Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

2

Assessment of zero gravity effects on space worker health and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One objective of the study is to assess the effects of all currently known deviations from normal of medical, physiological, and biochemical parameters which appear to be due to zero gravity (zero-g) environment and to acceleration and deceleration to be experienced, as outlined in the reference Solar Power Satellite (SPS) design, by space worker. Study results include identification of possible health or safety effects on space workers - either immediate or delayed - due to the zero gravity environment and acceleration and deceleration; estimation of the probability that an individual will be adversely affected; description of the possible consequence to work efficiently in persons adversely affected; and description of the possible/probable consequences to immediate and future health of individuals exposed to this environment. A research plan, which addresses the uncertainties in current knowledge regarding the health and safety hazards to exposed SPS space workers, is presented. Although most adverse affects experienced during space flight soon disappeared upon return to the Earth's environment, there remains a definite concern for the long-term effects to SPS space workers who might spend as much as half their time in space during a possible five-year career period. The proposed 90-day up/90 day down cycle, coupled with the fact that most of the effects of weightlessness may persist throughout the flight along with the realization that recovery may occupy much of the terrestrial stay, may keep the SPS workers in a deviant physical condition or state of flux for 60 to 100% of their five-year career. (JGB)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

ORISE: Environmental Assessment and Health Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessments and Health Physics Environmental Assessments and Health Physics Performing environmental assessments and independent verification is essential to building public trust and confidence in radiological cleanup. As the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies target contaminated sites across the country for decontamination and decommissioning, strict guidelines must be followed to ensure that property is effectively remediated before being released for public or private use. Through a combination of environmental assessments, health physics services, and radiochemistry analyses, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent environmental assessment and verification at DOE cleanup sites across the country. ORISE applies its

5

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system concept development and evaluation program: nonmicrowave health and ecological effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Concept Development and Evaluation Program is being carried out for a proposed Satellite Power System (SPS). For purposes of this evaluation, a preliminary reference system has been developed. SPS, as described in the reference system, would collect solar energy on satellites in geosychronous orbit in space. The energy would be converted to microwaves and beamed to an earth-receiving antenna (rectenna). One task in the environmental part of the program is the assessment of the nonmicrowave effects on health and the environment. These effects would result from all phases of SPS development and operation. This report covers the current knowledge regarding these effects, and is based on the reference system. The assessment is summarized as to scope, methodology, impacts of terrestrial development, launch and recovery of spacecraft, space activities (including health effects of the space environment, ionizing radiation, electromagnetic exposure, spacecraft charging and environmental interactions, occupational hazards, etc.) and construction and operation of rectenna (ground receiving station).

White, M.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Health impact assessment in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

Kang, Eunjeong, E-mail: marchej@kihasa.re.r [Division for Health Promotion Research, Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs, 268 Jinheung-ro, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngsoo, E-mail: leeys@kei.re.k [Centre for Environmental Impact Assessment Review, Korea Environment Institute, 290 Jinheung-ro, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyeong-gu (Korea, Republic of); Harris, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1981 (Australia); Koh, Kwangwook, E-mail: kwkoh@hanafos.co [Department of Preventive Medicine, Kosin University, 149-1 Dongsam-1-dong, Youngdo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keonyeop, E-mail: pmkky@knu.ac.k [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine and Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Public Health, KyungPook National University, 101 Dongin 2 , Jung-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 8. Health effects of oil shale development  

