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1

Health effects of risk-assessment categories  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Holgate S. 2002. Air pollution and health. Lancet Brunekreef2006. Bayesian modeling of air pollution health effects withExposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke Elsa Nielsen, Marianne Dybdahl HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PARTICLES FROM WOOD SMOKE 7 HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS 8 Human non-cancer health effects from exposure to particles from wood smoke 8 Human carcinogenic effects from exposure to particles from

5

Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality M. Valari(1), L (food, water etc.) -Population exposure: [c] x dt -Health data & air pollution health effects Health risk assessment #12;Pollutants concentrations [c] Population exposure [c] x dt Air pollution health

Menut, Laurent

6

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

7

The Health Effects Institute assessment of refueling vapors; A case study  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the Health Effects Institute (HEI) published an analysis it conducted of the informational basis for quantifying cancer risks from exposure to unleaded refueling vapors, an exposure that, for the general public, occurs most frequently at the self-service pump. Using the National Research Council's framework for risk assessment, the HEI analysis concluded that important information was lacking in the three areas that lead to the actual quantification of risk. The three are: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, and exposure assessment. The author presents details of the analysis, and a description of the Health Effects Institute.

Kavet, R. (Environmental Research Information, Inc., New York, NY (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing health effects Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; effects of context on health and health-related behavior; disparities in children's health care access... , personal and social costs of cancer, dynamics of health insurance...

9

BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of Nanoparticles- proaching the sensitivity limit for most instruments. #12;BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH A colloidal nanoparticle

Magee, Joseph W.

10

Information resources for assessing health effects from chemical exposure: Challenges, priorities, and future issues  

SciTech Connect

Issues related to developing information resources for assessing the health effects from chemical exposure include the question of how to address the individual political issues relevant to identifying and determining the timeliness, scientific credibility, and completeness of such kinds of information resources. One of the important ways for agencies to share information is through connection tables. This type of software is presently being used to build information products for some DHHS agencies. One of the challenges will be to convince vendors of data of the importance of trying to make data files available to communities that need them. In the future, information processing will be conducted with neural networks, object-oriented database management systems, and fuzzy-set technologies, and meta analysis techniques.

Seigel, S. [National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

The impact and effectiveness of health impact assessment: A conceptual framework  

SciTech Connect

The use of health impact assessment (HIA) has expanded rapidly and there are increasing demands for it to demonstrate its effectiveness. This paper presents a conceptual framework for evaluating HIA and describes its development through (i) a review of the literature, (ii) a review of work undertaken as part of a major HIA capacity building project and (iii) an in-depth study of seven completed HIAs. The framework emphasises context, process and impacts as key domains in understanding and evaluating the effectiveness of an HIA. This new framework builds upon the existing approaches to evaluating HIA and extends them to reflect the broad range of factors that comprise and influence the effectiveness of HIAs. It may be of use in evaluating completed HIAs and in planning HIAs that are yet to be undertaken. -- Highlights: ? The first empirically-derived conceptual framework for evaluating HIA ? It may also be useful for planning and reporting on HIAs. ? The framework emphasises context, process and impacts as key domains. ? A broad range of factors influence the effectiveness of HIAs.

Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: ben@harrisroxashealth.com; Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.au

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Assessment of fish health effects resulting from exposure to oil sands wastewater  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to determine if oil sands wastewater had an effect on the general health and condition of hatchery raised rainbow trout (200 to 400 g). Effects were assessed based on a battery of physiological and biochemical indices and the physical condition of the fish. The trout were exposed to tailings water in the field and in a flow through system under laboratory conditions. The field tests were conducted in 1992 and 1993 in experimental ponds at Syncrude which contained fine tails covered with surface water, fine tails covered with tailings water, and a surface water control pond. The laboratory treatments included Mildred Lake tailings water, dyke drainage water, fractionated tailings pond water (acid fraction containing naphthenic acids), sodium naphthenate, recycle water from Suncor`s tailings pond, and a laboratory control. All body condition factors and blood parameters were normal in the field and laboratory exposed fish and there were no apparent differences between the fish exposed to the tailings water and controls.

Balch, G.C.; Goudey, J.S. [HydroQual Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Birkholtz, D. [EnviroTest Labs. Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Van Meer, T.; MacKinnon, M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects  

SciTech Connect

This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

ORISE: Environmental Assessment and Health Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessments and Health Physics Environmental Assessments and Health Physics Performing environmental assessments and independent verification is essential to building public trust and confidence in radiological cleanup. As the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies target contaminated sites across the country for decontamination and decommissioning, strict guidelines must be followed to ensure that property is effectively remediated before being released for public or private use. Through a combination of environmental assessments, health physics services, and radiochemistry analyses, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent environmental assessment and verification at DOE cleanup sites across the country. ORISE applies its

15

COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR HOSPITAL SYSTEMS SERVING MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK 2012 Lakeside Health System Rochester General Health System Unity Health System Memorial Hospital Developed Collaboratively with Finger Lakes Health System Agency Monroe County Department

Goldman, Steven A.

16

COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR HOSPITAL SYSTEMS SERVING MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK 2013 Lakeside Health System Rochester General Health System Unity Health System Memorial Hospital Developed Collaboratively with Finger Lakes Health System Agency Monroe County Department

Goldman, Steven A.

17

Health Effects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers research programs and monitoring activities, both domestic and international, that support the protection and promotion of the health of DOE workers, their families, and residents of neighboring communities near DOE sites, affected by exposure to hazardous materials from DOE sites or a result of nuclear weapons testing, use or accident.

18

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on early health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Human exposure to mercury: A critical assessment of the evidence of adverse health effects  

SciTech Connect

The ubiquitous nature of mercury in the environment, its global atmospheric cycling, and its toxicity to humans at levels that are uncomfortably close to exposures experienced by a proportion of the population are some of the current concerns associated with this pollutant. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the scientific quality of published reports involving human exposures to mercury and associated health outcomes as an aid in the risk evaluation of this chemical. A comprehensive review of the scientific literature involving human exposures to mercury was performed and each publication evaluated using a defined set of criteria that are considered standards in epidemiologic and toxicologic research. Severe, sometimes fatal, effects of mercury exposure at high levels were primarily reported as case studies. The disasters in Minamata, Japan, in the 1950s and in Iraq in 1971-1972 clearly demonstrated neurologic effects associated with ingestion of methylmercury both in adults and in infants exposed in utero. The effects were convincingly Associated with methylmercury ingestion, despite limitations of the study design. Several well-conducted studies have investigated the effects of methylmercury at levels below those in the Iraq incident but have not provided clear evidence of an effect. The lower end of the dose-response curve constructed from the Iraq data therefore still needs to be confirmed. The studies of mercury exposure in the workplace were mainly of elemental or inorganic mercury, and effects that were observed at relatively low exposure levels were primarily neurologic and renal. Several studies have investigated effects associated with dental amalgam but have been rated as inconclusive because of methodologic deficiencies. In our overall evaluation, 29 of 110 occupational studies and 20 of 54 studies where exposure occurred in the natural environment provided at least suggestive evidence of an exposure-related effect. 259 refs., 4 tabs.

Ratcliffe, H.E.; Swanson, G.M.; Fischer, L.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

20

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Late health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA late health effects models.

Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models.

Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Grupa, J.B. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Speaker(s): Carol Rao Date: July 9, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mark Mendell Exposures to fungi have been linked with asthma, toxicoses, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and a range of non-specific symptoms. Definitive associations between indoor fungal exposure and health effects in population-based exposure-response studies, however, have not been well established. Issues in exposure assessment methods, both in collection and analysis, are major limitations. Classic methods for assessing airborne fungi rely upon collecting and analyzing whole fungal spores by culture. However, quantifying whole fungal spores may not fully describe fungal exposures, especially for purposes of investigating adverse respiratory

23

Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Worker Safety and Health Assessments Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments MISSION The Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments conducts assessments to provide...

24

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

25

Projection models for health-effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume II. SPAHR introductory guide  

SciTech Connect

The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projections. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, and thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of responses, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projects are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. This volume gives the user of the SPAHR program the information required to operate the program when it is up and running on the computer. It assumes that the user is familiar with the concepts and terms relating to demography and health risk assessment. It contains a brief description of all commands and options available in SPAHR, as well as a user-oriented description of the structure and operation of the control system and language processor.

Collins, J.J.; Lundy, R.T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

e-Assessment of Workplace Health & Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.imm.dtu.dk #12;Summary Danish companies with employees are obligated to assess the health and safety environment Java Beans which makes it a very powerful platform for large web and enterprise applications Faces this makes a powerful runtime platform. Part 2 describes Extreme Programming which is a relatively

27

Assessment of the Health IT Usability Evaluation Model (Health-ITUEM) for evaluating mobile health (mHealth) technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: Over two decades of research has been conducted using mobile devices for health related behaviors yet many of these studies lack rigor. There are few evaluation frameworks for assessing the usability of mHealth, which is critical as the use ... Keywords: Evaluation framework, Health-ITUEM, Mobile health, Usability

William Brown, III; Po-Yin Yen; Marlene Rojas; Rebecca Schnall

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

29

Assessing blood-pressure measurement in tablet-based mHealth apps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing blood-pressure measurement in tablet-based mHealth apps Rima Murthy Department, remained supported. Together, these two methods can allow mHealth applications to guide untrained patients with personal medical sensors have proven particularly effective for community health-data collection [3]. Any mHealth

30

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 12, 2009 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Name of Infonnatlon Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 136 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title Contact Information Phone, Email Anthony J. Kavran (208) 526-5826

31

Air Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The quality of the air we breathe is still a major concern to human health. Notwithstanding the air pollution mitigation efforts that have been pursued since ... be attributed to the effects of urban outdoor air

Ana Isabel Miranda; Joana Valente…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fossil fuels and conventional ethanol, would cause significant air pollution and healthHealth Impacts Assessments of Brazilian Ethanol 4.1 Introduction Each year, around a quarter of total world energy use, dominated by conventional fossil fuels,

Tsao, Chi-Chung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Health and Safety Office Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Safety Office Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 Health and Safety must be protected `so far be properly controlled #12;Health and Safety Office Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations be done ? Before any work is carried out, at the planning stage #12;Health and Safety Office Evaluating

de Gispert, Adrià

35

Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Protocol...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Protocol, Development and Maintenance of Criteria Review and Approach Documents, June 2014 Office of Environment, Safety and...

36

Assessment of mercury health risks to adults from coal combustion  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is preparing, for the U.S. Congress, a report evaluating the need to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from electric utilities. This study, to be completed in 1995, will have important health and economic implications. In support of these efforts, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1000 MW{sub e} coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. The approach draws on the extant knowledge in each of the important steps in the calculation chain from emissions to health effects. Estimated results at key points in the chain were compared with actual measurements to help validate the modeled estimates. Two cases were considered: the baseline case (no local impacts), and the impact case (maximum local power-plant impact). The BNL study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Many implicit and explicit sources of uncertainty exist in this analysis. Those that appear to be most in need of improvement include data on doses and responses for potentially sensitive subpopulations (e.g., fetal exposures). Rather than considering hypothetical situations, it would also be preferable to assess the risks associated with actual coal-fired power plants and the nearby sensitive water bodies and susceptible subpopulations. Finally, annual total Hg emissions from coal burning and from other anthropogenic sources are still uncertain; this makes it difficult to estimate the effects of U.S. coal burning on global Hg concentration levels, especially over the long term.

Lipfert, F.W.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.; Saroff, L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Environmental, health, and safety assessment of photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect

Potential enviornmental, health, and safety (E,H and S) concerns associated with all phases of the photovoltaic (PV) energy system life cycle are identified and assessed. E,H and S concerns affecting the achievement of National PV Program goals or the viability of specific PV technologies are emphasized. The report is limited to near-term manufacturing process alternatives for crystalline silicon PV materials, addresses flat-plate and concentrator collector designs, and reviews system deployment in grid-connected, roof-mounted, residential and ground-mounted central-station applications. The PV life-cycle phases examined include silicon refinement and manufacture of PV collectors, system deployment, and decommissioning. The primary E,H and S concerns that arise during collector fabrication are associated with occupational exposure to materials of undetermined toxicity or to materials that are known to be hazardous, but for which process control technology may be inadequate. Stricter exposure standards are anticipated for some materials and may indicate a need for further control technology development. Minimizing electric shock hazards is a significant concern during system construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning.

Rose, E.C.

1983-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

The 6/94 gap in health impact assessment  

SciTech Connect

Health impact assessment (HIA), a methodology that aims to facilitate the mitigation of negative and enhancement of positive health effects due to projects, programmes and policies, has been developed over the past 20-30 years. There is an underlying assumption that HIA has become a full fledged critical piece of the impact assessment process with a stature equal to both environmental and social impact assessments. This assumption needs to be supported by evidence however. Within the context of projects in developing country settings, HIA is simply a slogan without a clearly articulated and relevant methodology, offered by academia and having little or no salience in the decision-making process regarding impacts. This harsh assertion is supported by posing a simple question: 'Where in the world have HIAs been carried out?' To answer this question, we systematically searched the peer-reviewed literature and online HIA-specific databases. We identified 237 HIA-related publications, but only 6% of these publications had a focus on the developing world. What emerges is, therefore, a huge disparity, which we coin the 6/94 gap in HIA, even worse than the widely known 10/90 gap in health research (10% of health research funding is utilized for diseases causing 90% of the global burden of disease). Implications of this 6/94 gap in HIA are discussed with pointed emphasis on extractive industries (oil/gas and mining) and water resources development. We conclude that there is a pressing need to institutionalize HIA in the developing world, as a consequence of current predictions of major extractive industry and water resources development, with China's investments in these sectors across Africa being particularly salient.

Erlanger, Tobias E. [Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, Swiss Tropical Institute, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland)], E-mail: tobias.erlanger@unibas.ch; Krieger, Gary R. [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)], E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.com; Singer, Burton H. [Office of Population Research, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: singer@princeton.edu; Utzinger, Juerg [Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, Swiss Tropical Institute, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland)], E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.ch

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Health effects of smokeless tobacco  

SciTech Connect

Pharmacologic and physiologic effects of snuff and chewing tobacco include the gamut of cardiovascular, endocrinologic, neurologic, and psychological effects that are associated with nicotine. A review of studies appearing in the scientific literature involving various populations and approaches indicates that the use of snuff or chewing tobacco is associated with a variety of serious adverse effects and especially with oral cancer. The studies suggest that snuff and chewing tobacco also may affect reproduction, longevity, the cardiovascular system, and oral health. The Council on Scientific Affairs concludes there is evidence demonstrating that use of snuff or chewing tobacco is associated with adverse health effects such as oral cancer, urges the implementation of well-planned and long-term studies that will further define the risks of using snuff and chewing tobacco, and recommends that the restrictions applying to the advertising of cigarettes also be applied to the advertising of snuff and chewing tobacco.

Not Available

1986-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

40

Effects of environmental change on wildlife health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effects of environmental change on wildlife health Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse 1 * Amanda...Living organisms will strive to maintain health by recognizing and resolving abnormal...additional pressure on immunocompetence and health maintenance, which may seriously impact...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF PCE EMISSIONS FROM DRY CLEANING ACTIVITIES IN FRANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF PCE EMISSIONS FROM DRY CLEANING ACTIVITIES IN FRANCE L DELERY1 Verneuil-en-halatte-F ABSTRACT Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is a solvent used mostly in the dry health effects caused by chronic inhalation exposure of PCE. PCE is suspected to be probably carcinogenic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

42

Public Health Assessment Gopher State Ethanol, City of St. Paul  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Health Assessment Gopher State Ethanol, City of St. Paul Ramsey County, Minnesota September with the Gopher State Ethanol, St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota. It is based on a formal site evaluation....................................................................................................................... 3 Ethanol Production

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

43

COMPARATIVE HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ON FECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i COMPARATIVE HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ON FECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: A CASE STUDY OF KLONG Fecal sludge (FS) is widely acknowledged as a major source of infectious pathogens. However, the proper

Richner, Heinz

44

Nutrition Can Modulate the Toxicity of Environmental Pollutants: Implications in Risk Assessment and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century.Pollutants: Implications in Risk Assessment and Human Healthand their implications in risk assessment and human health.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing cumulative health Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Noto, Sorochan, Senn Summary: with an emphasis in Community Health Education trains students to develop, implement and assess health education... the health field; c....

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment occupational health Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

results for: assessment occupational health Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 UWO Occupational Health Care Policy The Occupational Health Care Policy is designed to ensure that all...

47

Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service  

SciTech Connect

This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

Hamel, D.R. [Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Illustrative assessment of human health issues arising from the potential release of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many countries have a programme for developing an underground geological disposal facility for radioactive waste. A case study is provided herein on the illustrative assessment of human health issues arising from the potential release of chemotoxic and radioactive substances from a generic geological disposal facility (GDF) for radioactive waste. The illustrative assessment uses a source–pathway–receptor methodology and considers a number of human exposure pathways. Estimated exposures are compared with authoritative toxicological assessment criteria. The possibility of additive and synergistic effects resulting from exposures to mixtures of chemical contaminants or a combination of radiotoxic and chemotoxic substances is considered. The case study provides an illustration of how to assess human health issues arising from chemotoxic species released from a GDF for radioactive waste and highlights potential difficulties associated with a lack of data being available with which to assess synergistic effects. It also highlights how such difficulties can be addressed.

James C Wilson; Michael C Thorne; George Towler; Simon Norris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Health effects of air pollution: some historical notes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that was his first air pollution health effects committeeand direction of air pollution health effects research inof community air pollution, including health ef- fects, has

Whittenberger, J L

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Health risk assessment for radium discharged in produced waters  

SciTech Connect

Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain enhanced levels of radium. This naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is discharged into freshwater streams, estuarine, coastal and outer continental shelf waters. Large volumes of produced waters are discharged to coastal waters along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico is an important producer of fish and shellfish, and there is concern that radium discharged to coastal Louisiana could contaminate fish and shellfish used by people for food, and present a significant increase in cancer risk. This paper describes a screening-level assessment of the potential cancer risks posed by radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in oil-field produced waters. This screening analysis was performed to determine if a more comprehensive and realistic assessment is necessary, and because of the conservative assumptions embedded in the analysis overestimates the risk associated with the discharge of radium in produced waters. Two isotopes of radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) are the radionuclides of most concern in produced water in terms of potential human health effects.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Health risk assessment for radium discharged in produced waters  

SciTech Connect

Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain enhanced levels of radium. This naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is discharged into freshwater streams, estuarine, coastal and outer continental shelf waters. Large volumes of produced waters are discharged to coastal waters along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico is an important producer of fish and shellfish, and there is concern that radium discharged to coastal Louisiana could contaminate fish and shellfish used by people for food, and present a significant increase in cancer risk. This paper describes a screening-level assessment of the potential cancer risks posed by radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in oil-field produced waters. This screening analysis was performed to determine if a more comprehensive and realistic assessment is necessary, and because of the conservative assumptions embedded in the analysis overestimates the risk associated with the discharge of radium in produced waters. Two isotopes of radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) are the radionuclides of most concern in produced water in terms of potential human health effects.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Utah Department of Health Bureau of Health Facility Licensing, Certification and Resident Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utah Department of Health Bureau of Health Facility Licensing, Certification and Resident of Utah Rule R432-31 (http://health.utah.gov/hflcra/forms.php) This is a physician order sheet based be effectively managed at current setting. ___ Limited additional interventions: Includes care above. May also

Tipple, Brett

53

The need for health impact assessment in China: Potential benefits for public health and steps forward  

SciTech Connect

Health impact assessment (HIA) is a useful tool to predict and estimate the potential health impact associated with programs, projects, and policies by comprehensively identifying relevant health determinants and their consequences. China is undergoing massive and rapid socio-economic changes leading to environment and population health challenges such as a large increase in non-communicable diseases, the emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases, new health risks associated with environmental pollutants and escalating health inequality. These health issues are affected by multiple determinants which can be influenced by planned policies, programs, and projects. This paper discusses the needs for health impact assessment in China in order to minimize the negative health consequences from projects, programs and policies associated with rapid social and economic development. It first describes the scope of China's current impact assessment system and points out its inadequacy in meeting the requirements of population health protection and promotion. It then analyses the potential use of HIA and why China needs to develop and apply HIA as a tool to identify potential health impacts of proposed programs, projects and policies so as to influence decision-making early in the planning process. Thus, the paper recommends the development of HIA as a useful tool in China to enhance decision-making for the protection and promotion of population health. For this to happen, the paper outlines steps necessary for the establishment and successful implementation of HIA in China: beginning with the establishment of a HIA framework, followed by workforce capacity building, methodology design, and intersectoral collaboration and stakeholder engagement.

Wu Liming, E-mail: lmwu@scdc.sh.c [Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai 200336 (China); Center for Environment and Population Health, Griffith University, Nathan 4111 (Australia); Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia [Center for Environment and Population Health, Griffith University, Nathan 4111 (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Assessing Safety, Health, and Environmental Impact Early during Process Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After identifying SHE problems as dangerous properties, their magnitude is analyzed as potential of danger and can be reduced by technological measures. ... Health effects are subdivided into two dangerous properties:? irritation and chronic toxicity. ...

Guntram Koller; Ulrich Fischer; Konrad Hungerbühler

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

ORISE: How to work with ORISE's environmental assessments and health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to work with us How to work with us The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides environmental assessments and health physics services to a variety of government customers. From characterization surveys and independent verification to radiochemical analyses and dose modeling, ORISE can help your environmental cleanup project meet regulatory standards and release criteria. If you are interested in any of ORISE's environmental assessments and health physics capabilities, contact: Sarah Roberts, CHP Director, Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Work: 865.241.8893 IVsurveys@orau.org Contracting with ORISE U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) purchasers may obtain services through ORISE by completing a field work proposal. Please contact the Procurement

56

Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing health-related quality Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trials in Summary: issues in assessing health-related quality of life of colorectal cancer patients in randomised controlled... , Molica S , Holzner B . Health-related quality...

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing perceived health Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Medicine Summary: and its importance in generating a debate about the success of health care interventions, assessment... and actual health status including methods of...

59

Environment, Safety and Health progress assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)  

SciTech Connect

The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Department`s continuous improvement process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the INEL ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Department with concise independent information on the following: (1) change in culture and attitude related to ES&H activities; (2) progress and effectiveness of the ES&H corrective actions resulting from previous Tiger Team Assessments; (3) adequacy and effectiveness of the ES&H self-assessment programs of the DOE line organizations and the site management and operating contractor; and (4) effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES&H problems. It is not intended that this Progress Assessment be a comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The points of reference for assessing programs at the INEL were, for the most part, the 1991 INEL Tiger Team Assessment, the INEL Corrective Action Plan, and recent appraisals and self-assessments of INEL. Horizontal and vertical reviews of the following programmatic areas were conducted: Management: Corrective action program; self-assessment; oversight; directives, policies, and procedures; human resources management; and planning, budgeting, and resource allocation. Environment: Air quality management, surface water management, groundwater protection, and environmental radiation. Safety and Health: Construction safety, worker safety and OSHA, maintenance, packaging and transportation, site/facility safety review, and industrial hygiene.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Stakeholder participation in health impact assessment: A multicultural approach  

SciTech Connect

The literature on impact assessment (HIA) registers the importance of stakeholder participation in the assessment process, but still lacks a model for engaging stakeholders of diverse ethnic, professional and sectorial backgrounds. This paper suggests that the multicultural approach can contribute to HIA through a revision of the generic 5-step HIA model, and its implementation in a metropolitan plan in Southern Israel. The health issue scoped by the stakeholders in the HIA is related to land uses in the vicinity of the national hazardous industry and hazardous waste site. The stakeholders were representatives of the diverse populations at stake, including rural Bedouins and Jewish city dwellers, as well as representatives from the public sector, private sector, non-governmental organizations and academia. The case study revealed that a multicultural stakeholder participation process helps to uncover health issues known to the community which were not addressed in the original plan, and provides local knowledge regarding health conditions that is especially valuable when scientific data is uncertain or absent. It enables diverse stakeholders to prioritize the health issues that will be assessed. The case study also reveals ways in which the model needs revisions and improvements such as in recruitment of diverse participants. This paper presents a multicultural model of HIA and discusses some of the challenges that are faced when HIA is implemented in the context of current decision-making culture. -- Highlights: • We revised the generic HIA model in light of the multicultural approach. • We tested the model in a case study of zoning a hazardous industry site. • Multicultural stakeholder participation uncovers health issues known to communities. • It enables community prioritization of health issues. • We present a model for multicultural stakeholder participation in HIA.

Negev, Maya, E-mail: mayane@tau.ac.il [Hartog School of Government and Policy, Faculty of Social Sciences, Tel Aviv University, P.O.B. 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)] [Hartog School of Government and Policy, Faculty of Social Sciences, Tel Aviv University, P.O.B. 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Davidovitch, Nadav, E-mail: nadavd@bgu.ac.il [Department of Health Systems Management, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, P.O.B. 653, Be'er Sheva 84105 (Israel)] [Department of Health Systems Management, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, P.O.B. 653, Be'er Sheva 84105 (Israel); Garb, Yaakov, E-mail: ygarb@bgu.ac.il [Swiss Institute for Dryland Environmental Research, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel)] [Swiss Institute for Dryland Environmental Research, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel); Tal, Alon, E-mail: alontal@bgu.ac.il [Mitrani Department of Dryland Ecology, Swiss Institute for Dryland Environmental Research, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel)] [Mitrani Department of Dryland Ecology, Swiss Institute for Dryland Environmental Research, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Update of the Mexican Health Care Formulary and Supply Catalog in the Context of the Health Technology Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the instruments Mexico has available for the optimization of resources specifically allocated to health technologies is the Health Care Formulary and Supply Catalog (Cuadro Básico y Catálogo de Insumos del Sector Salud [CBCISS]). The aim of the CBCISS is to collaborate in the optimization of public resources through the use of technologies (supplies) that have proven their safety, therapeutic efficacy, and efficiency. The importance of the CBCISS lies in the fact that all public institutions within the National Health System must use only the established technologies it contains. The implementation of strategies that strengthen the CBCISS update process allows it to be thought of as an essential regulatory tool for the introduction of health technologies, with relevant contributions to the proper selection of cost-effective interventions. It ensures that each supply included on the list meets the criteria sufficient and necessary to ensure efficacy, safety, effectiveness, and, of course, efficiency, as evidence supporting the selection of suitable technologies. The General Health Council (Consejo de Salubridad General [CSG]) is a collegial body of constitutional origin that—in accordance with its authority—prepares, updates, publishes, and distributes the CBCISS. To perform these activities, the CSG has the CBCISS Inter-institutional Commission. The CBCISS update is performed through the processes of inclusion, modification, and exclusion of supplies approved by the Interior Commission. The CBCISS update process consists of three stages: the first stage involves a test that leads to the acceptance or inadmissibility of the requests, and the other two focus on an in-depth evaluation for the ruling. This article describes the experience of health technology assessment in Mexico, presents the achievements and outlines the improvements in the process of submission of new health technologies, and presents a preliminary analysis of the submissions evaluated until December 2012. During the analysis period, 394 submissions were received. After confirming compliance with the requirements, 59.9% of the submissions passed to the next stage of the process, technology assessment. In the third stage, the committee approved 44.9% of the submissions evaluated. The improvements established in the country in terms of health technology assessment allowed choosing the technologies that give more value for money in a context of public health institutions.

Pedro Rizo Ríos; Aurora González Rivera; Itzel Rivas Oropeza; Odette Campos Ramírez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Depleted Uranium: Exposure and Possible Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the enrichment process of 235U used for fission in nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. It has both civilian and military applications. The military use of DU is of defensive as well as of offensive nature, being mainly employed as armor-piercing ammunition. So far, the usage of ammunitions containing DU has been officially confirmed in four military conflicts: Iraq (1991), Bosnia (1994), Kosovo (1999), and again Iraq (2003). During their deployment in the military actions, most penetrators are thought to have missed their intended targets. Therefore, a substantial amount of DU is still present in the environment and may act as a source of contamination for the environment and the population. The possible effects of this radioactive and chemically toxic material have attracted particular notice. To evaluate these consequences, it is important to have accurate methods to assess the exposure to DU in both environmental and biological samples. This article is therefore intended to point out the problematic nature of the experimental techniques and of the analytical methods so far used to quantify the exposure to DU in the light of possible health effects of DU.

U. Oeh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess public health Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assess public health Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Undergraduate Minor in Public Health A...

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing human health Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assessing human health Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Undergraduate Minor in Public Health A...

66

Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions 2005...

67

Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel...

