abrams tank tests ranged from 38% to 72% and, in most cases, varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Results with the Bradley vehicle ranged from 18% to 29% and were not specifically correlated with particle size.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Traub, Richard J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Colloids generation from metallic uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of colloid generation from spent fuel in an unsaturated environment has significant implications for storage of these fuels in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Because colloids can act as a transport medium for sparingly soluble radionuclides, it might be possible for colloid-associated radionuclides to migrate large distances underground and present a human health concern. This study examines the nature of colloidal materials produced during corrosion of metallic uranium fuel in simulated groundwater at elevated temperature in an unsaturated environment. Colloidal analyses of the leachates from these corrosion tests were performed using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results from both techniques indicate a bimodal distribution of small discrete particles and aggregates of the small particles. The average diameters of the small, discrete colloids are {approximately}3--12 nm, and the large aggregates have average diameters of {approximately}100--200 nm. X-ray diffraction of the solids from these tests indicates a mineral composition of uranium oxide or uranium oxy-hydroxide.

Metz, C.; Fortner, J.; Goldberg, M.; Shelton-Davis, C.

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 Item 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 E2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Exploration and Development Surface Drilling (million feet) 1.1 0.7 1.3 3.0 4.9 4.6 2.5 1.0 0.7 W W 1.2 1.7 2.7 5.1 5.1 3.7 4.9 6.3 7.2 Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1 5.7 1.1 2.6 7.2 20.0 18.1 7.9 5.6 2.7 W W 10.6 18.1 40.1 67.5 81.9 35.4 44.6 53.6 66.6 Mine Production of Uranium (million pounds U3O8) 2.1 2.5 3.5 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.5 3.0 4.7 4.5 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.1 4.3 Uranium Concentrate Production (million pounds U3O8) 3.1 3.4 6.0 6.3 5.6 4.7 4.6 4.0 2.6 2.3 2.0 2.3 2.7 4.1 4.5 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.0 4.1

287

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United David J. Nowak a, *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United States David J. Nowak a 26 May 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: Air pollution removal Air quality Ecosystem services Human and value of the effects of trees and forests on air quality and human health across the United States

288

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 million dollars Year Drilling Production Land and Other Total Expenditures Total Land and Other Land Exploration Reclamation 2003 W W 31.3 NA NA NA W 2004 10.6 27.8 48.4 NA NA NA 86.9 2005 18.1 58.2 59.7 NA NA NA 136.0 2006 40.1 65.9 115.2 41.0 23.3 50.9 221.2 2007 67.5 90.4 178.2 77.7 50.3 50.2 336.2 2008 81.9 221.2 164.4 65.2 50.2 49.1 467.6 2009 35.4 141.0 104.0 17.3 24.2 62.4 280.5 2010 44.6 133.3 99.5 20.2 34.5 44.7 277.3 2011 53.6 168.8 96.8 19.6 43.5 33.7 319.2 2012 66.6 186.9 99.4 16.8 33.3 49.3 352.9 Drilling: All expenditures directly associated with exploration and development drilling. Production: All expenditures for mining, milling, processing of uranium, and facility expense.

289

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Article Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium P. Roth V. Hollriegl E. Werner...for determining the amount of depleted uranium (DU) incorporated. The problems...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Höllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Worker and Public Health Activities Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Safety Programs Health and Safety Programs Home About HS-13 What's New HS-13 Staff Pandemic Influenza Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry CEDR Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Epi Moratorium United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries Occupational Medicine Worker and Community Public Health Activities Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) Program Chronic Beryllium Disease Bio-repository Initiative Articles Links HSS Logo Worker and Public Health Activities Program The aim of the Worker and Public Health Activities Program is to improve our understanding of the consequences of exposures to ionizing radiation and other hazardous materials to workers and to the public. One of the program's strategic objectives is to support studies related to current and past operations of DOE facilities that ascribe to the highest scientific standards and policies and to communicate the health effects into impact-driven practices for improving worker and public health. This objective strives to ensure that the studies and public health activities address the most relevant research pertaining to DOE operations and provide a framework for intervention. Periodic evaluation of the research via independent external peer review enhances this objective. DOE encourages publication in scientific peer-reviewed journals and presentations at scientific meetings.

291

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

accounted for 32%. The remaining 16% originated from Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Malawi, Namibia, Niger, Portugal, and South Africa. COOs purchased uranium...

292

U.S.Uranium Reserves  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

conditions. The uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The...

293

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013)....

294

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 10, 11 and 16. 2003-2013-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent 1 Includes purchases between...

295

Public Health-Related Impacts of Climate Change in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report. Health Effects Institute: 1–25; discussionand health. Health Effects Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.and health. Health Effects Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Marathon/Vitro to seek uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marathon/Vitro to seek uranium ... Last week, Marathon Oil agreed with Vitro Corp. of America to explore jointly for uranium in North America. ...

1967-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

297

Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for DOE's Uranium Leasing Program, under which DOE administers tracts of land in western Colorado for exploration, development, and the extraction of uranium and vanadium...

298

Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

Rothman, Alan B. (Willowbrook, IL); Graczyk, Donald G. (Lemont, IL); Essling, Alice M. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Dose effect for South Serbians due to 238U in natural drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......imported drinking water. Health Phys (2004) 86:365-373...H., Dietert S. E. Uranium in the tissue of an occupationally exposed individual. Health Phys (1989) 57:17-21...water. | The use of depleted uranium ammunition in South Serbia......

S. K. Sahoo; M. Matsumoto; K. Shiraishi; K. Fujimoto; O. Cuknic; Z. S. Zunic

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Uranio impoverito: perché? (Depleted uranium: why?)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we develop a simple model of the penetration process of a long rod through an uniform target. Applying the momentum and energy conservation laws, we derive an analytical relation which shows how the penetration depth depends upon the density of the rod, given a fixed kinetic energy. This work was sparked off by the necessity of understanding the effectiveness of high density penetrators (e.g. depleted uranium penetrators) as anti-tank weapons.

Germano D'Abramo

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Uranium from Seawater Program Review; Fuel Resources Uranium from Seawater Program DOE Office of Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect

For nuclear energy to remain sustainable in the United States, economically viable sources of uranium beyond terrestrial ores must be developed. The goal of this program is to develop advanced adsorbents that can extract uranium from seawater at twice the capacity of the best adsorbent developed by researchers at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1.5 mg U/g adsorbent. A multidisciplinary team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of Texas at Austin was assembled to address this challenging problem. Polymeric adsorbents, based on the radiation grafting of acrylonitrile and methacrylic acid onto high surface-area polyethylene fibers followed by conversion of the nitriles to amidoximes, have been developed. These poly(acrylamidoxime-co-methacrylic acid) fibers showed uranium adsorption capacities for the extraction of uranium from seawater that exceed 3 mg U/g adsorbent in testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Laboratory. The essence of this novel technology lies in the unique high surface-area trunk material that considerably increases the grafting yield of functional groups without compromising its mechanical properties. This technology received an R&D100 Award in 2012. In addition, high surface area nanomaterial adsorbents are under development with the goal of increasing uranium adsorption capacity by taking advantage of the high surface areas and tunable porosity of carbon-based nanomaterials. Simultaneously, de novo structure-based computational design methods are being used to design more selective and stable ligands and the most promising candidates are being synthesized, tested and evaluated for incorporation onto a support matrix. Fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic studies are being carried out to improve the adsorption efficiency, the selectivity of uranium over other metals, and the stability of the adsorbents. Understanding the rate-limiting step of uranium uptake from seawater is also essential in designing an effective uranium recovery system. Finally, economic analyses have been used to guide these studies and highlight what parameters, such as capacity, recyclability, and stability, have the largest impact on the cost of extraction of uranium from seawater. Initially, the cost estimates by the JAEA for extraction of uranium from seawater with braided polymeric fibers functionalized with amidoxime ligands were evaluated and updated. The economic analyses were subsequently updated to reflect the results of this project while providing insight for cost reductions in the adsorbent development through “cradle-to-grave” case studies for the extraction process. This report highlights the progress made over the last three years on the design, synthesis, and testing of new materials to extract uranium for seawater. This report is organized into sections that highlight the major research activities in this project: (1) Chelate Design and Modeling, (2) Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Structure, (3) Advanced Polymeric Adsorbents by Radiation Induced Grafting, (4) Advanced Nanomaterial Adsorbents, (5) Adsorbent Screening and Modeling, (6) Marine Testing, and (7) Cost and Energy Assessment. At the end of each section, future research directions are briefly discussed to highlight the challenges that still remain to reduce the cost of extractions of uranium for seawater. Finally, contributions from the Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP), which complement this research program, are included at the end of this report.

none,

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 March 26, 2010 Consent Order issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to Construction Deficiencies at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement has completed its investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with construction deficiencies at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings located at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants. The investigation reports, dated January 22, 2009, and April 23, 2009, were provided to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (DDS), and addressed specific areas of potential noncompliance with DOE nuclear safety requirements established in

303

Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The health effects of radiation from atomic explosions in Japan were completely different from those due to radiation from the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan. The sudden exposure to acute radiation in extremely high doses killed Japanese people, and harmed the survivors in lower doses as shown by increased cancer mortality, especially the leukemia based on the LNT model. The chronic radiation received by the residents unknowingly in the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan, even in higher doses, caused no excess cancer deaths; on the contrary their spontaneous cancer deaths were sharply reduced to only about 2.5% of that of the general population, and hereditary defects in their offspring were only 5%â??7% of those of the normal population. Therefore, the residents in the Co-60 contamination apartments had coincidently accomplished a human experiment of the health effects to human beings. The chronic radiation received from the Co-60 contaminated houses is quite similar to the radiation exposure to the workers and public in the peaceful use of nuclear energy and medical radiation. Acute radiation from a nuclear accident could harm a limited number of people, but the chronic radiation might benefit people, such as in the case of the Chernobyl accident. People should not be fearful of chronic exposure to low radiation and the traditional radiation protection policy and practices used in past 60 years should be revised based on the health effects observed in Taiwan.

Y.C. Luan; M.C. Shieh; S.T. Chen; H.T. Kung; K.L. Soong; Y.C. Yeh; T.S. Chou; W.C. Fang; S.L. Yao; C.J. Pong; S.H. Mong; J.T. Wu; J.M. Wu; H.J. Jen; W.L. Chen; W.P. Deng; M.F. Wu; M.L. Shen; C.P. Sun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants  

SciTech Connect

The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby Uranium One Americas, Inc. Shootaring Canyon Uranium Mill Garfield, Utah 750 Changing License To Operational Standby

306

Public meetings on radiation and its health effects caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect

The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has held public meetings on radiation and its health effects mainly for parents of students in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Fukushima and Ibaraki prefectures after the Fukushima nuclear accident. These meetings are held based on our experience of practicing risk communication activities for a decade in JAEA with local residents. By analyzing questionnaires collected after the meetings, we confirmed that interactive communication is effective in increasing participants' understanding and in decreasing their anxiety. Most of the participants answered that they understood the contents and that it eased their mind. (authors)

Sugiyama, K.; Ayame, J.; Takashita, H.; Yamamoto, R. [Risk Communication Study Office Japan Atomic Energy Agency 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI, 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Language and Immigrant Status Effects on Disparities in Hispanic Children’s Health Status and Access to Health Care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to estimate Hispanic/non-Hispanic (nH)-white health disparities and assess ... disparities can be explained by immigrant status and household primary language. The 2007 National Sur...