SciTech Connect

Information on the potential health effects of a developing oil shale industry can be derived from two major sources: (1) the historical experience in foreign countries that have had major industries; and (2) the health effects research that has been conducted in the US in recent years. The information presented here is divided into two major sections: one dealing with the experience in foreign countries and the second dealing with the more recent work associated with current oil shale development in the US. As a result of the study, several observations can be made: (1) most of the current and historical data from foreign countries relate to occupational hazards rather than to impacts on regional populations; (2) neither the historical evidence from other countries nor the results of current research have shown pulmonary neoplasia to be a major concern, however, certain types of exposure, particularly such mixed source exposures as dust/diesel or dust/organic-vapor have not been adequately studied and the lung cancer question is not closed; (3) the industry should be alert to the incidence of skin disease in the industrial setting, however, automated techniques, modern industrial hygiene practices and realistic personal hygiene should greatly reduce the hazards associated with skin contact; and (4) the entire question of regional water contamination and any resultant health hazard has not been adequately addressed. The industrial practice of hydrotreating the crude shale oil will diminish the carcinogenic hazard of the product, however, the quantitative reduction of biological activity is dependent on the degree of hydrotreatment. Both Soviet and American experimentalists have demonstrated a correlation betweed carcinogenicity/toxicity and retorting temperature; the higher temperatures producing the more carcinogenic or toxic products.

Rotariu, G.J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Late health effects uncertain assessment. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA late health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the expert panel on late health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Early health effects uncertainty assessment. Volume 2: Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA early health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the panel on early health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Speaker(s): Carol Rao Date: July 9, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mark Mendell Exposures to fungi have been linked with asthma, toxicoses, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and a range of non-specific symptoms. Definitive associations between indoor fungal exposure and health effects in population-based exposure-response studies, however, have not been well established. Issues in exposure assessment methods, both in collection and analysis, are major limitations. Classic methods for assessing airborne fungi rely upon collecting and analyzing whole fungal spores by culture. However, quantifying whole fungal spores may not fully describe fungal exposures, especially for purposes of investigating adverse respiratory

11

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

12

An assessment of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exploration of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations is made by assessing the results of a study of aviation's effects on United States air quality mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The ...

Sequeira, Christopher J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NETL: Health Effects - Source Contributions to PM Health Effects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Contributions to PM Health Effects: DOE Office of Fossil Energy Analysis DOE's Division of Planning and Environmental Analysis, within its Office of Fossil Energy, Office of...

14

ORISE: Capabilities in environmental assessments and health physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

assessments and health physics services for the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and other government agencies to thoroughly assess the...

15

ORISE: Resources for environmental assessments and health physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Environmental assessments and health physics publications, manuals, and standards development information ORISE technicians perform an indoor characterization survey For...

16

Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site, in Richland, Washington. The assessment, which was conducted from May 11 through May 22, 1992, included a selective-review of the ES&H management systems and programs of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices the DOE Richland Field Office, and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the Hanford Site ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H problems and requirements. They are not intended to be comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at the Hanford Site was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of the Hanford Site, which was conducted from May 21 through July 18, 1990. A summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management is included.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 12, 2009 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Name of Infonnatlon Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 136 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title Contact Information Phone, Email Anthony J. Kavran (208) 526-5826

18

Maintenance Effectiveness Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities want to know whether their equipment is being maintained in the most effective manner. Understanding the relationship between maintenance costs and benefits becomes even more important when established practices and schedules change. This report defines the problem of and presents a roadmap for the development of metrics for evaluating substation equipment maintenance effectiveness. A proposed suite of tools for assessing maintenance effectiveness TAME can provide a business analytics framework...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

19

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

An Assessment of Integrated Health Management Frameworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging NPPs presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging NPPs. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of an NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of an NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system development tools, deployable architectures, and peripheral tools.

Lybeck, Nancy; Coble, Jamie B.; Tawfik, Magdy; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Compounding conservatisms: EPA's health risk assessment methods  

SciTech Connect

Superfund conjures up images of hazardous waste sites, which EPA is spending billions of dollars to remediate. One of the law's most worrisome effects is that it drains enormous economic resources without returning commensurate benefits. In a Sept. 1, 1991, front page article in The New York Times, experts argued that most health dangers at Superfund sites could be eliminated for a fraction of the billions that will be spent cleaning up the 1,200 high-priority sites across the country. Even EPA has suggested that the Superfund program may receive disproportionate resources, compared with other public health programs, such as radon in houses, the diminishing ozone layer and occupational diseases. Public opinion polls over the last decade consistently have mirrored the public's vast fear of hazardous waste sites, a fear as great as that held for nuclear power plants. Fear notwithstanding, the high cost of chosen remedies at given sites may have less to do with public health goals than with the method EPA uses to translate them into acceptable contaminant concentrations in soil, groundwater and other environmental media.