68

Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites  

SciTech Connect

Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Selected Studies. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,of Selected Stu&es. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,and Health Effects. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,

McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The challenges of exposure assessment in health studies of Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...veterans with health outcomes in military...as pesticide or depleted uranium (DU) exposure...preventing ill health arising from war...2004Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed Gulf...Toxicol. Environ. Health A. 67, 277-296...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2006 research-article Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War...Medicine) Gulf War and health. In Depleted uranium, pyridostigmine bromide...McDiarmid, M.A , Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed Gulf War...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND CURRENT;EPA. National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Arsenic and Clarification to Compliance and New National Occurrence and Exposure to Arsenic in Public Drinking Water Supplies (Revised Draft). Washington

73

Safety Training Self-Assessment The UC Irvine Safety Training Self-Assessment (STSA) is provided by Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety Training Self-Assessment The UC Irvine Safety Training Self-Assessment (STSA) is provided by Environmental Health Safety (EH&S). The Safety Training Self-Assessment is required for: · All UC employees the Safety Training Self-Assessment: 1. Log into the UC Learning Center at http://www.uclc.uci.edu. 2

Rose, Michael R.

74

Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability: Air Pollution and Health Impacts By Chi-and indirect air-pollution and health impacts throughout theparticularly air pollution and health impacts. In this

Tsao, Chi-Chung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Information resources used in health risk assessment by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection  

SciTech Connect

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection`s responsibilities related to health-based risk assessment are described, including its research projects and its development of health based compound specific standards and guidance levels. The resources used by the agency to support health risk assessment work are outlined.

Post, G.B.; Baratta, M.; Wolfson, S.; McGeorge, L. [New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Trenton (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

29 Towards Equity Effectiveness in Health Interventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Côte d'Ivoire, environmental sanitation in Vietnam, and health and demographic surveillance of mobile; equity effectiveness; HIV/AIDS; environmental sanitation; drinking water; mobile pastoralists; Côte d in rich and poor countries. Where resources are lim- ited, priority in public budgetary allocation tends

Richner, Heinz

77

The health effects of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There has been a substantial amount of public discussion on the health effects of the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. In response to this concern the Royal Society set up an independent, expert working group to investigate the health effects of DU munitions. The Royal Society has now produced two reports, and this summary covering the key conclusions and recommendations from both reports. The part I report considered the increased risks of radiation-induced cancer from exposures to DU on the battlefield. Part II dealt with the risks from the chemical toxicity of uranium, non-malignant radiation effects from DU intakes, the long-term environmental consequences of the deployment of DU munitions and responses to part I including issues arising at a public meeting to discuss the part I report.

The Royal Society Working Group on the Health Hazards of

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radon: An Overview of Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radon is one of the most comprehensively studied human carcinogens. It is a naturally occurring noble gas, and due to current construction methods, radon concentrations often become enhanced indoors. Radon is the largest single contributor to the natural radiation exposure to the general public. Two of its radioactive decay products, polonium-218 and polonium-214, impart the majority of radiation dose to the lungs, rather than the radon gas itself. In fact, protracted exposure to radon and its decay products is one of the greatest environmental health threats. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in North America and the leading cause of lung cancer for individuals who have never smoked. Overall, radon is also the leading environmental cause of cancer mortality in North America. In vitro studies, controlled studies of radon-exposed animals, a variety of radiobiological analyses, 15 retrospective cohort studies of radon-exposed underground miners, and analyses of 22 pooled residential epidemiologic studies from North America, China, and Europe convincingly demonstrate that radon is a human lung carcinogen even at concentrations commonly encountered in the residential setting. Because of the significant health risks related to residential radon exposure, the World Health Organization (WHO) instituted an international initiative in 2005, the International Radon Project, to reduce indoor radon risks. This article and the following articles on radon provide a general overview of its characteristics, sources, occurrence, and health effects, as well as guidance on both radon measurement and mitigation.

R.W. Field

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurred during the nuclear accident, and probably noHEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT MILE ISLAND JacobENG-48 HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT A T THREE MILE

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

HEALTH CARE REFORM AND ITS EFFECT ON STUDENT HEALTH PLANS INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOPIC: HEALTH CARE REFORM AND ITS EFFECT ON STUDENT HEALTH PLANS INTRODUCTION: The Patient the initial impact of the Act on college and university- sponsored employee health care plans [1]. This Note-sponsored student health plans ("SHPs"). After the Affordable Care Act was enacted, many within the higher education

Martinez, Tony R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program (CDEP). [Microwave and non-microwave health and ecological assessment  

SciTech Connect

In the satellite power system (SPS), satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit would collect solar energy in space, convert it to microwaves, and transmit the microwaves to receiving antennas (rectennas) on earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted to electricity. This SPS environmental assessment considers the microwave and nonmicrowave effects on the terrestrial environment and human health, atmospheric effects, and effects on electromagnetic systems. No environmental problem has been identified that would preclude the continued study of SPS technology. To increase the certainty of the assessment, some research has been initiated and long-term research is being planned.

Valentino, A.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The effectiveness of health appraisal processes currently in addressing health and wellbeing during spatial plan appraisal: a systematic review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic review to identify evaluation studies of appraisals or assessments of plans where health issues were considered from 1987...

Selena Gray; Laurence Carmichael; Hugh Barton; Julie Mytton…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Abstract B81: Can “mHealth” improve risk assessment? A usability study of older, low-income women answering the Athena Breast Health Questionnaire app.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CA. Introduction: Mobile health (mHealth) tools may offer an opportunity for breast...mobile devices. However, the use of mHealth applications (apps) has not been well...sought to determine the usability of an mHealth Breast Health Risk Assessment Questionnaire...

Cristina M. Thorsen; Celia P. Kaplan; Natasha Brasic; Laura J. Esserman; Judith A. Luce; Rebecca Howe; Laura J. van 't Veer; Carolina Bravo; Alyse Wheelock; Elissa M. Ozanne; Athena Breast Health Network Investigators

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas. Final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the construction and operation of an Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Analytical Laboratory and subsequent demolition of the existing Analytical Chemistry Laboratory building at Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality requirements contained in 40 CFR 1500--1508.9, the Environmental Assessment examined the environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analysis of impacts in the EA, conducting the proposed action, construction of an analytical laboratory and demolition of the existing facility, would not significantly effect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Jean Carletta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Care Teams Jean Carletta Human Communication.Carletta@edinburgh.ac.uk ABSTRACT Primary health care team members need to communicate effectively with each other in order of cross-disciplinary team meetings, we describe communication in primary health care teams, explore

Carletta, Jean

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute health effects Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; effects of context on health and health-related behavior; disparities in children's health care access... College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes May...

88

Health and environmental effects document for direct coal liquefaction - 1981.  

SciTech Connect

This document presents initial estimates of potential human health effects from inhalation of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) that may be released from a future hypothetical industry producing about 600,000 bb1/day of synthetic fuel by direct liquefaction of coal. The assessment approach starts wth general assumptions that are then refined in a tiered sequence that considers available epidemiological, environmental and chemical data. The uncertainties involved in such an evaluation have been quantified where possible at this early stage of health risk analysis. Many surrogate data bases were considered for application to coal liquefaction including coke oven, British gas retort, roofing tar and asphalts, and cigarette smoke. The coke oven data base was selected for this assessment because the chemical and physical nature of coke oven emissions are judged to more closely approximate potential coal liquefaction emissions. Utilizing the extensive epidemiological data base for coke oven workers as a surrogate model, health effects from release of coal liquefaction NMHC may be quantified. This method results in estimates of about 1 x 10/sup -3/ excess cancer deaths/yr to an industrial work force of 7800 persons and 5 x 10/sup -2/ excess cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole from NMHC that boil above 600/sup 0/F. Sources of uncertainty in the estimates are listed. Using these uncertainties, it is estimated that from 2 x 10/sup -4/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ lung cancer deaths/yr may occur in the industrial work force and from 1 x 10/sup -2/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole. On an individual basis, the excess lifetime risk to occupationally exposed workers is estimated to be 500 times greater than to members of the U.S. public.

Mellinger, P.J.; Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Sever, L.E.; Olsen, A.R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

ORISE: Contacts for Environmental Assessments and Health Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact us Sarah Roberts, CHP Senior Associate Director; Health, Energy and Environment Work: 865.576.3180 IVsurveys@orau.org Tim Vitkus, CHP IEAV Associate Director Work:...

90

Department of Defense Kuwait oil fire health risk assessment. (The 'Persian Gulf Veterans' registry'). Background paper  

SciTech Connect

Second report prepared in response to P.L. 102-585--the Persian Gulf War Veterans' Health Status Act. (First report focused on the VA 'Persian Gulf War Veterans' Health Registry.') Assesses whether DoD's response 'meets the provisions of the law under which it was mandated,' assesses its 'potential utility ... for scientific study and assessment of the intermediate and long-term health consequences of military service in the Persian Gulf theater of operations during the Persian Gulf War,' and addresses some other related questions.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Assessing health impacts of CO2 leakage from a geological storage site into buildings: role of attenuation in the unsaturated zone and building foundation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a) Title Assessing health impacts of CO2 leakage from a geological storage site into buildings of the greenhouse gas CO2 has the potential to be a widespread and effective option to mitigate climate change. As any industrial activity, CO2 storage may lead to adverse impact on human health and the environment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

92

Analysis of Senate Bill 572: Mental Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing Mental Health Parity: Implications for Patientsof mental health parity laws and implications for SB 572,Mental health carve-outs: effects and implications. Medical

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

An assessment of health educators' likelihood of adopting genomic competencies for the public health workforce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the completion of the Human Genome Project helps develop efficient treatment/prevention programs, it will raise new and non-trivial public health issues. Many of these issues fall under the professional purview of health educators. Yet...

Chen, Lei-Shih

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Guidance manual for health risk assessment of chemically contaminated seafood. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report was written to assist in the evaluation and interpretation of the human health risks associated with chemical contaminate levels in seafood. High concentrations of toxic chemicals have been found in sediments and marine organisms in parts of Puget Sound. Since heavy consumption of contaminated seafood may pose a substantial human health risk, it's important that assessments of the risk associated with seafood consumption be conducted in a consistent, acceptable manner. The report provides an overview of risk assessment, and describes hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Guidance is provided on presentation and interpretation of results.

Pastorok, R.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Development and implementation of a coral health assessment tool for St. John, USVI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coral health in St. John, US Virgin Islands, has shown tremendous declines in recent years, with more than 50% declines in live coral cover. As one component of a group project to assess the possible impacts of anthropogenic ...

Detlefsen, William Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Rapid Assessment Method Examining the Ecological Health of Tidal Marine Wetlands in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been lost since 1950, due primarily to coastal development and declines in water quality. Restoration of wetlands is essential to reestablish lost functions, but there is no standard method to assess the ecological health of restored salt marshes...

Staszak, Lindsey Ann

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

Environment, Safety and Health Assessments | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

as well as weaknesses. We also strive to efficiently analyze complex activities and operations with an eye toward providing constructive and insightful assessments within a...

98

Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem ({plus_minus}2.4) to 0.04 mrem ({plus_minus}0.13) and translate to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments to about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

99

Health & Place 11 (2005) 131146 Assessing spatial and nonspatial factors for healthcare access  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health & Place 11 (2005) 131­146 Assessing spatial and nonspatial factors for healthcare access: towards an integrated approach to defining health professional shortage areas Fahui Wang*, Wei Luo the 2000 Census, and the primary care physician data for the same year are provided by the American Medical

Luo, Wei

100

Uranium: Environmental Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium is found ubiquitously in nature in low concentrations in soil, rock, and water. Naturally occurring uranium contains three isotopes, namely 238U, 235U, and 234U. All uranium isotopes have the same chemical properties, but they have different radiological properties. The main civilian use of uranium is to fuel nuclear power plants, whereas high enriched (in 235U) uranium is used in the military sector as nuclear explosives and depleted uranium (DU) as penetrators or tank shielding. Exposure to uranium may cause health problems due to its radiological (uranium is predominantly emitting alpha-particles) and chemical actions (heavy metal toxicity). Uranium uptake may occur by ingestion, inhalation, contaminated wounds, and embedded fragments especially for soldiers. Inhalation of dust is considered the major pathway for uranium uptake in workplaces. Soluble uranium compounds tend to quickly pass through the body, whereas insoluble uranium compounds pose a more serious inhalation exposure hazard. The kidney is the most sensitive organ for uranium chemotoxicity. An important indirect radiological effect of uranium is the increased risk of lung cancers from inhalation of the daughter products of radon, a noble gas in the uranium decay chains that transports uranium-derived radioactivity from soil into the indoor environment. No direct evidence about the carcinogenic effect of DU in humans is available yet.

D. Melo; W. Burkart

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Economic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax Increase in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Services May 26, 2006 Economic and Health Effects ofS.A. Glantz. Health and economic effects of two proposals toEconomic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax

California Department of Health Services, Tobacco Control Section

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Human Health Risk Assessment Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs) .......................... F-3 * Contaminant Concentrations-Near-Tern1 Ground Water Concentrations .................... F-6 Toxicity Factors ...................................... .. ............................................................ F-8 * Lower Montezuma'creek Exposure Scenario-Reasonable Maximurn Exposure ...... F-10

103

Human health-risk assessment for municipal-sludge disposal: benefits of alternative regulatory options. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses numerical criteria for the reuse and disposal of municipal sewage sludge and evaluates reductions in human health risks or benefits derived from controlling sludge-disposal practices. Quantitative aggregate risk estimates are projected for 31 contaminants for each of the key sludge-management practices: incineration; monofilling; land application (food chain and non-food chain); and distribution and marketing. The study utilizes state-of-the-art fate, transport, and exposure methodologies in predicting environmental concentrations. The analysis evaluates a number of human-exposure routes including dietary, drinking water, and inhalation pathways. The analysis couples this information with national and local populations exposed along with the Agency's most recent health-effects data in assessing risks. A methodology for quantitatively assessing non-carcinogenic effects from exposure to lead is introduced.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Peer Review of the ESR Health Risk Assessment on Dung Beetles 31 October 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peer Review of the ESR Health Risk Assessment on Dung Beetles 31 October 2013 General In general terms, the confidential peer reviewers (drawn from universities and CRIs) considered the ESR public findings of the ESR review (pg 94 of their risk assessment) were not supported by the peer reviewers

Sun, Jing

105

Exploring the potential for using the grid to support health impact assessment modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores the potential use of grid technology in healthcare, from the perspective of a European health authority in a Regional Healthcare Network (RHCN) seeking to model the effects of a proposed hospital closure programme. The paper reviews ... Keywords: grid computing, health, hospital planning, modelling, public health

David Piggott; Conor Teljeur; Alan Kelly

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment (RCBRA) Human Health...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by end of year Status of River Corridor Risk Assessments 2 RCBRA will be used in CERCLA Remedial InvestigationFeasibility Study (RIFS) * RCBRA provides "basis for action" to...

107

An assessment of mercury emissions and health risks from a coal-fired power plant  

SciTech Connect

Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) mandated that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluate the need to regulate mercury emissions from electric utilities. In support of this forthcoming regulatory analysis the U.S. DOE, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the US MeHg is the predominant way of exposure to mercury originated in the atmosphere. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1,000 MW coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. This study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Even at these more elevated exposure levels, the attributable incidence in mild neurological symptoms was estimated to be quite small, especially when compared with the estimated background incidence in the population. The current paper summarizes the basic conclusions of this assessment and highlights issues dealing with emissions control and environmental transport.

Fthenakis, V.M.; Lipfert, F.; Moskowitz, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Analytical Sciences Div.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Comparative Effectiveness and Health Care Spending — Implications for Reform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...correlation at the aggregate level between health spending and outcomes does not disprove the existence of a positive association within a hospital or other health care delivery organization. Moreover, a negative association does not imply that more spending is harmful. That said, there are undoubtedly... In this Sounding Board article, the authors argue that health care costs can be reduced without a negative effect on quality by reducing spending on interventions that are not cost-effective.

Weinstein M.C.; Skinner J.A.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

Transportation barriers to health care: assessing the Texas Medicaid program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for State Fiscal Year 2003 (Family of 3).......................................................................................................................... 66 10 Average Number of Medical and Dental Visits per Year: MTP Users and MTP Non... and common measures is accomplished by examining the actual delivery or utilization of health care services. Utilization is often examined in terms of patterns or rates of use of a single service or type of service. Physician visits and inpatient...

Borders, Stephen Boyce

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Radiological/Health physics program assessement at Rocky Flats, the process  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Office, Safety and Health Group, Health Physics Team (HPT) is responsible for oversight of the Radiation Protection and Health Physics Program (RPHP) of the Integrating Management Contractor (IMC), Kaiser-Hill (K-H) operations at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). As of 1 January 1996 the Rocky Flats Plant employed 300 DOE and 4,300 contractor personnel (K-H and their subcontractors). WSI is a subcontractor and provides plant security. To accomplish the RPHP program oversight HPT personnel developed a systematic methodology for performing a functional RPHP Assessment. The initial process included development of a flow diagram identifying all programmatic elements and assessment criteria documents. Formulation of plans for conducting interviews and performance of assessments constituted the second major effort. The generation of assessment reports was the final step, based on the results of this process. This assessment will be a 6 person-year effort, over the next three years. This process is the most comprehensive assessment of any Radiation Protection and Health Physics (RPHP) Program ever performed at Rocky Flats. The results of these efforts will establish a baseline for future RPHP Program assessments at RFETS. This methodology has been well-received by contractor personnel and creates no Privacy Act violations or other misunderstandings.

Psomas, P.O. [Department of Energy, Golden, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

QUANTITATIVE HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT RESULTING FROM GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION OF AN ABANDONED OPEN FIELD CHEMICAL WASTE BURNING SITE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative human health risk assessment was performed for the evaluation of health threat resulting from the chemical contamination of the soil and groundwater in the area of the former open field pharmaceutica...

GYULA DURA; SANDOR SZOBOSZLAI; BALAZS KRISZT…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Enhanced training effectiveness using automated student assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Training simulators have become increasingly popular tools for instructing humans on performance in complex environments. However, the question of how to provide individualized and scenario-specific assessment and feedback to students remains largely an open question. In this work, we follow-up on previous evaluations of the Automated Expert Modeling and Automated Student Evaluation (AEMASE) system, which automatically assesses student performance based on observed examples of good and bad performance in a given domain. The current study provides an empirical evaluation of the enhanced training effectiveness achievable with this technology. In particular, we found that students given feedback via the AEMASE-based debrief tool performed significantly better than students given only instructor feedback.

Forsythe, James Chris

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

Boyer, Edmond

114

Health effects of synfuels technology: a review  

SciTech Connect

This document contains annotated synopses of available information pertinent to health impacts of synthetic fuel technologies under development, and identifies needs for further information. The report focuses on carcinogenesis, which appears to be a special problem with coal conversion technologies. This review is intended to serve as a reference for the NEPA Affairs Division of DOE in its evaluation of the overall synthetic fuel program and specific projects in the program. Updated versions of this document are expected to be prepared annually or semiannually as new information becomes available.

Sanathanan, L.P.; Reilly, C.A.; Marshall, S.A.; Wilzbach, K.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Quantifying the health and economic impacts of mercury : an integrated assessment approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a toxic pollutant that endangers human and ecosystem health. Especially potent in the form of methyl mercury, exposure is known to lead to adverse neurological effects, and, a growing body of evidence suggests, ...

Giang, Amanda (Amanda Chi Wen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: 6.0 Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6.0 Assessment and Improvement check mark 6.0 Assessment and Improvement check mark The fifth core function of Integrated Safety Management (ISM) requires that feedback and continuous improvement are incorporated into the work cycle for activities that involve work with biological materials or exposure to biological materials. This function is accomplished when supervisors, work leads, principal investigators (PIs), line management, Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S), and others assess and continuously improve the biosafety of work conducted at LBNL. See PUB-3000, Chapter 26, Section 26.9, for a description of how LBNL assessment and improvement processes are incorporated into work with biological materials and the Biosafety Program. The bulleted paragraphs below provide an overview of assessment and improvement processes and

117

Validating health impact assessment: Prediction is difficult (especially about the future)  

SciTech Connect

Health impact assessment (HIA) has been recommended as a means of estimating how policies, programmes and projects may impact on public health and on health inequalities. This paper considers the difference between predicting health impacts and measuring those impacts. It draws upon a case study of the building of a new hypermarket in a deprived area of Glasgow, which offered an opportunity to reflect on the issue of the predictive validity of HIA, and to consider the difference between potential and actual impacts. We found that the actual impacts of the new hypermarket on diet differed from that which would have been predicted based on previous studies. Furthermore, they challenge current received wisdom about the impact of food retail outlets in poorer areas. These results are relevant to the validity of HIA as a process and emphasise the importance of further research on the predictive validity of HIA, which should help improve its value to decision-makers.

Petticrew, Mark [MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, 4 Lilybank Gardens, Glasgow, G12 8RZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mark@msoc.mrc.gla.ac.uk; Cummins, Steven [Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Sparks, Leigh [Institute for Retail Studies, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA (United Kingdom); Findlay, Anne [Institute for Retail Studies, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA (United Kingdom)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Health assessment for Pasco Sanitary Landfill, Pasco, Franklin County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD991281874. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, Health Assessments are also prepared for non-NPL sites in response to requests from States and individuals. In the report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available.

Not Available

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

119

Targeted Health Assessment for Wastes Contained at the Niagara Falls Storage Site to Guide Planning for Remedial Action Alternatives - 13428  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is evaluating potential remedial alternatives at the 191-acre Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) brought radioactive wastes to the site during the 1940's and 1950's, and the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) consolidated these wastes into a 10-acre interim waste containment structure (IWCS) in the southwest portion of the site during the 1980's. The USACE is evaluating remedial alternatives for radioactive waste contained within the IWCS at the NFSS under the Feasibility Study phase of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. A preliminary evaluation of the IWCS has been conducted to assess potential airborne releases associated with uncovered wastes, particularly during waste excavation, as well as direct exposures to uncovered wastes. Key technical issues for this assessment include: (1) limitations in waste characterization data; (2) representative receptors and exposure routes; (3) estimates of contaminant emissions at an early stage of the evaluation process; (4) consideration of candidate meteorological data and air dispersion modeling approaches; and (5) estimates of health effects from potential exposures to both radionuclides and chemicals that account for recent updates of exposure and toxicity factors. Results of this preliminary health risk assessment indicate if the wastes were uncovered and someone stayed at the IWCS for a number of days to weeks, substantial doses and serious health effects could be incurred. Current controls prevent such exposures, and the controls that would be applied to protect onsite workers during remedial action at the IWCS would also effectively protect the public nearby. This evaluation provides framing context for the upcoming development and detailed evaluation of remedial alternatives for the IWCS. (authors)

Busse, John; Keil, Karen; Staten, Jane; Miller, Neil; Barker, Michelle [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States); MacDonell, Margaret; Peterson, John; Chang, Young-Soo; Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Survey to assess Persian Gulf spill effects  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that an international group is poised for an extensive survey of the Persian Gulf, including an assessment of the long term effects of last year's oil spill, a legacy of the Persian Gulf war. Saudi Arabia plans a $450 million cleanup program on beaches fouled by the massive spill. Plans for the survey were disclosed by the United National Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco). It is to be carried out under the auspices of the Regional Organization for the Protection of the Marine Environment (Ropme), Unesco's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Ropme member countries are Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

Not Available

1992-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Health-risk assessment of chemical contamination in Puget Sound seafood. Final report 1985-1988  

SciTech Connect

This report provides resource management and health agencies with a general indication of the magnitude of potential human health risks associated with consumption of recreationally harvested seafoods from Puget Sound. Data collection and evaluation focused on a variety of metal and organic contaminants in fish, shellfish and edible seaweeds from 22 locations in the Sound. EPA risk assessment techniques were used to characterize risks to average and high consumer groups for both carcinogens and noncarcinogens. Theoretical risks associated with consumption of both average and high quantities of Puget Sound seafood appear to be comparable to or substantially less than those for fish and shellfish from other locations in the United States.

Williams, L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Language and Immigrant Status Effects on Disparities in Hispanic Children’s Health Status and Access to Health Care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to estimate Hispanic/non-Hispanic (nH)-white health disparities and assess ... disparities can be explained by immigrant status and household primary language. The 2007 National Sur...

Rosa M. Avila; Matthew D. Bramlett

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

ASSESSMENT OF VARIABLE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMS WITH DEMAND RESPONSE RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASSESSMENT OF VARIABLE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMS WITH DEMAND RESPONSE RESOURCES BY ANUPAMA SUNIL KOWLI B of consumers - called demand response resources (DRRs) - whose role has become increasingly important

Gross, George

124

Human and animal health risk assessments of chemicals in the food chain: Comparative aspects and future perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Chemicals from anthropogenic and natural origins enter animal feed, human food and water either as undesirable contaminants or as part of the components of a diet. Over the last five decades, considerable efforts and progress to develop methodologies to protect humans and animals against potential risks associated with exposure to such potentially toxic chemicals have been made. This special issue presents relevant methodological developments and examples of risk assessments of undesirable substances in the food chain integrating the animal health and the human health perspective and refers to recent Opinions of the Scientific Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). This introductory review aims to give a comparative account of the risk assessment steps used in human health and animal health risk assessments for chemicals in the food chain and provides a critical view of the data gaps and future perspectives for this cross-disciplinary field. - Highlights: ? Principles of human and animal health risk assessment. ? Data gaps for each step of animal health risk assessment. ? Implications of animal risk assessment on human risk assessment. ? Future perspectives on chemical risk assessment.

Dorne, J.L.C.M., E-mail: jean-lou.dorne@efsa.europa.eu [Emerging Risk Unit, Via Carlo Magno 1A, 43126 Parma (Italy); Fink-Gremmels, J. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM Utrecht (Netherlands)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse health effects Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adverse health effects Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Regulation of Animal Health Products FDACVM:...

126

Radioactivity and X-rays Applications and health effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the release of radioactivity from reactor accidents and fallout from nuclear explosions in the atmosphereRadioactivity and X-rays Applications and health effects by Thormod Henriksen #12;Preface ­ 7 Chapter 2. What is radioactivity page 8 ­ 27 Chapter 3. Radioactive decay laws page 28 ­ 35

Sahay, Sundeep

127

Applying a framework for assessing the health system challenges to scaling up mHealth in South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobile phone technology has demonstrated the potential to improve health service delivery, but there is little guidance to inform decisions about acquiring and implementing mHealth technology at scale in health s...

Natalie Leon; Helen Schneider…

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy  

SciTech Connect

An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Assessment of Pollution Effects by the use of Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Assessment of Pollution Effects by the use of Algae Elsie M. Burrows An attempt has been made...culture of some of the larger attached algae for indication of pollution. Ulva lactua...Assessment of pollution effects by the use of algae. | Journal Article | 0 Culture Media...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The role of Health Impact Assessment in the setting of air quality standards: An Australian perspective  

SciTech Connect

The approaches used for setting or reviewing air quality standards vary from country to country. The purpose of this research was to consider the potential to improve decision-making through integration of HIA into the processes to review and set air quality standards used in Australia. To assess the value of HIA in this policy process, its strengths and weaknesses were evaluated aligned with review of international processes for setting air quality standards. Air quality standard setting programmes elsewhere have either used HIA or have amalgamated and incorporated factors normally found within HIA frameworks. They clearly demonstrate the value of a formalised HIA process for setting air quality standards in Australia. The following elements should be taken into consideration when using HIA in standard setting. (a) The adequacy of a mainly technical approach in current standard setting procedures to consider social determinants of health. (b) The importance of risk assessment criteria and information within the HIA process. The assessment of risk should consider equity, the distribution of variations in air quality in different locations and the potential impacts on health. (c) The uncertainties in extrapolating evidence from one population to another or to subpopulations, especially the more vulnerable, due to differing environmental factors and population variables. (d) The significance of communication with all potential stakeholders on issues associated with the management of air quality. In Australia there is also an opportunity for HIA to be used in conjunction with the NEPM to develop local air quality standard measures. The outcomes of this research indicated that the use of HIA for air quality standard setting at the national and local levels would prove advantageous. -- Highlights: • Health Impact Assessment framework has been applied to a policy development process. • HIA process was evaluated for application in air quality standard setting. • Advantages of HIA in the air quality standard setting process are demonstrated.