Rosa M. Avila; Matthew D. Bramlett

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Long term depleted uranium exposure in Gulf War I veterans does not cause elevated numbers of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a high density heavy metal that has been used in military munitions since the 1991 Gulf War. DU is weakly radioactive and chemically toxic. Long term exposure can cause adverse health effects. This study assessed genotoxic effects in DU exposed Gulf War I veterans as a function of uranium (U) body burden. Levels of urine U were used to categorize the cohort into low and high exposure groups. Exposure to DU occurred during friendly fire incidents in 1991 involving DU munitions resulting in inhalation and ingestion exposure to small particles of DU and soft tissue DU fragments from traumatic injuries. All of these Veterans are enrolled in a long term health surveillance program at the Baltimore Veterans Administration Medical Center. Blood was drawn from 35 exposed male veterans aged 36–59 years, then cultured and evaluated for micronuclei (MN) using the cytokinesis block method. The participants were divided into two exposure groups, low and high, based on their mean urine uranium (uU) concentrations. Poisson regression analyses with mean urine U concentrations, current smoking, X-rays in the past year and donor age as dependent variables revealed no significant relationships with MN frequencies. Our results indicate that on-going systemic exposure to DU occurring in Gulf War I Veterans with DU embedded fragments does not induce significant increases in MN in peripheral blood lymphocytes compared to MN frequencies in Veterans with normal U body burdens.

M.V. Bakhmutsky; M.S. Oliver; M.A. McDiarmid; K.S. Squibb; J.D. Tucker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Underground (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Open Pit (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching (thousand pounds U3O8) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W Other1 (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Total Mine Production (thousand pounds U3O8) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Number of Operating Mines Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

310

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner In-Situ-Leach Plant Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources,Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed

311

Pollution-Related Health Effects of Truck-to-Train Freight Modal Shifts in the Midwestern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by reducing air pollution. Objective: This study sought to quantify the pollution-related health impactsPollution-Related Health Effects of Truck-to-Train Freight Modal Shifts in the Midwestern United Background: Outdoor air pollution causes increases in mortality, cardiovascular events, and respiratory

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

312

U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 16, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 2010 2011 2012 American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) AREVA NC, Inc. (was COGEMA, Inc.) American Fuel Resources, LLC American Fuel Resources, LLC BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. CAMECO BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ConverDyn CAMECO CAMECO Denison Mines Corp. ConverDyn ConverDyn Energy Resources of Australia Ltd. Denison Mines Corp. Energy Fuels Resources Energy USA, Inc. Effective Energy N.V.

313

FAQ 7-How is depleted uranium produced?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? Depleted uranium is produced during the uranium enrichment process. In the United States, uranium is enriched through the gaseous diffusion process in which the compound uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is heated and converted from a solid to a gas. The gas is then forced through a series of compressors and converters that contain porous barriers. Because uranium-235 has a slightly lighter isotopic mass than uranium-238, UF6 molecules made with uranium-235 diffuse through the barriers at a slightly higher rate than the molecules containing uranium-238. At the end of the process, there are two UF6 streams, with one stream having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the other. The stream having the greater uranium-235 concentration is referred to as enriched UF6, while the stream that is reduced in its concentration of uranium-235 is referred to as depleted UF6. The depleted UF6 can be converted to other chemical forms, such as depleted uranium oxide or depleted uranium metal.

314

Uranyl Protoporphyrin: a New Uranium Complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...received 3 times the LD50 of uranium as uranyl protoporphyrin...nitrate, had showed livers depleted of glycogen and kidneys...destruc-tion typical of uranium poisoning. The uranium-damaged...T. Godwin et al., Cancer 8, 601 (1954). 5...excretion of hexavalent uranium in man," in Proc...

ROBERT E. BASES

1957-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

315

Health Effects of SubChronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sara M. Pletcher sara M. Pletcher Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4236 sara.pletcher@netl.doe.gov Joe L. Mauderly Principal Investigator Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute 2425 Ridgecrest Drive, SE Albuquerque, NM 87108-5129 505-348-9432 jmauderl@lrri.org Environmental and Water Resources HealtH effects of sub-cHronic inHalation of simulated downwind coal combustion emissions Background Emissions from coal-fired power plants and their associated atmospheric reaction products contribute to environmental air pollution and are often cited as a critical cause of pollution-related health risks. However, there have been few toxicological evaluations of the heath hazards resulting from the inhalation of coal combustion

316

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Safe Operating Procedure SAFETY PROTOCOL: URANIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involve the use of natural or depleted uranium. Natural isotopes of uranium are U-238, U-235 and U-234 (see Table 1 for natural abundances). Depleted uranium contains less of the isotopes: U-235 and U-234. The specific activity of depleted uranium (5.0E-7 Ci/g) is less than that of natural uranium (7.1E-7 Ci

Farritor, Shane

318

A review of uranium economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent increase in the demand for power for commercial use, the challenges facing fossil fuel use and the prospective of cheap nuclear power motivate different countries to plan for the use of nuclear power. This paper reviews many aspects of uranium economics, which includes the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power, comparisons with other sources of power, nuclear power production and requirements, the uranium market, uranium pricing, spot price and long-term price indicators, and the cost of building a nuclear power facility.

A.K. Mazher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Using Science to Improve the Nation's Health System: NIH's Commitment to Comparative Effectiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and reform the US health care system. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been--and will continue; Health Policy; Medical Practice, Other; Quality of Care; Quality of Subscribe Email Alerts http health interventions yield the greatest benefits. Health reform and economic concerns may have moved

Bandettini, Peter A.

320

Uranium Mining Life-Cycle Energy Cost vs. Uranium Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The long-term viability of nuclear energy systems depends on the availability of uranium and on the question, whether the overall energy balance of the fuel cycle is positive, taking into account the full life-cy...

W. Eberhard Falck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Uranium-loaded apoferritin with antibodies attached: molecular design for uranium neutron-capture therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular design for uranium neutron-capture therapy (cancer/immunotherapy...methodology for cancer therapy. Boron...system using uranium, as described...800 to =400 uranium atoms per apoferritin...uranyl ions were depleted, and loading...

J F Hainfeld

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Characterization of uranium isotopic abundances in depleted uranium metal assay standard 115  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Certified reference material (CRM) 115, Uranium (Depleted) Metal (Uranium Assay Standard), was analyzed using a ... TRITON Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer to characterize the uranium isotope-amount ratios. T...

K. J. Mathew; G. L. Singleton; R. M. Essex…

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Disposition of uranium-233  

SciTech Connect

The US is developing a strategy for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable uranium-233 ({sup 233}U). The strategy (1) identifies the requirements for the disposition of surplus {sup 233}U; (2) identifies potential disposition options, including key issues to be resolved with each option; and (3) defines a road map that identifies future key decisions and actions. The disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials is part of a US international arms-control program for reduction of the number of nuclear weapons and the quantities of nuclear-weapons-usable materials worldwide. The disposition options ultimately lead to waste forms requiring some type of geological disposal. Major options are described herein.

Tousley, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Fissile Materials Disposition; Forsberg, C.W.; Krichinsky, A.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

The relative effect of health literacy and patient activation on provider choice in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Active provider choice by patients has become an important policy theme in western, countries over the last decades. However, not many patients and consumers exercise their right to, choose. Both health literacy and patient activation are likely to have an impact on the choice process. In, this article the relative effect of health literacy and patient activation on provider choice in the, Netherlands is studied. A questionnaire was sent to a representative sample of 2000 Dutch citizens. The questionnaire, included a measure of functional health literacy, the Dutch version of the Patient Activation Measure, and questions assessing active provider choice, reasons not to engage in it and other ways of provider, selection. The majority of respondents (59.6%) would not search for information on the basis of which they, could select the best provider or hospital. Most people rely on their general practitioner's advice. Both, low literacy and lower patient activation levels were negatively associated with active provider choice. In a regression analysis gender, education and patient activation proved the most important, predictors. The policy focus on active provider choice might result in inequity, with men, less educated, and less activated people being at a disadvantage.

Jany Rademakers; Jessica Nijman; Anne E.M. Brabers; Judith D. de Jong; Michelle Hendriks

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

326

5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed uranium mining materials. The potential effects in the consideration of unreclaimed uranium mines. Although the Superfund characterization process includes

327

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Domestic Uranium Production Report June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

328

2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii

329

Uranium Enrichment's $7-Billion Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...229 : 1407 ( 1985 ). Uranium...claims John R. Longenecker, who heads...because it be-John Longenecker '"ou have...based on gas centrifuges Finally...research on the centrifuge technology...21 June 1985, p. 1407...

COLIN NORMAN

1986-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

330

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 28, 29, 30 and 31. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent...

331

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 10, 11 and 16. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". dollars per pound U 3 O 8 equivalent dollars per pound U 3 O 8...

332

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 28, 29, 30 and 31. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent...

333

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 22, 23, 25, and 27. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". - No data reported. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1994 1995 1996 1997...

334

2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. U.S. uranium concentrate production, shipments, and sales, 2003-13" "Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013...

335

Acute health effects in a community after a release of hydrofluoric acid  

SciTech Connect

{approximately} 3,000 persons were evacuated from a Texas community after 24,036 kg (53,000 lb) of caustic hydrofluoric acid (HF) were released from a nearby petrochemical plant. Emergency room and hospital records of 939 persons who were seen at two area hospitals were reviewed. Most persons who presented at the emergency rooms were female (56%) or black (60%), and their mean age was 33.9 y. The most frequently reported symptoms were eye irritation (41.5%), burning throat (21%), headache (20.6%), and shortness of breath (19.4%). Physical examination results were normal for 49% of the cases; however, irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, skin, and lungs were noted on other exams. Decreased pulmonary function was demonstrated by pulmonary function tests (forced expiratory volume in the first second, less than 80% of predicted value, 42.3%); hypoxemia (pO2 less than 80 mm Hg, 17.4%) and hypocalcemia (less than 8.5 mg/dl, 16.3%) were also noted. Ninety-four (10%) of the cases were hospitalized, and more than 83% of all cases were discharged with a primary diagnosis of HF exposure. There are several reports of individuals who are acutely and chronically exposed to HF; however, we are unaware of other published reports that describe exposure of a community to HF. This incident represented a unique opportunity to study the immediate health impact on a community of residents who were exposed to a hazardous materials release. Results of this analysis suggest that (a) initial health problems should be followed up, (b) any long-term health effects of HF exposure must be assessed, and (c) the health impact on the population at risk should be determined.

Wing, J.S.; Brender, J.D.; Sanderson, L.M.; Perrotta, D.M.; Beauchamp, R.A. (Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Uranium Resources Inc URI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uranium Resources Inc URI Uranium Resources Inc URI Jump to: navigation, search Name Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) Place Lewisville, Texas Zip 75067 Product Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) is primarily engaged in the business of acquiring, exploring, developing and mining uranium properties using the in situ recovery (ISR) or solution mining process. References Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) is a company located in Lewisville, Texas . References ↑ "Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Uranium_Resources_Inc_URI&oldid=352580" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

337

Health physics considerations in UF{sub 6} handling  

SciTech Connect

Uranium is a radioactive substance that emits alpha particles and very small amounts of gamma radiation. Its daughter products emit beta and gamma radiation. In uranium handling operations these are the radiations one must consider. This presentation will review the characteristics of the radiations, the isotopes from which they originate, the growth and decay of the uranium daughter products, and some specific health physics practices dictated by these factors.