Stackelberg, K. von; Burmaster, D.E. (Alceon Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

White Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to Evaluate Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans January to conduct HIAs in the Gothenburg Consensus Paper [8] (see http

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

23

Health Effects for Boron and Borates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron occurs in varying concentrations in coal fly ash and is typically found in fly ash leachates. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is in the process of performing a risk assessment to determine safe levels of boron for human ingestion. This report describes existing information on the health effects of boron and how that information is being used to calculate a reference dose (RfD) and acceptable concentration in drinking water.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

24

Environmental, health, and safety assessment of photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential enviornmental, health, and safety (E,H and S) concerns associated with all phases of the photovoltaic (PV) energy system life cycle are identified and assessed. E,H and S concerns affecting the achievement of National PV Program goals or the viability of specific PV technologies are emphasized. The report is limited to near-term manufacturing process alternatives for crystalline silicon PV materials, addresses flat-plate and concentrator collector designs, and reviews system deployment in grid-connected, roof-mounted, residential and ground-mounted central-station applications. The PV life-cycle phases examined include silicon refinement and manufacture of PV collectors, system deployment, and decommissioning. The primary E,H and S concerns that arise during collector fabrication are associated with occupational exposure to materials of undetermined toxicity or to materials that are known to be hazardous, but for which process control technology may be inadequate. Stricter exposure standards are anticipated for some materials and may indicate a need for further control technology development. Minimizing electric shock hazards is a significant concern during system construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning.

Rose, E.C.

1983-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Assessment of mercury health risks to adults from coal combustion  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is preparing, for the U.S. Congress, a report evaluating the need to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from electric utilities. This study, to be completed in 1995, will have important health and economic implications. In support of these efforts, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1000 MW{sub e} coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. The approach draws on the extant knowledge in each of the important steps in the calculation chain from emissions to health effects. Estimated results at key points in the chain were compared with actual measurements to help validate the modeled estimates. Two cases were considered: the baseline case (no local impacts), and the impact case (maximum local power-plant impact). The BNL study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Many implicit and explicit sources of uncertainty exist in this analysis. Those that appear to be most in need of improvement include data on doses and responses for potentially sensitive subpopulations (e.g., fetal exposures). Rather than considering hypothetical situations, it would also be preferable to assess the risks associated with actual coal-fired power plants and the nearby sensitive water bodies and susceptible subpopulations. Finally, annual total Hg emissions from coal burning and from other anthropogenic sources are still uncertain; this makes it difficult to estimate the effects of U.S. coal burning on global Hg concentration levels, especially over the long term.

Lipfert, F.W.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.; Saroff, L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Solid waste management and health effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report investigates possible health effects due to improper disposal of waste and the awareness within a community. The aim was also to investigate… (more)

Selin, Emma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Differing forms, differing purposes: A typology of health impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is currently considerable diversity in health impact assessment (HIA) practice internationally. Historically this diversity has been described as simple dichotomies, for example the differences between HIAs of projects and policies. However these distinctions have failed to adequately describe the differences that can be observed between different forms of HIAs. This paper describes the three historical and disciplinary fields from which HIA has emerged - environmental health, a social view of health, and health equity. It also puts forward a typology of four different forms of HIA that can be observed in current HIA practice: mandated, decision-support, advocacy, and community-led HIAs. This paper argues that these different forms of HIA serve different purposes and are not necessarily in competition; rather they allow HIA to be responsive to a range of population health concerns and purposes.

Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: b.harris-roxas@unsw.edu.au; Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.a

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

29

Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

ORISE: How to work with ORISE's environmental assessments and health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to work with us How to work with us The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides environmental assessments and health physics services to a variety of government customers. From characterization surveys and independent verification to radiochemical analyses and dose modeling, ORISE can help your environmental cleanup project meet regulatory standards and release criteria. If you are interested in any of ORISE's environmental assessments and health physics capabilities, contact: Sarah Roberts, CHP Director, Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Work: 865.241.8893 IVsurveys@orau.org Contracting with ORISE U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) purchasers may obtain services through ORISE by completing a field work proposal. Please contact the Procurement

31

Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

Health Effects of Inhalation of Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential human health effects of inhaled coal combustion products (CCPs), which consist of fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products. The focus is on as-managed CCPs, with evaluation of the potential effects of exposure through fugitive emissions from storage facilities. Because the literature pertaining to bottom ash, boiler slag, and FGD solids is scarce, this review draws almost entirely from studies of fly ash as a surrogate particulate ma...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Health Effects Review of Asbestos Substitutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concern about the possible health effects of asbestos on the general population and the workplace has stimulated interest in the manufacture and use of other natural and man-made fibers. This report summarizes information available through July 21, 1993, on the health effects--carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic--of exposure to these fibers, including glass fibers, rockwool and slagwool, refractory ceramic fibers, calcium silicate, and perlite.

1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

34

Health Effects Associated with Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hexafluoride (UF6) UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Health Effects Associated with Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium...

35

Health effects of coal technologies: research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this 1977 Environmental Message, President Carter directed the establishment of a joint program to identify the health and environmental problems associated with advanced energy technologies and to review the adequacy of present research programs. In response to the President's directive, representatives of three agencies formed the Federal Interagency Committee on the Health and Environmental Effects of Energy Technologies. This report was prepared by the Health Effects Working Group on Coal Technologies for the Committee. In this report, the major health-related problems associated with conventional coal mining, storage, transportation, and combustion, and with chemical coal cleaning, in situ gasification, fluidized bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamic combustion, cocombustion of coal-oil mixtures, and cocombustion of coal with municipal solid waste are identified. The report also contains recommended research required to address the identified problems.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Health Effects of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents results of a project to identify and quantify toxic effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) in living organisms. The overall goal is to develop concentration and time-dependent profiles of CO2 toxicity in a variety of organisms. This project phase was designed to develop exposure-effect profiles for humans and nonhuman mammals and to identify the availability of information for other species.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites  

SciTech Connect

Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A system dynamics model for the screening-level long-term assessment of human health risks at contaminated sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the design of sustainable and cost-effective management strategies for contaminated sites, decision makers need appropriate tools, i.e. environmental decision support systems to assist them in the planning, assessment, selection and optimisation ... Keywords: Contaminated sites, EDSS, Human health risk assessment, Monitored natural attenuation, Risk-based land management, System dynamics, Uncertainty, Vensim

Ursula S. Mcknight; Michael Finkel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

CO2 Health Effects in Wildlife Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CCS) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in wildlife animal species. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans, laboratory animals, and domesticated animals...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

Environment, Safety and Health Self-Assessment Report Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program was established to ensure that Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is implemented institutionally and by all divisions. The ES&H Self-Assessment Program, managed by the Office of Contractor Assurance (OCA), provides for an internal evaluation of all ES&H programs and systems at LBNL. The primary objective of the program is to ensure that work is conducted safely and with minimal negative impact to workers, the public, and the environment. Self-assessment follows the five core functions and guiding principles of ISM. Self-assessment is the mechanism used to promote the continuous improvement of the Laboratory's ES&H programs. The process is described in the Environment, Safety, and Health Assurance Plan (PUB-5344) and is composed of three types of self-assessments: Division ES&H Self-Assessment, ES&H Technical Assurance Program Assessment, and Division ES&H Peer Review. The Division ES&H Self-Assessment Manual (PUB-3105) provides the framework by which divisions conduct formal ES&H self-assessments to systematically identify program deficiencies. Issue-specific assessments are designed and implemented by the divisions and focus on areas of interest to division management. They may be conducted by teams and involve advance planning to ensure that appropriate resources are available. The ES&H Technical Assurance Program Manual (PUB-913E) provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs and processes. The ES&H Technical Assurance Program Assessment is designed to evaluate whether ES&H programs and processes are compliant with guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented by LBNL divisions. The Division ES&H Peer Review Manual provides the framework by which division ISM systems are evaluated and improved. Peer Reviews are conducted by teams under the direction of senior division management and focus on higher-level management issues. Peer Review teams are selected on the basis of members knowledge and experience in the issues of interest to the division director. LBNL periodically requests in-depth independent assessments of selected ES&H programs. Such assessments augment LBNL's established assessment processes and provide an objective view of ES&H program effectiveness. Institutional Findings, Observations, and Noteworthy Practices identified during independent assessments are specifically intended to help LBNL identify opportunities for program improvement. This report includes the results of the Division ES&H Self-Assessment, ES&H Technical Assurance Program Assessment, and Division ES&H Peer Review, respectively.