Spickett, Jeffery, E-mail: J.Spickett@curtin.edu.au [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia) [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Katscherian, Dianne [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia) [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Harris, Patrick [CHETRE — UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, University of New South Wales (Australia)] [CHETRE — UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, University of New South Wales (Australia)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

so on. 11.1.2 Air pollution and health effects Weestimateavailabihty of air pollution and health data in a particularRelationships of Air Pollution Health: Results Prom the

McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Feeding the world healthily: the challenge of measuring the effects of agriculture on health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...measuring the effects of agriculture on health Sophie Hawkesworth 1 2 Alan D. Dangour...lshtm.ac.uk ). 1 Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Research Unit, London School...Intergrative Research in Agriculture and Health London International Development Centre...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Health risk assessment is based on access to comprehensive information about potentially hazardous agents in question. Relevant information is scattered throughout the literature, and often is not readily accessible. To be useful in assessment efforts, emerging scientific findings, risk assess parameters, and associated data must be compiled and evaluated systemically. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are among the federal agencies heavily involved in this effort. This symposium was a direct response by EPA and ORNL to the expressed needs of individuals involved in assessing risks from chemical exposure. In an effort to examine the state of the risk assessment process, the availability of toxicological information, and the future development and transfer of this information, the symposium provided an excellent cadre of speakers and participants from state and federal agencies, academia and research laboratories to address these topics. This stimulating and productive gathering discussed concerns associated with (1) environmental contamination by chemicals; (2) laws regulating chemicals; (3) information needs and resources; (4) applications; (5) challenges and priorities; and (6)future issues. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual Supplemental Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-921314 1-921314 OSWER DIRECTIVE: 9285.6-03 March 25, 1991 RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE FOR SUPERFUND VOLUME I: HUMAN HEALTH EVALUATION MANUAL SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE "STANDARD DEFAULT EXPOSURE FACTORS" INTERIM FINAL Office of Emergency and Remedial Response Toxics Integration Branch U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 (202)475-9486 REPRODUCED BY U.S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE SPRINGFIELD, VA 22161 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 25 1991 S O L I D W A S T E A N D E M E R G E N C Y R E S P O N S E O F F I C E O F OSWER Directive 9285.6-03 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: FROM: Human Health Evaluation Manual, Supplemental Guidance: TO: Director, Waste Management Division, Regions I, IV, V, & VII Director, Emergency & Remedial Response Division,

135

A risk assessment software tool for evaluating potential risks to human health and the environment  

SciTech Connect

The Ecology and National Environmental Policy Act Division (END), is providing a sitewide evaluation of alternative strategies for the final disposition of the Rocky Flats Plant material inventory. This analysis is known as the Systems Engineering Analysis (SEA) for the Rocky Flats Plant. The primary intent of the SEA is to support the Rocky Flats Plant decision-making. As part of the SEA project, a risk assessment software tool has been developed which will assist in the analysis by providing an evaluation of potential risks to human health and the environment for the purpose of augmenting future decisions at the site.

Drendel, G. [ICF/Kaiser, Lakewood, CO (United States); Jones, M.; Shain, D. [EG & G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Allen, B.; Gentry, R.; Shipp, A.; Van Landingham, C. [ICF Kaiser, Ruston, LA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Air Pollution Health Effects: Toward an Integrated Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientists and policy makers have become increasingly aware of the need to jointly study climate change and air pollution because of the interactions among policy measures and in the atmospheric chemistry that creates the ...

Yang, Trent.

137

EA-0921; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research 21; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Proposed Action 3.2 Project Description 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operations Activities 3.3 No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS 5.1 Construction 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources 5.1.1.1 Historic/Archeological Resources 5.1.1.2 Federal/State-Listed or Proposed Protected Species or Critical Habitats 5.1.1.3 Flood Plains/Wetlands 5.1.1.4 National Forest, Parks, Trails, etc. 5.1.1.5 Prime Farmland 5.1.1.6 Special Sources of Water

138

Assessment of health implications related to processing and use of natural wool insulation products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper discusses possible health implications related to dust particles released during the manufacture of sheep's wool-based non-woven insulation material. Such insulation may replace traditional synthetic insulation products used in roofs, wall cavities, etc. A review of the literature concerning organic dusts in general and sheep's wool fiber summarizes dust exposure patterns, toxicological pathways and the hazards imposed by inhalation and explosion risk. This paper highlights a need for more research in order to refrain from overgeneralizing potential pulmonary and carcinogenic risks across the industries. Variables existing between industries such as the use of different wool types, processes, and additives are shown to have varying health effects. Within the final section of the paper, the health issues raised are compared with those that have been extensively documented for the rock and glass wool industries.

E. Mansour; C. Loxton; R.M. Elias; G.A. Ormondroyd

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

FACT SHEET: Fusion Center Assessment emergency response, public health and private sector security personnel to understand local intelligence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FACT SHEET: Fusion Center Assessment emergency response, public health and private sector security, protecting against, and responding to large scale weather/natural events or terrorism. CCICADA Project on Fusion Center Assessment: A mature, fully functioning national network of fusion centers is critical

140

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Health assessment for Industrial Latex Corporation, Wallington Borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD981178411. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has prepared Health Assessment reports for sites currently on, or proposed for, the National Priorities List. In the report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available.

Not Available

1990-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

Strategies for assessing the implications of malformed frogs for environmental health.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whether there are human health implications in the malformedHealth Perspectives Workshop Summary * Implications ofHealth Perspectives Workshop Summary * Implications of

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

HEALTH EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST: AN HEI PERSPECTIVE  

SciTech Connect

Diesel engines have many advantages, including good fuel economy, power, durability, lower emissions of some pollutants (such as carbon monoxide) and of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). However, there are a number of concerns that need to be addressed: (1) emissions of nitrogen oxides (which contribute to ozone formation) and of particulate matter (PM); (2) questions about cancer and other health effects from exposure to diesel PM; and (3) as efforts to decrease emissions progress, a need to understand whether the nature and toxicity of the PM emitted has changed. This paper focuses on (1) carcinogenicity data, (2) noncancer effects, and (3) diesel as part of the complex ambient mixture of PM.

Warren, Jane

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

144

Human health risk assessment for off-shore media at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard  

SciTech Connect

A human health risk assessment for off-shore media was performed at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, Maine. The purpose was to determine whether any potential human health risks could be posed by exposures to the estuary. Included in the study were the evaluations of potential risks existing from human exposures to surface water and sediment, as well as potential risks posed by ingestion of various species of fish and shellfish which are caught commercially and recreationally in the estuary. Three species were chosen for study. They were lobsters, mussels, and flounder. The USEPA prescribed protocols for performing human health risk assessments under CERCLA and RCRA were followed to estimate risks associated with ingestion of these species caught in the lower estuary, in the vicinity of the Shipyard. USEPA required the evaluation of two potential seafood ingestion scenarios recreational fishermen and subsistence fishermen. The results indicated that the USEPA risk target of 10{sup {minus}6} for carcinogens or the hazard index of one was exceeded in at least one species for the subsistence ingestion scenario for some inorganics and organic compounds. Based on these results, it was necessary to propose Media Protection Standards in the biota, which would represent the USEPA target risk level for carcinogens and noncarcinogens, as potential cleanup targets. In performing this task, a review of regional background levels for these chemicals found in biota throughout the Great Bay Estuarine System, at locations removed from the Shipyard, was performed. Also examined were regional Maine data from the NOAA Mussel Watch Program. Biota concentrations near the Shipyard were found to be within the range of biota concentrations for most of these chemicals throughout the region, suggesting possible multiple, non-point sources for the contaminants found in seafood throughout the region.

Mahoney, E. [Eileen Mahoney Associates, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments.

Ebinger, M.H.; Beckman, R.J.; Myers, O.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.; Bestgen, H.T. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

ASA conference on radiation and health: Health effects of electric and magnetic fields: Statistical support for research strategies. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a collection of papers documenting presentations made at the VIII ASA (American Statistical Association) Conference on Radiation and Health entitled Health Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields: Statistical Support for Research Strategies. Individual papers are abstracted and indexed for the database.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effects of Ecotourism on the Behavior and Health of Red Howler Monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) in Suriname.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ecological changes and habitat degradation have measurable effects on nonhuman primate group size, but little is known about their effects on the behavior and health… (more)

Westin, Jessica L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Physiological acoustics and health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews work on the assessment of the damaging effect of noise on man’s auditory system the degree to which the auditory system interacts directly with the autonomic system of the body noise as the sole or contributory cause of general (nonauditory) physiological and psychological ill health in communities and the effect of noise on general health in industry.

Karl D. Kryter

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect Shao, Hongfei Florida State University Liu, Guosheng Florida State University Category: Aerosols The aerosol first indirect effect is known to cool the Earth radiatively. However, its magnitude is very uncertain; large discrepancies exist among the observed values published in the literature. In this study, we first survey the published values of those parameters used for describing the first indirect effect. By analyzing the discrepancies among these values, we show that the first indirect effect has been overestimated by many investigators due to an improper parameter being used. Therefore, we introduce a more meaningful parameter to measure this effect. We estimated the first indirect effect using the new parameter based on observational

150

Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized. Total waste generation increased 9.8%, but it was possible to reduce the volume of non-recyclable materials (11%) and increase the volume of recyclable materials (4%). It was also possible to segregate organic waste (7%), which was forwarded for production of compost. The rate of infectious waste generation in critical areas decreased from 0.021 to 0.018 kg/procedure. Many improvements have been observed, and now the PHC complies with most of legal requirements, offers periodic training and better biosafety conditions to workers, has reduced the volume of waste sent to sanitary landfills, and has introduced indicators for monitoring its own performance. This evaluation method might subsidize the creation and evaluation of medical waste management plans in similar heath institutions.

Moreira, A.M.M., E-mail: anamariainforme@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil); Guenther, W.M.R. [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method of assessing a lipid-related health risk based on ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU), a waste product of uranium enrichment, has several civilian and military applications. It was used as armor-piercing ammunition in international military conflicts and was claimed to contribute to health problems, known as the Gulf War Syndrome and recently as the Balkan Syndrome. This led to renewed efforts to assess the environmental consequences and the health impact of the use of DU. The radiological and chemical properties of DU can be compared to those of natural uranium, which is ubiquitously present in soil at a typical concentration of 3 mg/kg. Natural uranium has the same chemotoxicity, but its radiotoxicity is 60% higher. Due to the low specific radioactivity and the dominance of alpha-radiation no acute risk is attributed to external exposure to DU. The major risk is DU dust, generated when DU ammunition hits hard targets. Depending on aerosol speciation, inhalation may lead to a protracted exposure of the lung and other organs. After deposition on the ground, resuspension can take place if the DU containing particle size is sufficiently small. However, transfer to drinking water or locally produced food has little potential to lead to significant exposures to DU. Since poor solubility of uranium compounds and lack of information on speciation precludes the use of radioecological models for exposure assessment, biomonitoring has to be used for assessing exposed persons. Urine, feces, hair and nails record recent exposures to DU. With the exception of crews of military vehicles having been hit by DU penetrators, no body burdens above the range of values for natural uranium have been found. Therefore, observable health effects are not expected and residual cancer risk estimates have to be based on theoretical considerations. They appear to be very minor for all post-conflict situations, i.e. a fraction of those expected from natural radiation.

A Bleise; P.R Danesi; W Burkart

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Single track effects, biostack and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

This talk addresses the single-track nature of the space radiation environment, and points out the importance of single hits'' in the evaluation of radiation risk for long-term missions occurring outside the earth's magnetic field. A short review is made of biological objects found to show increased effects when hit'' by a single heavy charged-particle in space. A brief discussion is given of the most provocative results from the bacterial spore B. subtilis: experimental evidence that tracks can affect biological systems at much larger distances from the trajectory than previously suspected, and that the resultant inactivation cross section in space calculated for this system is very large. When taken at face value, the implication of these results, when compared to those from experiments performed at ground-based accelerators with beams at low energies in the same LET range, is that high-energy particles can exert their influence a surprising distance from their trajectory and the inactivation cross sections are some twenty times larger than expected. Clearly, beams from high-energy heavy-ion accelerators should be used to confirm these results. For those end points that can also be caused by low-LET beams such as high-energy protons, it is important to measure their action cross sections as well. The ratio of the cross sections for a high-LET beam to that of a low-LET beam is an interesting experimental ratio and, we suggest, of more intrinsic interest than the RBE. It is a measure of the biological'' importance of one particle type relative to another particle type. This ratio will be introduced and given the name RPPE (Relative Per Particle Effectiveness). Values of RPPE will be discussed.

Curtis, S.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Single track effects, biostack and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

This talk addresses the single-track nature of the space radiation environment, and points out the importance of single ``hits`` in the evaluation of radiation risk for long-term missions occurring outside the earth`s magnetic field. A short review is made of biological objects found to show increased effects when ``hit`` by a single heavy charged-particle in space. A brief discussion is given of the most provocative results from the bacterial spore B. subtilis: experimental evidence that tracks can affect biological systems at much larger distances from the trajectory than previously suspected, and that the resultant inactivation cross section in space calculated for this system is very large. When taken at face value, the implication of these results, when compared to those from experiments performed at ground-based accelerators with beams at low energies in the same LET range, is that high-energy particles can exert their influence a surprising distance from their trajectory and the inactivation cross sections are some twenty times larger than expected. Clearly, beams from high-energy heavy-ion accelerators should be used to confirm these results. For those end points that can also be caused by low-LET beams such as high-energy protons, it is important to measure their action cross sections as well. The ratio of the cross sections for a high-LET beam to that of a low-LET beam is an interesting experimental ratio and, we suggest, of more intrinsic interest than the RBE. It is a measure of the ``biological`` importance of one particle type relative to another particle type. This ratio will be introduced and given the name RPPE (Relative Per Particle Effectiveness). Values of RPPE will be discussed.

Curtis, S.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

WORKING PAPER N 2007 -40 The distortionary effect of health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, health care, public/private, compulsory/voluntary insurance PARIS-JOURDAN SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES for modeling the impact of insurance on health- care demand extending some of the results of the two-risk model and still consume healthcare. Keywords: Health insurance, Adverse selection, Health care, Public

Boyer, Edmond

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing health impacts Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a study intended... or management analysis unrelated to improved health or health care (e.g., the impact of the health-care industry... into ... Source: MacMillan, Andrew -...

157

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

158

Environmental Assessment of Photovoltaic Systems and Effectiveness Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment of Photovoltaic Systems and Effectiveness Analysis Environmental Assessment of Photovoltaic Systems and Effectiveness Analysis of U.S. Renewable Energy Policies Speaker(s): Pei Zhai Date: October 25, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Chris Marnay This presentation mainly covers two perspectives relevant to solar energy technologies. The first one is the environmental aspect. The questions to be answered are how "green" photovoltaic technology is (embodied energy and carbon are two main indicators); and, how have these two indicators evolved during the past 10 years. The methodology for analysis is a hybrid Life Cycle Assessment. The second part involves a policy analysis of the effectiveness of U.S. renewable energy policies, such as state-level Renewable Portfolio Standards, for supporting solar energy adoption. A

159

WHAT GOOD IS WEALTH WITHOUT HEALTH? THE EFFECT OF HEALTH ON THE MARGINAL UTILITY OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate how the marginal utility of consumption varies with health. To do so, we develop a simple model in which the impact of health on the marginal utility of consumption can be estimated from data on permanent income, ...

Finkelstein, Amy

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing health service Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Faculty Director Pat Remington Program... What Works (to reduce Health Disparities) Health Care SystemsServices Diabetes QI Collaborative... University of Wisconsin School...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possible links between environmental problems like air pollution and chronic diseases like asthma part of CDC's Environmental Public Health Tracking Program since 2002. Massachusetts began building itsCS227358_A National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental Hazards and Health

162

U.S. Department of Energy worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with environmental restoration and waste management  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM). The methodology is appropriate for estimating worker risks across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex at both programmatic and site-specific levels. This document supports the worker health risk methodology used to perform the human health risk assessment portion of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) although it has applications beyond the PEIS, such as installation-wide worker risk assessments, screening-level assessments, and site-specific assessments.

Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.; Travis, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management; Simek, M.A.; Sutherland, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scofield, P.A. [Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) has been claimed to contribute to health problems both in military personnel directly involved in war actions as well in military and civilian individuals who resided in areas where DU ammunition was expended. Due to the low specific radioactivity and the dominance of alpha-radiation, no acute health risk can be attributed to external exposure to DU. Internalised DU is both chemo- and radio-toxic. The major risk is from inhalation of DU dust or particles with less than 10 ?m aerodynamic-equivalent diameter, formed when DU ammunitions hit hard targets (aerosol formation) or during weathering of DU penetrators. One major conclusion is that for all post-conflict situations, the inhaled DU quantities (central estimates) produced radiation doses that would be only a fraction of those normally received by the lung from natural radiation. Hence no long term lung effects due to these DU amounts can be expected. These conclusions also hold for whole-body exposure from ingestion of DU in local food and water.

W. Burkart; P.R. Danesi; J.H. Hendry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Comparing rating paradigms for evidence-based Program registers in behavioral health: Evidentiary criteria and implications for Assessing programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Decision makers need timely and credible information about the effectiveness of behavioral health interventions. Online evidence-based program registers (EBPRs) have been developed to address this need. However, the methods by which these registers determine programs and practices as being “evidence-based” has not been investigated in detail. This paper examines the evidentiary criteria \\{EBPRs\\} use to rate programs and the implications for how different registers rate the same programs. Although the registers tend to employ a standard Campbellian hierarchy of evidence to assess evaluation results, there is also considerable disagreement among the registers about what constitutes an adequate research design and sufficient data for designating a program as evidence-based. Additionally, differences exist in how registers report findings of “no effect,” which may deprive users of important information. Of all programs on the 15 registers that rate individual programs, 79% appear on only one register. Among a random sample of 100 programs rated by more than one register, 42% were inconsistently rated by the multiple registers to some degree.

Stephanie N. Means; Stephen Magura; Jason T. Burkhardt; Daniela C. Schröter; Chris L.S. Coryn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The relative effect of health literacy and patient activation on provider choice in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Active provider choice by patients has become an important policy theme in western, countries over the last decades. However, not many patients and consumers exercise their right to, choose. Both health literacy and patient activation are likely to have an impact on the choice process. In, this article the relative effect of health literacy and patient activation on provider choice in the, Netherlands is studied. A questionnaire was sent to a representative sample of 2000 Dutch citizens. The questionnaire, included a measure of functional health literacy, the Dutch version of the Patient Activation Measure, and questions assessing active provider choice, reasons not to engage in it and other ways of provider, selection. The majority of respondents (59.6%) would not search for information on the basis of which they, could select the best provider or hospital. Most people rely on their general practitioner's advice. Both, low literacy and lower patient activation levels were negatively associated with active provider choice. In a regression analysis gender, education and patient activation proved the most important, predictors. The policy focus on active provider choice might result in inequity, with men, less educated, and less activated people being at a disadvantage.

Jany Rademakers; Jessica Nijman; Anne E.M. Brabers; Judith D. de Jong; Michelle Hendriks

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Acute health effects in a community after a release of hydrofluoric acid  

SciTech Connect

{approximately} 3,000 persons were evacuated from a Texas community after 24,036 kg (53,000 lb) of caustic hydrofluoric acid (HF) were released from a nearby petrochemical plant. Emergency room and hospital records of 939 persons who were seen at two area hospitals were reviewed. Most persons who presented at the emergency rooms were female (56%) or black (60%), and their mean age was 33.9 y. The most frequently reported symptoms were eye irritation (41.5%), burning throat (21%), headache (20.6%), and shortness of breath (19.4%). Physical examination results were normal for 49% of the cases; however, irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, skin, and lungs were noted on other exams. Decreased pulmonary function was demonstrated by pulmonary function tests (forced expiratory volume in the first second, less than 80% of predicted value, 42.3%); hypoxemia (pO2 less than 80 mm Hg, 17.4%) and hypocalcemia (less than 8.5 mg/dl, 16.3%) were also noted. Ninety-four (10%) of the cases were hospitalized, and more than 83% of all cases were discharged with a primary diagnosis of HF exposure. There are several reports of individuals who are acutely and chronically exposed to HF; however, we are unaware of other published reports that describe exposure of a community to HF. This incident represented a unique opportunity to study the immediate health impact on a community of residents who were exposed to a hazardous materials release. Results of this analysis suggest that (a) initial health problems should be followed up, (b) any long-term health effects of HF exposure must be assessed, and (c) the health impact on the population at risk should be determined.

Wing, J.S.; Brender, J.D.; Sanderson, L.M.; Perrotta, D.M.; Beauchamp, R.A. (Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Effective dose conversion coefficients for health care provider exposed to pediatric and adult victims in radiological dispersal device incident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After an incident of radiological dispersal devices (RDD), health care providers will be exposed to the contaminated patients in the extended medical treatments. Assessment of potential radiation dose to the health care providers will be crucial to minimize their health risk. In this study, we compiled a set of conversion coefficients (mSv?MBq?1?s?1) to readily estimate the effective dose from the time-integrated activity for the health care providers while they deal with internally contaminated patients at different ages. We selected Co-60, Ir-192, Am-241, Cs-137, and I-131 as the major radionuclides that may be used for RDD. We obtained the age-specific organ burdens after the inhalation of those radionuclides from the Dose and Risk Calculation Software (DCAL) program. A series of hybrid computational phantoms (1-, 5-, 10-, and 15?year-old, and adult males) were implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, MCNPX v 2.7, to simulate an adult male health care provider exposed to contaminated patients at different ages. Two exposure scenarios were taken into account: a health care provider (a) standing at the side of patients lying in bed and (b) sitting face to face with patients. The conversion coefficients overall depended on radionuclides, the age of the patients, and the orientation of the patients. The conversion coefficient was greatest for Co-60 and smallest for Am-241. The dose from the 1?year-old patient phantom was up to three times greater than that from the adult patient phantom. The conversion coefficients were less dependent on the age of the patients in the scenario of a health care provider sitting face to face with patients. The dose conversion coefficients established in this study will be useful to readily estimate the effective dose to the health care providers in RDD events.

Eun Young Han; Wi-Ho Ha; Young-Woo Jin; Wesley E Bolch; Choonsik Lee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I. Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publication 9285.7-01D Publication 9285.7-01D January 1998 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Revision No. 0 ii January 1998 NOTICE This document provides guidance to EPA staff. The guidance is designed to communicate National policy on the planning, reporting and review of Superfund risk assessments. The document does not, however, substitute for EPA's statutes or regulations, nor is it a regulation itself. Thus, it cannot impose legally-binding requirements on EPA, States, or the regulated community, and may not apply to a particular situation based upon

169

The development of an effective portfolio assessment instrument  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN EFFECTIVE PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENT A Thesis by KAREN LEIGH ALDERETE Approved as to style and content by: Viola E. Florez ( Chair of Committee ) Rafael ra... (Schroeder and Hunsburger, 1989). A good writing curriculum for students at-risk should include several components. There must be an emphasis on meaningful conununication. Less emphasis should be placed on learning mechanics of the language (e. g...

Alderete, Karen Leigh

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development of a structural health monitoring system for the life assessment of critical transportation infrastructure.  

SciTech Connect

Recent structural failures such as the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota have underscored the urgent need for improved methods and procedures for evaluating our aging transportation infrastructure. This research seeks to develop a basis for a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system to provide quantitative information related to the structural integrity of metallic structures to make appropriate management decisions and ensuring public safety. This research employs advanced structural analysis and nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for an accurate fatigue analysis. Metal railroad bridges in New Mexico will be the focus since many of these structures are over 100 years old and classified as fracture-critical. The term fracture-critical indicates that failure of a single component may result in complete collapse of the structure such as the one experienced by the I-35W Bridge. Failure may originate from sources such as loss of section due to corrosion or cracking caused by fatigue loading. Because standard inspection practice is primarily visual, these types of defects can go undetected due to oversight, lack of access to critical areas, or, in riveted members, hidden defects that are beneath fasteners or connection angles. Another issue is that it is difficult to determine the fatigue damage that a structure has experienced and the rate at which damage is accumulating due to uncertain history and load distribution in supporting members. A SHM system has several advantages that can overcome these limitations. SHM allows critical areas of the structure to be monitored more quantitatively under actual loading. The research needed to apply SHM to metallic structures was performed and a case study was carried out to show the potential of SHM-driven fatigue evaluation to assess the condition of critical transportation infrastructure and to guide inspectors to potential problem areas. This project combines the expertise in transportation infrastructure at New Mexico State University with the expertise at Sandia National Laboratories in the emerging field of SHM.

Roach, Dennis Patrick; Jauregui, David Villegas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Daumueller, Andrew Nicholas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage Key parts of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as the health care reform law, go into effect January 1, 2014. When this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as the health care reform law, go into effect January 1, 2014 by the health care reform law (i.e., the plan's share of the total allowed benefit costs covered by the planNew Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage Key parts of the Patient

172

Environment, Safety, and Health Self-Assessment Report, Fiscal Year 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the 4th Annual Safety Culture Survey conducted by HealthFinally, results of the Safety Culture Survey indicate thatawareness and promotes safety culture within the Division.

Chernowski, John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing potential health Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Care Center 1 Fletcher Drive PO Box 117500 Summary: -392-1161 The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution UF Employee Preplacement Health...

174

Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s exposure to nitrogen dioxide in Sweden: investigatingto traf- fic and nitrogen dioxide. Epidemiology 16(6):737–Spatial variations in nitrogen dioxide concen- trations in

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The effects of health coaching on adult patients with chronic diseases: A systematic review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective The aim of this systematic review was to describe the effects of health coaching on adult patients with chronic diseases. Methods The reviewers searched electronic databases and performed a manual search for studies published from 2009 to 2013. The inclusion criteria covered health coaching for adults with chronic diseases by health care professionals. The studies were original, randomized controlled trials or quasi-experimental designs. Results Thirteen studies were selected using the inclusion criteria. The results indicate that health coaching produces positive effects on patients’ physiological, behavioral and psychological conditions and on their social life. In particular, statistically significant results revealed better weight management, increased physical activity and improved physical and mental health status. Conclusion Health coaching improves the management of chronic diseases. Further research into the cost-effectiveness of health coaching and its long-term effectiveness for chronic diseases is needed. Practice implications Health care professionals play key roles in promoting healthy behavior and motivating good care for adults with chronic diseases. Health coaching is an effective patient education method that can be used to motivate and take advantage of a patient's willingness to change their life style and to support the patient's home-based self-care.

Kirsi Kivelä; Satu Elo; Helvi Kyngäs; Maria Kääriäinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Health Effects of Exercising in Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The health benefits of exercise are well known. Many of the most accessible forms of exercise, such as walking, cycling, and running often occur outdoors. This means that exercising outdoors may increase exposure...

Luisa V. Giles; Michael S. Koehle

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment, West Pullman Iron and Metal (a/k/a West Pullman/Victory Heights), Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, Region 5: CERCLIS number ILD005428651. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The West Pullman/Victory Heights/Maple Park site consists of two abandoned industrial properties. The Navistar International Transportation Corporation (Navistar) property is commonly called International Harvester (IH) and the NL Industries, Incorporated property is commonly called Dutch Boy (DB). These industries were active from the early part of this century until the early 1980s when the factories were closed and abandoned. Currently, for people trespassing on the site, both the Dutch Boy and the International Harvester properties represent a potential public health hazard. Limited data are available to assess potential off-site exposures to site-related contaminants, and therefore, exposure to off-site contaminants from the International Harvester and Dutch Boy properties is classified as an indeterminate public health hazard.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Air quality resolution for health impact assessment: influence of regional characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate how regional characteristics of population and background pollution might impact the selection of optimal air quality model resolution when calculating the human health impacts of changes to air quality. Using ...

Thompson, T. M.

179

Effects of Medicare payment reform: Evidence from the home health interim and prospective payment systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Medicare continues to implement payment reforms that shift reimbursement from fee-for-service toward episode-based payment, affecting average and marginal payment. We contrast the effects of two reforms for home health agencies. The home health interim payment system in 1997 lowered both types of payment; our conceptual model predicts a decline in the likelihood of use and costs, both of which we find. The home health prospective payment system in 2000 raised average but lowered marginal payment with theoretically ambiguous effects; we find a modest increase in use and costs. We find little substantive effect of either policy on readmissions or mortality.

Peter J. Huckfeldt; Neeraj Sood; José J. Escarce; David C. Grabowski; Joseph P. Newhouse

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Assessment of the impacts on health due to the emissions of Cuban power plants that use fossil fuel oils with high content of sulfur. Estimation of external costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuel electricity generation has been demonstrated to be a main source of atmospheric pollution. The necessity of finding out a balance between the costs of achieving a lower level of environmental and health injury and the benefits of providing electricity at a reasonable cost have lead to the process of estimating the external costs derived from these impacts and not included in the electricity prices as a quantitative measure of it that, even when there are large uncertainties involved, can be used by decision makers in the process of achieving a global sustainable development. The external costs of the electricity generation in three Cuban power plants that use fossil fuel oils with high sulfur content have been assessed. With that purpose a specific implementation of the Impact Pathways Methodology for atmospheric emissions was developed. Dispersion of atmospheric pollutants is modeled at local and regional scales in a detailed way. Health impacts include mortality and those morbidity effects that showed relation with the increment of selected pollutant concentration in national studies. The external cost assessed for the three plants was 40,588,309 USD yr?1 (min./max.: 10,194,833/169,013,252), representing 1.06 USD Cent kWh?1. Costs derived from sulfur species (SO2 and sulfate aerosol) stand for 93% of the total costs.