Bailey, J.C. [Norway Assoicates, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluation of Uranium Measurements in Water by Various Methods - 13571  

SciTech Connect

In December 2000, EPA amended its drinking water regulations for radionuclides by adding a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for uranium (so called MCL Rule)[1] of 30 micrograms per liter (?g/L). The MCL Rule also included MCL goals of zero for uranium and other radionuclides. Many radioactively contaminated sites must test uranium in wastewater and groundwater to comply with the MCL rule as well as local publicly owned treatment works discharge limitations. This paper addresses the relative sensitivity, accuracy, precision, cost and comparability of two EPA-approved methods for detection of total uranium: inductively plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry. Both methods are capable of measuring the individual uranium isotopes U-234, U- 235, and U-238 and both methods have been deemed acceptable by EPA. However, the U-238 is by far the primary contributor to the mass-based ICP-MS measurement, especially for naturally-occurring uranium, which contains 99.2745% U-238. An evaluation shall be performed relative to the regulatory requirement promulgated by EPA in December 2000. Data will be garnered from various client sample results measured by ALS Laboratory in Fort Collins, CO. Data shall include method detection limits (MDL), minimum detectable activities (MDA), means and trends in laboratory control sample results, performance evaluation data for all methods, and replicate results. In addition, a comparison will be made of sample analyses results obtained from both alpha spectrometry and the screening method Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA) performed at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) FUSRAP Maywood Laboratory (UFML). Many uranium measurements occur in laboratories that only perform radiological analysis. This work is important because it shows that uranium can be measured in radiological as well as stable chemistry laboratories and it provides several criteria as a basis for comparison of two uranium test methods. This data will indicate which test method is the most accurate and most cost effective. This paper provides a benefit to Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and other Department of Defense (DOD) programs that may be performing uranium measurements. (authors)

Tucker, Brian J. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure Group, 150 Royall Street, Canton, MA (United States)] [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure Group, 150 Royall Street, Canton, MA (United States); Workman, Stephen M. [ALS Laboratory Group, Environmental Division, 225 Commerce Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80524 (United States)] [ALS Laboratory Group, Environmental Division, 225 Commerce Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80524 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Uranium Atoms Don't Share the Vibe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Atoms Don't Share the Vibe Uranium Atoms Don't Share the Vibe Suppose you throw a rock into a pond, but instead of circular waves spreading across the surface, only a single bit of the surface at the rock's entry point oscillates up and down continuously. In the 31 March Physical Review Letters, researchers using the XOR 3-ID-C beamline at the APS report a surprising effect in a crystalline solid: a few-atom-wide vibration that refuses to spread through the material. The team probed heated uranium with x rays and neutrons to study the crystal's vibrations. Although predicted twenty years ago, the effect has never been conclusively seen in a three-dimensional crystal. The result seems to demonstrate the surprising ability of a uniform material to concentrate energy spontaneously. - JR Minkel

340

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on early health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DETERMINATION OF 234U/238U, 235U/238U AND 236U/238U ISOTOPE RATIOS IN URINE USING SECTOR FIELD INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......aerosols of depleted uranium (DU) exhibit...uranium-related health effects(3-5...et al. Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed...Detection of depleted uranium (DU) in urines...Gulf War. Health Phys. (2004......

Ge Xiao; Robert L. Jones; David Saunders; Kathleen L. Caldwell

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to implement a comprehensive management program to safely, efficiently, and effectively manage its potentially reusable low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). Uranium materials, which are presently located at multiple sites, are to be consolidated by transporting the materials to one or several storage locations, to facilitate ultimate disposition. Management would include the storage, transport, and ultimate disposition of these materials. This action is needed because of DOE's current missions and functions; increasing budget pressures; the continuing need for good stewardship of resources, including materials in inventory; and continuing DOE attention to considerations of environment, safety, and health. Also, increased pressure on the federal budget requires that DOE take a closer look at materials management in order to ensure maximum cost effectiveness. This includes an examination of feasible uses of this material, consistent with DOE's mission, as well as an examination of management methods that are consistent with environmental requirements and budgetary constraints. DOE needs to implement a long-term (greater than 20 years) management plan for its inventory of potentially reusable LEU, NU, and DU.

N /A

2002-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

Patient and provider perspectives on quality and health system effectiveness in a transition economy: Evidence from Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Facing a severe population health crisis due to noncommunicable diseases, Ukraine and other former Soviet republics and Eastern European countries have a pressing need for more effective health systems. Policies to enhance health system effectiveness should consider the perspectives of different stakeholder groups, including providers as well as patients. In addition, policies that directly target the quality of clinical care should be based on objective performance measures. In 2009 and 2010 we conducted a coordinated series of household and facility-level surveys to capture the perspectives of Ukrainian household members, outpatient clinic patients, and physicians regarding the country's health system overall, as well as the quality, access, and affordability of health care. We objectively measured the quality of care for heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using CPV® vignettes. There was broad agreement among household respondents (79%) and physicians (95%) that Ukraine's health system should be reformed. CPV® results indicate that the quality of care for common noncommunicable diseases is poor in all regions of the country and in hospitals as well as polyclinics. However, perspectives about the quality of care differ, with household respondents seeing quality as a serious concern, clinic patients having more positive perceptions, and physicians not viewing quality as a reform priority. All stakeholder groups viewed affordability as a problem. These findings have several implications for policies to enhance health system effectiveness. The shared desire for health system reform among all stakeholder groups provides a basis for action in Ukraine. Improving quality, strengthening primary care, and enhancing affordability should be major goals of new health policies. Policies to improve quality directly, such as pay-for-performance, would be mutually reinforcing with purchasing reforms such as transparent payment mechanisms. Such policies would align the incentives of physicians with the desires of the population they serve.

J. Luck; J.W. Peabody; L.M. DeMaria; C.S. Alvarado; R. Menon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Variations of the Isotopic Ratios of Uranium in Environmental Samples Containing Traces of Depleted Uranium: Theoretical and Experimental Aspects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Samples Containing Traces of Depleted Uranium: Theoretical and Experimental...for the detection of traces of depleted uranium (DU) in environmental samples...percentage composition is about 20% depleted uranium and 80% natural uranium, for......

M. Magnoni; S. Bertino; B. Bellotto; M. Campi

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Human exposure to mercury: A critical assessment of the evidence of adverse health effects  

SciTech Connect

The ubiquitous nature of mercury in the environment, its global atmospheric cycling, and its toxicity to humans at levels that are uncomfortably close to exposures experienced by a proportion of the population are some of the current concerns associated with this pollutant. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the scientific quality of published reports involving human exposures to mercury and associated health outcomes as an aid in the risk evaluation of this chemical. A comprehensive review of the scientific literature involving human exposures to mercury was performed and each publication evaluated using a defined set of criteria that are considered standards in epidemiologic and toxicologic research. Severe, sometimes fatal, effects of mercury exposure at high levels were primarily reported as case studies. The disasters in Minamata, Japan, in the 1950s and in Iraq in 1971-1972 clearly demonstrated neurologic effects associated with ingestion of methylmercury both in adults and in infants exposed in utero. The effects were convincingly Associated with methylmercury ingestion, despite limitations of the study design. Several well-conducted studies have investigated the effects of methylmercury at levels below those in the Iraq incident but have not provided clear evidence of an effect. The lower end of the dose-response curve constructed from the Iraq data therefore still needs to be confirmed. The studies of mercury exposure in the workplace were mainly of elemental or inorganic mercury, and effects that were observed at relatively low exposure levels were primarily neurologic and renal. Several studies have investigated effects associated with dental amalgam but have been rated as inconclusive because of methodologic deficiencies. In our overall evaluation, 29 of 110 occupational studies and 20 of 54 studies where exposure occurred in the natural environment provided at least suggestive evidence of an exposure-related effect. 259 refs., 4 tabs.

Ratcliffe, H.E.; Swanson, G.M.; Fischer, L.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

346

Modeling exposure to depleted uranium in support of decommissioning at Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

Jefferson Proving Ground was used by the US Army Test and Evaluation Command for testing of depleted uranium munitions and closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This paper integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

Ebinger, M.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Oxenburg, T.P. [Army Test and Evaluation Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

High surface soil concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and high above-ground measurements of gamma-ray intensity in the vicinity of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat show both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The former mill area, occupied by a trade school at the time of this survey, shows a comparatively high level of contamination, probably from unprocessed ore on the surface of the ore storage area near the location of the former mill buildings. However, the estimated health effect of exposure to gamma rays during a 2000-hr work year in the area represents an increase of 0.1% in the risk of death from cancer. Exposure of less than 600 persons within 1.6 km of the tailings to radon daughters results in an estimated 0.2%/year increase in risk of lung cancer.

Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Spectrophotometric determination of tantalum in boron, uranium, zirconium, and uranium-Zircaloy-2 alloy with malachite green  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spectrophotometric determination of tantalum in boron, uranium, zirconium, and uranium-Zircaloy-2 alloy with malachite green ...

Allan R. Eberle; Morris W. Lerner

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

health_risks.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Background Definition Sources of Radiation During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas

350

The impact and effectiveness of health impact assessment: A conceptual framework  

SciTech Connect

The use of health impact assessment (HIA) has expanded rapidly and there are increasing demands for it to demonstrate its effectiveness. This paper presents a conceptual framework for evaluating HIA and describes its development through (i) a review of the literature, (ii) a review of work undertaken as part of a major HIA capacity building project and (iii) an in-depth study of seven completed HIAs. The framework emphasises context, process and impacts as key domains in understanding and evaluating the effectiveness of an HIA. This new framework builds upon the existing approaches to evaluating HIA and extends them to reflect the broad range of factors that comprise and influence the effectiveness of HIAs. It may be of use in evaluating completed HIAs and in planning HIAs that are yet to be undertaken. -- Highlights: ? The first empirically-derived conceptual framework for evaluating HIA ? It may also be useful for planning and reporting on HIAs. ? The framework emphasises context, process and impacts as key domains. ? A broad range of factors influence the effectiveness of HIAs.

Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: ben@harrisroxashealth.com; Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.au

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evidence of uranium biomineralization in sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwestern China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence of uranium biomineralization in sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwestern Available online 25 January 2005 Abstract We show evidence that the primary uranium minerals, uraninite-front uranium deposits, Xinjiang, northwestern China were biogenically precipitated and psuedomorphically

Fayek, Mostafa

352

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 State(s) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Wyoming 134 139 181 195 245 301 308 348 424 512 Colorado and Texas 48 140 269 263 557 696 340 292 331 248 Nebraska and New Mexico 92 102 123 160 149 160 159 134 127 W Arizona, Utah, and Washington 47 40 75 120 245 360 273 281 W W Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota 0 0 0 16 25 30 W W W W California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia 0 0 0 0 9 17 W W W W Total 321 420 648 755 1,231 1,563 1,096 1,073 1,191 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012 person-years

353

The End of Cheap Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a world...

Dittmar, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Uranium Metal: Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Metal Uranium Metal Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses Steven M. Baker, Ph.D. Knoxville Tn 5 August 1998 Summary Uranium Metal is a Valuable Resource 3 Large Inventory of "Depleted Uranium" 3 Need Commercial Uses for Inventory  Avoid Disposal Cost  Real Added Value to Society 3 Uranium Metal Has Valuable Properties  Density  Strength 3 Market will Come if Story is Told Background The Nature of Uranium Background 3 Natural Uranium: 99.3% U238; 0.7% U 235 3 U235 Fissile  Nuclear Weapons  Nuclear Reactors 3 U238 Fertile  Neutron Irradiation of U238 Produces Pu239  Neutrons Come From U235 Fission  Pu239 is Fissile (Weapons, Reactors, etc.) Post World War II Legacy Background 3 "Enriched" Uranium Product  Weapons Program 

355

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual With Data for 2012 | Release Date: June 06, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 |full report Previous domestic uranium production reports Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 Go Drilling Figure 1. U.S. Uranium drilling by number of holes, 2004-2012 U.S. uranium exploration drilling was 5,112 holes covering 3.4 million feet in 2012. Development drilling was 5,970 holes and 3.7 million feet. Combined, total uranium drilling was 11,082 holes covering 7.2 million feet, 5 percent more holes than in 2011. Expenditures for uranium drilling in the United States were $67 million in 2012, an increase of 24 percent compared with 2011. Mining, production, shipments, and sales U.S. uranium mines produced 4.3 million pounds U3O8 in 2012, 5 percent more

356

Polyethylene Encapsulation of Depleted Uranium Trioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium, in the form of uranium trioxide (UO3) powder, was encapsulated in molten polyethylene forming a stable, dense composite henceforth known as DUPoly (patent pending). Materials were fed by calibra...