Robinson, Scott

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS), near Chicago, Illinois, conducted from October 25 through November 9, 1993. During the Progress Assessment, activities included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and programs with principal focus on the DOE Office of Energy Research (ER); CH, which includes the Argonne Area Office; the University of Chicago; and the contractor`s organization responsible for operation of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of DOE`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the AIS ES&H Progress Assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy, senior DOE managers, and contractor management with concise independent information on the following: change in culture and attitude related to ES&H activities; progress and effectiveness of the ES&H corrective actions resulting from the previous Tiger Team Assessment; adequacy and effectiveness of the ES&H self-assessment process of the DOE line organizations, the site management, and the operating contractor; and effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES&H problems and new ES&H initiatives.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU' s Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENT SAFETY & HEALTH MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (ISMS) CORE FUNCTION FOR FEEDBACK & CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management assessment is required of US Department of Energy contractors by 10 CFR 830.122 and DOE Order 414.1. The management assessment process is a rigorous, preplanned, forward-looking review. It is required to be performed by owners of the processes that are being assessed. Written from the perspective of the Assessment Program Director and an Assessment Specialist, this paper describes the evolution of the process used by CH2MHILL to implement its management assessment program over the past two years including: roles, responsibilities, and details about our program improvement project designed to produce a clear picture of management processes and to identify opportunities for improvement. The management assessment program is essential to successful implementation, maintenance, and improvement of the CH2MHILL Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System (ISMS). The management assessment program implements, in part, ISMS Core Function No. 5. ''Feedback and Continuous Improvement''. Organizations use the management assessment process to assess ISMS implementation and effectiveness. Management assessments evaluate the total picture of how well management processes are meeting organizational objectives and the customer's requirements and expectations. The emphasis is on management issues affecting performance, systems, and processes such as: strategic planning, qualification, training, staffing, organizational interfaces, communication, cost and schedule control and mission objectives. Management assessments should identify any weaknesses in the management aspects of performance and make process improvements. All managers from first line supervisors to the president and general manager are involved in the management assessment process. More senior managers, in conducting their assessment, will use data from lower levels of management. This approach will facilitate the objective of having managers closer to the work under review focusing on more compliance- and process-oriented aspects of work performance, while senior managers will concentrate on more strategic issues, having more access to information generated from assessments by their subordinates.

VON WEBER, M.

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

47

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound PAHs and binary mixtures of PAHs in order to bridge the gap between component assessment and mixture assessment. Seven pure parent compound PAHs and four binary mixtures of PAHs were examined in the Salmonella/Microsome Mutagenicity Assay, a Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) assay and the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assay (EROD). These assays were chosen for their ability to measure specific toxic endpoints related to the carcinogenic process (i.e. initiation, promotion, progression). Data from these assays was used in further studies to build Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) to estimate toxic endpoints and to test the additive assumption in PAH mixtures. These QSAR models will allow for the development of bioassay based potential potencies (PPB) or toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) that are derived not only from bioassay data, but also from structure, activity, and physical/chemical properties. These models can be extended to any environmental media to evaluate risk to human health from exposures to PAHs.