L. Turtós Carbonell; E. Meneses Ruiz; M. Sánchez Gácita; J. Rivero Oliva; N. Díaz Rivero

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Environment, Safety and Health Self-Assessment Report Fiscal Year 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Division Earth Day Ergonomics Advanced Light SourceComputer Workstation Ergonomics Review and Update of theDirectorate Assessment of Ergonomics Risk Management New

Robinson, Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing health worker Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Latina women, being involved in prenatal... assessment, education, maternity care coordination, and developing and ... Source: Holliday, Mark A. - Department of...

183

The causal effect of retirement on health: New evidence from Australian pension reform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The causal effect of retirement on health is studied using the Australian 1993 Age Pension reform to isolate exogenous variation in retirement status. Using instrumental variable methods we find that retirement has a positive impact on subjective and objective measures of health.

Kadir Atalay; Garry F. Barrett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide levels inside and outside homes and the implications on health effects research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide levels inside and outside homes and the implications on health effects research ...

John D. Spengler; Benjamin G. Ferris Jr.; Douglas W. Dockery; Frank E. Speizer

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambient air quality standards and health effects research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambient air quality standards and health effects research ...

John D. Spengler; Colin P. Duffy; Richard. Letz; Theodore W. Tibbitts; Benjamin G. Ferris

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

DOE has prepared an environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site. This (new) facility would meet requirements of the site radiological protection program and would ensure site compliance with regulations. It was determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and no environmental impact statement is needed.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Why and How Should We Assess Occupational Health Impacts in Integrated Product Policy?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, in an attempt to consider other sustainability criteria and to avoid a shift from environmental health impacts to occupational health impacts one may want to include occupational health in IPP. ... Integrated product policy (IPP) has emerged as an area of intense research and debate among policy makers in order to better consider the “world behind the product” (1) and to deal with the many dimensions of sustainable development (2?4). ... Viscusi and Zeckhauser (20) estimate for 1987 the number of workdays lost due to injuries per million dollars output for a 38 sector model of the United States economy to be 0.1 (real estate) to 1.2 (furniture and fixtures). ...

Patrick Hofstetter; Gregory A. Norris

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

Health assessment for Medley Farms Site, Cherokee County, Gaffney, South Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. SCD980558142. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Medley Farms site is proposed for inclusion on the National Priorities List. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) had not permitted the use of the property for disposal of hazardous materials. Approximately 5,300 55-gallon drums and 15-gallon containers were discovered during an investigation by SCDHEC staff. After the Environmental Protection Agency's 1983 emergency clean-up activities, on-site groundwater samples were collected in 1984 and 1986. Contaminants found in these samples were as follows: methylene chloride, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. From the information reviewed, the site is concluded to be of potential health concern because of the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations which may result in adverse health effects.

Not Available

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

The effect of European contact on the health of indigenous populations in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, however, that overall population health did not decline with European contact; there was, in fact, a slight decline in the frequency of dental disturbances. Several studies are currently being conducted on the effects of European contact on the Maya...THE EFFECT OF EUROPEAN CONTACT ON THE HEALTH OF INDIGENOUS POPULATIONS IN TEXAS A Thesis by ELIZABETH ANN MILLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Miller, Elizabeth Ann

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Health and Productivity: A Needs Assessment Pilot at Two DOE Sites (2012)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Productivity of the Productivity of the U.S. Department of Energy FINAL REPORT Prepared by the University of Maryland with the Integrated Benefits Institute 2012 FINAL REPORT 2 Executive Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been concerned about employees' health and well-being for several years, especially as they relate to workplace productivity and safety. Additionally, the DOE's reliance on an aging workforce makes it even more critical for the Department to ensure that its programs and policies support employees, regardless of their age, to perform their jobs safely, while maintaining productivity, overall health, and well-

192

Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Exploring the Effect of mHealth Technologies on Communication and Information Sharing in a Pediatric Critical Care Unit: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Communication and information sharing is an important aspect of healthcare information technology and mHealth management. A main requirement in the quality of patient care is the ability of all health care participants to communicate. Research illustrates ... Keywords: Health Care Technology, Information Technology, Management of Technology, Professional Communication, Technology Assessment, eHealth, mHealth

Rocci Luppicini; Victoria Aceti

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Public health assessment for Griffiss Air Force Base, Rome, Oneida County, New York, Region 2. Cerclis No. NY4571924451. Addendum. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The public health assessment addendum addresses the two public health issues identified at Griffiss Air Force Base by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR): (1) exposures to contaminated fish from Three Mile and Six Mile Creeks, and (2) past exposures to contaminated groundwater through private wells off base. Frequent consumption of contaminated fish from Three Mile and Six Mile Creeks could pose a health problem. However, if NYSDOH fish consumption guidelines are followed, fish consumption should not present a public health hazard. ATSDR cannot evaluate exposures to contaminated groundwater through private well use prior to 1982 because there are no sampling data.

NONE

1996-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effective CKD Care in European Countries: Challenges and Opportunities for Health Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important global public health problem that is associated with adverse health outcomes and high health care costs. Effective and cost-effective treatments are available for slowing the progression of CKD and preventing its complications, including cardiovascular disease. Although wealthy nations have highly structured schemes in place to support the care of people with kidney failure, less consideration has been given to health systems and policy for the much larger population of people with non–dialysis-dependent CKD. Further, how to integrate such strategies with national and international initiatives for control of other chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) merits attention. We synthesized the various approaches to CKD control across 17 European countries and present our findings according to the key domains suggested by the World Health Organization framework for NCD control. This report identifies opportunities to strengthen CKD-relevant health systems and explores potential mechanisms to capitalize on these opportunities. Across the 17 countries studied, we found a number of common barriers to the care of people with non–dialysis-dependent CKD: limited work force capacity, the nearly complete absence of mechanisms for disease surveillance, lack of a coordinated CKD care strategy, poor integration of CKD care with other NCD control initiatives, and low awareness of the significance of CKD. These common challenges faced by diverse health systems reflect the need for international cooperation to strengthen health systems and policies for CKD care.

Aminu K. Bello; Adeera Levin; Braden J. Manns; John Feehally; Tilman Drueke; Labib Faruque; Brenda R. Hemmelgarn; Charles Kernahan; Johannes Mann; Scott Klarenbach; Giuseppe Remuzzi; Marcello Tonelli

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

SciTech Connect

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this booklet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are debed. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns about potential health effects of power lines. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this booklet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Health risk assessment for the Building 3001 Storage Canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This human health risk assessment has been prepared for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The objectives of this risk assessment are to evaluate the alternatives for interim closure of the Building 3001 Storage Canal and to identify the potential health risk from an existing leak in the canal. The Building 3001 Storage Canal connects Buildings 3001 and 3019. The volume of water in the canal is monitored and kept constant at about 62,000 gal. The primary contaminants of the canal water are the radionuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 90}Sr; a layer of sediment on the canal floor also contains radionuclides and metals. The prime medium of contaminant transport has been identified as groundwater. The primary route for occupational exposure at the canal is external exposure to gamma radiation from the canal water and the walls of the canal. Similarly, the primary exposure route at the 3042 sump is external exposure to gamma radiation from the groundwater and the walls of the sump. Based on the exposure rates in the radiation work permits (Appendix C) and assuming conservative occupational work periods, the annual radiation dose to workers is considerably less than the relevant dose limits. The potential risk to the public using the Clinch River was determined for three significant exposure pathways: ingestion of drinking water; ingestion of contaminated fish; and external exposure to contaminated sediments on the shoreline, the dominant exposure pathway.

Chidambariah, V.; White, R.K.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation at dose levels helow in rads lack reliable data bases and dose- effect information to derive quantitative estimation

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Health Insurance and Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article reviews the recent literature on the causal effect of health insurance on health outcomes. The focus is mainly on private health insurance in the US. The objective is to illustrate measurement issues for both health insurance and health outcomes, and to discuss the methodological challenges for researchers as they address endogeneity of insurance. Finally, a brief overview of methods and results found in the source studies is provided. Certain patterns emerge: in general, insurance is more pronounced for all-cause mortality and for generic health outcomes as compared with disease-specific outcomes. In addition, vulnerable and medically needy populations are more likely to benefit from health insurance than the general population. Finally, there is some support for the notion that continuous health insurance coverage benefits health more than intermittent insurance, suggesting that sporadic coverage offers limited value.

A. Dor; E. Umapathi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Health assessment for Nearshore/Tideflats, Tacoma, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD980726368. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats project site is located in Pierce County, Washington and includes approximately 12 square miles of shallow water, shorelines, tideflats, and upland industrial/commercial sections in and around the City of Tacoma. Since the late 1800s, industrialization of the Commencement Bay area has resulted in many metals, such as lead and arsenic, and organic compounds, such as polychlorinated bipheny (PCBs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), being released into the marine environment. The waterways and the shoreline are impacted by over 400 potential pollutant sources, including storm drains, pulp mills, chemical plants, and oil refineries. Levels of contaminants in bottom fish and shell fish pose a potential public health concern for those consuming local seafood. Levels of contaminants in sediment, surface water, soil, and air may also pose potential public health concerns for remedial workers and those individuals involved in recreational and commercial activities at the site.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Health Benefits and Cost-Effectiveness of Primary Genetic Screening for Lynch Syndrome in the General Population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 research-article Research Articles Health Benefits and Cost-Effectiveness of Primary...Whether this approach would improve health outcomes in a manner that is cost-effective...5-generation family history model to predict health and economic outcomes of 20 primary screening...

Tuan A. Dinh; Benjamin I. Rosner; James C. Atwood; C. Richard Boland; Sapna Syngal; Hans F. A. Vasen; Stephen B. Gruber; Randall W. Burt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Assessment of geothermal development in the Imperial Valley of California. Volume 1. Environment, health, and socioeconomics  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of the Imperial Valley's geothermal resources to support energy production could be hindered if environmental impacts prove to be unacceptable or if geothermal operations are incompatible with agriculture. To address these concerns, an integrated environmental and socioeconomic assessment of energy production in the valley was prepared. The most important impacts examined in the assessment involved air quality changes resulting from emissions of hydrogen sulfide, and increases in the salinity of the Salton Sea resulting from the use of agricultural waste waters for power plant cooling. The socioeconomics consequences of future geothermal development will generally be beneficial. (MHR)

Layton, D. (ed.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was successful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Bradley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was sUGcessful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Raymond,, J. R.; Brandley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat,, J. K.; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Water chlorination: environmental impact and health effects. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

The papers dealt with the major facets of chlorination and its associated effects. Each has been abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)

Jolley, R.L.; Brungs, W.A.; Cumming, R.B. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The health effects of deployment frequency and duration in US military service members supporting the Global War on Terrorism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Board Task Force on Persian Gulf War Health Effects.Ann Clin Psychiatry. The Iowa Persian Gulf Study Group.health status among Persian Gulf War veterans: a population-

Smith, Besa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

GRR/Section 11-FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment 11FDCNHPASection106EffectsAssessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Regulations & Policies National Historic Preservation Act 36 CFR 800 - Protection of Historic Properties Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11FDCNHPASection106EffectsAssessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Federal agency must proceed to the assessment of adverse effects when

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing behavioral effects Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as well as Summary: improvement activity and assessments. Quality Improvement 5. a. Articulate and effectively apply relevant... , timeout, positive ID). b. Actively...

210

Health assessment for Baird and McGuire, Holbrook, Massachusetts, Region 1. CERCLIS No. MAD001041987. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Baird McGuire site in Holbrook, Massachusetts was evaluated for potential health effects of the herbicide, pesticide, and dioxin concentrations found there. There is concern that the contaminants enter the river and may eventually contaminate the towns' water supply. Groundwater contamination and surface runoff into the river are the pathways of concern. To a lesser extent, air dispersion of contaminated surface materials off site is another potential pathway. The sampling data demonstrates that surface and subsurface soil is heavily contaminated with organochlorine and dioxin compounds. The levels of soil contaminants represent a potential public health hazard to nearby residents. Off site migration can occur via groundwater contamination and/or surface runoff to the river and subsequent ingestion of water, fish, shellfish and other benthic organisms. Moreover, air can be a pathway but it is unlikely due to the low vapor pressure of the compounds which are adsorbed to the soil.

Not Available

1985-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

211

Public health assessment for Foote Mineral Company, Frazer, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. Cerclis No. PAD077087989. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Foote Mineral site, seven miles south of Phoenixville, generated large amounts of lithium and boron wastes since World War II. Concentrations of lithium up to 13,000 parts per billion (ppb) and boron up to 20,000 ppb have been detected in off-site private wells northeast of the site. A groundwater basin divide passes through approximately the center of the site such that volatile organic compounds (trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and benzene) migrate from the site (burn pit) westward for an unknown distance. At present, the site represents an indeterminate public health hazard. Although no adverse health effects have been identified in people exposed for short periods of time to levels of lithium and boron found in drinking water near the site, little information is available in the scientific literature on long-term, low-level exposure to lithium and boron.

Godfrey, J.E.; Sivarajah, K.

1994-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

212

Quantification of escalation effects in offshore quantitative risk assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Loss-of-containment events on offshore installations can lead to complex escalation effects, especially in congested modules, where the close proximity of processing equipment and control systems creates the potential for very many different escalation paths. Conventional risk analysis tools are not well suited to deriving and evaluating the large number of possibilities, relying on the risk analyst to devise and quantify a ‘representative’ set of scenarios. The danger is that the ‘representative’ scenarios lack realism, may be insufficiently detailed to support upgrade decisions, and tend towards ‘generic’ risk analysis. A novel computer simulation technique has therefore been developed which starts from a list of initiating loss-of-containment events and utilizes physical rule sets and consequence models to generate consistent and detailed accident scenarios from a basic platform description, comprising a collection of equipment items, structural elements and protective systems. The program has proved stable on application to a variety of offshore installations, including simple gas platforms, a typical deep sea oil and gas platform, and a semi-submersible production vessel. It eliminates the manual drafting and analysis of event trees, which is very laborious even when aided by interactive computer tools; and, because the risk model comprises factual information, rather than abstract concepts, it is much more accessible and amenable to scrutiny by discipline engineers, allowing operators to derive and maintain a genuinely ‘living’ quantitative risk assessment.

Mark Morris; Alan Miles; John Cooper

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I-Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C, Risk C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/004 Publication 9285.7-01 C December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper NOTICE The policies set out in [his document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

214

Phase 1 data summary report for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: Health risk and ecological risk screening assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants released from the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. The contaminants released since the early 1940s include a variety of radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of Phase 1 of the CRRI. Phase 1 was designed to (1) obtain high-quality data to confirm existing historical data for contaminant levels in fish, sediment, and water from the CR/WBR; (2) determine the in the range of contaminant concentrations present river-reservoir system; (3) identify specific contaminants of concern; and (4) establish the reference (background) concentrations for those contaminants.

Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Longman, R.C.; McGinn, C.W.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.; Williams, L.F.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

LOW-LEVEL RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS: PROGRAMS AND PANEL DISCUSSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accident. The report of the Soviet Union to the International Atomic Energy Agency experts' meeting plutonium had been produced in reactors and separated for bomb production for -40 yr (Ref. 1. The reduction was presumably due to the reduced effects at low dose rate. THE DATA SETS In the former USSR

Shlyakhter, Ilya

217

Methodology for comparing the health effects of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels  

SciTech Connect

A methodology was developed for comparing the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels. The health effects attributable to the construction, operation, and decommissioning of each facility in the two fuel cycle were considered. The methodology is based on defining (1) requirement variables for the materials, energy, etc., (2) effluent variables associated with the requirement variables as well as with the fuel cycle facility operation, and (3) health impact variables for effluents and accidents. The materials, energy, etc., required for construction, operation, and decommissioning of each fuel cycle facility are defined as primary variables. The materials, energy, etc., needed to produce the primary variable are defined as secondary requirement variables. Each requirement variable (primary, secondary, etc.) has associated effluent variables and health impact variables. A diverging chain or tree is formed for each primary variable. Fortunately, most elements reoccur frequently to reduce the level of analysis complexity. 6 references, 11 figures, 6 tables.

Rhyne, W.R.; El-Bassioni, A.A.

1981-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

Air quality standards: Role of the Health Effects Institute in conducting research  

SciTech Connect

The Health Effects Institute is an independently governed organization, jointly funded by the public and private sectors to conduct scientific research, for regulatory purposes, concerning the health effects on humans of motor vehicle emissions. The consensus is that research HEI is performing is credible and of high quality. GAO believes that future funding should still be considered and that more open dialogue between the Environmental Protection Agency and HEI could help ensure that an increasing number of mutually agreed upon relevant research projects are undertaken.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

SciTech Connect

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the EMF (electric and magnetic fields) produced by power lines and other electrical devices affect our health. Although no adverse health effects of electric power EMF have been confirmed, there is continued scientific uncertainty about this issue. Research on EMF is ongoing throughout the world. The purpose of this booklet is to answer some common questions that the BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are debed. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns about potential health effects of power lines. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this booklet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Assessing the Effect of Mercury Emissions from Contaminated Soil at Natural Gas Gate Stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of mercury emissions from contaminated soil at natural gas distribution stations is presented. The effects were estimated as part of a risk assessment that included inhalation and multimedia exposure pathways. The purpose of the paper ...

A. Roffman; K. Macoskey; R. P. Shervill

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A phenomenological muscle model to assess history dependent effects in human movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A phenomenological muscle model to assess history dependent effects in human movement C.P. Mc of the history dependent effects. The phenomenological model of stretch-induced force enhancement was dependent

Ben-Yakar, Adela

222

The effect of indoor office environment on the work performance, health and well-being of office workers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of indoor environment may have an influence on the performance, productivity health and well-being of office workers.

Komalanathan Vimalanathan…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The effectiveness of portfolios in assessing students' connections between mathematical symbols and mathematical concepts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1995 Major Subject: Educational Curriculum k Instruction THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PORTFOLIOS IN ASSESSING STUDENTS' CONNECTIONS BETWEEN MATHEMATICAL SYMBOLS AND MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS.... Dockweiler (Mender) Gonzalo Garcia, Jr. (Member) Donna Wiseman (Head of Department) August 1995 Major Subject: Educational Curriculum & Instruction ABSTRACT The EfFectiveness of Portfolios in Assessing Students' Connections Between Mathematical...

McGinnis, Leslie Grable

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

SciTech Connect

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this pamphlet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. (BPA is the Pacific Northwest`s Federal electric power marketing agency.) First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are described. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns raised by these studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this pamphlet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Assessment of the Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Oak Ridge National Laboratory TM report, referred to as the "9505 Assessment" describes the technical basis for the report to Congress that was called for in the SECURE Water Act. The 9505...

226

New Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New Zealand Agency/Company /Organization New Zealand Ministry of the Environment Sector Energy, Climate Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publica Country New Zealand Australia and New Zealand References Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New Zealand [1] "This Guidance Manual: provides projections of future climate change around New Zealand compares these projections with present climate extremes and variations identifies potential effects on local government functions and

227

Health Effects of Nanoparticles Nanotechnology research is producing remarkable advances for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, measures, and characterizes nanoparticles, including those with special bio-medical properties. For example time. #12;Yet another health application Zachariah examines is the effect of diesel soot on the environment. Diesel soot, a nanoparticle that appears to contribute significantly to global warming, contains

Hill, Wendell T.

228

Thomson, H. and Kearns, A. and Petticrew, M. (2003) Assessing the health impact of local amenities: a qualitative study of contrasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: a qualitative study of contrasting experiences of local swimming pool and leisure provision in two areas amenities: a qualitative study of contrasting experiences of local swimming pool and leisure provision: Study objective: To assess the health impacts of local public swimming pool and leisure provision

Glasgow, University of

229

Rapid Impedance Spectrum Measurements for State-of-Health Assessment of Energy Storage Devices  

SciTech Connect

Harmonic compensated synchronous detection (HCSD) is a technique that can be used to measure wideband impedance spectra within seconds based on an input sum-of-sines signal having a frequency spread separated by harmonics. The battery (or other energy storage device) is excited with a sum-of-sines current signal that has a duration of at least one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured and synchronously detected at each frequency of interest to determine the impedance spectra. This technique was successfully simulated using a simplified battery model and then verified with commercially available Sanyo lithium-ion cells. Simulations revealed the presence of a start-up transient effect when only one period of the lowest frequency is included in the excitation signal. This transient effect appears to only influence the low-frequency impedance measurements and can be reduced when a longer input signal is used. Furthermore, lithium-ion cell testing has indicated that the transient effect does not seem to impact the charge transfer resistance in the mid-frequency region. The degradation rates for the charge transfer resistance measured from the HCSD technique were very similar to the changes observed from standardized impedance spectroscopy methods. Results from these studies, therefore, indicate that HCSD is a viable, rapid alternative approach to acquiring impedance spectra.

Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch; William H. Morrison

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United David J. Nowak a, *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United States David J. Nowak a 26 May 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: Air pollution removal Air quality Ecosystem services Human and value of the effects of trees and forests on air quality and human health across the United States

231

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of the Surveillance Program of the High-Level Waste Storage Tanks at Hanford :.I LALI iE REJ 163 ROOM 1t 4 F77L. -77 .:earmn OfEeg Asitn Sertr fo niomn 4 z. r...

232

Depleted uranium contamination by inhalation exposure and its detection after ? 20 years: Implications for human health assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inhaled depleted uranium (DU) aerosols are recognised as a distinct human health hazard and DU has been suggested to be responsible in part for illness in both military and civilian populations that may have been exposed. This study aimed to develop and use a testing procedure capable of detecting an individual's historic milligram-quantity aerosol exposure to DU up to 20 years after the event. This method was applied to individuals associated with or living proximal to a DU munitions plant in Colonie New York that were likely to have had a significant DU aerosol inhalation exposure, in order to improve DU-exposure screening reliability and gain insight into the residence time of DU in humans. We show using sensitive mass spectrometric techniques that when exposure to aerosol has been unambiguous and in sufficient quantity, urinary excretion of DU can be detected more than 20 years after primary DU inhalation contamination ceased, even when DU constitutes only ? 1% of the total excreted uranium. It seems reasonable to conclude that a chronically DU-exposed population exists within the contamination ‘footprint’ of the munitions plant in Colonie, New York. The method allows even a modest DU exposure to be identified where other less sensitive methods would have failed entirely. This should allow better assessment of historical exposure incidence than currently exists.

Randall R. Parrish; Matthew Horstwood; John G. Arnason; Simon Chenery; Tim Brewer; Nicholas S. Lloyd; David O. Carpenter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Public Health-Related Impacts of Climate Change in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report. Health Effects Institute: 1–25; discussionand health. Health Effects Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.and health. Health Effects Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Assessing Water Deprivation at the Sub-river Basin Scale in LCA Integrating Downstream Cascade Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing Water Deprivation at the Sub-river Basin Scale in LCA Integrating Downstream Cascade Effects ... Although these indicators represent a great step forward in the assessment of water-use-related impacts in LCA, significant challenges still remain in improving their accuracy and relevance. ...

Philippe Loubet; Philippe Roux; Montserrat Núñez; Gilles Belaud; Véronique Bellon-Maurel

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

235

Including Pathogen Risk in Life Cycle Assessment of Wastewater Management. 2. Quantitative Comparison of Pathogen Risk to Other Impacts on Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of the presented study was to include pathogen risks to human health in life cycle assessment (LCA) of wastewater and sludge management systems, as this is commonly omitted from LCAs due to methodological limitations. ... Part 1 of this article series estimated the overall pathogen risk for such a system with agricultural use of the sludge, in a way that enables the results to be integrated in LCA. ... This article (part 2) presents a full LCA for two model systems (with agricultural utilization or incineration of sludge) to reveal the relative importance of pathogen risk in relation to other potential impacts on human health. ...

Sara Heimersson; Robin Harder; Gregory M. Peters; Magdalena Svanström

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

236

EA-0896; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center For Nuclear Medicine Research In Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West 6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 1.1. Description 1.2 Alternatives 1.3 Affected Environment 1.4 Construction Impacts 1.5 Operating Impacts 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Description of the Proposed Action 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operation Activities 3.3 The No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources

237

Effect of Shenmai Injection (?????) on ventricular diastolic function in patients with chronic heart failure: An assessment by tissue Doppler imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To assess the effect of Shenmai Injection (?????, ... with chronic heart failure (CHF) by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI).

Rong-guo Ma ???; Chun-xia Wang; Yin-hua Shen…

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Assessment of soot particle vaporization effects during laser-induced incandescence with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of soot particle vaporization effects during laser-induced incandescence with time-induced incandescence (LII) has been successfully used for soot volume fraction and particle size measurements

Hahn, David W.

239

Assessment of the effectiveness of mixed uranium-plutonium fuel in VVÉR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An assessment of the cost-effectiveness of burning mixed uranium-plutonium fuel in VVÉR reactors is made as a function of the price of natural uranium. It is shown that for the present price structure, based on t...

N. N. Ponomarev-Stepnoi; V. F. Tsibul’skii

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Effectiveness of digital imagery in assessing rangeland conditions as used by Texas Range Extension Specialists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of selected electronic transfer technology, i.e., digital imagery, utilized by Range Extension Specialists in Texas to assess rangeland conditions. The study was conducted near College...

Whitney, Travis Raymond

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Alchemy to reason: Effective use of Cumulative Effects Assessment in resource management  

SciTech Connect

Cumulative Effects Assessment (CEA) is a tool that can be useful in making decisions about natural resource management and allocation. The decisions to be made include those (i) necessary to construct planning and regulatory frameworks to control development activity so that societal goals will be achieved and (ii) whether or not to approve individual development projects, with or without conditions. The evolution of CEA into a more successful tool cannot occur independently of the evolution of decision making processes. Currently progress is painfully slow on both fronts. This paper explores some opportunities to accelerate improvements in decision making in natural resource management and in the utility of CEA as a tool to assist in making such decisions. The focus of the paper is on how to define the public interest by determining what is acceptable.

Hegmann, George, E-mail: george.hegmann@stantec.com [Principal, Environmental Management, Stantec Consulting Ltd., 805 - 8th Avenue SW Suite 300, Calgary, Alberta, T2P 1H7 (Canada); Yarranton, G.A., E-mail: yarran@shaw.ca [121 Artists View Way, Calgary, Alberta, T3Z 3N1 (Canada)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Dose assessment for inhalation intakes in complex, energetic environments: experience from the US Capstone study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the associated health effect risks...perforated by depleted uranium ammunition...al. Capstone depleted uranium aerosols: generation...et al. Human health risk assessment of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols. In......

Raymond A. Guilmette; Mary Ann Parkhurst

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Assessing the Effect of Students’ Perceptions on Benefits Received from Participation in Service-Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASSESSING THE EFFECT OF STUDENTS? PERCEPTIONS ON BENEFITS RECEIVED FROM PARTICIPATION IN SERVICE-LEARNING A Thesis by TESSA MARING GOOLSBY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2009 Major Subject: Sociology ASSESSING THE EFFECT OF STUDENTS? PERCEPTIONS ON BENEFITS RECEIVED FROM PARTICIPATION IN SERVICE-LEARNING A Thesis by TESSA...

Goolsby, Tessa Maring

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

244

Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The health effects of radiation from atomic explosions in Japan were completely different from those due to radiation from the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan. The sudden exposure to acute radiation in extremely high doses killed Japanese people, and harmed the survivors in lower doses as shown by increased cancer mortality, especially the leukemia based on the LNT model. The chronic radiation received by the residents unknowingly in the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan, even in higher doses, caused no excess cancer deaths; on the contrary their spontaneous cancer deaths were sharply reduced to only about 2.5% of that of the general population, and hereditary defects in their offspring were only 5%â??7% of those of the normal population. Therefore, the residents in the Co-60 contamination apartments had coincidently accomplished a human experiment of the health effects to human beings. The chronic radiation received from the Co-60 contaminated houses is quite similar to the radiation exposure to the workers and public in the peaceful use of nuclear energy and medical radiation. Acute radiation from a nuclear accident could harm a limited number of people, but the chronic radiation might benefit people, such as in the case of the Chernobyl accident. People should not be fearful of chronic exposure to low radiation and the traditional radiation protection policy and practices used in past 60 years should be revised based on the health effects observed in Taiwan.

Y.C. Luan; M.C. Shieh; S.T. Chen; H.T. Kung; K.L. Soong; Y.C. Yeh; T.S. Chou; W.C. Fang; S.L. Yao; C.J. Pong; S.H. Mong; J.T. Wu; J.M. Wu; H.J. Jen; W.L. Chen; W.P. Deng; M.F. Wu; M.L. Shen; C.P. Sun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants  

SciTech Connect

The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Inhalation of motor vehicle emissions: effects of urban population and land area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transfer factors for air pollution health risk assessment.of the health impacts attributable to air pollution (Bennettair-quality management is to minimize adverse health effects of air pollution.