J. W. Adams; P. R. Lageraaen; P. D. Kalb…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

DOE Amends Decision for the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amends Decision for the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Amends Decision for the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings in Moab, Utah DOE Amends Decision for the Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings in Moab, Utah February 29, 2008 - 11:43am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced an amendment to its 2005 Record of Decision (ROD) for the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to allow for the use of truck or rail in transporting residual radioactive materials from the Moab site in Utah. These materials will be relocated to a new disposal site 30 miles north at Crescent Junction, Utah. "The Department is committed to ensuring the protection of human health and the environment in the Moab area and in the communities served by the Colorado River," Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Jim

358

Microstructure of depleted uranium under uniaxial strain conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium samples of two different purities were used for spall strength measurements. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material (38 ppm of carbon) and from material containing 280 ppm carbon. Experimental conditions were chosen to effectively arrest the microstructural damage at two places in the development to full spall separation. Samples were soft recovered and characterized with respect to the microstructure and the form of damage. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level stress state and sample purity. This information is used in developing a model to predict the mode of fracture.

A. K. Zurek; J. D. Embury; A. Kelly; W. R. Thissell; R. L. Gustavsen; J. E. Vorthman; R. S. Hixson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Alteration of mouse oocyte quality after a subchronic exposure to depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gametes and embryo tissues are known to represent a sensitive target to environmental toxicants exposure. Oocyte quality can impact subsequent developmental competence, pregnancy course and even adult health. The major health concern from depleted uranium (DU) is mainly centred on its chemotoxic properties as a heavy metal. Little attention was paid to the impact of uranium on female gamete quality. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of DU on mouse oocyte quality after 49 days of subchronic contamination in drinking water and to correlate the observed effects with the amount of DU accumulated in organs. Four different DU concentrations were investigated: 0 (control), 10 (DU10), 20 (DU20) and 40 mg L?1 (DU40). DU did not influence the intensity of ovulation but affected oocyte quality. The proportion of healthy oocytes was reduced by half (P < 0.001) from 20 mg L?1 compared with control group (0.537; 0.497; 0.282 and 0.239 in control, DU10, DU20 and DU40 groups respectively) whereas no accumulation of DU was recorded in the ovaries whatever the dose tested. Abnormal perivitelline space (P < 0.001) or absence of the 1st polar body (P < 0.001) was identified as the main characteristic of DU impact. In the context of this study, the NOAEL for oocyte quality was determined at 10 mg L?1 in drinking water (1.9 mg kg?1 day?1). An increase in the dose of contamination over 20 mg L?1 did not amplify the proportion of oocytes contracting a specific alteration but conducted to a diversification in oocytes abnormalities. Further investigations are necessary to correlate morphologic assessment of female gamete with its developmental competence.

Alexandre Feugier; Sandrine Frelon; Patrick Gourmelon; Marie Claraz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Speciation of uranium(VI) sorption complexes on montmorillonite  

SciTech Connect

Environmental contaminant releases that contain uranium are among the most serious problems that must be confronted by restoration programs. To facilitate restoration, information concerning the speciation of uranium is needed. Under oxidizing conditions, dissolved uranium is predominantly in the U(VI) (uranyl) form and is quite mobile in the environment, however sorption onto soils may retard its movement. In this study, we have investigated the effects of changes in solution speciation on the nature of uranyl sorption complexes on montmorillonite, a common soil constituent. Aqueous U(VI) solutions between pH 3 to 7 were batch-equilibrated with montmorillonite for several days; specific pH values were selected such that the solutions consisted of dominantly monomeric, oligomeric, or a mix of monomeric and oligomeric aqueous uranyl species. Emission spectroscopy was used to investigate the nature of U(VI) sorbed to montmorillonite.

Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Morris, D.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Richard, R.E. (Fort Lewis Coll., Durango, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Health Impacts of the School Commute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are a number of health implications associated with theschool children: implications for public health. Health andconcurrent health effects in all areas has implications both

Lee, Murray; Orenstein, Marla; Richardson, Maxwell J.; Ragland, David R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Statistical data of the uranium industry  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented on US uranium reserves, potential resources, exploration, mining, drilling, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1980. The compendium reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Office. Statistics are based primarily on information provided by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. Data on commercial U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ sales and purchases are included. Data on non-US uranium production and resources are presented in the appendix. (DMC)

none,

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Late health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA late health effects models.

Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models.

Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Grupa, J.B. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Information resources for assessing health effects from chemical exposure: Challenges, priorities, and future issues  

SciTech Connect

Issues related to developing information resources for assessing the health effects from chemical exposure include the question of how to address the individual political issues relevant to identifying and determining the timeliness, scientific credibility, and completeness of such kinds of information resources. One of the important ways for agencies to share information is through connection tables. This type of software is presently being used to build information products for some DHHS agencies. One of the challenges will be to convince vendors of data of the importance of trying to make data files available to communities that need them. In the future, information processing will be conducted with neural networks, object-oriented database management systems, and fuzzy-set technologies, and meta analysis techniques.

Seigel, S. [National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Health effects of electromagnetic field generated by lightning current pulses near down conductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lightning current generates a time varying magnetic field near down conductors, when lightning strikes the connected Franklin-rod. The down conductors are mounted on the wall of buildings, where residential places can be situated. It is well known that the rapidly changing magnetic fields could generate dangerous eddy currents in the human body. If the duration and the gradient of the magnetic field were high enough, the peripheral nerves are excited. In this study, the authors introduce an improved model of the interaction of electromagnetic fields of lighting current near a down conductor with the human body. The interaction model has two parts: estimation of the magnetic fields surrounding the down conductor and evaluation of health effects of rapid changing magnetic fields on the human body.

Z Á Tamus; B Novák; L Szücs; I Kiss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

What is the impact of systematically missing exposure data on air pollution health effect estimates?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time-series studies reporting associations between daily air pollution and health use pollution data from monitoring stations that vary in the frequency of recording. Within the Air Pollution and Health: A Europe...

Evangelia Samoli; Roger D. Peng; Tim Ramsay…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012" 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012" "million pounds U3O8" "Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s)","Forward Cost 2" ,"$0 to $30 per pound","$0 to $50 per pound","$0 to $100 per pound" "Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work","W","W",101.956759 "Properties Under Development for Production","W","W","W" "Mines in Production","W",21.40601,"W" "Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently","W","W",133.139239 "In-Situ Leach Mining","W","W",128.576534

369

Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study  

SciTech Connect

Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

1999-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

370

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Lost Creek ISR LLC Lost Creek Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 2,000,000 Developing

371

The Uranium Institute 24th Annual Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the waste U-238 into Pu-239 for burning. By this means 100 times as much energy can be obtained from it to extract the uranium, enriching the natural uranium in the fissile isotope U-235, burning the U-235 than the uranium fuel it burns, leading to a breeder reactor. In addition, if the reactor is a fast

Laughlin, Robert B.

372

D Riso-R-429 Automated Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

routinely used analytical techniques for uranium determina- tions in geological samples, fissionCM i D Riso-R-429 Automated Uranium Analysis by Delayed-Neutron Counting H. Kunzendorf, L. Løvborg AUTOMATED URANIUM ANALYSIS BY DELAYED-NEUTRON COUNTING H. Kunzendorf, L. Løvborg and E.M. Christiansen

373

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

374

THE BEIR-III REPORT AND THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

called hypothetical nuclear reactor accident are thereforenuclear reactors, but rather on the probabilities and health consequences of a reactor accident

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects  

SciTech Connect

This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" 4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" "Mill Owner","Mill Name","County, State (existing and planned locations)","Milling Capacity","Operating Status at End of the Year" ,,,"(short tons of ore per day)",2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Cotter Corporation","Canon City Mill","Fremont, Colorado",0,"Standby","Standby","Standby","Reclamation","Demolished" "EFR White Mesa LLC","White Mesa Mill","San Juan, Utah",2000,"Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating"

377

Effective dose conversion coefficients for health care provider exposed to pediatric and adult victims in radiological dispersal device incident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After an incident of radiological dispersal devices (RDD), health care providers will be exposed to the contaminated patients in the extended medical treatments. Assessment of potential radiation dose to the health care providers will be crucial to minimize their health risk. In this study, we compiled a set of conversion coefficients (mSv?MBq?1?s?1) to readily estimate the effective dose from the time-integrated activity for the health care providers while they deal with internally contaminated patients at different ages. We selected Co-60, Ir-192, Am-241, Cs-137, and I-131 as the major radionuclides that may be used for RDD. We obtained the age-specific organ burdens after the inhalation of those radionuclides from the Dose and Risk Calculation Software (DCAL) program. A series of hybrid computational phantoms (1-, 5-, 10-, and 15?year-old, and adult males) were implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, MCNPX v 2.7, to simulate an adult male health care provider exposed to contaminated patients at different ages. Two exposure scenarios were taken into account: a health care provider (a) standing at the side of patients lying in bed and (b) sitting face to face with patients. The conversion coefficients overall depended on radionuclides, the age of the patients, and the orientation of the patients. The conversion coefficient was greatest for Co-60 and smallest for Am-241. The dose from the 1?year-old patient phantom was up to three times greater than that from the adult patient phantom. The conversion coefficients were less dependent on the age of the patients in the scenario of a health care provider sitting face to face with patients. The dose conversion coefficients established in this study will be useful to readily estimate the effective dose to the health care providers in RDD events.

Eun Young Han; Wi-Ho Ha; Young-Woo Jin; Wesley E Bolch; Choonsik Lee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Depleted uranium is not toxic to rat brain endothelial (RBE4) cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies on Gulf War veterans with depleted uranium (DU) fragments embedded in their soft...3O8 uranyl chloride form of DU into RBE4 cells is efficient, but there are little or no resulting cytotoxic effects on th...

Allison W. Dobson; Anna K. Lack; Keith M. Erikson…

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Assessment of fish health effects resulting from exposure to oil sands wastewater  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to determine if oil sands wastewater had an effect on the general health and condition of hatchery raised rainbow trout (200 to 400 g). Effects were assessed based on a battery of physiological and biochemical indices and the physical condition of the fish. The trout were exposed to tailings water in the field and in a flow through system under laboratory conditions. The field tests were conducted in 1992 and 1993 in experimental ponds at Syncrude which contained fine tails covered with surface water, fine tails covered with tailings water, and a surface water control pond. The laboratory treatments included Mildred Lake tailings water, dyke drainage water, fractionated tailings pond water (acid fraction containing naphthenic acids), sodium naphthenate, recycle water from Suncor`s tailings pond, and a laboratory control. All body condition factors and blood parameters were normal in the field and laboratory exposed fish and there were no apparent differences between the fish exposed to the tailings water and controls.