Bruce, Erica Dawn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

An Assessment of Integrated Health Management (IHM) Frameworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging nuclear power plants presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to the better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging nuclear power plants. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of a NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of a NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system development tools, deployable architectures, and peripheral tools.

N. Lybeck; M. Tawfik; L. Bond; J. Coble

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

Wike, L

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Analysis of Assembly Bill 652: Child Health Assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health treatment; prescription drugs; rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices; laboratory

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Environment, Safety, and Health Self-Assessment Report, Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program ensures that Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is implemented institutionally and by all divisions. The Self-Assessment Program, managed by the Office of Contract Assurance (OCA), provides for an internal evaluation of all ES&H programs and systems at LBNL. The functions of the program are to ensure that work is conducted safely, and with minimal negative impact to workers, the public, and the environment. The Self-Assessment Program is also the mechanism used to institute continuous improvements to the Laboratory's ES&H programs. The program is described in LBNL/PUB 5344, Environment, Safety, and Health Self-Assessment Program and is composed of four distinct assessments: the Division Self-Assessment, the Management of Environment, Safety, and Health (MESH) review, ES&H Technical Assurance, and the Appendix B Self-Assessment. The Division Self-Assessment uses the five core functions and seven guiding principles of ISM as the basis of evaluation. Metrics are created to measure performance in fulfilling ISM core functions and guiding principles, as well as promoting compliance with applicable regulations. The five core functions of ISM are as follows: (1) Define the Scope of Work; (2) Identify and Analyze Hazards; (3) Control the Hazards; (4) Perform the Work; and (5) Feedback and Improvement. The seven guiding principles of ISM are as follows: (1) Line Management Responsibility for ES&H; (2) Clear Roles and Responsibilities; (3) Competence Commensurate with Responsibilities; (4) Balanced Priorities; (5) Identification of ES&H Standards and Requirements; (6) Hazard Controls Tailored to the Work Performed; and (7) Operations Authorization. Performance indicators are developed by consensus with OCA, representatives from each division, and Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S) Division program managers. Line management of each division performs the Division Self-Assessment annually. The primary focus of the review is workplace safety. The MESH review is an evaluation of division management of ES&H in its research and operations, focusing on implementation and effectiveness of the division's ISM plan. It is a peer review performed by members of the LBNL Safety Review Committee (SRC), with staff support from OCA. Each division receives a MESH review every two to four years, depending on the results of the previous review. The ES&H Technical Assurance Program (TAP) provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs and processes. The intent of ES&H Technical Assurance assessments is to provide assurance that ES&H programs and processes comply with their guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented by LBNL divisions. The Appendix B Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) requires that LBNL sustain and enhance the effectiveness of integrated safety, health, and environmental protection through a strong and well-deployed system. Information required for Appendix B is provided by EH&S Division functional managers. The annual Appendix B report is submitted at the close of the fiscal year. This assessment is the Department of Energy's (DOE) primary mechanism for evaluating LBNL's contract performance in ISM.

Chernowski, John

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

Estimated long-term health effects  

SciTech Connect

Apart from the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed as children, there is no evidence to date of a major public health impact of the radiation exposure from the Chernobyl accident in the three most affected countries. Although some increases in the frequency of cancer in exposed populations have been reported, these results are difficult to interpret, mainly because of differences in the intensity and method of follow-up between exposed populations and the general population to which they are compared. If the experience of atomic bomb survivors and of other exposed populations is applicable, the major radiological impact of the accident will be cancer and the total lifetime numbers of excess cancers will be greatest among the liquidators and among the residents of contaminated territories, of the order of 2,000 to 2,500. These increases would be difficult to detect epidemiologically against an expected background number of 41,500 and 433,000 respectively (size of the exposed populations: 200,000 and 3,700,000, respectively). It is noted, however, that the exposures received by populations exposed as a result of Chernobyl are different (in type and pattern) from those of atomic bomb survivors. Predictions derived from these populations are therefore uncertain. Indeed, the extent of the increase in thyroid cancer incidence in persons exposed as children was not foreseen. In addition, only ten years have passed since the accident. It is essential therefore that monitoring of the health of the population be continued in order to assess the public health impact of the accident, even if, apart from leukemia among liquidators, little detectable increase of cancers due to radiation from the Chernobyl accident is expected.