Marshall, Julian D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Deakin, Elizabeth; Nazaroff, William W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Health assessment for Griffiss Air Force Base NPL (National Priorities List) site, Rome, Oneida County, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NY4571924451. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Griffiss Air Force Base National Priorities List Site is located near the City of Rome, New York. Most of these sites have not been sufficiently investigated at this time for a complete determination of their possible health effects. Residential wells south of Griffiss Air Force Base are contaminated with volatile organic compounds: trichloroethene and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane. The measured concentrations of trichloroethene and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, to date, are below levels of concern. The site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible future exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time.

Not Available

1988-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

248

Replacing fish meal by food waste in feed pellets to culture lower trophic level fish containing acceptable levels of organochlorine pesticides: Health risk assessments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study used food waste (collected from local hotels and restaurants) feed pellets in polyculture of low-trophic level fish [bighead (Aristichtys nobilis), grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus), and mud carp (Cirrhina molitorella)] aiming at producing safe and quality products for local consumption. The results indicated that grass carp (hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) risk assessments based on digestible concentrations are commonly regarded as a more accurate method. The results of health risk assessments based on raw and digestible concentrations showed that the fish fed with food waste feed pellets were safe for consumption from the OCP perspective.

Zhang Cheng; Wing-Yin Mo; Yu-Bon Man; Xiang-Ping Nie; Kai-Bing Li; Ming-Hung Wong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Public meetings on radiation and its health effects caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect

The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has held public meetings on radiation and its health effects mainly for parents of students in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Fukushima and Ibaraki prefectures after the Fukushima nuclear accident. These meetings are held based on our experience of practicing risk communication activities for a decade in JAEA with local residents. By analyzing questionnaires collected after the meetings, we confirmed that interactive communication is effective in increasing participants' understanding and in decreasing their anxiety. Most of the participants answered that they understood the contents and that it eased their mind. (authors)

Sugiyama, K.; Ayame, J.; Takashita, H.; Yamamoto, R. [Risk Communication Study Office Japan Atomic Energy Agency 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI, 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

251

Pollution-Related Health Effects of Truck-to-Train Freight Modal Shifts in the Midwestern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by reducing air pollution. Objective: This study sought to quantify the pollution-related health impactsPollution-Related Health Effects of Truck-to-Train Freight Modal Shifts in the Midwestern United Background: Outdoor air pollution causes increases in mortality, cardiovascular events, and respiratory

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

252

Assessing wave energy effects on biodiversity: the Wave Hub experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of wave energy on biodiversity...accelerate the implementation of wave energy, within a coherent...in the form of wind, wave and tidal...Rajapandian2007A review of wind energy technologiesRenew...emergence and the challenges it facesRefocus...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Health Effects of SubChronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sara M. Pletcher sara M. Pletcher Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4236 sara.pletcher@netl.doe.gov Joe L. Mauderly Principal Investigator Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute 2425 Ridgecrest Drive, SE Albuquerque, NM 87108-5129 505-348-9432 jmauderl@lrri.org Environmental and Water Resources HealtH effects of sub-cHronic inHalation of simulated downwind coal combustion emissions Background Emissions from coal-fired power plants and their associated atmospheric reaction products contribute to environmental air pollution and are often cited as a critical cause of pollution-related health risks. However, there have been few toxicological evaluations of the heath hazards resulting from the inhalation of coal combustion

254

A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas  

SciTech Connect

Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plant–soil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plant–soil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a ‘conservative’ vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a ‘realistic worst case’ site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: • A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. • Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. • Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

Swartjes, Frank A., E-mail: frank.swartjes@rivm.nl; Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Assessment of Climate Change Effect to Regional and Global Biodiversity: a MetaAnalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Climate Change Effect to Regional and Global Biodiversity: a Meta­Analysis Talk given on biodiversity main- tenance in regional ecosystems. Based on works by Hans van Houwelingen and colleagues, we. The effect of this change on biodiversity has been widely discussed where peer-review publications have

Breuer, Florian

256

Project Plan Field Assessment of the Effectiveness of DiazaConTM on Reducing Gray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Plan Field Assessment of the Effectiveness of DiazaConTM on Reducing Gray Squirrel that the contraceptive was effective in preventing reproduction in both male and female squirrels. However, the cost of capturing and vaccinating individual EGS with GonaConTM was $15/squirrel and proved to be cost prohibitive

Bolding, M. Chad

257

Assessing the protective effect of mountain forests against rockfall using a 3D simulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the protective effect of mountain forests against rockfall using a 3D simulation model and compared the results obtained with the 3D simulation model RockyFor with empirical data on tree impacts; Rockfall; 3D simulation model; Swiss Alps 1. Introduction Many mountain forests effectively protect people

Stoffel, Markus

258

Best Practices in Social Media: Utilizing a Value Matrix to Assess Social Media's Impact on Health Care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship of social media channel utilization (activity on blogs, content communities, and social networking sites, plus posting a social media policy) by health care organizations and the brand rating of those organizations, ... Keywords: ROI, health care, hospitals, social media, social media value matrix

Deirdre Mccaughey, Catherine Baumgardner, Andrew Gaudes, Dominique Larochelle, Kayla Jiaxin Wu, Tejal Raichura

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Using Science to Improve the Nation's Health System: NIH's Commitment to Comparative Effectiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and reform the US health care system. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been--and will continue; Health Policy; Medical Practice, Other; Quality of Care; Quality of Subscribe Email Alerts http health interventions yield the greatest benefits. Health reform and economic concerns may have moved

Bandettini, Peter A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Air Pollution & Health in Rapidly Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For example, “Air Pollution and Health – Studies in theAssessment of Air Pollution and Health” is illustrative inReview: Air Pollution & Health in Rapidly Developing

Bucher, Scott

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Measuring the effects of acoustical environments on nurses in health?care facilities: A pilot study.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the methods and results of a pilot ecological study conducted in four health?care facilities (acute?care community?care and long?term?care). The objective was to consolidate and test tools for exposure assessment and the investigation of study outcomes in particular stress. Area and personal monitoring was performed. Nurse noise exposures were monitored. Full?shift monitoring of sound levels was performed and conventional acoustical parameters derived; new acoustical descriptors including occurrence rate and peakiness were also determined. Two questionnaire scales were developed: a study questionnaire to assess perception of the acoustical environment and of work? and noise?related stresses and a daily diary to capture variations in the perceived stress and document aggressive events. The study questionnaire was found to measure disturbance impaired communication and mental fatigue. Biological markers of noise?related stress (salivary cortisol and heart?rate variability) were collected. Exposure measures were correlated with outcomes; while the results were often not statistically significant due to small sample sizes they identified interesting relationships and validated the measurement tools for future use. Long?term?care was identified as the most acoustically?critical environment both from a physical?acoustical perspective and from the perspective of workers.

Hind Sbihi; Murray Hodgson; George Astrakianakis; Pamela Ratner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Health assessment for Motco, Incorporated, Texas City, Galveston County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD980629851. Addendum. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The MOTCO National Priorities List (NPL) site is located in the City of LaMarque, Galveston County, Texas. The contaminants of concern consist of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (semi-VOCs). Evidence of heavy metal contamination was also noted. Areas of highest contaminant concentration are in the subsurface soil, on-site pits, and shallow ground water. Population exposure to the site is limited due to location; those most likely to be exposed are unprotected remedial workers and trespassers. Although these groups might be exposed by skin contact with, ingestion of, or inhalation of contaminated soil and pit waste, there is no evidence that exposures to site contaminants are occurring. Therefore, the site is currently classified as no public health hazard. The ATSDR Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) and the Texas Department of Health (TDH) have evaluated the MOTCO site for appropriate follow-up with respect to health activities.

Not Available

1992-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

264

Multidimensional health assessment of 75- and 80-year-old men and women: A five-year prospective study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background and aims: There are no earlier reports of regular multidimensional health check programs in elderly people. The aim of this study was to establish the number and type of previously unr...

Pia Laukkanen MD; PhD; Pertti Era…

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

DOE/EA-1329; Environmental Assessment for the Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (8/10/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

329 329 Environmental Assessment for the Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico Final Document Date Prepared: August 10, 2000 Prepared by: Department of Energy, Los Alamos Area Office Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at LANL Environmental Assessment iii August 10, 2000 Contents ACRONYMS AND TERMS ....................................................................................................................................................... v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................................................................................................ vii 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED .......................................................................................................................................................1

266

Effects of oil drops containing Lactobacillus salivarius WB21 on periodontal health and oral microbiota producing volatile sulfur compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to evaluate the effects of oil drops containing Lactobacillus salivarius WB21 on periodontal health and oral microbiota producing volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). For this study, 42 subjects were randomly assigned to receive oil samples containing L. salivarius WB21 or a placebo for two weeks. Oral assessment and saliva collection were performed on days 1 and 15. Bacterial analysis was performed using the real-time polymerase chain reaction and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). In both the experimental and placebo groups, the average probing depth, number of periodontal pockets, and the percentage of bleeding on probing (BOP) decreased while stimulated salivary flow increased on day 15. BOP was reduced in the experimental group compared with the placebo group (P = 0.010). In the experimental group, total bacterial numbers decreased, and the number of L. salivarius increased. The number of Prevotella intermedia, which is correlated with hydrogen sulfide concentration in mouth air, increased in the placebo group and did not change in the experimental group. T-RFLP analysis found that the peak area proportions representing Porphyromonas gingivalis, P. intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum decreased in the experimental group, although there was no significant change in the bacterial composition. Thus we observed oil drops containing L. salivarius WB21 improved BOP and inhibited the reproduction of total and VSC-producing periodontopathic bacteria compared with the placebo group, but also showed the limit of its efficacy in controlling VSCs producing and periodontal pathogens.

Nao Suzuki; Kazunari Tanabe; Toru Takeshita; Masahiro Yoneda; Tomoyuki Iwamoto; Sueko Oshiro; Yoshihisa Yamashita; Takao Hirofuji

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Development of a Multiscale Monitoring and Health Assessment Framework for Effective Management of Levee Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data of small scale centrifuge levee models. INTRODUCTION The integrity and reliability of levees-makers is that an effort must be urgently undertaken to upgrade and rehabilitate the national flood-control levee

Yazici, Birsen

268

An informative Bayesian structural equation model to assess source-specific health effects of air pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Si and Al), coal-fired power...SULF), oil combustion primarily for...pollution from coal-fired power plants, oil combustion for home heating...approach Oil combustion Ni 0.036 0...American Chemistry Council grant......

Margaret C. Nikolov; Brent A. Coull; Paul J. Catalano; John J. Godleski

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Information resources for assessing health effects from chemical exposure: Office of pesticides programs  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Pesticide Programs is trying to develop a complete picture of a chemical`s toxicity and exposure profile. It is also important to share information in the office`s files because of pesticides, particularly as a consequence of agricultural use, find their way into places not necessarily intended.

Fenner-Crisp, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community impacts; environmental and safety engineering for LNG, oil spills, LPG, shale oil waste waters, geothermal liquid waste disposal, compressed air energy storage, and nuclear/fusion fuel cycles; operational and environmental safety studies of decommissioning, environmental monitoring, personnel dosimetry, and analysis of criticality safety; health physics studies; and epidemiological studies. Also included are an author index, organization of PNL charts and distribution lists of the annual report, along with lists of presentations and publications. (DLS)

Baalman, R.W.; Hays, I.D. (eds.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Interest of the Theory of Uncertain in the Dynamic LCA- Fire Methodology to Assess Fire Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is the third phase of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) described in ISO 14042. The purpose of LCIA is to assess a product system's life cycle inventory analysis (LCI) in order to better understand its environmental significance. However, LCIA typically excludes spatial, temporal, threshold and dose-response information, and combines emissions or activities over space and/or time. This may diminish the environmental relevance of the indicator result. The methodology, Dynamic LCA -Fire proposed in this paper to complete the International Standard ISO 14042 in the fire field, combines the LCA - Fire method with the Dispersion Numerical Model. It is based on the use of the plume model used to assess pollutant concentrations and thermal effects from fire accident scenarios. In this study, The Dynamic LCA - Fire methodology is applied to a case study for petroleum production process management.

Samia Chettouh; Rachida Hamzi; Fares Innal; Djamel Haddad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Patient and provider perspectives on quality and health system effectiveness in a transition economy: Evidence from Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Facing a severe population health crisis due to noncommunicable diseases, Ukraine and other former Soviet republics and Eastern European countries have a pressing need for more effective health systems. Policies to enhance health system effectiveness should consider the perspectives of different stakeholder groups, including providers as well as patients. In addition, policies that directly target the quality of clinical care should be based on objective performance measures. In 2009 and 2010 we conducted a coordinated series of household and facility-level surveys to capture the perspectives of Ukrainian household members, outpatient clinic patients, and physicians regarding the country's health system overall, as well as the quality, access, and affordability of health care. We objectively measured the quality of care for heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using CPV® vignettes. There was broad agreement among household respondents (79%) and physicians (95%) that Ukraine's health system should be reformed. CPV® results indicate that the quality of care for common noncommunicable diseases is poor in all regions of the country and in hospitals as well as polyclinics. However, perspectives about the quality of care differ, with household respondents seeing quality as a serious concern, clinic patients having more positive perceptions, and physicians not viewing quality as a reform priority. All stakeholder groups viewed affordability as a problem. These findings have several implications for policies to enhance health system effectiveness. The shared desire for health system reform among all stakeholder groups provides a basis for action in Ukraine. Improving quality, strengthening primary care, and enhancing affordability should be major goals of new health policies. Policies to improve quality directly, such as pay-for-performance, would be mutually reinforcing with purchasing reforms such as transparent payment mechanisms. Such policies would align the incentives of physicians with the desires of the population they serve.

J. Luck; J.W. Peabody; L.M. DeMaria; C.S. Alvarado; R. Menon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Health assessment for Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex, Kellogg, Shoshone County, Idaho, Region 10. CERCLIS No. IDD048340921. Addenda. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Bunker Hill site is listed, by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), on the National Priorities List (NPL). The 21 square-mile site includes the Bunker Hill mining and smelting complexes and the communities of Pinehurst, Page, Smelterville, Kellog, and Wardner, Idaho. Mining and smelting operations have occurred in the area (Silver Valley) since the 1880's. The Bunker Hill smelter discontinued operation in 1982. The former milling and smelting operation at the Bunker Hill Complex has left behind contaminated soils and deposits of slag, mine tailings, and other process residuals. Based upon the information reviewed, ATSDR has concluded that this site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the probable human exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to heavy metals is probably occurring via ingestion, dermal, or inhalation exposure to contaminated surface soils, mine wastes and tailings, surface waters, or contaminated foodstuffs.

Not Available

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Effect of residence on mothers’ health care seeking behavior for common childhood illness in Northwest Ethiopia: a community based comparative cross – sectional study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Children are at higher risk of acquiring infections and developing severe disease. This study assessed the health care seeking behavior and associated factors of urban and rural mothers for common childhood il...

Yalemzewod Assefa Gelaw; Gashaw Andargie Biks; Kefyalew Addis Alene

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Health assessment for H and H Incorporated Burn Site, Farrington, Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS No. VAD980539878. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The H H Incorporated Burn Site, located in Hanover County, Virginia, contains a pit where dry printing ink residues were disposed of. Groundwater contaminants of concern (and maximum concentrations) include benzene (25 ppb), toluene (1180 ppb), chromium (110 ppb), barium (1,300 ppb), beryllium (20 ppb). Organics, including phthalates (131,000 ppb), vinyl chloride (3,600 ppb), toluene (82 ppb), and xylenes (45 ppb), were detected in leachate and/or runoff, presumably emanating from the pit area. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances.

Not Available

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

276

Assessing the effects of Norway rats on auklet breeding success and survival at Sirius Point, Kiska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the effects of Norway rats on auklet breeding success and survival at Sirius Point, Kiska-8141 FAX: (709) 737-2410 e-mail: carie@mun.ca #12;Eggleston and Jones Kiska auklet-rat monitoring in 2006 2 Introduction The presence of introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been implicated as a possible

Jones, Ian L.

277

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division: Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 29th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXIX) that were received on or before December 2, 1988.

Sanderson, C.G.; Feiner, M.S.

1989-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

278

Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated Assessment (PIA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of renewable energy, affect concentrations of air pollutants and as a consequence affect human health. PM2.5 concentra- tions were estimated with the IIASA Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies). 1 Observation, Impacts, Energy Center, MINES ParisTech, Sophia Antipolis, France, mireille.lefevre@mines

Boyer, Edmond

279

Russian Health Studies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Russian Health Studies Program assesses worker and public health risks from radiation exposure resulting from nuclear weapons production activities in the former Soviet Union.

280

Air pollution, the automobile, and public health  

SciTech Connect

The author reviews a volume of articles written by experts in the study of air pollution and its effects. The Health Effects Institute, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, commissioned the articles. Described as an excellent review of scientific and technological work in the field, its weakness is a failure to adequately address risk assessment.

Wilson, R.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Health Impacts of the School Commute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are a number of health implications associated with theschool children: implications for public health. Health andconcurrent health effects in all areas has implications both

Lee, Murray; Orenstein, Marla; Richardson, Maxwell J.; Ragland, David R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Health effects of electromagnetic field generated by lightning current pulses near down conductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lightning current generates a time varying magnetic field near down conductors, when lightning strikes the connected Franklin-rod. The down conductors are mounted on the wall of buildings, where residential places can be situated. It is well known that the rapidly changing magnetic fields could generate dangerous eddy currents in the human body. If the duration and the gradient of the magnetic field were high enough, the peripheral nerves are excited. In this study, the authors introduce an improved model of the interaction of electromagnetic fields of lighting current near a down conductor with the human body. The interaction model has two parts: estimation of the magnetic fields surrounding the down conductor and evaluation of health effects of rapid changing magnetic fields on the human body.

Z Á Tamus; B Novák; L Szücs; I Kiss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Incentives in Water Management Reform: Assessing the Effect on Water Use,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incentives in Water Management Reform: Assessing the Effect on Water Use, Incentives in Water Management Reform: Assessing the Effect on Water Use, Production and Poverty in the Yellow River Basin Speaker(s): Jinixia Wang Date: May 22, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The purpose of this presentation is to better understand water management reform in China's rural communities, focusing on the effect of incentives to water managers on the nation's water resources and the welfare of the rural population. Based on a survey study in the Yellow River Basin, our findings show that Water User Associations and contracting have begun to systematically replace traditional forms of collective management. The analysis demonstrates, however, that it is not a nominal implementation of the reform that matters, but rather it is a creation of new management

284

What is the impact of systematically missing exposure data on air pollution health effect estimates?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time-series studies reporting associations between daily air pollution and health use pollution data from monitoring stations that vary in the frequency of recording. Within the Air Pollution and Health: A Europe...

Evangelia Samoli; Roger D. Peng; Tim Ramsay…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

THE BEIR-III REPORT AND THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

called hypothetical nuclear reactor accident are thereforenuclear reactors, but rather on the probabilities and health consequences of a reactor accident

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Public health assessment for Chem-Central, Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID980477079. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Chem Chentral, a distributor of bulk chemicals, is located in Wyoming, Michigan. Between 1957 and 1962, a fault in the piping at this facility allowed chemicals to leak into the ground. In 1977, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) discovered that a section of ditch 1,000 feet north of the Chem Central property was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). The MDNR traced this contamination to Chem Central, and identified a plume of VOC contamination in the groundwater between the Chem Central property and the ditch. The site poses an indeterminate public health hazard under present conditions because the possibility of exposure to PCBs from the site through the biota of Cole Drain and Plaster Creek has not been fully investigated. The known completed exposure pathway, through surface soil on the site, poses no significant health hazard. Potential exposure pathways include the possible future use of contaminated groundwater.

Not Available

1994-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Health assessment for Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, Palm Beach County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD001447952. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Pratt and Whitney Government Engine Business Division has been in operation as a division of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC) plant since 1958. In the past, materials disposed of in the landfill/incineration trenches at the plant included construction debris, discarded equipment, unknown solid waste from Air Force Plant Number 74, solvents and solvent sludges, asbestos, fuels, paints, pesticide and herbicide container residues, benzonitrite and solvent-contaminated soils, mercury (from bulbs and thermometers), discarded equipment from metal finishing operations, commercial and laboratory chemicals, garbage, and sewage sludge. Based on available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via chemicals in the groundwater and air (wind-blown) and possibly through ingestion of contaminated wildlife.

Not Available

1989-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

288

HEALTH AND CLIMATE POLICY IMPACTS ON SULFUR EMISSION CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the climate and health effects of sulfate aerosol into an integrated-assessment model of fossil fuel emission warming and health simultaneously will support more stringent fossil fuel and sulfur controls control. Our simulations show that a policy that adjusts fossil fuel and sulfur emissions to address both

Russell, Lynn

289

Radiological Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis — An Update (1990)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Reactor Accident Consequence Assessment / Radiation Biology and Environment

John S. Evans

290

Assessment of Fukushima-Derived Radiation Doses and Effects on Wildlife in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following releases from the nuclear accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), contention has arisen over the potential radiological impact on wildlife. ... This work was conducted under the auspices of the UNSCEAR, and a more comprehensive version of the assessment presented here is reported within the UN publication “Levels and effects of radiation exposure due to the nuclear accident after the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and Tsunami”. ...

P. Strand; T. Aono; J. E. Brown; J. Garnier-Laplace; A. Hosseini; T. Sazykina; F. Steenhuisen; J. Vives i Batlle

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

Management Challenges in Developing Performance Assessments and Effectively Communicating Their Results - 13612  

SciTech Connect

The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the cleaned waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making, performance assessments have been developed for the low-level waste disposal facility and for the SRS Tank Farms. Although these performance assessments share many similar features, the nature of the hazards and associated containments differ. As a management team, we are challenged to effectively communicate both the similarities and differences of these performance assessments, how they should be used to support sound decision making for treatment, disposal and waste tank cleaning decisions, and in defending their respective assumptions to the regulatory community and the public but, equally important, to our own corporate decision makers and operations personnel. Effective development and defense of these performance assessments, and effective interpretation and communication of the results are key to making cost-effective, pragmatic decisions for the safe disposal of the low-level waste and stabilization and operational closure of the cleaned tanks and associated structures. This paper will focus on the importance and challenges in communicating key attributes, conclusions and operational implications within a company. (authors)

Thomas, Steve; Mahoney, Mark [Savannah River Remediations LLC, Building 705-1C, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediations LLC, Building 705-1C, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division: Quality assessment program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 28th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXVIII) that were received on or before June 7, 1988. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the Quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed, at first Quarterly and then semiannually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participation contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Feiner, M.S.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division: Quality assessment program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 27th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXVII) that were received on or before December 3, 1987. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the Quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed, at first Quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participation contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Feiner, M.S.

1988-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 32nd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXXII) that were received on or before June 5, 1990. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. This is the 39th report of this program.

Sanderson, C.G.; Scarpitta, S.C.

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

295

Health assessment for Ludlow Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) site, Clayville, Oneida County, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD013468939. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Ludlow Landfill is a National Priorities List site located in Clayville, Oneida County, New York. The landfill was in operation for over 20 years and was closed February 15, 1988. At the time of its closure only municipal refuse was being accepted for disposal, but in the past, some industrial wastes were deposited in the landfill. The primary contaminants found at the site are polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and volatile organic compounds. Off-site migration of contaminants can occur via ground water, surface water, and suspended sediments. Potential adverse effects on public health could occur if PCBs or other site-related chemicals migrated off-site in ground water and contaminated downgradient potable-well supplies. Human exposure to PCB-contaminated soils in the wetlands or the consumption of biota from the wetlands are also pathways of potential public health concern.

Not Available

1988-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

Public health assessment for Petro-Chemical, Inc. (Turtle Bayou) Liberty, Liberty County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD980873350. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Petro-Chemical Systems, Inc. site, located near Liberty, Texas, is a site where unauthorized disposal of petroleum-based oils has taken place. Although there is evidence of past exposure to site contaminants, the best available evidence does not indicate that humans are currently being exposed to site contaminants at levels that could cause adverse health effects. Contaminated ground water, surface water, soils, and surface water sediments have been found on the site. Although sampling was done for 144 priority pollutants, the primary contaminants of concern are benzene, ethylbenzene, xylene, naphthalene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and lead. Because the greatest threat to public health would be contamination of drinking water, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has recommended that necessary actions are taken to insure that private wells do not become contaminated with site contaminants.

Not Available

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Abstract B26: Developing a community health educator (CHE) intervention model for identifying unmet needs and assessing behavioral change with tailored health education for breast and colorectal cancer patients after cancer treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Meeting-Abstract Behavioral and Social Science Health Education - Poster Presentations AACR International Conference: The Science of Cancer Health Disparities...Spanish-language community education breast health program increases...

Bonnie Schwartzbauer; Kevin Fiscella; Starlene Loader; and Sally Rousseau

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

OIL EXPOSURE AND CHRONIC HEALTH EFFECTS ON INDIGENOUS POPULATIONS IN SOUTH AMERICA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is an ongoing discussion on whether the activity of oil companies and its environmental impacts are a threat for the health of the populations… (more)

Gascon Merlos, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Neighborhood Disorder and Health: The Mediating Effects of Powerlessness and Psychological Distress.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? How does living in a dangerous community impact a person’s physical health? Research shows that people living in neighborhoods that they perceive to be… (more)

Hennessee, Kimberly K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal health effects Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Policy on the Occupational Health & Safety Program in the Care and Use of Animals in Research and Instruction...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B, B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/003 Publication 9285.7-01 B December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper N O T I C E The policies set out in this document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

302

Phase 1 data summary report for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: Health risk and ecological risk screening assessment. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants released from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. The contaminants released since the early 1940s include a variety of radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of Phase 1 of the CRRI. Phase 1 was designed to (1) obtain high-quality data to confirm existing historical data for contaminant levels in fish, sediment, and water from the CR/WBR; (2) determine the in the range of contaminant concentrations present river-reservoir system; (3) identify specific contaminants of concern; and (4) establish the reference (background) concentrations for those contaminants.

Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Longman, R.C.; McGinn, C.W.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.; Williams, L.F.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Public health assessment for Kentwood Landfill, Kentwood, Kent County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID000260281. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Kentwood Landfill site encompasses approximately 72 acres and was operated as a licensed landfill prior to 1976. It accepted domestic and industrial waste including unidentified hazardous wastes from heavy manufacturing and refining. Shallow ground water and leachate from the landfill are contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds. On numerous occasions, leachate has been observed seeping out of the landfill and entering Plaster Creek. While significant exposure does not appear to have occurred or to be presently occurring, the Kentwood Landfill poses a public health hazard because of possible future exposures to contaminants. Nearby residents' ground water supplies could become contaminated should the contaminant plume shift or new wells be drilled into the plume. A lesser hazard is that trespassers could come into direct contact with contaminated surface materials on the site.

Not Available

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Health assessment for Kalama Specialty Chemicals, Burton, South Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. SCD094995503. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Kalama Specialty Chemicals (Kalama) 16-acre site is located in Beaufort County, South Carolina. The Vega Chemical Company operated at the site from 1973 until 1977. As a speciality chemical company, it produced a wide range of chemicals in small, special-order batches for use by manufacturing firms and larger chemical producers. In 1977, the facility was purchased by Kalama primarily to manufacture the herbicide and plant growth regulator Krenite (fosamine ammonium). Chemical sampling conducted at Kalama has been limited in scope. Lead, benzene, ethyl benzene, and dichloromethane have been among the detected on-site groundwater and soil contaminants. On the basis of available information, the Kalama site is considered to be of potential public health concern.

Not Available

1989-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Health assessment for Maxey Flats Disposal Site, Morehouse, Fleming County, Kentucky, Region 4. CERCLIS No. KYD0980729107. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The National Priorities List Maxey Flats Disposal Site is located approximately 10 miles northwest of Morehouse, Kentucky, in Fleming County. The site was initially approved for the disposal of low level radioactive waste in 1963, and by 1977, an estimated maximum of 6 million cubic feet of wastes had been buried. In 1977, radionuclides were found in soil being excavated for additional trenches resulting in the site being closed in December of 1977. In addition to radioactive material, chemical wastes were disposed of in violation of the site license. Furthermore, water has infiltrated these trenches which now require pumping to prevent overflow. Monitoring wells on-site have detected numerous radionuclides, organic and inorganic contaminants in trench leachates produced by the flooding. The primary health concern for the site is the potential exposure to radiation received on-site by occupational workers and off-site by the general public.