Balch, G.C.; Goudey, J.S. [HydroQual Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Birkholtz, D. [EnviroTest Labs. Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Van Meer, T.; MacKinnon, M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 million pounds U 3 O 8 $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report"

382

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) 2003 NA NA NA NA W W 2004 W W W W 2,185 1,249 2005 W W W W 3,143 1,668 2006 1,473 821 3,430 1,892 4,903 2,713 2007 4,351 2,200 4,996 2,946 9,347 5,146 2008 5,198 2,543 4,157 2,551 9,355 5,093 2009 1,790 1,051 3,889 2,691 5,679 3,742 2010 2,439 1,460 4,770 3,444 7,209 4,904 2011 5,441 3,322 5,156 3,003 10,597 6,325 2012 5,112 3,447 5,970 3,709 11,082 7,156 NA = Not available. W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-

383

Uranium: Prices, rise, then fall  

SciTech Connect

Uranium prices hit eight-year highs in both market tiers, $16.60/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for non-former Soviet Union (FSU) origin and $15.50 for FSU origin during mid 1996. However, they declined to $14.70 and $13.90, respectively, by the end of the year. Increased uranium prices continue to encourage new production and restarts of production facilities presently on standby. Australia scrapped its {open_quotes}three-mine{close_quotes} policy following the ouster of the Labor party in a March election. The move opens the way for increasing competition with Canada`s low-cost producers. Other events in the industry during 1996 that have current or potential impacts on the market include: approval of legislation outlining the ground rules for privatization of the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC) and the subsequent sales of converted Russian highly enriched uranium (HEU) from its nuclear weapons program, announcement of sales plans for converted US HEU and other surplus material through either the Department of Energy or USEC, and continuation of quotas for uranium from the FSU in the United States and Europe. In Canada, permitting activities continued on the Cigar Lake and McArthur River projects; and construction commenced on the McClean Lake mill.

Pool, T.C.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012" 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012" "Item",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,"E2003",2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Exploration and Development" "Surface Drilling (million feet)",1.1,0.7,1.3,3,4.9,4.6,2.5,1,0.7,"W","W",1.2,1.7,2.7,5.1,5.1,3.7,4.9,6.3,7.2 "Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1",5.7,1.1,2.6,7.2,20,18.1,7.9,5.6,2.7,"W","W",10.6,18.1,40.1,67.5,81.9,35.4,44.6,53.6,66.6 "Mine Production of Uranium" "(million pounds U3O8)",2.1,2.5,3.5,4.7,4.7,4.8,4.5,3.1,2.6,2.4,2.2,2.5,3,4.7,4.5,3.9,4.1,4.2,4.1,4.3 "Uranium Concentrate Production" "(million pounds U3O8)",3.1,3.4,6,6.3,5.6,4.7,4.6,4,2.6,2.3,2,2.3,2.7,4.1,4.5,3.9,3.7,4.2,4,4.1

385

Oral Histories: Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D. Conducted October 14, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments June 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Graduate Studies at University of Rochester AEC-Funded Research at University of Rochester Use of Human Subjects at University of Rochester AEC Direction of University of Rochester Research Contacts With Researchers Into Radiation Effects No Knowledge of Uranium Injections at Rochester Beginning a Career at Hanford Radionuclide Inhalation Studies at Hanford Use of Animals in Radiation Studies Identifying Health Effects of Inhaled Radionuclides Expanded Customer Base for Inhalation Studies Limited Involvement With Human Studies

386

Influence of depleted uranium on hepatic cholesterol metabolism in apolipoprotein e-deficient mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is uranium with a lower content of the fissile isotope U-235 than natural uranium. It is a radioelement and a waste product from the enrichment process of natural uranium. Because of its very high density, it is used in the civil industry and for military purposes. DU exposure can affect many vital systems in the human body, because in addition to being weakly radioactive, uranium is a toxic metal. It should be emphasized that, to be exposed to radiation from DU, you have to eat, drink, or breathe it, or get it on your skin. This particular study is focusing on the health effects of DU for the cholesterol metabolism. Previous studies on the same issue have shown that the cholesterol metabolism was modulated at molecular level in the liver of laboratory rodents contaminated for nine months with DU. However, this modulation was not correlated with some effects at organs or body levels. It was therefore decided to use a “pathological model” such as hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-deficient laboratory mice in order to try to clarify the situation. The purpose of the present study is to assess the effects of a chronic ingestion (during 3 months) of a low level DU-supplemented water (20 mg L?1) on the above mentioned mice in order to determine a possible contamination effect. Afterwards the cholesterol metabolism was studied in the liver especially focused on the gene expressions of cholesterol-catabolising enzymes (CYP7A1, CYP27A1 and CYP7B1), as well as those of associated nuclear receptors (LXR?, FXR, PPAR?, and SREBP 2). In addition, mRNA levels of other enzymes of interest were measured (ACAT 2, as well as \\{HMGCoA\\} Reductase and \\{HMGCoA\\} Synthase). The gene expression study was completed with SRB1 and LDLr, apolipoproteins A1 and B and membrane transporters ABC A1, ABC G5. The major effect induced by a low level of DU contamination in apo-E deficient mice was a decrease in hepatic gene expression of the enzyme CYP7B1 (?23%) and nuclear receptors LXR? (?24%), RXR (?32%), HNF4? (?21%) when compared to unexposed ones. These modifications on cholesterol metabolism did not lead to increased disturbances that are specific for apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, suggesting that chronic DU exposure did not worsen the pathology in this experimental model. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that even for a sensitive pathologic model the exposure to a low dose of DU has no relevant impact. The results confirm the results of our first study carried out on healthy laboratory rodents where a sub-chronic contamination with low dose DU did not affect in vivo the metabolism of cholesterol.

M. Souidi; R. Racine; L. Grandcolas; S. Grison; J. Stefani; P. Gourmelon; P. Lestaevel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

OIL EXPOSURE AND CHRONIC HEALTH EFFECTS ON INDIGENOUS POPULATIONS IN SOUTH AMERICA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is an ongoing discussion on whether the activity of oil companies and its environmental impacts are a threat for the health of the populations… (more)

Gascon Merlos, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Neighborhood Disorder and Health: The Mediating Effects of Powerlessness and Psychological Distress.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? How does living in a dangerous community impact a person’s physical health? Research shows that people living in neighborhoods that they perceive to be… (more)

Hennessee, Kimberly K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal health effects Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Policy on the Occupational Health & Safety Program in the Care and Use of Animals in Research and Instruction...

390

Long-term exposure to depleted uranium in Gulf-War veterans does not induce chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Depleted uranium (DU) is a high-density heavy metal that has been used in munitions since the 1991 Gulf War. DU is weakly radioactive and chemically toxic, and long-term exposure may cause adverse health effects. This study evaluates genotoxic effects of exposure to DU by measuring chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes with fluorescence in situ hybridization whole-chromosome painting. Study participants are Gulf War-I Veterans with embedded DU fragments and/or inhalation exposure due to involvement in friendly-fire incidents; they are enrolled in a long-term health surveillance program at the Baltimore Veterans Administration Medical Center. Blood was drawn from 35 exposed male veterans aged 39 to 62 years. Chromosomes 1, 2, and 4 were painted red and chromosomes 3, 5, and 6 were simultaneously labeled green. At least 1800 metaphase cells per subject were scored. Univariate regression analyses were performed to evaluate the effects of log(urine uranium), age at time of blood draw, log(lifetime X-rays), pack-years smoked and alcohol use, against frequencies of cells with translocated chromosomes, dicentrics, acentric fragments, color junctions and abnormal cells. No significant relationships were observed between any cytogenetic endpoint and log(urine uranium) levels, smoking, or log(lifetime X-rays). Age at the time of blood draw showed significant relationships with all endpoints except for cells with acentric fragments. Translocation frequencies in these Veterans were all well within the normal range of published values for healthy control subjects from around the world. These results indicate that chronic exposure to DU does not induce significant levels of chromosome damage in these Veterans.

Marina V. Bakhmutsky; Katherine Squibb; Melissa McDiarmid; Marc Oliver; James D. Tucker

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of doses to members of the public, since all humans are exposed...22). For members of the public, ingestion could also be an...Physics Society First Annual Meeting 25-27 June 1956. 33-48...United States Uranium Registry/Hanford Environmental Health Foundation......

R. J. Tanner; J. S. Eakins; J. T. M. Jansen; J. D. Harrison

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution Health Effects A Report to the US Centers for Disease Prevention and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution Health Effects 1 #12;2 A Report to the US Centers Tracking of Air Pollution Effects January 15-16, 2008 #12;HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution ........................................................................................................................................... 13 AN INCREMENTAL APPROACH TO PUBLIC HEALTH TRACKING OF AIR POLLUTION

393

Chernobyl Studies Project - working group 7.0 environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, October 1993--January 1994  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project was begun as part of a cooperative agreement between the US and the former USSR, (quote) To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future reactor accident (quote). Most of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus has now turned primarily to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are extensively engaged in case-control and cohort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children and in the Ukraine. A major part of the effort is providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and providing support and equipment for the medical teams. This document contains reports on progress in the following task areas: Management; External Dose; Hydrological Transport; Chromosome Painting Dosimetry; Stochastic Effects; Thyroid Studies; and Leukemia Studies.

Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Uranium and Neptunium Desorption from Yucca Mountain Alluvium  

SciTech Connect

Uranium and neptunium were used as reactive tracers in long-term laboratory desorption studies using saturated alluvium collected from south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of these long-term experiments is to make detailed observations of the desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium to provide Yucca Mountain with technical bases for a more realistic and potentially less conservative approach to predicting the transport of adsorbing radionuclides in the saturated alluvium. This paper describes several long-term desorption experiments using a flow-through experimental method and groundwater and alluvium obtained from boreholes along a potential groundwater flow path from the proposed repository site. In the long term desorption experiments, the percentages of uranium and neptunium sorbed as a function of time after different durations of sorption was determined. In addition, the desorbed activity as a function of time was fit using a multi-site, multi-rate model to demonstrate that different desorption rate constants ranging over several orders of magnitude exist for the desorption of uranium from Yucca Mountain saturated alluvium. This information will be used to support the development of a conceptual model that ultimately results in effective K{sub d} values much larger than those currently in use for predicting radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain.

C.D. Scism; P.W. Reimus; M. Ding; S.J. Chipera

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Global terrestrial uranium supply and its policy implications : a probabilistic projection of future uranium costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accurate outlook on long-term uranium resources is critical in forecasting uranium costresource relationships, and for energy policy planning as regards the development and deployment of nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. ...

Matthews, Isaac A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012" 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012" "Production / Mining Method",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Underground" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W" "Open Pit" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "In-Situ Leaching" "(thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W",2681,4259,"W","W","W","W","W","W" "Other1" "(thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W"

397

:- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'Xxy";^ ...... ' '. .- -- Metals, Ceramics, and Materials. : . - ,.. ; - . _ : , , ' z . , -, .- . >. ; . .. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A .-... r .. .. i ' LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER 4 r . _.i'- ' ...... ' -'".. :-'' ,' :... : , '.- ' ;BY R.' J. ' ANSEN .AEC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT PERSONAL PROPERTY OF J. F. Schlltz .:- DECLASSIFIED - PER AUTHORITY OF (DAlE) (NhTI L (DATE)UE) FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER NATIONAL LFE A COMPANY OF OHIO 26 1 3967 3035406 NLCO - 886 Metals, Ceramics and Materials (TID-4500, 22nd Ed.) DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER By R. J. Jansen* TECHNICAL DIVISION NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Date of Issuance: September 13, 1963 Approved By: Approved By: Technical Director Head, Metallurgical Department *Mr. Jansen is presently

398

Potential Uses of Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM Robert R. Price U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20874 M. Jonathan Haire and Allen G. Croff Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 June 2000 For American Nuclear Society 2000 International Winter and Embedded Topical Meetings Washington, D.C. November 12B16, 2000 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________

399

Semiconductive Properties of Uranium Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES Thomas Meek Materials Science Engineering Department University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37931 Michael Hu and M. Jonathan Haire Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6179 August 2000 For the Waste Management 2001 Symposium Tucson, Arizona February 25-March 1, 2001 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________ * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy

400

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012" 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012" "person-years" "State(s)",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Wyoming",134,139,181,195,245,301,308,348,424,512 "Colorado and Texas",48,140,269,263,557,696,340,292,331,248 "Nebraska and New Mexico",92,102,123,160,149,160,159,134,127,"W" "Arizona, Utah, and Washington",47,40,75,120,245,360,273,281,"W","W" "Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota",0,0,0,16,25,30,"W","W","W","W" "California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia",0,0,0,0,9,17,"W","W","W","W"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" 5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" "In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner","In-Situ-Leach Plant Name","County, State (existing and planned locations)","Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year)","Operating Status at End of the Year" ,,,,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Cameco","Crow Butte Operation","Dawes, Nebraska",1000000,"Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating" "Hydro Resources, Inc.","Church Rock","McKinley, New Mexico",1000000,"Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed"

402

Nuclear non-proliferation regime effectiveness : an integrated methodology for analyzing highly enriched uranium production scenarios at gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dramatic change in the international security environment after the collapse of the bipolar system has had a negative impact on the effectiveness of the existing nuclear non-proliferation regime. Furthermore, the success ...