Cardis, F. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Okeanov, A.E. [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk (Belarus); Likthariev, I.; Prisyazhniuk [All-Union Scientific Centre of Radiation Medicine, Kiev (Ukraine); Anspaugh, L.R. [California Univ., Livermore, CA (United States) Lawrence Livermore Lab.; Mabuchi, K. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Ivanov, V.K. [MRRC of RAMS, Obninsk (Russia)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nanomaterials" with partners from Evonik, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, BASF, DuPont and General Electric. ...

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Integration of fuzzy AHP and FPP with TOPSIS methodology for aeroengine health assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper models the aeroengine health assessment problem as a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) problem and proposes a three-step evaluation model, which combines the techniques of fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (fuzzy AHP), fuzzy preference ... Keywords: Aeroengine health assessment, FPP, Fuzzy AHP, MCDM, TOPSIS

Jianrong Wang; Kai Fan; Wanshan Wang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Health impact assessment of air pollution using a dynamic exposure profile: Implications for exposure and health impact estimates  

SciTech Connect

In both ambient air pollution epidemiology and health impact assessment an accurate assessment of the population exposure is crucial. Although considerable advances have been made in assessing human exposure outdoors, the assessments often do not consider the impact of individual travel behavior on such exposures. Population-based exposures to NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} using only home addresses were compared with models that integrate all time-activity patterns-including time in commute-for Flanders and Brussels. The exposure estimates were used to estimate the air pollution impact on years of life lost due to respiratory mortality. Health impact of NO{sub 2} using an exposure that integrates time-activity information was on average 1.2% higher than when assuming that people are always at their home address. For ozone the overall estimated health impact was 0.8% lower. Local differences could be much larger, with estimates that differ up to 12% from the exposure using residential addresses only. Depending on age and gender, deviations from the population average were seen. Our results showed modest differences on a regional level. At the local level, however, time-activity patterns indicated larger differences in exposure and health impact estimates, mainly for people living in more rural areas. These results suggest that for local analyses the dynamic approach can contribute to an improved assessment of the health impact of various types of pollution and to the understanding of exposure differences between population groups. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure to ambient air pollution was assessed integrating population mobility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This dynamic exposure was integrated into a health impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differences between the dynamic and residential exposure were quantified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modest differences in health impact were found at a regional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At municipal level larger differences were found, influenced by gender and age.

Dhondt, Stijn, E-mail: stijn.dhondt@vub.ac.be [Department of Medical Sociology and Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090, Brussels (Belgium); Beckx, Carolien, E-mail: Carolien.Beckx@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Degraeuwe, Bart, E-mail: Bart.Degraeuwe@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Lefebvre, Wouter, E-mail: Wouter.Lefebvre@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Kochan, Bruno, E-mail: Bruno.Kochan@uhasselt.be [Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Bellemans, Tom, E-mail: Tom.Bellemans@uhasselt.be [Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Int Panis, Luc, E-mail: Luc.intpanis@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Macharis, Cathy, E-mail: cjmachar@vub.ac.be [Department MOSI-Transport and Logistics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050, Brussels (Belgium); Putman, Koen, E-mail: kputman@vub.ac.be [Department of Medical Sociology and Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090, Brussels (Belgium); Interuniversity Centre for Health Economics Research (I-CHER), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Assessing health impacts in complex eco-epidemiological settings in the humid tropics: The centrality of scoping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural resources development projects are - and have been for more than 150 years - located in remote rural areas in developing countries, where local level data on community health is notoriously scarce. Health impact assessment (HIA) aims at identifying potential negative health consequences of such projects and providing the initial evidence-base for prevention and mitigation of diseases, injuries and risk factors, as well as promotion of positive effects. An important, but under-systematised early phase of the HIA process is scoping. It aims at organising diverse, often fragmentary, evidence and identifying potential project-related health impacts and underlying data gaps. It is also a key element in defining the terms of reference for the entire assessment. We present novel methodological features for the scoping process, emphasising the evaluation of quality of evidence, and illustrate its use in a contemporary HIA of the Simandou iron ore project in the Republic of Guinea. Assessment of data quality is integrated with specific content information via an analytical framework for the systematic identification of health outcomes and determinants of major concern. A subsequent gap analysis is utilised to assess the need for further baseline data collection and to facilitate the specification of a set of potential key performance indicators and strategies to inform the required evidence-base. We argue that scoping also plays a central role in the design of surveillance systems for longitudinal monitoring of health, equity and wellbeing following project implementation.