Not Available

1989-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effect of radon dose on cleanup criteria and using RESRAD for chemical risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has used RESRAD, a pathway analysis program developed at Argonne National Laboratory, in conjunction with the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle to develop site-specific residual radioactive material guidelines (cleanup criteria) for many sites. This study examines the effects of the radon pathway, recently added to the RESRAD program, on the calculation of uranium, radium, and thorium cleanup criteria. The results show that the derived uranium guidelines will not be affected by the radon ingrowth considerations. The effect of radon on radium and thorium generic guidelines is more significant, but the model does indicate that at the generic soil limits used for radium and thorium the indoor radon decay product concentrations would be below the 0.02 working level standard. This study also examines the feasibility of applying RESRAD to chemical risk assessment. The results show that RESRAD can perform risk assessment of toxic chemicals after simple modifications. Expansion of the RESRAD database to include chemical compounds will increase its capability to handle chemical risk assessments. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wallo, A. III (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution Health Effects A Report to the US Centers for Disease Prevention and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution Health Effects 1 #12;2 A Report to the US Centers Tracking of Air Pollution Effects January 15-16, 2008 #12;HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution ........................................................................................................................................... 13 AN INCREMENTAL APPROACH TO PUBLIC HEALTH TRACKING OF AIR POLLUTION

308

Chernobyl Studies Project - working group 7.0 environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, October 1993--January 1994  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project was begun as part of a cooperative agreement between the US and the former USSR, (quote) To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future reactor accident (quote). Most of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus has now turned primarily to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are extensively engaged in case-control and cohort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children and in the Ukraine. A major part of the effort is providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and providing support and equipment for the medical teams. This document contains reports on progress in the following task areas: Management; External Dose; Hydrological Transport; Chromosome Painting Dosimetry; Stochastic Effects; Thyroid Studies; and Leukemia Studies.

Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Health assessment for Cherokee County-Galena Subsite National Oriorities List (NPL) Site, Galena, Cherokee County, Kansas, Region 7. CERCLIS No. KSD980741862. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Cherokee County site is on the National Priorities List. Mine wastes resulting from the shaft excavations, ore-milling processes, and smelter operations had been disposed of on the ground near mine shafts and former mill sites. Maximum contaminant concentrations in the on-site areas consist of lead (3,880 parts per million (ppm) in surface-mine wastes, 550 ppm in surface soils, 390 parts per billion (ppb) in private drinking-water wells, 290 ppb in surface water from subsidence or open-pit mine ponds, 67 ppb in other surface waters (creeks or rivers)); cadmium (60 ppm surface-mine wastes, 12 ppm in surface soils, 180 ppb in private drinking-water wells, 200 ppb in surface water from subsidence or open-pit-mine ponds, 140 ppb in other surface water (creeks or rivers)); and, chromium (total) (120 ppb in private drinking water wells). The site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the probable human exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to heavy metals is probably occurring via ingestion, dermal, or inhalation exposure to contaminated surface soils, mine wastes, surface waters, or contaminated foodstuffs.

Not Available

1989-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

310

HEALTH & COUNSELLING Health Clinic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH & COUNSELLING SERVICES Health Clinic 778.783.4615 - Burnaby 778.782.5200 - Vancouver_counsellor@sfu.ca Health Promotion 778.782.4674 Health & Counselling Services, SFU - 8888 University Drive, MBC 0164 health can suffer if you're under stress for a long time, especially if you are not eating well. You may

311

Assessment of the acoustic effects on marine animals by an offshore wind farm.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of the planning for an offshore wind farm in Rhode Island coastal waters an assessment of the potential acoustic effects on the ecosystem is being conducted. The developer has proposed to initially deploy eight 3.6?MW wind turbines within 3 nm of Block Island. Two passive aquatic listener (PAL) systems were deployed south of Block Island from October 6 to November 11 2008. Using data from the PALs ambient noise histograms were computed for this pre?construction phase. The largest sources of noise in the area at low frequencies were found to be from shipping wind rain and biological sources. In addition transmission loss measurements were also made in the region to calibrate a geoacoustic model. Measurements of airborne noise from a 1.5?MW land?based wind turbine already in operation in Rhode Island were made in 1/3?octave bands and near the proposed windfarm site. A preliminary assessment of the effects of the offshore wind farm on marine animals at these sites will be presented. A plan for monitoring the noise field and potential biological effects during construction and operation of the windfarm is presented. [Funding provided by the RI Office of Energy Resources.

James H. Miller; Gopu R. Potty; Kathleen Vigness Raposa; David Casagrande; Lisa A. Miller; Jeffrey A. Nystuen; Peter M. Scheifele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The potential human health effect(s) of the metal uranium in the environment. Report on the known human health effects associated with the exposure to the metal uranium  

SciTech Connect

Concern over the levels of the metal uranium in the environment as a result of industrial activities has been expressed by several Federal and State agencies. This concern is associated with potential human health effects of this metal on kidney function and bone formation. Although limits for the Metal uranium in the environment remain to be set, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently in the process of establishing guidance limits for this metal in water and soil. These limits will be established for both the metal and the associated radioactivity. The suggested limits currently being considered for water and soil are, 20 pCi/liter and 10 pCi/gram wet weight, respectively. For naturally occurring uranium EPA assumes that 1 ug of uranium metal equals 0.67 pCi at equilibrium (i.e. at equilibrium the mass ratio of {sup 234}uranium to {sup 238}uranium is small but their activities are equal). Thus the limits for water and soil on weight basis for the uranium metal would be 30 ug/liter and 15 ug/gram wet weight, respectively. These limits are being established based on the potential increase in cancer death in populations that exceed this limit. Since there does not appear to be a significant correlation between cancer deaths and.uranium metal exposure (see discussion below), these limits will probably be established based on the known association between radionuclides exposure and cancer deaths. The exposure limits for other health effects such as kidney damage and retardation in bone formation apparently are not being considered by EPA.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Effects of offshore wind farms on marine wildlife—a generalized impact assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine management plans over the world express high expectations to the development of offshore wind energy. This would obviously contribute to renewable energy production, but potential conflicts with other usages of the marine landscape, as well as conservation interests, are evident. The present study synthesizes the current state of understanding on the effects of offshore wind farms on marine wildlife, in order to identify general versus local conclusions in published studies. The results were translated into a generalized impact assessment for coastal waters in Sweden, which covers a range of salinity conditions from marine to nearly fresh waters. Hence, the conclusions are potentially applicable to marine planning situations in various aquatic ecosystems. The assessment considered impact with respect to temporal and spatial extent of the pressure, effect within each ecosystem component, and level of certainty. Research on the environmental effects of offshore wind farms has gone through a rapid maturation and learning process, with the bulk of knowledge being developed within the past ten years. The studies showed a high level of consensus with respect to the construction phase, indicating that potential impacts on marine life should be carefully considered in marine spatial planning. Potential impacts during the operational phase were more locally variable, and could be either negative or positive depending on biological conditions as well as prevailing management goals. There was paucity in studies on cumulative impacts and long-term effects on the food web, as well as on combined effects with other human activities, such as the fisheries. These aspects remain key open issues for a sustainable marine spatial planning.

Lena Bergström; Lena Kautsky; Torleif Malm; Rutger Rosenberg; Magnus Wahlberg; Nastassja Åstrand Capetillo; Dan Wilhelmsson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Society's Nervous System: Building Effective Government, Energy, and Public Health Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drawing on a unique, multi-year collaboration with the heads of major IT, wireless, hardware, health, and financial firms, as well as the heads of American, EU, and other regulatory organizations, and a variety of NGOs ...

Pentland, Alex Paul

315

Broadcast news and abortion : the effects of conservative narratives on the reproductive health debate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How have changes in the elite discussion of reproductive health narratives affected the debate on abortion and influenced state legislation and popular opinion? Using analysis of broadcast transcripts from CNN and FOX News, ...

Jenssen, Mark (Mark Peter)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 3. Generator routines  

SciTech Connect

The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for utilization by the hydraulic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System, a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display is described. This is the third of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

Friedrichs, D.R.; Argo, R.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Comparison of test specific sediment effect concentrations with marine sediment quality assessment guidelines  

SciTech Connect

As part of NOAA`s National Status and Trends (NS and T) Bioeffects Assessment program and studies conducted by the National Biological Service, numerous sediment quality assessment surveys have recently been conducted along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the US using the sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development tests with pore water. Additional toxicity tests were also conducted in conjunction with most of these studies. The areas that have been sampled include Boston harbor, Massachusetts; Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, and Savannah River, South Carolina; St. Simon Sound, Georgia; Biscayne Bay, Tampa Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Apalachicola Bay, St. Andrew Bay, and Pensacola Bay, Florida; Galveston Bay, Lavaca Bay, and Sabine Lake, Texas, and 200 stations in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. Sufficient data are now available from this series of surveys to calculate test specific sediment effect concentrations (SECs). Based on these recent studies, SECs were developed for the sea urchin porewater and amphipod tests and compared with existing marine sediment quality assessment guidelines.

Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Marine Ecotoxicology Research Station; Long, E.R. [NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); MacDonald, D.D. [MacDonald Environmental Sciences Ltd., Ladysmith, British Columbia (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

ORISE: Worker Health Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Health Research Worker Health Research Worker Health Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides technical assistance to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies by performing specialized worker health research to assess the health of workers and other populations. Statistical methods, epidemiologic research and hazard assessments are core ORISE worker health research competencies. Because information technology is an integral part of the epidemiologic research process, ORISE also capitalizes on its benefits by organizing worker health research data into manageable databases. By providing DOE and the scientific community with accessible information on the long-term health outcomes of occupational exposures, ORISE is helping improve the

319

A case study on effectiveness of structural reliability analysis in nuclear reactor safety assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems on reliability of structural integrity occupy an important position in various aspects of nuclear reactor safety. In the present paper, an effective method for quantitative evaluation of structural reliability based on ‘stress strength model’ is developed with the objectives of taking a larger number of factors into the evaluation than before and giving useful results within moderate computing time. The method is applied to the reliability analysis of PWR pressure vessels. The results show the relative importance of inspection as well as the parameter uncertainty for assuring the reliability of the structure, although analysis is limited within the scope of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). This case study also shows that the analysis of structural reliability is effective for safety assessment of nuclear power plants in general and possibly for the improvements of the consistency in the design code.

A. Yamaguchi; S. Kondo; Y. Togo

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chronic disease complications Improve quality of life Reduce health care costs #12;ImpactHealth Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal

Meagher, Mary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Assessment of the acoustic effects of offshore wind turbines on the marine ecosystem.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The University of Rhode Island recently completed an assessment of the potential acoustic and other effects of the wind farms on the ecosystem. A developer has proposed to initially construct eight 3.6?MW wind turbines on lattice jacket structures 5 km south of Block Island and approximately 100 turbines in a second stage 20 km east of Block Island. Construction on the first stage is tentatively planned for summer of 2011 and pile driving will be the main source of noise. The main source of operational noise will likely be vibration from the turbine conducted through the lattice jacket structure into the water. Two passive aquatic listener (PAL) systems were deployed 5 km of Block Island from October 6 to November 11 2008. Two more PAL systems were deployed on meteorological buoys one near the first farm and one near the larger farm for 12 months in 2009/2010. Using data from the PALs ambient noise budgets and histograms were computed for this pre?construction phase. The largest sources of noise were found to be shipping wind rain and biological sources. An assessment of the effects of the offshore wind farms will be presented for both the construction and operational phases.?

James H. Miller; Gopu R. Potty; Kathleen Vigness Raposa; David S. Casagrande; Lisa A. Miller; Jeffrey A. Nystuen; Peter M. Scheifele; John Greer Clark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Public health assessment for Reynolds Metals Company, Troutdale, Multnomah County, Oregon, Region 10. Cerclis No. ORD009412677. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Reynolds Metals Company in Troutdale, Oregon, is a primary aluminum plant. When operating, the plant produced wastes that were contaminated with aluminum, mercury, fluoride, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and cyanide. Studies are currently underway to determine the extent of environmental contamination and subsequent clean-up efforts which will be required. People may be exposed to contaminated soils and sediments in the area bordering the Columbia and Sandy rivers. Contamination at the site may have contributed to contamination of fish in the Columbia River, although it is difficult to determine what effect the site may have. Workers at the Reynolds site may also be exposed to contaminated soils and sediments, particularly those workers who are involved in outdoor activities.

NONE

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Abstract B26: Developing a community health educator (CHE) intervention model for identifying unmet needs and assessing behavioral change with tailored health education for breast and colorectal cancer patients after cancer treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Behavioral and Social Science Health Education: Poster Presentations - Proffered Abstracts...for technology-based cancer education for Latina women from an agricultural...technology-driven health education programs improve on passive communication...

Bonnie Schwartzbauer; Kevin Fiscella; Starlene Loader; and Sally Rousseau

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

An integrated environmental modeling framework for performing Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Standardized methods are often used to assess the likelihood of a human-health effect from exposure to a specified hazard, and inform opinions and decisions about risk management and communication. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is specifically ... Keywords: Integrated environmental modeling, Manure, Pathogens, QMRA, Risk assessment, Watershed modeling

Gene Whelan, Keewook Kim, Mitch A. Pelton, Jeffrey A. Soller, Karl J. Castleton, Marirosa Molina, Yakov Pachepsky, Richard Zepp

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chapter 15 - Health Technology, Quality, Law, and Ethics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Technology assessment capability is vital in determining health policy and priorities because science and technology changes occur rapidly and are essential for progress. Quality is promoted by high professional education and practice standards, accreditation by state and non governmental authorities for health provider institutions, public health departments as well as educational program for public health, health policy and health management. Quality is an ongoing challenge in health care and public health. New innovations and therapies change the nature of care and prevention, with important epidemic and epidemiologic effects. Adoption of new evidence based methods of prevention, diagnosis and therapy have and will continue to improve quality of life and longevity. Translation of scientific and technological advances into applied practice requires education of public health policy makers, and practitioners to be well trained to evaluate new evidence and keep up with rapidly changing capacity to address old and new challenges in public health. The context of public health is set in legal frameworks and ethical standards developed over many millennia, centuries and decades which need continuous revision in keeping with societal changes and norms. Law and ethics in public health reflect the societal values in the context of social, economic, demographic, epidemiologic and political changes, while facing new health challenges and new technologies. Health ethics needed to be reexamined in the light of medical participation in 20th century genocides in the name of racial purity and industrialized murder of millions in World War II. The Nuremberg Trials redefined ethics of health research and bioethics. Public health works to protect the population from illness and premature death, often with restrictions such as in cigarette advertisement and smoking. Failure to act in protection of public health can be unethical by denying best practices in health protection and health promotion.

Theodore H. Tulchinsky; Elena A. Varavikova

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Experimental program to assess the effect of residual stresses on fracture behavior  

SciTech Connect

A series of ``model material`` tests were previously undertaken on aluminium alloy tensile loaded plate specimens containing a central through-thickness crack to investigate the effect of in-plane self-balancing residual stresses on ductile tearing behavior in the context of the R6 methodology. Residual stresses were generated by an electron-beam welding method and this resulted in stress levels of the order of 1/3 yield stress in the test specimens. Provisional results of these tests were presented at the 1993 ASME PVP conference. The value of 1/3 yield is commonly considered as the level of residual stress for fracture assessments of structural components which have been stress relieved. For non stress relieved components, higher values of residual stress need to be considered. A new design of test specimen has therefore been developed. Further ductile tearing experiments have been undertaken on this new design of specimen. The results obtained from these, and the previous tests, have quantitatively demonstrated the influence of residual stress on fracture behavior in terms of both the level of residual stress and the region under consideration on the R6 failure assessment diagram. The general conservatism of the current R6 method for dealing with residual stresses has been confirmed for the type of geometry, loading and residual stress field under consideration.

Sharples, J.K.; Sanderson, D.J.; Bowdler, B.R.; Wightman, A.P. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom). Technical Services Division; Ainsworth, R.A. [Nuclear Electric plc, Berkeley (United Kingdom)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Men's Health - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials > Men's Health Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Health & Productivity Health...

328

Health & Productivity - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health & Productivity Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and Screenings...

329

Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

330

Effect of non-aqueous drilling fluid and its synthetic base oil on soil health as indicated by its dehydrogenase activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drilling fluids are used for drilling natural gas, oil and water wells. These spill over into the surrounding soil at the point of drilling, which may impair soil health. A ... out to determine the effect of non ...

Kanchan Wakadikar; Avik Sil; Niranjan Kolekar…

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

332

Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting: Comments on American Medical Association Policy Statement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The American Medical Association House of Delegates in June of 2012 adopted a policy statement on nighttime lighting and human health. This major policy statement summarizes the scientific evidence that nighttime electric light can disrupt circadian rhythms in humans and documents the rapidly advancing understanding from basic science of how disruption of circadian rhythmicity affects aspects of physiology with direct links to human health, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and metabolism. The human evidence is also accumulating, with the strongest epidemiologic support for a link of circadian disruption from light at night to breast cancer. There are practical implications of the basic and epidemiologic science in the form of advancing lighting technologies that better accommodate human circadian rhythmicity.

Richard G. Stevens; George C. Brainard; David E. Blask; Steven W. Lockley; Mario E. Motta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Global Health: Global Effects of Smoking, of Quitting, and of Taxing Tobacco  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...people this century, mostly in low- and middle-income countries. About half of these deaths will occur before 70 years of age.– The 2013 World Health Assembly called on governments to reduce the prevalence of smoking by about a third by 2025, which would avoid more than 200 million deaths from tobacco... Cigarette smoking is a major cause of illness and death. This article reviews both the magnitude of the disease burden from cigarette smoking worldwide and strategies to limit smoking.

Jha P.; Peto R.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

334

A methodological framework for assessing the employment effects associated with energy efficiency interventions in buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The global trend toward a low carbon, sustainable economy is widely acknowledged to create a large number of jobs across many sectors of the economy. The deployment of renewable and energy efficiency projects represent a large share of the so called green jobs and help retain current levels of employment especially in countries facing the socio-economic threat of increasing unemployment rates. These effects should be taken into account during the process of energy planning, but due to difficulties in their quantification this is not always feasible. This paper utilizes the input–output analysis and the adjusted earnings gain approach for assessing the employment effects associated with the implementation of energy saving interventions in the building sector, with a view to produce results that can be easily incorporated into cost–benefit analyses. The proposed framework, which comprises four basic steps, namely identification of all the potential changes in employment due to energy efficiency interventions, quantification of these employment effects in physical terms, calculation of the net present value of the estimated employment effects and monetization, has been implemented for three energy efficiency interventions widely implemented in Greek buildings. The results of the analysis clearly show that the exploitation of energy saving technologies in the Greek building stock generates significant employment benefits, ranging between €0.11 and 0.23 million per €1 million of investment in the base case scenario and reaching the 10–24% of the energy costs savings attributed to the implementation of these interventions throughout their entire lifetime.

S. Mirasgedis; C. Tourkolias; E. Pavlakis; D. Diakoulaki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Health Insurance Marketplace Notice New Health Insurance Marketplace...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options and Your Health Coverage PART A: General Information When key parts of the health care law take effect in 2014, there will be a new way to buy health insurance: the...

336

Improving Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in a Managed Care Health Plan: Recruitment of Provider Organizations for a Randomized Effectiveness Trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...model, the health plan delegates most responsibility for utilization review, coverage decisions...ability of the health plan to do chart review without requiring...rates through chart review and telephone interviews. The health plan, funded through...

Patricia A. Ganz; Melissa M. Farmer; Michael Belman; Jennifer L. Malin; Roshan Bastani; Katherine L. Kahn; Allen Dietrich; and Jonathan Fielding

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Feeding the world healthily: the challenge of measuring the effects of agriculture on health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...suggest very low energy availability...not meet the World Food Programme...proportion of this energy is derived from...availability statistics for assessing...able to feed the world healthily and...level of dietary energy consumption...availability data), a statistic undermined by...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Impact on Health of Emissions to Air from Municipal Waste Incinerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This view is based on detailed assessments of the effects of air pollutants on health and on the fact concentrations of air pollutants. The Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products responsibility to advise Government and Local Authorities on possible health impacts of air pollutants. 2

339

Re-Visiting Health Informatics What is Health Informatics?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the quality of care Facilitate remote healthcare at a patient's home #12;What do Health Informaticians DoRe-Visiting Health Informatics HINF1100 Fall 2008 #12;What is Health Informatics? · Health the effective organization, analysis, management and use of health information to improve the delivery

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

340

Effect of the Transformation of the Veterans Affairs Health Care System on the Quality of Care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Data from the External Peer Review Program are collected by abstracters trained by the West Virginia Medical Institute, a professional review organization with extensive experience and programs to ensure reliable and accurate data collection. Analyses of these data suggest high interrater reliability... To improve the efficiency and quality of care, in 1995, the Veterans Health Administration launched a program that included increased use of information technology, performance measurement and reporting, realigned payment policies, and integration of services. After the implementation of this program, the quality of preventive, acute, and long-term care substantially improved.

Jha A.K.Perlin J.B.Kizer K.W.Dudley R.A.

2003-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Usage of XML technology in electronic health record for effective heterogeneous systems integration in healthcare  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A virtual patient record is an ideal electronic health record (EHR) that is decentralised and contains heterogeneous clinical data. Extensible markup language (XML) is a web standard that has become the major driver towards heterogeneous systems integration for any industry solution. This work focuses on creating an XML schema that operates as an interface between different heterogeneous patient record structures. The XML schema structure is based on standards such as HL7 and DICOM modelled with UML metadata techniques. The technological platform used to test this XML schema is by implementing various healthcare scenarios and XML-based technologies.

C. Sunil Kumar; A. Govardhan; C.V. Guru Rao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Sleep Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleep Assessment Sleep Assessment 1 | Thank you for taking the time to complete this extensive form. Sleep disturbances and/or fatigue are most often the result of many factors. In order to best treat your condition we need to understand your symptoms and history. Please bring your completed assessment form to your appointment. To schedule an appointment please call 505 844-HBES (4237). Name: Employee ID#: Date: Male Female Age: Health Plan : United BCBSNM Other: Referred by: Sleep and Health History In general, would you describe your sleep as: Refreshing Not Refreshing How would you rate your sleep? Very Good Good Adequate Poor Very Poor How would you describe your sleep problem? Sleep Problem (indicate all that apply) Duration of problem

343

Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES HEALTH CARE SERVICE CORPORATION HEALTH PLAN ("Health Plan")  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY. The Health Plan and the Flex Plan (collectively, the "Plans1 HIPAA NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES HEALTH CARE SERVICE CORPORATION HEALTH PLAN ("Health Plan") & HEALTH CARE SERVICE CORPORATION MASTER FLEXIBLE BENEFIT PLAN ("Flex Plan") EFFECTIVE APRIL 14, 2003

Shahriar, Selim

345

An Experimental Examination of the Effects of Fraud Specialist and Audit Mindsets on Fraud Risk Assessments and on the Development of Fraud-Related Problem Representations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fraud risk assessment is an important audit process that has a direct impact on the effectiveness of auditors' fraud detection in an audit. However, prior… (more)

Chui, Lawrence

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Effect of restriction endonucleases on assessment of biodiversity of cultivable polar marine planktonic bacteria by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we report the effect of restriction endonucleases on assessment of biodiversity of marine planktonic bacteria isolated from polar region by...HinfI, HaeIII and a combination of AfaI and MspI, AluI g...

Yinxin Zeng; Wenqi Liu; Huirong Li; Yong Yu; Bo Chen

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop ... There is increasing interest in perennial grasses as a renewable source of bioenergy and feedstock for second-generation cellulosic biofuels. ... Due to global warming and energy independence concerns, there is increasing interest in perennial grasses as a renewable source of bioenergy. ...

Tze Ling Ng; J. Wayland Eheart; Ximing Cai; Fernando Miguez

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

348

Health-related effects reproted by electronic cigarette users in online forums  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects were sometimes opposites, eg, improved cough andworsened cough were reported by different individuals. Somereports, such as “developed cough” or “cough worsened”,

Talbot, Prue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

350

Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier  

SciTech Connect

Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and post-burn to determine changes in the gravel content of the surface layer so as to quantify inflationary or deflationary responses to fire and to reveal the ability of the surface to resist post-fire erosive stresses. Measures of bulk density, water repellency, water retention, and hydraulic conductivity will be used to characterize changes in infiltration rates and water storage capacity following the fire. Samples will also be analyzed to quantify geochemical changes including changes in soil pH, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, and the concentration of macro nutrients (e.g. N, P, K) and other elements such as Na, Mg, Ca, that are critical to the post-fire recovery revegetation. Soil CO2 emissions will be measured monthly for one year following the burn to document post-fire stimulation of carbon turnover and soil biogenic emissions. Surface and subsurface temperature measurements at and near monitoring installations will be used to document fire effects on electronic equipment. The results of this study will be used to bridge the gaps in knowledge on the effects of fire on engineered ecosystems (e.g. surface barriers), particularly the hydrologic and biotic characteristics that govern the water and energy balance. These results will also support the development of practical fire management techniques for barriers that are compatible with wildfire suppression strategies. Furthermore, lessons learned will be use to develop installation strategies needed to protect electronic monitoring equipment from the intense heat of fire and the potential damaging effects of smoke and fire extinguishing agents. Such information is needed to better understand long-term barrier performance under extreme conditions, especially if site maintenance and operational funding is lost for activities such as barrier revegetation.

Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

National Climate Assessment: Available Technical Inputs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Available Technical Inputs Print E-mail Available Technical Inputs Print E-mail Technical inputs for the 2013 National Climate Assessment were due March 1, 2012. Please note that these reports were submitted independently to the National Climate Assessment for consideration and have not been reviewed by the National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee. Links to agency-sponsored reports will be posted here as they are made available. Sectors National Climate Assessment Health Sector Literature Review and Bibliography. Technical Input for the Interagency Climate Change and Human Health Group, September 2012. Overview Bibliography Bibliography User's Guide Search Strategy and Results Walthall et al. 2012. Climate Change and Agriculture in the United States: Effects and Adaptation. USDA Technical Bulletin 1935. Washington, DC. 186 pages. | Report FAQs

352

Women's Health - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials > Women's Health Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Health & Productivity...

353

School of Allied Health and Life Sciences Master of Public Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Allied Health and Life Sciences Master of Public Health RUBRIC FOR TABLE OF COMPETENCIES FOR MPH INTERNSHIPS Assessment Type: Embedded assessment instrument Program: Master of Public Health Course Name: Internship in Public Health Instructor: All internship advisors/supervisors Emphasized

O'Laughlin, Jay

354

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic Therapy (half time, 3 year contract) The School of Health and Human Performance invites applications from and assessment, have relevant qualifications and be experienced in emergency care training and be competent

Humphrys, Mark

355

Occupational Health Nurse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Occupational Health Nurse position is located in the Talent Sustainment group within the Human Capital Management (HCM) organization. The Talent Sustainment organization ensures that effective...

356

Energy Commission staff reviewed the petition and assessed the impacts of this proposal on environmental quality, public health and safety. Staff proposes revisions to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on environmental quality, public health and safety. Staff proposes revisions to existing Air Quality, Biological Resources, Public Heath, Water, Soils, Civil Engineering, Waste and Transmission Line Safety and Nuisance................................................................................................................5 AIR QUALITY

357

Disability-Adjusted Life Years in the Assessment of Health Effects of Traffic-Related Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Road transport plays a vital role in air pollution emissions, especially in large cities. According...10...and 32 % of nitrogen oxides in the European Union. An adverse influence of high air pollution on human he...

?. Adamkiewicz; A. J. Badyda; A. Gayer; D. Mucha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Health technology : design of bandage-sized wireless sensors and effect of ambient displays on social support and diabetes management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health-Zero refers to health technology design that focus on interaction with an individual as a whole to promote well-being. This thesis presents two explorations in the discipline. The first exploration involves the ...

Mohan, Akshay, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1979 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health, and safety  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the 1979 Annual Report to the Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for the Environment presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Technology Impacts, the Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview, and the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The report is in four sections, corresponding to the program elements: technology impacts, environmental control engineering, operational and environmental compliance, and human health studies. In each section, articles describe progress made during FY 1979 on individual projects.

Baalman, R.W.; Dotson, C.W. (eds.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The effect of carbonation after demolition on the life cycle assessment of pavements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high contribution of CO? emissions associated with pavements has driven research to assess the life cycle of concrete versus asphalt structures and to develop a strategy to reduce the carbon footprint. The life cycle ...

Rossick, Katelyn M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sciences Enhancing the Capability of Computational Earth System Models and Using NASA Data for Operation and Assessment...Science, Decadal and Regional Climate Prediction using Earth System Models program (M.W. and S.J.G.). PNNL is operated...