Kwak, Taeshin (Taeshin S.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Package Package Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package The steel components of the waste package could be replaced with a uranium cermet. The cermet contains uranium dioxide particulates, which are embedded in steel. Cermets are made with outer layers of clean steel; thus, there is no radiation-contamination hazard in handling the waste packages. Because cermets are made of the same materials that would normally be found in the YM repository (uranium dioxide and steel), there are no chemical compatibility issues. From half to all of the DU inventory in the United States could be used for this application. Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Cross Section of a Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Follow the link below for more information on Cermets:

404

Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DU Uses DU Uses Depleted Uranium Uses Research & Development A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore beneficial uses of depleted uranium (DU) and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6. A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore the safe, beneficial use of depleted uranium and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6 (e.g., fluorine and empty carbon steel cylinders) for the purposes of resource conservation and cost savings compared with disposal. This program explored the risks and benefits of several depleted uranium uses, including uses as a radiation shielding material, a catalyst, and a semi-conductor material in electronic devices.

405

Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

HEALTH & COUNSELLING Health Clinic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH & COUNSELLING SERVICES Health Clinic 778.783.4615 - Burnaby 778.782.5200 - Vancouver_counsellor@sfu.ca Health Promotion 778.782.4674 Health & Counselling Services, SFU - 8888 University Drive, MBC 0164 health can suffer if you're under stress for a long time, especially if you are not eating well. You may

407

Uranium bioaccumulation and biological disorders induced in zebrafish (Danio rerio) after a depleted uranium waterborne exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of its toxicity and its ubiquity within aquatic compartments, uranium (U) represents a significant hazard to aquatic species such as fish. In a previous study, we investigated some biological responses in zebrafish either exposed to depleted or to enriched U (i.e., to different radiological activities). However, results required further experiments to better understand biological responses. Moreover, we failed to clearly demonstrate a significant relationship between biological effects and U radiological activity. We therefore chose to herein examine U bioaccumulation and induced effects in zebrafish according to a chemical dose–response approach. Results showed that U is highly bioconcentrated in fish, according to a time- and concentration-dependent model. Additionally, hepatic antioxidant defenses, red blood cells DNA integrity and brain acetylcholinesterase activity were found to be significantly altered. Generally, the higher the U concentration, the sooner and/or the greater the effect, suggesting a close relationship between accumulation and effect.

Sabrina Barillet; Christelle Adam-Guillermin; Olivier Palluel; Jean-Marc Porcher; Alain Devaux

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 Total Mines and Sources 4 6 10 11 12 17 20 9 11 12 Other 1 Number of Operating Mines Table 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Underground Open Pit In-Situ Leaching Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012).

409

Review of uranium bioassay techniques  

SciTech Connect

A variety of analytical techniques is available for evaluating uranium in excreta and tissues at levels appropriate for occupational exposure control and evaluation. A few (fluorometry, kinetic phosphorescence analysis, {alpha}-particle spectrometry, neutron irradiation techniques, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) have also been demonstrated as capable of determining uranium in these materials at levels comparable to those which occur naturally. Sample preparation requirements and isotopic sensitivities vary widely among these techniques and should be considered carefully when choosing a method. This report discusses analytical techniques used for evaluating uranium in biological matrices (primarily urine) and limits of detection reported in the literature. No cost comparison is attempted, although references are cited which address cost. Techniques discussed include: {alpha}-particle spectrometry; liquid scintillation spectrometry, fluorometry, phosphorometry, neutron activation analysis, fission-track counting, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A summary table of reported limits of detection and of the more important experimental conditions associated with these reported limits is also provided.

Bogard, J.S.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18 108 W W 121 420 2005 79 149 142 154 124 648 2006 188 121 W W 155 755 2007 375 378 107 216 155 1,231 2008 457 558 W W 154 1,563 2009 175 441 W W 162 1,096 2010 211 400 W W 125 1,073 2011 208 462 W W 102 1,191 2012 161 462 W W 179 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-2012 person-years W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

411

SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C ·Historical Operation ·Western Nuclear Crooks Gap Project ·Mined 1956 ­ 1988 and Open Pit Mining ·Current Mine Permit (381C) ·Updating POO, Reclamation Plan & Bond ·Uranium Recovery

412

Excretion of depleted uranium by Gulf war veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Dosimetry Article Excretion of depleted uranium by Gulf war veterans R. E...personnel had potential intakes of depleted uranium (DU), including shrapnel...excretion rate. Excretion of depleted uranium by Gulf War veterans. | During......

R. E. Toohey

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Depleted uranium - induced malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Washington, DC Abstract 3590: Depleted uranium-induced leukemia: Epigenetic...with leukemia development. Depleted uranium is used in military missions...Karvelisse Miller, Max Costa. Depleted uranium-induced leukemia: Epigenetic...

Aldona A. Karaczyn; Hong Xie; and John P. Wise

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Uranium Pollution of Meat in Tien-Shan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium in water, soil, fodder and food products (especially meat) was studied in areas of former Soviet uranium industry in Tien-Shan 1950–1970. Uranium environment migration was very intensive in Tien-Shan, due...

Rustam Tuhvatshin; Igor Hadjamberdiev…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Society's Nervous System: Building Effective Government, Energy, and Public Health Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drawing on a unique, multi-year collaboration with the heads of major IT, wireless, hardware, health, and financial firms, as well as the heads of American, EU, and other regulatory organizations, and a variety of NGOs ...

Pentland, Alex Paul

416

Broadcast news and abortion : the effects of conservative narratives on the reproductive health debate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How have changes in the elite discussion of reproductive health narratives affected the debate on abortion and influenced state legislation and popular opinion? Using analysis of broadcast transcripts from CNN and FOX News, ...

Jenssen, Mark (Mark Peter)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Structural Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of metal-contaminated waters (in engineered remediation technologies, for example)?" Uranium is a key contaminant of concern at US DOE sites and shuttered mining and ore...

418

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

419

U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The initial uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The...

420

Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetric Measurements of Trace Uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of Trace Uranium at the Bismuth Film Electrode. Abstract: Bismuth-coated carbon-fiber electrodes have been successfully applied for adsorptive-stripping...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Biogeochemical Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted with uranium contaminated subsurface sediment to assess the geochemical and microbial community response to ethanol amendment. A...

422

Statistical data of the uranium industry  

SciTech Connect

Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry is a compendium of information relating to US uranium reserves and potential resources and to exploration, mining, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1981. The statistics are based primarily on data provided voluntarily by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. The compendium has been published annually since 1968 and reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Area Office (GJAO) of the US Department of Energy. The production, reserves, and drilling information is reported in a manner which avoids disclosure of proprietary information.

none,

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Uranium geochemistry in soil and groundwater at the F and H seepage basins  

SciTech Connect

For 33 years, low activity liquid wastes from the chemical separation areas at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site were disposed of in unlined seepage basins. Soil and associated pore water samples of widely varying groundwater chemistries and contaminant concentrations were collected from the region downgradient of these basins using cone penetrometer technology. Analysis of samples using inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry has allowed the investigation of uranium partitioning between the aqueous phase and soil surfaces at this site. The distribution of uranium was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH, redox potential, cation and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation modeling. The uranium soil source term at the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB) is much smaller than has been used in previous modeling efforts. This should result in a much shorter remediation time and a greater effectiveness of a pump-and-treat design than previously predicted. Distribution coefficients at the (FHSB) were found to vary between 1.2 to 34,000 1 kg{sup {minus}1} for uranium. Differences in sorption of these elements can be explained primarily by changes in aqueous pH and the associated change in soil surface charge. Sorption models were fit directly to sorption isotherms from field samples. All models underestimated the fraction of uranium bound at low aqueous uranium concentrations. Linear models overestimated bound uranium at locations where the aqueous concentration was greater than 500 ppb. Mechanistic models provided a much better estimate of the bound uranium concentrations, especially at high aqueous concentrations. Since a large fraction of the uranium at the site is associated with the low-pH portion of the plume, consideration should be given to pumping water from the lowest pH portions of the plume in the F-Area.

Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, W.H.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal administration of CBMIDA for removing uranium in rats after parenteral injections of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......chemical forms of the uranium in the body after intake...REFERENCES 1 Mould R. F. Depleted uranium and radiation-induced lung cancer and leukaemia. Br. J...Abou-Donia M. B. Depleted and natural uranium: chemistry and toxicological......

S. Fukuda; M. Ikeda; M. Nakamura; X. Yan; Y. Xie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

SRP Scientific Meeting: Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

London, January 2002 The meeting was organised by the SRP to review current research and discuss the use, dispersion into the environment and radiological impact of depleted uranium (DU) by the UK and US in recent military conflicts. Brian Spratt chaired the morning session of the meeting and stressed the need to gauge the actual risks involved in using DU and to balance professional opinions with public mistrust of scientists and government bodies. He asked whether more could be done by the radiation protection profession to improve communication with the media, pressure groups and the public in general. Ron Brown, of the MOD Dstl Radiological Protection Services, gave a thorough overview of the origins and properties of DU, focusing on munitions, in the UK and abroad and public concerns arising from its use in the 1991 Gulf War. He gave a brief overview of past DU munitions studies by the UK and US governments and contrasted this with the lack of hard data used to back up claims made by pressure groups. He compared the known risks of DU with other battlefield risks, e.g. biological agents, chemical attacks and vaccines, and questioned whether peacetime dose limits should apply to soldiers on the battlefield. Barry Smith, of the British Geological Survey, spoke on DU transport, pathways and exposure routes focusing on groundwater as an important example in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Kosovo. He discussed the large amount of work that has already been done on natural uranium in groundwater, with particular emphasis on its mobility within the soil and rock profile being strongly dependent on precipitation and the local geochemical conditions. Therefore, generic risk assessments will not be sufficient in gauging risks to local populations after the introduction of DU into their environment; local geochemical conditions must be taken into account. However, experiments are required to fully appreciate the extent to which DU, particularly DU:Ti alloys used in munitions, disperses into the environment in a variety of soil types. Barry outlined recent computer modelling work investigating the time taken for DU to migrate from a buried munition to a borehole in three different scenarios. The modelling revealed times from 30 years to 5 ? 109 years depending on the local geochemical environment and the depth of the DU penetrator in the soil profile. This suggests the real possibility of borehole contamination within a human lifetime in wet conditions similar to those found in Kosovo. Nick Priest, of Middlesex University, discussed methods of biological monitoring for natural and depleted uranium. The preferred method of detection is by 24 h urine sampling, with measurement of the total mass or isotopic ratios of uranium using mass spectroscopy (ICPMS). This is because uranium is only deposited in new areas of bone growth, a slow process in healthy adults, the remainder is filtered by the kidneys and excreted in urine, giving a non-invasive and rapid sample collection method. Nick also described a rapid assessment technique to look for total uranium and DU in a sample, using a multi-collector ICPMS, specifically looking at the 235U:238U ratio with 236U as a tracer to determine the total mass of uranium present and its source. The MC-ICPMS method was applied in a BBC Scotland funded study of uptakes of uranium in three populations in the Balkans during March 2001. Variable levels of DU were found in each population. The age of the subject was found to influence the excretion of natural uranium and DU to the same degree, increasing age leading to increased excretion. Overall, the levels of DU were extremely small (tens of µg), but DU was found to be present in each population investigated. The MC-ICPMS method is capable of detecting  1% DU in natural uranium and Nick intends to extend the study to include ground and drinking water samples and food in the same populations. Neil Stradling gave a talk on the contribution of the NRPB to the WHO report on DU published in April 2001. It addressed the biokinetics of inhaled uranium