Yuan Wang; Minghuai Wang; Renyi Zhang; Steven J. Ghan; Yun Lin; Jiaxi Hu; Bowen Pan; Misti Levy; Jonathan H. Jiang; Mario J. Molina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Using an energy index to assess the effectiveness and potential of energy management programs  

SciTech Connect

A technique is presented for using an energy index to monitor a building's energy management program. A target Energy Utilizaiton Index (EUI) is computed, and this target is compared with current energy usage to assess the progress of energy conservation efforts. The method is relatively easy for the engineer to implement, and the information is in a form that provides the building operator with a quick assessment of the energy management program.

Steele, W.G.; Hodge, B.K.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collection Methods, Health Effects Institute, Mickely LelandMatter Species, Health Effects Institute:HEI 130 Pt 2

Logue, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

50 International Health Global Health Policy-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ghp.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp Our mission is to improve population health by enhancing accountability and improving evidence base of global (both domestic and international) health programmes through the provision

Miyashita, Yasushi

365

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as other federal and state agencies. From radiological facility audits and reviews to dose modeling and technical evaluations, ORISE is nationally-recognized for its health physics support to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the United States. Our health physics services include: Environmental survey Applied health physics projects We work with government agencies and organizations to identify, measure and assess the presence of radiological materials during the D&D process. ORISE

366

TENORM aerosols in the Florida phosphate industry?assessment of lung fluid solubility and annual effective dose to workers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Inhalation studies of uranium trioxide. Health Phys. 23 , 273-280...simulant solution. Health Phys. 43 , 663-668...vitro solubility of depleted uranium (DU) in aerosols produced...on armored vehicles. Health Phys. 82 , S157 (2002......

Kwang Pyo Kim; Chang-Yu Wu; Brian K. Birky; Wesley E. Bolch

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Johns Hopkins individualized Health Initiative Hopkins inHealth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;$2,593,644,000,000 #12;#12;#12;Why is U.S. health care so much more "expensive" but not more effective than in most OECD disease? #12;Older? #12;McKinsey Global Institute. 2008. Accounting for the costs of US health care: A newJohns Hopkins individualized Health Initiative Hopkins inHealth Scott L. Zeger Professor

Niebur, Ernst

368

Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or ground-level nuclear explosion.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

369

Continuous training versus interval training in deep water running: health effects for obese women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives To search intermittent and continous trainning (IT and CT, respectively) effects through deep water running for the control and prevention of excessive body fat accumulation and improvement of quality of life. Methods Experimental study composed by 30 women, aged between 34 to 58 years old, during 12 weeks, three sessions per week, 47 minutes each. Body composition, cardiorespiratory condition and Quality of Life by WHOQOL-Brief were considered. Student's and Wilcoxon's non parametric tests were applied at 5% significance level. Results With the only exception for social domain of quality of life, all investigated variables revealed improvement in both groups for IT in comparison to CT. Conclusion Deep water running contributes to body fat reduction, physical fitness evolution and improvement of WHOQOL-Brief domains, regardless of the trainning type conducted.

S.R. Pasetti; A. Gonçalves; C.R. Padovani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Office of International Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Health Studies International Health Studies Home Mission and Functions Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Studies Marshall Islands Program Russian Health Studies Program Russian Radiobiology Human Tissue Repository Spain (Palomares) Program Health and Safety HSS Logo Office of International Health Studies Reports to the Office of Health and Safety Mission and Functions Mission The Office of International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents. The mission includes providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

371

Public health assessment for Seattle Municipal Landfill/Kent Highlands, Kent, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD980639462. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle Municipal Landfill, better known as the Kent Highlands Landfill, is located in the City of Kent, approximately 14 miles south of the City of Seattle, Washington, at 23076 Military Road South. Surface water settling ponds, a leachate collection system, and gas collection system have been constructed. Only one completed pathway exists, which is the use of Midway Creek by recreationists. However, worst case scenarios were evaluated and there did not appear to be a human health threat. Two potential pathways were analyzed, for landfill gas and ground water. Again the worst case scenarios did not reveal any imminent human health threat.

Not Available

1994-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

372

Assessment of Delaware and Groningen effects on dual-laterolog measurements with a self-adaptive hp finite-element method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Delaware and Groningen effects on dual-laterolog measurements with a self-adaptive hp and Groningen effects. Both effects give rise to abnormally high readings of DLL measurements under extreme laterolog mea- surements, generating the so-called Groningen effect. INTRODUCTION The electrical resistivity

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

373

EXHALE Exploration of Health and Lungs in the Environment Exposure to poor air quality is recognised to have a detrimental effect on children's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is recognised to have a detrimental effect on children's respiratory health and air pollution is London, the air pollutants which damage lungs and are linked to respiratory problems such as asthma. A Low symptoms, inflammation in the lung, exposure to traffic-related air pollution, and genetic susceptibility

Applebaum, David

374

Combustion & Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH Winifred J. Hamilton, PhD, SM Clear Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Galveston, TX October 9?11, 2012 FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? Biggest threat to world ecosystems (and to human health...) ? Combustion of fossil fuels for ? Electricity ? Industrial processes ? Vehicle propulsion ? Cooking and heat ? Other ? Munitions ? Fireworks ? Light ? Cigarettes, hookahs? FFCOMBUSTION & HEALTH FFCOMBUSTION: THE THREAT ? SCALE (think health...

Hamilton, W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A statistically-engineered approach for assessing ageing effects on thermal-hydraulic elements for CANDU reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to develop a valid method to assess ageing effects on thermal-hydraulic elements for CANDU reactors. This method consisted of six steps. The ageing elements used in this method allowed for the immediate consideration of the code input without adjusting preexisting NPP simulation codes, and it also comprehensively considered the change in NPP’s thermal-hydraulic elements due to ageing effects. Each ageing element was selected from among the many thermal-hydraulic factors in which each element would have the greatest effect on the thermal-hydraulic conditions determined by the analysis of the ageing effect on the reactor. In this process, sensitivity analysis for each ageing element was done to understand the effects of each ageing element on the thermal-hydraulic conditions and peak cladding temperature. In addition, a degradation model capable of anticipating the values of the ageing elements over time was developed based on statistical interpretation methods and measured data, and the results’ conservativeness was guaranteed by conservatively selecting optimized combinations of ageing elements and their effects. The inherent uncertainty found in the complex nature of ageing for thermal-hydraulic elements can be reduced by being very conservative. Thus, the concept of the safety margin was introduced to propose a criterion for the assessment of ageing effects on thermal-hydraulic elements in NPPs. In addition, a preliminary analysis of Wolsong Unit 2 has been done. The results show that the 3rd highest value of PCT during LBLOCA was higher than that of the baseline with a value of 21.4 K. Thus, the ageing effect which is not taken into consideration in existing accident analysis evaluation methods was evaluated in this study. Moreover, it was found that meaningful differences may occur from the consideration of the safety analysis of NPP accidents. Accordingly, this method could synthetically assess the ageing effects on thermal-hydraulic elements in CANDU reactors, and this is expected to make considerable contributions to secure reliable safety margins for NPPs.

Yong Won Choi; Jun Soo Yoo; Man Woong Kim; Un Chul Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

"Sometimes they used to whisper in our ears": health care workers' perceptions of the effects of abortion legalization in Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population and Government of Nepal. Kathmandu: Ministry ofand Macro International Inc: Nepal Demographic Health SurveyCREHPA): Unsafe Abortion Nepal Country Profile. Kathmandu:

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Potential Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies and Fuels: A report from the Health Effects Insitute Potential Health and Environmental Impact from Emerging Technologies...

378

LANL Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medical Screening Program for Medical Screening Program for Former Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers United States Department of Energy Office of Occupational Medicine and Medical Surveillance Final Phase I Needs Assessment Report submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environment, Safety and Health Division National Jewish Medical and Research Center February 1999 Department of Environmental Health Sciences 615 North Wolfe Street Baltimore, Maryland 21205 Development of a Medical Screening Program for Former.Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers Phase I Needs Assessment Submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America

379

LANL Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medical Screening Program for Medical Screening Program for Former Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers United States Department of Energy Office of Occupational Medicine and Medical Surveillance Final Phase I Needs Assessment Report submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environment, Safety and Health Division National Jewish Medical and Research Center February 1999 Department of Environmental Health Sciences 615 North Wolfe Street Baltimore, Maryland 21205 Development of a Medical Screening Program for Former.Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers Phase I Needs Assessment Submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America

380

Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental and Prevention October 17, 2012 #12;Coastal flooding Climate change effects: ·Temperature ·Sea level,civil conflict Anxiety,despair,depression Civil conflict Climate Change Health Effects Food & water Malnutrition

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Russian Health Studies Program- Program Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Russian Health Studies Program assesses worker and public health risks from radiation exposure resulting from nuclear weapons production activities in the former Soviet Union.

382

US EPA: OSWER: Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, January 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

540-R-070-002 540-R-070-002 OSWER 9285.7-82 January 2009 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part F, Supplemental Guidance for Inhalation Risk Assessment) Final Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ....................................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Scope .........................................................................................................2 1.3 Effects on Other Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology

383

Urban health and health inequalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban health and health inequalities and the role of urban forestry in Britain: A review Liz O'Brien Kathryn Williams Amy Stewart 2010 #12;Urban health and woodlands Contents Executive Summary 4 1.1.3 Definition of terms 9 3. The policy context: health and forestry policies 11 3.1 Health policies 11 3

384

Health Risks of Accidents at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To the Editor: Christodouleas et al. (June 16 issue) discuss the health risks of nuclear accidents but do not include the psychological and social effects of such events. Such casualties in Fukushima will far exceed any cases of physical illness. Having just returned from the region to assess mental... To the Editor: Christodouleas et al. (June 16 issue)1 discuss the health risks of nuclear accidents but do not include the psychological and social effects of such events. Such casualties in Fukushima will far exceed any cases of physical illness. Having ...

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

385

Radon programmes and health marketing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......possible way is to employ health marketing that draws...INTRODUCTION Being aware of health effects of the exposure...people that radon is dangerous. Generally, people...radon could not be so dangerous. Table-1. Risk perception...stronger evidence of radon health effects(4) WHO draws......

Ivana Fojtikova; Katerina Rovenska

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

School health services, health promotion and health outcomes: an investigation of the Health Promoting Schools approach as supported by school nurses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Health promotion interventions in schools have grown in popularity and have demonstrated varying degrees of effectiveness on the health of the school and its individuals.… (more)

Carlsson, Dru

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single- and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and its performance as early as possible in the project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

Mann, F.M.

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

Mann, F.M.

1997-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cost-effectiveness assessment of energy efficiency obligation schemes - implications for Swedish industries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis is an investigation of whether an energy efficiency obligation scheme would be cost-effective for the Swedish industrial sector. The basic guidelines of… (more)

Xylia, Maria

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Effect of Direct-to-Consumer Genomewide Profiling to Assess Disease Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...still unknown. Direct-to-consumer genomic risk testing recently attracted national attention when one company that offers such testing, Pathway Genomics, announced it would sell its DNA saliva kits at Walgreen stores nationwide. This announcement led the Food and Drug Administration to consider whether... Direct-to-consumer genomewide profiling to assess disease risk provides information about a person's genetic risk of 20 to 40 common polygenic diseases. The tests simultaneously genotype approximately 500,000 variant bases of a person's DNA. Consumers can ...

Bloss C.S.Schork N.J.Topol E.J.

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Qualitative Exploration of the Effect of Age at Migration on the Acculturative Processes of Filipino Immigrants: Implications for Public Health Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Implications ..that includes public health implications of this research,this topic and the health implications of migrating at later

Molina, Lourdes Cricel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Reproductive health of Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...B2005Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols...Environ. Health. 4, 17...Surveillance of depleted uranium exposed Gulf...veterans: health effects observed...exposed to depleted uranium. Int. Arch...Environ. Health. 79, 11-21...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Incorporation of analgesics into rodent embryo transfer protocols: assessing the effects on reproductive outcomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surgical embryo transfer in rodents is a common procedure in today’s research laboratory, although little is known of the effect analgesics may have on not only the recipient female but also the embryos. Two perioperative analgesics, ketoprofen...

Burckhardt, Heather Ann

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Assessing Ecosystem Effects of Reservoir Operations Using Food Web–Energy Transfer and Water Quality Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the effects on the reservoir food web of a new temperature control device (TCD) on the dam at Shasta Lake, California. We followed a linked modeling approach that used a specialized reservoir wate...

Laurel Saito; Brett M. Johnson; John Bartholow; R. Blair Hanna

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

An issue of permanence: assessing the effectiveness of temporary carbon storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a method to quantify the effectiveness of carbon mitigation options taking into account the "permanence" of the emissions reduction. While the issue of permanence is most commonly associated with ...

Herzog, Howard J.

397

Effect of microbubble contrast on intracranial blood flow velocity assessed by transcranial Doppler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) salvage a considerable number of transcranial Doppler (TCD) exams which would have failed ... measured blood flow velocity (BFV). The effect of UCA continuous infusion on measured...

Nicola Logallo; Annette Fromm; Ulrike Waje-Andreassen…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Uncertainty analysis of an aviation climate model and an aircraft price model for assessment of environmental effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating, presenting, and assessing uncertainties are important parts in assessment of a complex system. This thesis focuses on the assessment of uncertainty in the price module and the climate module in the Aviation ...

Jun, Mina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Health assessment for New Hanover County Burn Pit, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. NCD981021157. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The New Hanover County Burn Pit, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, has been proposed for the National Priorities List by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The burn pit is part of an active airport and was used from 1968-1979 for fire-training exercises. Aviation fuel, waste oil, and petroleum tank bottoms were burned and extinguished with water, carbon dioxide, or dry chemicals. Samples from the pit and soil adjacent to the pit, where pit contents were drained, showed the presence of heavy metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Investigation of the site has been limited to the pit and surrounding soil. Groundwater is close to land surface in the area and may be affected. Groundwater is used for domestic purposes within a 3-mile radius of the site. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances.

Not Available

1990-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

400

DOE/FDA/EPA: Workshop on methylmercury and human health  

SciTech Connect

In the US the general population is exposed to methylmercury (MeHg) principally through the consumption of fish. There is continuing discussion about the sources of this form of mercury (Hg), the magnitudes and trends in exposures to consumers, and the significance of the sources and their contributions to human health. In response to these discussions, the US Department of Energy, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the US Environmental Protection Agency cosponsored a two-day workshop to discuss data and methods available for characterizing the risk to human health presented by MeHg. This workshop was attended by 45 individuals representing various Federal and state organizations and interested stakeholders. The agenda covered: Agency interests; probabilistic approach to risk assessment; emission sources; atmospheric transport; biogeochemical cycling; exposure assessment; health effects of MeHg; and research needs.

Moskowitz, P.D.; Saroff, L.; Bolger, M.; Cicmanec, J.; Durkee, S. [eds.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fleet assessment for opportunities to effectively deploy light duty alternative fuel vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The City of Detroit conducted an initial program to assess the potential for substitution of vehicles currently in operation with alternative fuel vehicles. A key task involved the development of an operating profile of the participant light truck and van fleets involved in the study. To do this a survey of operators of light duty trucks and vans within the project participant fleets was conducted. These survey results were analyzed to define the potential for substitution of conventional vehicles with alternate fuel vehicles with alternate fuel vehicles and to identify candidates for participation in the Mini-Demonstration portion of the project. The test program involved the deployment of an electric van (two GM Griffon Electric Vans provided by Detroit Edison) at seven Mini-Demonstration sites for a period of four weeks each for test and evaluation. The Technical Work Group then analyzed vehicle performance data and used a questionnaire to obtain impressions and attitudes of the users toward the acceptability of the electric van. The Technical Work Group (TWG) and Management Assessment Group (MAG) then prepared recommendations and an implementation plan to develop further information aimed toward eventual expanded deployment of alternative fuel vehicles within project participant light duty fleets. The MAG concluded that the study had been beneficial in collecting and developing important quantitative information, introducing a set of public fleet managers to alternative fuel vehicle opportunities and features, and had provided specific experience with the Griffon van which provided some indications of requirements in such vehicles if they are to be a normal part of public fleet operations. These included the need for some increase of the mileage range of the Griffon, an improvement in the ride and handling of the Griffon, and several minor'' difficulties experienced with malfunctioning or inconvenient characteristics of the Griffon equipment. 25 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment Monitoring Management & Communication Water Safety Plans Public health context and health outcomes-cost improvements to operations and· management practices that can enhance water safety; improve efficiencyNational Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services CS

403

IAAP Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 Burlington Atomic Energy Commission Plant- Former Worker Program A US DOE funded project conducted by: Dr. Laurence Fuortes, Principal Investigator The University of Iowa College of Public Health Department of Occupational and Environmental Health 5 2940 Steindler Building Iowa City, IA 52242 TEL: 319 335 9819 FAX: 319 335 9200 BACEP-FWP Needs Assessment 1. INTRODUCTION In August of 2000, the University of Iowa College of Public Health initiated a needs assessment study to evaluate whether or not individuals formerly employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) near Burlington, Iowa, would benefit from a Former Worker Medical Surveillance Program. These workers were employed at IAAP in the atomic weapons industry on what was known at the facility as Line 1 or Division B at the

404

Application of Causal Inference Methods to Estimate Single Pollutant and Multi-Pollutant Health Effects in Asthmatic Children in Fresno, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry, in Air Pollution and Health, S.T. Holgate, etHealth History, in Air Pollution and Health, S.T. Holgate,and Standards, in Air Pollution and Health, S.T. Holgate, et

Snowden, Jonathan Maclean

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Quantification issues  

SciTech Connect

The quantitative procedures associated with noncancer risk assessment include reference dose (RfD), benchmark dose, and severity modeling. The RfD, which is part of the EPA risk assessment guidelines, is an estimation of a level that is likely to be without any health risk to sensitive individuals. The RfD requires two major judgments: the first is choice of a critical effect(s) and its No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL); the second judgment is choice of an uncertainty factor. This paper discusses major assumptions and limitations of the RfD model.

Dourson, M.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Health and Visibility Cost of Air Pollution: A Comparison of Estimation Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economics, air pollution, health effects, visibility,Cost of Health Effects of Motor Vehicle Air Pollution. UCD-of the health costs of air pollution (because individuals

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James; McCubbin, Donald

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis  

SciTech Connect

Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R. (eds.)

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the aerosols have an indirect effect by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, and their interaction latent heating (6), leading to an enhanced pre- cipitation efficiency (7­12), invigorated convection Satellite Cloud Climatology Project and high-resolution infrared sounder. In addition, a trend of increasing

409

ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTIVENESS AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF HUMIDITY CONTROL APPROACHES IN VACANT FLORIDA HOMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but it yielded insufficient RH control during cloudy weather. Furthermore, AC energy use peaks during the utility’s peak demand period. Running the AC system for two hours a day (3-5 AM) yielded effective and energy efficient RH control. Operation of a...

Cummings, J. B.; Withers, C. R.

410

Effective Grid Utilization: A Technical Assessment and Application Guide; April 2011 - September 2012  

SciTech Connect

In order to more fully integrate renewable resources, such as wind and solar, into the transmission system, additional capacity must be realized in the short term using the installed transmission capacity that exists today. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Transmission and Grid Integration Group supported this study to assemble the history of regulations and status of transmission technology to expand existing grid capacity. This report compiles data on various transmission technology methods and upgrades for increased capacity utilization of the existing transmission system and transmission corridors. The report discusses the technical merit of each method and explains how the method could be applied within the current regulatory structure to increase existing transmission conductor and/or corridor capacity. The history and current state of alternatives to new construction is presented for regulators, legislators, and other policy makers wrestling with issues surrounding integration of variable generation. Current regulations are assessed for opportunities to change them to promote grid expansion. To support consideration of these alternatives for expanding grid capacity, the report lists relevant rules, standards, and policy changes.

Balser, S.; Sankar, S.; Miller, R.; Rawlins, A.; Israel, M.; Curry, T.; Mason, T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An assessment of remediation measures and effects on groundwater quality at the Oneida County Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect

The Oneida County Sanitary Landfill has operated from 1979 to the present. The four existing landfill cells were constructed based on standards that existed at their time of development from 1979 to 1995. The landfill was initially permitted as a natural attenuation landfill with a silt soil base liner and top cover. Groundwater sampling at the site showed that many constituents exceeded Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter NR 140 (NR 140) standards throughout the 1980s. Measures that were implemented to remediate landfill impacts on groundwater quality included installation of a leachate/gas extraction system in 1990 and construction of a composite final cover over completed cells in 1994. In 1994, an Environmental Contamination Assessment (ECA) was conducted in accordance with NR 140 to evaluate landfill performance, groundwater quality trends, and future monitoring/remediation measures. Since implementation of the gas/leachate extraction system, there has been a reduction in detected volatile organic compounds in leachate, gas, gas condensate, and groundwater quality samples. Continued monitoring is necessary to evaluate remediation measures.

McGuire, P.; Otterson, S. [Rust Environment & Infrastructure, Sheboygan, WI (United States); Welhouse, G. [Environmental Compliance Consultants, Oshkosh, WI (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Assessing the effect of metal speciation on lead toxicity to Vicia faba pigment contents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lead is a highly toxic heavy metal, but its putative toxicity with respect to its speciation remains to unveil. In this study, Pb-induced toxicity to Vicia faba pigment contents was assessed against Pb speciation and accumulation. After a culture period of three weeks, V. faba seedlings were exposed to 5 ?M of lead nitrate alone or chelated by citric acid (CA) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The plants were treated for 1, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h in nutrient solution. Exposure to Pb-5 caused increased production of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation and decrease in V. faba chlorophyll contents during 24 h. Lead-induced oxidative stress and toxicity to chlorophyll contents varied with the speciation of Pb. Addition of EDTA to Pb solution alleviated Pb-induced oxidative stress and toxicity to V. faba pigments by decreasing Pb accumulation in V. faba leaves. However, addition of citric acid to Pb did not affect Pb accumulation or toxicity to V. faba leaves. It is proposed that metal speciation plays an important role in Pb toxicity to V. faba pigment. Moreover, organic ligands vary greatly in terms of their ability to modify Pb phytoaccumulation and toxicity.

Muhammad Shahid; Camille Dumat; Bertrand Pourrut; Muhammad Sabir; Eric Pinelli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Office of Enterprse Assessments Review of the West Valley Demonstratio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deputy Director, Office of Enterprise Assessments Thomas R. Staker, Director, Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Quality Review Board William A. Eckroade Thomas...

414

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Health Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Investigators Health Physics The March 2011 special issue of Health Physics highlights the Victor Bond Workshop held May 2-5, 2010, in Richland, Wash. The workshop honored the late Dr. Victor (Vic) Bond for his lifetime achievement in the radiation sciences. Dr. Bond's research resulted in numerous influential scientific papers that contributed greatly to the understanding of radiation effects in biological systems. The workshop attracted internationally recognized experts in biophysics, experimental radiation biology, epidemiology, and risk assessment to discuss issues of low-dose risk. Participants included current and previously funded U.S. Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research

415

University of Florida College of Public Health & Health Professions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.ufl.edu). COURSE DESCRIPTION: On a day to day basis, health care managers are charged with improving costs and financial outcomes while simultaneously improving clinical and service quality. Health care organizations required to make effective tactical and operational decisions in a health care environment. The course

Kane, Andrew S.

416

New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options and Your Health Coverage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When key parts of the health care reform law (the Affordable Care Act or ACA) take effect in 2014 your employer, you may qualify for Medicaid depending on your household income. Please visit www.HealthCare coverage options, including your eligibility for coverage through the Marketplace and its cost. Visit http://www.HealthCare

Ziurys, Lucy M.

417

Assessment of eddy current effects on compression experiments in the TFTR tokamak  

SciTech Connect

The eddy current induced on the TFTR vacuum vessel during compression experiments is estimated based on a cylindrical model. It produces an error magnetic field that generates magnetic islands at the rational magnetic surfaces. The widths of these islands are calculated and found to have some effect on electron energy confinement. However, resistive MHD simulation results indicate that the island formation process can be slowed down by plasma rotation.

Wong, K.L.; Park, W.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Use of terrestrial toxicity tests for Superfund site assessments  

SciTech Connect

Most risk assessment efforts that evaluate risk from hazardous waste sites have focused on potential human health effects. Concern for potential ecological risk has become a prominent factor in these assessments. The potential impact on all components of ecological systems at risk (including the human component) has prompted the regulatory community to take a more comprehensive approach to risk assessments, incorporating terrestrial toxicity testing. Terrestrial toxicity testing ultimately strengthens the overall risk assessment since responses of feral animals in their natural habitats have important implications in human health. Many biological indicators of stress in animals can be extrapolated to human health as well. Reliance on terrestrial toxicity testing for hazardous waste sites provides both a priori toxicity tests of single chemicals (generally conducted in a laboratory setting), or site-specific testing of extant contamination. Using bioassays of toxicity of environmental samples or in situ testing. Appropriate toxicity tests with representative chemicals and chemical bioavailability, on appropriate species will greatly enhance the information gained and widen mitigation options. Risk managers will be better able to integrate and evaluate toxicity information for the entire system at risk, including the human component. The authors present several matrices that relate chemical action, anticipated toxic effects, and possible terrestrial effects that can be used to provide more comprehensive and ecologically realistic risk assessments at hazardous waste sites.

Williams, B.A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Assessment of the effect of high ash content in pulverized coal combustion  

SciTech Connect

The existing literature on CFD-based coal combustion modelling is applicable mainly for coals of low ash content and the calculations are done on an ash-free basis. In Indian coals, the ash content may be significantly higher, up to 40% or more. Studies reported in the literature show that the mineral matter in the coal may have a number of effects on the combustion characteristics. In the present study, a sensitivity analysis is performed, using the CFD code CFX of AEA Technology, on the likely effect of ash content on the char reactivity, oxygen diffusion rate for char combustion and on the radiative heat transfer parameters. The results show that the effect of enhanced char reactivity is negligible whereas reduced oxygen diffusion rates due to a thicker ash layer may result in a significant reduction in char oxidation rates with a resultant decrease in the peak temperature in the furnace. The global parameters such as the peak temperature and the flue gas temperature remain relatively insensitive to the presence of high ash content. These results are consistent with the experimental observations of Kurose et al. . Kurose, M. Ikeda, H. Makino, Combustion characteristics of high ash coal in pulverized coal combustion, J. Fuel 80 (2001) 1447-1455).

Jayanti, S.; Maheswaran, K.; Saravanan, V. [Indian Institute of Technology, Madras (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix F: Assessment Methodologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX F: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES Assessment Methodologies F-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Assessment Methodologies F-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX F: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES In general, the activities assessed in this environmental impact statement (EIS) could affect workers, members of the general public, and the environment during construction of new facilities, during routine operation of facilities, during transportation, and during facility or transportation accidents. Activities could have adverse effects (e.g., human health impairment) or positive effects (e.g., regional socioeconomic benefits, such as the creation of jobs). Some impacts would result primarily from the unique characteristics of the uranium and other chemical

422

Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art  

SciTech Connect

A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

College of Health and Human Development Faculty Research Themes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

school youth, development of youth competencies, healthy lifestyle & democratic behavior through leisure. Elizabeth Farmer Associate Professor Health Policy & Administration Email Address: emf13@psu.edu Research Interests Children's mental health services, effectiveness of mental health interventions, mental health

Yener, Aylin

425

Workshop overview: Arsenic research and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The chronic exposure of humans through consumption of high levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs)-contaminated drinking water is associated with skin lesions, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, and cancers. Additionally, humans are exposed to organic arsenicals when used as pesticides and herbicides (e.g., monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) also known as cacodylic acid). Extensive research has been conducted to characterize the adverse health effects that result from exposure to iAs and its metabolites to describe the biological pathway(s) that lead to adverse health effects. To further this effort, on May 31, 2006, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) sponsored a meeting entitled 'Workshop on Arsenic Research and Risk Assessment'. The invited participants from government agencies, academia, independent research organizations and consultants were asked to present their current research. The overall focus of these research efforts has been to determine the potential human health risks due to environmental exposures to arsenicals. Pursuant in these efforts is the elucidation of a mode of action for arsenicals. This paper provides a brief overview of the workshop goals, regulatory context for arsenical research, mode of action (MOA) analysis in human health risk assessment, and the application of MOA analysis for iAs and DMA{sup V}. Subsequent papers within this issue will present the research discussed at the workshop, ensuing discussions, and conclusions of the workshop.

Sams, Reeder [Integrated Risk Information System Program, National Center for Environmental Assessment, MC: B-243 01, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)], E-mail: sams.reeder@epa.gov; Wolf, Douglas C. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Ramasamy, Santhini; Ohanian, Ed [Health and Ecological Criteria Division, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Chen, Jonathan [Antimicrobials Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Lowit, Anna [Health Effects Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

MMU Health and Safety Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and effective management control plays in establishing a positive safety culture and preventing incidents, work · believing that the development of a positive health and safety culture is necessary to achieve adequateMMU Health and Safety Policy Manchester Metropolitan University Health and Safety Unit Tel 0161 247

427

Health and Safety Training Reciprocity  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes a policy for reciprocity of employee health and safety training among DOE entities responsible for employee health and safety at DOE sites and facilities to increase efficiency and effectiveness of Departmental operations while meeting established health and safety requirements. Does not cancel other directives.

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Has Massachusetts health care reform worked for the working poor? Results from an analysis of opportunity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractPurpose Health care reform was introduced in Massachusetts (MA) in 2006 and serves as a model for what was subsequently introduced nationally as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The Boston Area Community Health survey collected data before (2002–2005) and after (2006–2010) introduction of the MA health insurance mandate, providing a unique opportunity to assess its effects in a large, epidemiologic cohort. Methods We report on the apparent effects of the mandate on the same participants over time, focusing specifically on the vulnerable working poor (WP). We evaluated differences in subpopulations of interest at pre- and post-reform periods to explore whether MA health care reform resulted in an overall gain in insurance coverage. Results MA health care reform was associated with net gains in health insurance coverage overall and among the subgroups studied. Our findings suggest that despite being targeted by health care reform legislation, the WP in MA continue to report lower rates of insurance coverage compared with both the nonworking poor and the not poor. Conclusions MA health care reform legislation, including the expansion of Medicaid, resulted in substantial overall gains in coverage. Disparities in insurance coverage persist among some subgroups following health care reform implementation in MA. These results have important implications for health services researchers and policy makers, particularly in light of the ongoing implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Liane J. Tinsley; Susan A. Hall; John B. McKinlay

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following chemical terrorist attack: Introduction and key assessment considerations  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While restoration timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical terrorist release. What follows is the first of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information, and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. A conceptual site model and human health-based exposure guidelines are developed and reported as an aid to site-specific pre-planning in the current absence of U.S. state or Federal values designated as compound-specific remediation or re-entry concentrations, and to safely expedite facility recovery to full operational status. Chemicals of concern include chemical warfare nerve and vesicant agents and the toxic industrial compounds phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Assessment of ocean waste disposal. Task 5. Human-health impacts of waste constituents. 2. Pathogens and antibiotic- and heavy-metal-resistant bacteria. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of wastes in the ocean has been practiced by coastal nations for many decades. All areas of the ocean have been subject to disposal use, including estuaries, nearshore, open shelf, and deep ocean sites. Until recently, it was believed that pathogenic bacteria did not survive for any significant period of time in estuarine and marine environments. Scientists and public-health workers never bothered to ask the question could viable, virulent pathogens be present in water samples even though they could not be detected by conventional plating methods. This laboratory answered this question in the affirmative for several bacterial pathogens, and this is discussed in detail. What follows in the report is a description of potentially harmful constituents of wastes, ways in which those constituents could reach humans, known incidents of human disease contracted from wastes, detection of waste-borne disease agents, management technologies, and monitoring and predictive technologies. Since the report is not just a review of the literature, not all known literature has been discussed. However, every attempt is made to include very relevant material, regardless of its age. What follows then is both a literature review and a position paper.

Grimes, D.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Acute Respiratory Health Effects in Asthmatic and Nonasthmatic Children Associated with Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Environ.Health Perspect.,63, 39-44. Whittemore,A.S., and Korn,E.L. (1980). Asthmaand air pollution-Term Exposure to Air Pollutants Author(s): Lisa Kan, Barry Wiggs, Mark Irwin, Irene Yee Source: The CanadianMemorandumof Intenton TransboundaryAir Pollution(1983). Impactassessment-Work Group I. Final Report,Section 4, pp. 1

Irwin, Mark E.

432

State of Maryland Employees and Retirees Health and Welfare Benefits Program Medical Plan Changes Effective July 1, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

care that is currently covered in full in network under healthcare reform remains covered in fullState of Maryland Employees and Retirees Health and Welfare Benefits Program Medical Plan Changes Copay In-Network Per Visit Copay Specialist Office Visit $25 $30 Urgent Care Facility $20 $30 Emergency

Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

433

Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 4: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Medical University of South Carolina`s (MUSC) vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. The significant growth in the number of environmental/health information systems that has occurred over the past few years has made data access challenging. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: immunological consequences of beryllium exposure; assessment of genetic risks to environmental diseases; low dose-rate radiation health effects; environmental risk perception in defined populations; information support and access systems; and environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Research Abstract, Wireless Health 2013 Wireless Health 2013, Nov 1-3 2013, Baltimore, MD, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health (mHealth) interventions such as text messaging or SMS can deliver frequent patient contact. To be more effective, mHealth services need to adapt to each patient's unique needs over the long

Baveja, Satinder Singh

435

Analysis of macroscopic gunshot residues by Raman spectroscopy to assess the weapon memory effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gunshot residues (GSR) are valuable evidence which provide the forensic analyst with useful information about a crime scene when proper analytical methods are used. Nowadays, the method of choice for analyzing GSR is scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). However, SEM/EDX presents limitations when the GSR identification of “non-toxic” ammunition types is performed. To overcome this drawback, Raman spectroscopy has been recently proposed as a complementary technique to SEM/EDX. However, for the time being, it can only be used in a limited number of casework (e.g. examining the macroscopic GSR produced at short distance over victim's clothes) and further research to know when this technique could support SEM–EDX results is required. In the present work, the memory effect of the weapon, which plays an important role to link the GSR found and the ammunition fired, is studied. Twenty shots were fired at close distance (?30 cm) at paper targets using the same weapon with two different types of ammunition. The first, third, ninth, and twentieth shots were fired with the first ammunition and the shots among them using the second ammunition. The macroscopic GSR produced by the first ammunition were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. First, the spectra obtained were visually differentiated by taking into account the band at about 1342 cm?1. This first approach shown that in the first shot were no GSR particles from the second ammunition, but 1.5–7.5% of analyzed particles corresponded to the second ammunition in the third, ninth, and twentieth shots. Additionally, the same differentiation was then performed by discriminant analysis using the spectral range from 1800 to 800 cm?1. Although using this second approach only one GSR was identified as the second ammunition, was remarkable that after the shots with different ammunition the GSR obtained shows greater variability. The results obtained suggest that the memory effect of the weapon has not a significant influence when the organic analysis of macroscopic GSR on targets by Raman spectroscopy is performed.

María López-López; Juan Jose Delgado; Carmen García-Ruiz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Powering Health | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powering Health Powering Health Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Powering Health Agency/Company /Organization: USAID Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Health Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.poweringhealth.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America Language: English Related Tools SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook ProForm Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) ... further results

437

National Climate Assessment: Production Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NCA & Development Advisory Committee NCA & Development Advisory Committee Production Team Indicators System Coastal Resilience Resources Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally National Climate Assessment: Production Team Print E-mail National Climate Assessment Staff (USGCRP National Coordination Office) Current NCA Staff Dr. Fabien Laurier, Director, Third National Climate Assessment Dr. Glynis Lough, Chief of Staff for the National Climate Assessment Emily Therese Cloyd, Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Bryce Golden-Chen, Program Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Alison Delgado, Scientist Dr. Ilya Fischhoffkri, Scientist Melissa Kenney, Indicators Coordinator Dr. Fred Lipschultz, Regional Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment

438

Dose-Response Effect of Charged Carbon Beam on Normal Rat Retina Assessed by Electroretinography  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the effects of carbon beam irradiation with those of proton beam irradiation on the physiology of the retina of rats. Methods and Materials: Eight-week-old Wister rats were used. The right eyes were irradiated with carbon beam (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 Gy) or proton beam (4, 8, 16, and 24 Gy) with the rats under general anesthesia. Electroretinograms were recorded 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the irradiation, and the amplitudes of the a and b waves were compared with those of control rats. Results: The amplitude of b waves was reduced more than that of a waves at lower irradiation doses with both types of irradiation. With carbon ion irradiation, the amplitudes of the b wave were significantly reduced after radiation doses of 8 and 16 Gy at 6 months and by radiation doses of 4, 8, and 16 Gy at 12 months. With proton beam irradiation, the b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced after 16 and 24 Gy at 6 months and with doses of 8 Gy or greater at 12 months. For the maximum b-wave amplitude, a significant difference was observed in rats irradiated with carbon beams of 4 Gy or more and with proton beams of 8 Gy or more at 12 months after irradiation. Conclusions: These results indicate that carbon beam irradiation is about two times more damaging than proton beam irradiation on the rat retina at the same dose.

Mizota, Atsushi, E-mail: mizota-a@med.teikyo-u.ac.j [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu (Japan); Tanaka, Minoru [Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu (Japan); Kubota, Mariko; Negishi, Hisanari [Department of Ophthalmology, National Hospital Organization Chiba Medical Center, Chiba (Japan); Watanabe, Emiko [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Mercury Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS: IMPACTS OF LOCAL DEPOSITIONS *T.M. Sullivan 1 , F.D. Lipfert 2 , S.M. Morris 2 , and S. Renninger 3 1 Building 830, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 2 Private Consultants 3 Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to regulate emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants. However, there is still debate over whether the limits should be placed on a nationwide or a plant-specific basis. Before a nationwide limit is selected, it must be demonstrated that local deposition of mercury from coal-fired power plants does not impose an excessive local health risk. The principal health

440

Assessing the Effects of Radiation Damage on Ni-base Alloys for the Prometheus Space Reactor System  

SciTech Connect

Ni-base alloys were considered for the Prometheus space reactor pressure vessel with operational parameters of {approx}900 K for 15 years and fluences up to 160 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV). This paper reviews the effects of irradiation on the behavior of Ni-base alloys and shows that radiation-induced swelling and creep are minor considerations compared to significant embrittlement with neutron ,exposure. While the mechanism responsible for radiation-induced embrittlement is not fully understood, it is likely a combination of helium embrittlement and solute segregation that can be highly dependent on the alloy composition and exposure conditions. Transmutation calculations show that detrimental helium levels would be expected at the end of life for the inner safety rod vessel (thimble) and possibly the outer pressure vessel, primarily from high energy (E > 1 MeV) n,{alpha} reactions with {sup 58}Ni. Helium from {sup 10}B is significant only for the outer vessel due to the proximity of the outer vessel to the Be0 control elements. Recommendations for further assessments of the material behavior and methods to minimize the effects of radiation damage through alloy design are provided.

T. Angeliu

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Assessing the Effects of Radiation Damage on Ni-base Alloys for the Prometheus Space Reactor System  

SciTech Connect

Ni-base alloys were considered for the Prometheus space reactor pressure vessel with operational parameters of {approx}900 K for 15 years and fluences up to 160 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV). This paper reviews the effects of irradiation on the behavior of Ni-base alloys and shows that radiation-induced swelling and creep are minor considerations compared to significant embrittlement with neutron exposure. While the mechanism responsible for radiation-induced embrittlement is not fully understood, it is likely a combination of helium embrittlement and solute segregation that can be highly dependent on the alloy composition and exposure conditions. Transmutation calculations show that detrimental helium levels would be expected at the end of life for the inner safety rod vessel (thimble) and possibly the outer pressure vessel, primarily from high energy (E > 1 MeV) n,{alpha} reactions with {sup 58}Ni. Helium from {sup 10}B is significant only for the outer vessel due to the proximity of the outer vessel to the BeO control elements. Recommendations for further assessments of the material behavior and methods to minimize the effects of radiation damage through alloy design are provided.

T Angeliu; J Ward; J Witter

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

A methodology to assess energy-demand savings and cost effectiveness of retrofitting in existing Swedish residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Swedish residential buildings are typically retrofitted on a case-by-case basis. Large numbers of building consultants are involved in the decision-making, and stakeholders find it difficult to quantify the sustainable profits from retrofits and to make an efficient selection of the optimal alternative. The present paper presents an approach to design and assess energy-demand retrofitting scenarios. This aims to contribute to retrofitting decision-making regarding the main archetypes of existing Swedish residential buildings and to the evaluation of their long-term cost effectiveness. The approach combines energy-demand modeling and retrofit option rankings with life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA). Four types of typical Swedish residential buildings are used to demonstrate the model. Retrofits in the archetypes are defined, analyzed and ranked to indicate the long-term energy savings and economic profits. The model indicates that the energy saving potential of retrofitting is 36–54% in the archetypes. However, retrofits with the largest energy-saving potential are not always the most cost effective. The long-term profits of retrofitting are largely dominated by the building types. The finding can contribute to the standardization of future retrofitting designs on municipality scale in Sweden.

Qian Wang; Sture Holmberg

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 1 of 8 Health and Safety Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 1 of 8 Health and Safety Policy #12;Health and Safety Policy Version 2012, Page 2 of 8 Coventry University Health and Safety Policy 1. Introduction, Purpose and Scope The objective of our Health and Safety Policy is to enable the University to operate effectively

Low, Robert

444

OFFICE ERGONOMICS A Self-Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OFFICE ERGONOMICS A Self-Assessment Guide Environmental Health and Safety Office safety, along with additional information on ergonomics, is also available through the Dalhousie Safety Office

Brownstone, Rob

445

Use of gene probes to assess the impact and effectiveness of aerobic in situ bioremediation of TCE  

SciTech Connect

Gene probe hybridization was used to determine distribution and expression of co-metabolic genes at a contaminated site as it underwent in situ methanotrophic bioremediation of trichloroethylene (TCE). The bioremediation strategies tested included a series of air, air:methane, and air:methane:nutrient pulses of the test plot using horizontal injection wells. During the test period, the levels of TCE reduced drastically in almost all test samples. Sediment core samples (n = 367) taken from 0 m (surface)-43 m depth were probed for gene coding for methanotrophic soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and heterotrophic toluene dioxygenase (TOD), which are known to co-metabolize TCE. The same sediment samples were also probed for genes coding for methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) (catalyzing the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde) to assess specifically changes in methylotrophic bacterial populations in the site. Gene hybridization results showed that the frequency of detection of sMMO genes were stimulated approximately 250% following 1% methane:air (v/v) injection. Subsequent injection of 4% methane:air (v/v) resulted in an 85% decline probably due to nutrient limitations, since addition of nutrients (gaseous nitrogen and phosphorus) thereafter caused an increase in the frequency of detection of sMMO genes. Detection of TOD genes declined during the process, and eventually they were non-detectable by the final treatment, suggesting that methanotrophs displaced the TOD gene containing heterotrophs. Active transcription of sMMO and TOD was evidenced by hybridization to mRNA. These analyses combined with results showing the concomitant decline in TCE concentrations, increases in chloride concentration and increases in methanotroph viable counts, provide multiple lines of evidence that TCE remediation was caused specifically by methanotrophs. Our results suggest that sMMO genes are responsible for most, if not all, of the observed biodegradation of TCE. This study demonstrates that the use of nucleic acid analytical methods provided a gene specific assessment of the effects of in situ treatment technologies.

Hazen, Terry C.; Chakraborty, Romy; Fleming, James M.; Gregory, Ingrid R.; Bowman, John P.; Jimenez, Luis; Zhang, Dai; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Brockman, Fred J.; Sayler, Gary S.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.

Uhart, M.; et al,

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

DOE limited standard: Operations assessments  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this standard is to provide DOE Field Element assessors with a guide for conducting operations assessments, and provide DOE Field Element managers with the criteria of the EM Operations Assessment Program. Sections 6.1 to 6.21 provide examples of how to assess specific areas; the general techniques of operations assessments (Section 5) may be applied to other areas of health and safety (e.g. fire protection, criticality safety, quality assurance, occupational safety, etc.).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Global Health: Disease Eradication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...have been considered as potential candidates for eradication, but the World Health Organization (WHO) has targeted only two other diseases for global eradication after smallpox. In 1986, WHO's policymaking body, the World Health Assembly, adopted the elimination of dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease)... The most cost-effective intervention for certain infectious diseases is to eliminate them entirely. This article reviews the characteristics of potentially eradicable diseases and surveys current eradication methods.

Hopkins D.R.

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

449

Health Economics College of Public Health and Health Professions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of health, the demand for health care, health insurance theory, the demand for health insurance, the health insurance market and managed care, the market for physicians' services, production and cost of health care care environment. #12;2 Apply general and health economics concepts and show demonstrated competence

Kane, Andrew S.

450

Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to health problems and health care systems, through developing and applying theories, concepts44 Health Sciences and Nursing Health Sociology in interdisciplinary academic fields, involving health, medicine and nursing as well as the field of sociology

Miyashita, Yasushi

451

Race and gender differences in the effect of informal social supports on the use of health services by the elderly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of physician visits, and the number of days spent in the hospital. Although the increases in the R's were minimal, they were statistically significant. In addition, several interactive effects were found. The effects of a number of the social support... variables on physician contact, the number of physician visits and the number of days spent in the hospital differed according to race and gender. However, these effects were inconsistent. The effect that a particular support variable had on one...

Nelson, Martha Alice

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

452

Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Health and EPA/600/8-91/011B Environmental Protection Environmental Assessment January 1992 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Interim Report Research and Development Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications EPA/600/8 -91/OllB January 1992 Interim Report DERMAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS Exposure Assessment Group Office of Health and Environmental Assessment U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 DISCLAIMER This document is an interim report subject to review by the Science Advisory Board. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii

453

Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Environmental assessment of offshore wind power generation near Rhode Island: Acoustic and electromagnetic effects on marine animals.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An offshore wind farm is planned for Rhode Island coastal waters. The developer has proposed to deploy wind turbines in two stages: 5 turbines in shallow waters 5 km south of Block Island and 100 turbines in deeper waters 30 km to the east. As part of the planning of the proposed offshore wind powergeneration project under the Rhode Island Special Area Management Plan ambient acoustic and electromagneticmeasurements were made in the area. Two passive acoustic listener (PAL) systems were deployed within 4 km of Block Island from October 6 to November 11 2008. Data from the PALs were used to compute the ocean acousticnoise budget and other statistics by source. Transmission loss measurements were also made to support the noise budget calculation. Measurements of airborne noise from a 1.5?MW land?based wind turbine already in operation in Rhode Island were made. To support the electromagneticeffect study an underwater magnetometer was towed at the two proposed sites and over an operational underwater 23?kV power cable. A preliminary assessment of the effects of the offshore wind farm on marine animals at these sites will be presented. [Funding provided by the RI Office of Energy Resources.

James H. Miller; Gopu R. Potty; Kathleen Vigness Raposa; David Casagrande; Lisa Miller; Steven E. Crocker; Robert Tyce; Jonathan Preston; Brian Roderick; Jeffrey A. Nystuen; Peter M. Scheifele

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Final Report DE-EE0005380- Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report that assesses possible interference to various kinds of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed.

456

Environmental monitoring, restoration and assessment: What have we learned  

SciTech Connect

The Twenty-Eighth Hanford Symposium on Health and the Environment was held in Richland, Washington, October 16--19, 1989. The symposium was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The symposium was organized to review and evaluate some of the monitoring and assessment programs that have been conducted or are currently in place. Potential health and environmental effects of energy-related and other industrial activities have been monitored and assessed at various government and private facilities for over three decades. Most monitoring is required under government regulations; some monitoring is implemented because facility operators consider it prudent practice. As a result of these activities, there is now a substantial radiological, physical, and chemical data base for various environmental components, both in the United States and abroad. Symposium participants, both platform and poster presenters, were asked to consider, among other topics, the following: Has the expenditure of millions of dollars for radiological monitoring and assessment activities been worth the effort How do we decide when enough monitoring is enough Can we adequately assess the impacts of nonradiological components -- both inorganic and organic -- of wastes Are current regulatory requirements too restrictive or too lenient Can monitoring and assessment be made more cost effective Papers were solicited in the areas of environmental monitoring; environmental regulations; remediation, restoration, and decommissioning; modeling and dose assessment; uncertainty, design, and data analysis; and data management and quality assurance. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

Gray, R.H. (ed.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action  

SciTech Connect

This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants  

SciTech Connect

Understanding and quantifying outdoor and indoor sources of human exposure are essential but often not adequately addressed in health-effects studies for air pollution. Air pollution epidemiology, risk assessment, health tracking and accountability assessments are examples of health-effects studies that require but often lack adequate exposure information. Recent advances in exposure modeling along with better information on time-activity and exposure factors data provide us with unique opportunities to improve the assignment of exposures for both future and ongoing studies linking air pollution to health impacts. In September 2006, scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) along with scientists from the academic community and state health departments convened a symposium on air pollution exposure and health in order to identify, evaluate, and improve current approaches for linking air pollution exposures to disease. This manuscript presents the key issues, challenges and recommendations identified by the exposure working group, who used cases studies of particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutant exposure to evaluate health-effects for air pollution. One of the over-arching lessons of this workshop is that obtaining better exposure information for these different health-effects studies requires both goal-setting for what is needed and mapping out the transition pathway from current capabilities to meeting these goals. Meeting our long-term goals requires definition of incremental steps that provide useful information for the interim and move us toward our long-term goals. Another over-arching theme among the three different pollutants and the different health study approaches is the need for integration among alternate exposure assessment approaches. For example, different groups may advocate exposure indicators, biomonitoring, mapping methods (GIS), modeling, environmental media monitoring, and/or personal exposure modeling. However, emerging research reveals that the greatest progress comes from integration among two or more of these efforts.

McKone, Thomas E.; Ryan, P. Barry; Ozkaynak, Haluk

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Developing a CD-CBM Anticipatory Approach for Cavitation - Defining a Model-Based Descriptor Consistent Across Processes, Phase 1 Final Report Context-Dependent Prognostics and Health Assessment: A New Paradigm for Condition-based Maintenance SBIR Topic No. N98-114  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research, and subsequent testing, was to identify specific features of cavitation that could be used as a model-based descriptor in a context-dependent condition-based maintenance (CD-CBM) anticipatory prognostic and health assessment model. This descriptor is based on the physics of the phenomena, capturing the salient features of the process dynamics. The test methodology and approach were developed to make the cavitation features the dominant effect in the process and collected signatures. This would allow the accurate characterization of the salient cavitation features at different operational states. By developing such an abstraction, these attributes can be used as a general diagnostic for a system or any of its components. In this study, the particular focus will be pumps. As many as 90% of pump failures are catastrophic. They seem to be operating normally and fail abruptly without warning. This is true whether the failure is sudden hardware damage requiring repair, such as a gasket failure, or a transition into an undesired operating mode, such as cavitation. This means that conventional diagnostic methods fail to predict 90% of incipient failures and that in addressing this problem, model-based methods can add value where it is actually needed.

Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Health Insurance After Graduation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Insurance After Graduation: Individual Health Insurance in California University of California, Berkeley Student Health Insurance Office Tang Center Fall Semester 2013 #12;Health Care vs. Health Insurance Health Care is... Provision of Medical Services by ­ Private Physicians & Hospitals

Kammen, Daniel M.

462

Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings...

Detmer, Don E

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

463

environmental health The Local Board of Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environmental health The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Second Edition #12;The Local Board of Health Environmental Health Primer Second Edition Author Carrie Hribar, MA Project Director � Public Health Policy National Association of Local Boards of Health Editor Mark Schultz, MEd

464

Course Number: 7120 Course Title: Introduction to Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It also addresses environmental health applications and domains such as water quality, air pollution and fate of pollutants, exposure and risk assessment, epidemiology, toxicology, and environmental policy to environmental health stressors including heavy metals, pesticides, radiation, organic pollutants, among others

Dasgupta, Dipankar

465

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self-assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect

466

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self-assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect

467

Assessing uncertainties in the relationship between inhaled particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing uncertainties in the relationship between inhaled particle Assessing uncertainties in the relationship between inhaled particle concentration, internal deposition and health effects, Chapter 9 Title Assessing uncertainties in the relationship between inhaled particle concentration, internal deposition and health effects, Chapter 9 Publication Type Book Chapter Year of Publication 2005 Authors Price, Phillip N. Secondary Authors Ruzer, Lev S., and Naomi H. Harley Book Title Aerosols Handbook: Measurement, Dosimetry and Health Effects Chapter Chapter Pagination 157-188 Publisher CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL Abstract The question that ultimately motivates most aerosol inhalation research is: for a given inhaled atmosphere, what health effects will result in a specified population? To attempt to address this question, quantitative research on inhaled aerosols has been performed for at least fifty years (Landahl et al, 1951). The physical factors that determine particle deposition have been determined, lung morphology has been quantified (particularly for adults), models of total particle deposition have been created and validated, and a large variety of inhalation experiments have been performed. However many basic questions remain, some of which are identified by the U.S. Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter (NRC 1998a) as high-priority research areas. Among these are: What are the quantitative relationships between outdoor concentrations measured at stationary monitoring stations, and actual personal exposures? What are the exposures to biologically important constituents of particulate matter that cause responses in potentially susceptible subpopulations and the general population? What is the role of physicochemical characteristics of particulate matter in causing adverse health effects? As these questions show, in spite of significant progress in all areas of aerosol research, many of the most important practical questions remain unanswered or inadequately answered.In this chapter, we discuss the sources and magnitudes of error that hinder the ability to answer basic questions concerning the health effects of inhaled aerosols. We first consider the phenomena that affect the epidemiological studies, starting with studies of residential radon and moving on to fine particle air pollution. Next we discuss the major uncertainties in physical and physiological modeling of the causal chain that leads from inhaled aerosol concentration, to deposition in the airway, to time-dependent dose (that is, the concentration of particles at a given point in the lungs as function of time), to physiological effects, and finally to health effect.

468

ANDROS: A code for Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection  

SciTech Connect

ANDROS (Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection) is a computer code written to compute doses and health effects from atmospheric releases of radionuclides. ANDROS has been designed as an integral part of the CRRIS (Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System). ANDROS reads air concentrations and environmental concentrations of radionuclides to produce tables of specified doses and health effects to selected organs via selected pathways (e.g., ingestion or air immersion). The calculation may be done for an individual at a specific location or for the population of the whole assessment grid. The user may request tables of specific effects for every assessment grid location. Along with the radionuclide concentrations, the code requires radionuclide decay data, dose and risk factors, and location-specific data, all of which are available within the CRRIS. This document is a user manual for ANDROS and presents the methodology used in this code.

Begovich, C.L.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Ohr, S.Y.; Chester, R.O.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

What (or who) causes health inequalities: Theories, evidence and implications?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Health inequalities are the unjust differences in health between groups of people occupying different positions in society. Since the Black Report of 1980 there has been considerable effort to understand what causes them, so as to be able to identify actions to reduce them. This paper revisits and updates the proposed theories, evaluates the evidence in light of subsequent epidemiological research, and underlines the political and policy ramifications. The Black Report suggested four theories (artefact, selection, behavioural/cultural and structural) as to the root causes of health inequalities and suggested that structural theory provided the best explanation. These theories have since been elaborated to include intelligence and meritocracy as part of selection theory. However, the epidemiological evidence relating to the proposed causal pathways does not support these newer elaborations. They may provide partial explanations or insights into the mechanisms between cause and effect, but structural theory remains the best explanation as to the fundamental causes of health inequalities. The paper draws out the vitally important political and policy implications of this assessment. Health inequalities cannot be expected to reduce substantially as a result of policy aimed at changing health behaviours, particularly in the face of wider public policy that militates against reducing underlying social inequalities. Furthermore, political rhetoric about the need for ‘cultural change’, without the required changes in the distribution of power, income, wealth, or in the regulatory frameworks in society, is likely to divert from necessary action.

Gerry McCartney; Chik Collins; Mhairi Mackenzie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Effectiveness of Adult Day Care Programs on Health Outcomes of Thai Family Caregivers of Persons with Dementia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adult day care (ADC) is recognized as a supportive intervention for persons with dementia (PWD) and family caregivers during the day time. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Thai ADC programs ...

Noimuenwai, Premruetai

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

Insolvency prediction for assessing corporate financial health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Una aproximacion a la predicion del fracaso emperial mediante redes neuronales. IX Encuentro de Profesores Universitarios de Contabilidad...Una aproximacion a la predici on del fracaso emperial mediante redes neu- ronales. In IX Encuentro de Profesores Universitarios......

Dragan Simic; Ilija Kovacevic; Svetlana Simic

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Schiffert Health Center TUBERCULOSIS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Persistent cough of unknown etiology for more than 3 weeks · Productive cough with bloody sputum Section 2

Virginia Tech

473

Review: Clearing the Air: The Health and Economic Damages of Air Pollution in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the assessment of air pollution and its health and economiclargest source of health damages of air pollution in China,to air pollution, and the economic evaluations of health

Lee, Joseph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program of the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health public health agencies. For example, CDC staff are currently studying the effect of outdoor air pollution for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program supports

475

Risk identification and assessment in a risk based audit environment: the effects of budget constraints and decision aid use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In particular, this approach has important implications for risk identification and risk assessment. The success of the RBA approach is contingent on understanding what factors improve or interfere with the accuracy of these risk judgments. I examine how budget...

Diaz, Michelle Chandler

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z