David Kestell

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Depleted uranium risk assessment for Jefferson Proving Ground using data from environmental monitoring and site characterization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the third risk assessment completed for the depleted uranium (DU) munitions testing range at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG), Indiana, for the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation command. Jefferson Proving Ground was closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act and the testing mission was moved to Yuma Proving Ground. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This report integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

United States transuranium and uranium registries - 25 years of growth, research, and service. Annual report, April 1992--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Registries originated in 1968 as the National Plutonium Registry with the name changed to the United States Transuranium Registry the following year to reflect a broader concern with the heavier actinides as well. Initially, the scientific effort of the USTR was directed towards study of the distribution and dose of plutonium and americium in occupationally exposed persons, and to assessment of the effects of exposure to the transuranium elements on health. This latter role was reassessed during the 1970`s when it was recognized that the biased cohort of the USTR was inappropriate for epidemiologic analysis. In 1978, the administratively separate but parallel United States Uranium Registry was created to carry out similar work among persons exposed to uranium and its decay products. A seven member scientific advisory committee provided guidance and scientific oversight. In 1992, the two Registries were administratively combined and transferred from the purview of a Department of Energy contractor to Washington State University under the provisions of a grant. Scientific results for the first twenty-five years of the Registries are summarized, including the 1985 publication of the analysis of the first whole body donor. Current scientific work in progress is summarized along with administrative activities for the period.

Kathren, R.L.; Harwick, L.A.; Toohey, R.E.; Russell, J.J.; Filipy, R.E.; Dietert, S.E.; Hunacek, M.M.; Hall, C.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on...

429

Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Most recently, LM visited 84 defense-related legacy uranium mine sites located within 11 uranium mining districts in 6 western states. At these sites, photographs and global...

430

Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Uranium.pdf More Documents & Publications Secretarial Determination Pursuant to USEC Privatization Act for the Sale or Transfer of Low-Enriched Uranium Secretarial...

431

Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

5-15-14.pdf More Documents & Publications Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan 2008 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the...

432

President Truman Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Uranium and Plutonium Washington, DC President Truman approves a 1.4 billion expansion of Atomic Energy Commission facilities to produce uranium and plutonium for nuclear weapons...

433

Editorial - Depleted Uranium: A Problem of Perception rather than Reality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Protection Dosimetry Editorial Editorial - Depleted Uranium: A Problem of Perception rather than Reality R. L. Kathren Depleted uranium: a problem of perception rather than reality......

R. L. Kathren

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Modeling of Depleted Uranium Transport in Subsurface Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater and soil contamination with depleted uranium (DU) isan important public concern because ... four extremecases of climate and existing conditions of uranium penetrator fragments. The simulations demons...

J. Paul Chen; Sotira Yiacoumi

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site Summary This...

436

3rd Quarter 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, ""Domestic Uranium Production Report.""" " U.S. Energy Information Administration 3rd Quarter 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report...

437

Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chronic disease complications Improve quality of life Reduce health care costs #12;ImpactHealth Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal

Meagher, Mary

438

Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1980 annual report  

SciTech Connect

Studies of asphalt emulsion sealants conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory have demonstrated that the sealants are effective in containing radon and other potentially hazardous material within uranium tailings. The laboratory and field studies have further demonstrated that radon exhalation from uranium tailings piles can be reduced by greater than 99% to near background levels. Field tests at the tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado, confirmed that an 8-cm admix seal containing 22 wt% asphalt could be effectively applied with a cold-mix paver. Other techniques were successfully tested, including a soil stabilizer and a hot, rubberized asphalt seal that was applied with a distributor truck. After the seals were applied and compacted, overburden was applied over the seal to protect the seal from ultraviolet degradation.

Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.; Buelt, J.L.; Nelson, D.A.; Elmore, M.R.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Uranio impoverito: perch'e? (Depleted uranium: why?)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we develop a simple model of the penetration process of a long rod through an uniform target. Applying the momentum and energy conservation laws, we derive an analytical relation which shows how the penetration depth depends upon the density of the rod, given a fixed kinetic energy. This work was sparked off by the necessity of the author of understanding the reasons of the effectiveness of high density penetrators (e.g. depleted uranium penetrators) as anti-tank weapons.

D'Abramo, G

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Advective Desorption of Uranium (VI) from Contaminated Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentary, hydrologic, and geochemical variations in the Hanford subsurface environment, as well as compositional differences in contaminating waste streams, have created vast differences in the migration and mobility of uranium within the subsurface environment. A series of hydraulically-saturated and -unsaturated column experiments were performed to i.) assess the effect of water content on the advective desorption and migration of uranium from contaminated sediments, and ii.) evaluate the uranium concentration that can develop in porewater and/or groundwater as a result of desorption/dissolution reactions. Flow rate and moisture content were varied to evaluate the influence of contact time, pore water velocity, and macropore desaturation on aqueous uranium concentrations. Sediments were collected from the T-TX-TY tank farm complex and the 300 Area Process Ponds located on the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington State. The sediments vary in depth, mineralogy, and in contamination events. Experiments were conducted under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of conditions commonly encountered at repository sites across the arid western United States and, in particular, the Hanford site. Results illustrate the release of uranium from these sediments is kinetically controlled and low water contents encountered within the Hanford vadose zone result in the formation of mobile-immobile water regimes, which isolate a fraction of the reactive sites within the sediments, effectively reducing the concentration of uranium released into migrating porewaters.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Forrester, Steven W.

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects uranium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The New Generation of Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities: Design Improvements Should Reduce Radiological Impacts Relative to First Generation Uranium Solution Mining Plants  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching / In Situ Recovery (ISL / ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the mid 1970's. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980's). These early designs typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ including use of ammonium carbonate which resulted in groundwater restoration challenges, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying vs the 'zero emissions' vacuum dryers as typically used today. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery in the U.S. typically involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing (gaseous oxygen e.g) and complexing agents (carbon dioxide, e.g) into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant ( mill). Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. The radiological character of these processes are described using empirical data collected from many operating facilities. Additionally, the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these first generation facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of uranium ISR technologies and facilities. In summary: This paper has presented an overview of in situ Uranium recovery processes and associated major radiological aspects and monitoring considerations. Admittedly, the purpose was to present an overview of those special health physics considerations dictated by the in situ Uranium recovery technology, to point out similarities and differences to conventional mill programs and to contrast these alkaline leach facilities to modern day ISR designs. As evidenced by the large number of ISR projects currently under development in the U.S. and worldwide, non conventional Uranium recovery techniques

Brown, S.H. [CHP, SHB INC., Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

New Findings Allay Concerns Over Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...poses virtually no cancer risk. Moreover, Danesi's...VISAR KRYEZIU/AP Depleted uranium is what's left...the munitions to cancer cases, particularly...VISAR KRYEZIU/AP Depleted uranium is what's left...the munitions to cancer cases, particularly...

Richard Stone

2002-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

443

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Ore from Underground Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills 1 0 W W W 0 W W W W W Other Feed Materials 2 W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,000 2,282 2,689 4,106 4,534 3,902 3,708 4,228 3,991 4,146 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E1,600 2,280 2,702 3,838 4,050 4,130 3,620 5,137 4,000 3,911 Deliveries (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W 3,786 3,602 3,656 2,044 2,684 2,870 3,630 Weighted-Average Price (dollars per pound U 3 O 8 ) W W W 28.98 42.11 43.81 36.61 37.59 52.36 49.63 Notes: The 2003 annual amounts were estimated by rounding to the nearest 200,000 pounds to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Totals may not equal sum of components

444

IPNS enriched uranium booster target  

SciTech Connect

Since startup in 1981, IPNS has operated on a fully depleted /sup 238/U target. With the booster as in the present system, high energy protons accelerated to 450 MeV by the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron are directed at the target and by mechanisms of spallation and fission of the uranium, produce fast neutrons. The neutrons from the target pass into adjacent moderator where they slow down to energies useful for spectroscopy. The target cooling systems and monitoring systems have operated very reliably and safely during this period. To provide higher neutron intensity, we have developed plans for an enriched uranium (booster) target. HETC-VIM calculations indicate that the target will produce approx.90 kW of heat, with a nominal x5 gain (k/sub eff/ = 0.80). The neutron beam intensity gain will be a factor of approx.3. Thermal-hydraulic and heat transport calculations indicate that approx.1/2 in. thick /sup 235/U discs are subject to about the same temperatures as the present /sup 238/U 1 in. thick discs. The coolant will be light demineralized water (H/sub 2/O) and the coolant flow rate must be doubled. The broadening of the fast neutron pulse width should not seriously affect the neutron scattering experiments. Delayed neutrons will appear at a level about 3% of the total (currently approx.0.5%). This may affect backgrounds in some experiments, so that we are assessing measures to control and correct for this (e.g., beam tube choppers). Safety analyses and neutronic calculations are nearing completion. Construction of the /sup 235/U discs at the ORNL Y-12 facility is scheduled to begin late 1985. The completion of the booster target and operation are scheduled for late 1986. No enriched uranium target assembly operating at the projected power level now exists in the world. This effort thus represents an important technological experiment as well as being a ''flux enhancer''.

Schulke, A.W. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Uranium in prehistoric Indian pottery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

present in the sample, and the cross l section of the process (the measure of the probability of a neutron interacting with an uranium atom), In general, a daughter product 235 of U fission is analyzed on a detector which counts either gamma rays... for quantitative analysis of various elements on archaeological artifacts, Manganese has been determined in Mesoamerican pot sherds (Bennyhoff and Heizer 1965). A Pu-Be radioisotope neutron source with a flux of 4 x 10 4 -2 -1 neutrons cm sec was used...

Filberth, Ernest William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

446

Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's DUF DOE's DUF 6 Cylinder Inventory a Location Number of Cylinders DUF 6 (MT) b Paducah, Kentucky 36,910 450,000 Portsmouth, Ohio 16,041 198,000 Oak Ridge (ETTP), Tennessee 4,683 56,000 Total 57,634 704,000 a The DOE inventory includes DUF 6 generated by the government, as well as DUF 6 transferred from U.S. Enrichment Corporation pursuant to two memoranda of agreement. b A metric ton (MT) is equal to 1,000 kilograms, or 2,200 pounds. Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce enriched uranium for U.S. national defense and civilian purposes. The gaseous diffusion process uses uranium in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ), primarily because UF 6 can conveniently be used in

447

National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Tonopah quadrangle, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Tonopah Quadrangle, Nevada, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Investigations included reconnaissance and detailed surface geologic and radiometric studies, geochemical sampling and evaluation, analysis and ground-truth followup of aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data, and subsurface data evaluation. The results of these investigations indicate environments favorable for hydroallogenic uranium deposits in Miocene lacustrine sediments of the Big Smoky Valley west of Tonopah. The northern portion of the Toquima granitic pluton is favorable for authigenic uranium deposits. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits include Quaternary sediments; intermediate and mafic volcanic and metavolcanic rocks; Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Precambrian sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks; those plutonic rocks not included within favorable areas; and those felsic volcanic rocks not within the Northumberland and Mount Jefferson calderas.

Hurley, B W; Parker, D P

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

BLENDING LOW ENRICHED URANIUM WITH DEPLETED URANIUM TO CREATE A SOURCE MATERIAL ORE THAT CAN BE PROCESSED FOR THE RECOVERY OF YELLOWCAKE AT A CONVENTIONAL URANIUM MILL  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex, there are a number of streams of low enriched uranium (LEU) that contain various trace contaminants. These surplus nuclear materials require processing in order to meet commercial fuel cycle specifications. To date, they have not been designated as waste for disposal at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS). Currently, with no commercial outlet available, the DOE is evaluating treatment and disposal as the ultimate disposition path for these materials. This paper will describe an innovative program that will provide a solution to DOE that will allow disposition of these materials at a cost that will be competitive with treatment and disposal at the NTS, while at the same time recycling the material to recover a valuable energy resource (yellowcake) for reintroduction into the commercial nuclear fuel cycle. International Uranium (USA) Corporation (IUSA) and Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) have entered into a commercial relationship to pursue the development of this program. The program involves the design of a process and construction of a plant at NFS' site in Erwin, Tennessee, for the blending of contaminated LEU with depleted uranium (DU) to produce a uranium source material ore (USM Ore{trademark}). The USM Ore{trademark} will then be further processed at IUC's White Mesa Mill, located near Blanding, Utah, to produce conventional yellowcake, which can be delivered to conversion facilities, in the same manner as yellowcake that is produced from natural ores or other alternate feed materials. The primary source of feed for the business will be the significant sources of trace contaminated materials within the DOE complex. NFS has developed a dry blending process (DRYSM Process) to blend the surplus LEU material with DU at its Part 70 licensed facility, to produce USM Ore{trademark} with a U235 content within the range of U235 concentrations for source material. By reducing the U235 content to source material levels in this manner, the material will be suitable for processing at a conventional uranium mill under its existing Part 40 license to remove contaminants and enable the product to re-enter the commercial fuel cycle. The tailings from processing the USM Ore{trademark} at the mill will be permanently disposed of in the mill's tailings impoundment as 11e.(2) byproduct material. Blending LEU with DU to make a uranium source material ore that can be returned to the nuclear fuel cycle for processing to produce yellowcake, has never been accomplished before. This program will allow DOE to disposition its surplus LEU and DU in a cost effective manner, and at the same time provide for the recovery of valuable energy resources that would be lost through processing and disposal of the materials. This paper will discuss the nature of the surplus LEU and DU materials, the manner in which the LEU will be blended with DU to form a uranium source material ore, and the legal means by which this blending can be accomplished at a facility licensed under 10 CFR Part 70 to produce ore that can be processed at a conventional uranium mill licensed under 10 CFR Part 40.

Schutt, Stephen M.; Hochstein, Ron F.; Frydenlund, David C.; Thompson, Anthony J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

449

Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

Francis, C. W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Men's Health - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials > Men's Health Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Health & Productivity Health...

451

Health & Productivity - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health & Productivity Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and Screenings...

452

Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

453

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

454

Effect of non-aqueous drilling fluid and its synthetic base oil on soil health as indicated by its dehydrogenase activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drilling fluids are used for drilling natural gas, oil and water wells. These spill over into the surrounding soil at the point of drilling, which may impair soil health. A ... out to determine the effect of non ...

Kanchan Wakadikar; Avik Sil; Niranjan Kolekar…

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

FAQ 3-What are the common forms of uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are the common forms of uranium? are the common forms of uranium? What are the common forms of uranium? Uranium can take many chemical forms. In nature, uranium is generally found as an oxide, such as in the olive-green-colored mineral pitchblende. Uranium oxide is also the chemical form most often used for nuclear fuel. Uranium-fluorine compounds are also common in uranium processing, with uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) being the two most common. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored metal. The most common forms of uranium oxide are U3O8 and UO2. Both oxide forms have low solubility in water and are relatively stable over a wide range of environmental conditions. Triuranium octaoxide (U3O8) is the most stable form of uranium and is the form most commonly found in nature. Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the form in which uranium is most commonly used as a nuclear reactor fuel. At ambient temperatures, UO2 will gradually convert to U3O8. Because of their stability, uranium oxides are generally considered the preferred chemical form for storage or disposal.

456

The Sorption/Desorption Behavior of Uranium in Transport Studies Using Yucca Mountain Alluvium  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, Nevada is the proposed site of a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. In the event repository engineered barriers fail, the saturated alluvium located south of Yucca Mountain is expected to serve as a natural barrier to the migration of radionuclides to the accessible environment. The purpose of this study is to improve the characterization of uranium retardation in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain to support refinement of an assessment model. The distribution of uranium desorption rates from alluvium obtained from Nye County bore holes EWDP-19IM1, EWDP-10SA, EWDP-22SA were studied to address inconsistencies between results from batch sorption and column transport experiments. The alluvium and groundwater were characterized to better understand the underlying mechanisms of the observed behavior. Desorption rate constants were obtained using an activity based mass balance equation and column desorption experiments were analyzed using a mathematical model utilizing multiple sorption sites with different first-order forward and reverse reaction rates. The uranium desorption rate constants decreased over time, suggesting that the alluvium has multiple types of active sorption sites with different affinities for uranium. While a significant fraction of the initially sorbed uranium desorbed from the alluvium quite rapidly, a roughly equivalent amount remained sorbed after several months of testing. The information obtained through this research suggests that uranium may experience greater effective retardation in the alluvium than simple batch sorption experiments would suggest. Electron Probe Microanalysis shows that uranium is associated with both clay minerals and iron oxides after sorption to alluvial material. These results provide further evidence that the alluvium contains multiple sorption sites for uranium.

C. D. Scism

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Radon releases from Australian uranium mining and milling projects: assessing the UNSCEAR approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The release of radon gas and progeny from the mining and milling of uranium-bearing ores has long been recognised as a potential radiological health hazard. The standards for exposure to radon and progeny have decreased over time as the understanding of their health risk has improved. In recent years there has been debate on the long-term releases (10,000 years) of radon from uranium mining and milling sites, focusing on abandoned, operational and rehabilitated sites. The primary purpose has been estimates of the radiation exposure of both local and global populations. Although there has been an increasing number of radon release studies over recent years in the USA, Australia, Canada and elsewhere, a systematic evaluation of this work has yet to be published in the international literature. This paper presents a detailed compilation and analysis of Australian studies. In order to quantify radon sources, a review of data on uranium mining and milling wastes in Australia, as they influence radon releases, is presented. An extensive compilation of the available radon release data is then assembled for the various projects, including a comparison to predictions of radon behaviour where available. An analysis of cumulative radon releases is then developed and compared to the UNSCEAR approach. The implications for the various assessments of long-term releases of radon are discussed, including aspects such as the need for ongoing monitoring of rehabilitation at uranium mining and milling sites and life-cycle accounting.

Gavin M. Mudd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A MODEL STUDY ON THE ABSORBED DOSE OF RADIATION FOLLOWING RESPIRATORY INTAKE OF 238U3O8 AEROSOLS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......A review of depleted uranium biological effects...Rev. Environ. Health (2007) 22...Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general...Environmental and health consequences of depleted uranium use in the 1991......

Carlo Canepa

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

ESTIMATION OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT BURDEN RESULTING FROM A PROLONGED INHALATION EXPOSURE TO AEROSOLS OF DU, BASED ON THE U IN A 24-H URINE SAMPLE TAKEN YEARS AFTER EXPOSURE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......military use, and health effects of depleted uranium. (1999) Available...Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general overview...Waligorski M. P.R. Depleted uranium-a health, environmental or societal......

M. Valdés

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Gulf War Illness: The Battle Continues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...long-term health effects...for PB, depleted uranium, and anthrax...variety of health problems...contained depleted uranium as ballast—as...long-term health effects...for PB, depleted uranium, and anthrax...

Martin Enserink

2001-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting: Comments on American Medical Association Policy Statement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The American Medical Association House of Delegates in June of 2012 adopted a policy statement on nighttime lighting and human health. This major policy statement summarizes the scientific evidence that nighttime electric light can disrupt circadian rhythms in humans and documents the rapidly advancing understanding from basic science of how disruption of circadian rhythmicity affects aspects of physiology with direct links to human health, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and metabolism. The human evidence is also accumulating, with the strongest epidemiologic support for a link of circadian disruption from light at night to breast cancer. There are practical implications of the basic and epidemiologic science in the form of advancing lighting technologies that better accommodate human circadian rhythmicity.

Richard G. Stevens; George C. Brainard; David E. Blask; Steven W. Lockley; Mario E. Motta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Global Health: Global Effects of Smoking, of Quitting, and of Taxing Tobacco  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...people this century, mostly in low- and middle-income countries. About half of these deaths will occur before 70 years of age.– The 2013 World Health Assembly called on governments to reduce the prevalence of smoking by about a third by 2025, which would avoid more than 200 million deaths from tobacco... Cigarette smoking is a major cause of illness and death. This article reviews both the magnitude of the disease burden from cigarette smoking worldwide and strategies to limit smoking.

Jha P.; Peto R.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

463

Measurements of daily urinary uranium excretion in German peacekeeping personnel and residents of the Kosovo region to assess potential intakes of depleted uranium (DU)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following the end of the Kosovo conflict, in June 1999, a study was instigated to evaluate whether there was a cause for concern of health risk from depleted uranium (DU) to German peacekeeping personnel serving in the Balkans. In addition, the investigations were extended to residents of Kosovo and southern Serbia, who lived in areas where DU ammunitions were deployed. In order to assess a possible DU intake, both the urinary uranium excretion of volunteer residents and water samples were collected and analysed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). More than 1300 urine samples from peacekeeping personnel and unexposed controls of different genders and age were analysed to determine uranium excretion parameters. The urine measurements for 113 unexposed subjects revealed a daily uranium excretion rate with a geometric mean of 13.9 ng/d (geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 2.17). The analysis of 1228 urine samples from the peacekeeping personnel resulted in a geometric mean of 12.8 ng/d (GSD = 2.60). It follows that both unexposed controls and peacekeeping personnel excreted similar amounts of uranium. Inter-subject variation in uranium excretion was high and no significant age-specific differences were found. The second part of the study monitored 24 h urine samples provided by selected residents of Kosovo and adjacent regions of Serbia compared to controls from Munich, Germany. Total uranium and isotope ratios were measured in order to determine DU content. 235U/238U ratios were within ± 0.3% of the natural value, and 236U/238U was less than 2 × 10? 7, indicating no significant DU in any of the urine samples provided, despite total uranium excretion being relatively high in some cases. Measurements of ground and tap water samples from regions where DU munitions were deployed did not show any contamination with DU, except in one sample. It is concluded that both peacekeeping personnel and residents serving or living in the Balkans, respectively, were not exposed to significant amounts of DU.

U. Oeh; N.D. Priest; P. Roth; K.V. Ragnarsdottir; W.B. Li; V. Höllriegl; M.F. Thirlwall; B. Michalke; A. Giussani; P. Schramel; H.G. Paretzke

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z