Winkler, Mirko S., E-mail: mirko.winkler@unibas.c [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Divall, Mark J., E-mail: mdivall@newfields.co [NewFields, LLC, Pretoria 0062 (South Africa); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.co [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Balge, Marci Z., E-mail: mbalge@newfields.co [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.ed [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Utzinger, Juerg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.c [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program (CDEP). [Microwave and non-microwave health and ecological assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the satellite power system (SPS), satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit would collect solar energy in space, convert it to microwaves, and transmit the microwaves to receiving antennas (rectennas) on earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted to electricity. This SPS environmental assessment considers the microwave and nonmicrowave effects on the terrestrial environment and human health, atmospheric effects, and effects on electromagnetic systems. No environmental problem has been identified that would preclude the continued study of SPS technology. To increase the certainty of the assessment, some research has been initiated and long-term research is being planned.

Valentino, A.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas. Final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the construction and operation of an Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Analytical Laboratory and subsequent demolition of the existing Analytical Chemistry Laboratory building at Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality requirements contained in 40 CFR 1500--1508.9, the Environmental Assessment examined the environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analysis of impacts in the EA, conducting the proposed action, construction of an analytical laboratory and demolition of the existing facility, would not significantly effect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessing health impacts in complex eco-epidemiological settings in the humid tropics: Modular baseline health surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantitative assessment of health impacts has been identified as a crucial feature for realising the full potential of health impact assessment (HIA). In settings where demographic and health data are notoriously scarce, but there is a broad range of ascertainable ecological, environmental, epidemiological and socioeconomic information, a diverse toolkit of data collection strategies becomes relevant for the mainly small-area impacts of interest. We present a modular, cross-sectional baseline health survey study design, which has been developed for HIA of industrial development projects in the humid tropics. The modular nature of our toolkit allows our methodology to be readily adapted to the prevailing eco-epidemiological characteristics of a given project setting. Central to our design is a broad set of key performance indicators, covering a multiplicity of health outcomes and determinants at different levels and scales. We present experience and key findings from our modular baseline health survey methodology employed in 14 selected sentinel sites within an iron ore mining project in the Republic of Guinea. We argue that our methodology is a generic example of rapid evidence assembly in difficult-to-reach localities, where improvement of the predictive validity of the assessment and establishment of a benchmark for longitudinal monitoring of project impacts and mitigation efforts is needed.

Winkler, Mirko S., E-mail: mirko.winkler@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Divall, Mark J., E-mail: mdivall@shapeconsulting.org [SHAPE Consulting Ltd., Pretoria 0062 (South Africa); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.com [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Schmidlin, Sandro, E-mail: sandro.schmidlin@gmail.com [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Magassouba, Mohamed L., E-mail: laminemagass@yahoo.fr [Clinique Ambroise Pare, P.O. Box, 1042 Conakry (Guinea); Knoblauch, Astrid M., E-mail: astrid.knoblauch@me.com [SHAPE Consulting Ltd., Pretoria 0062 (South Africa); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.edu [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Utzinger, Juerg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

ORISE: Contacts for Environmental Assessments and Health Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bruce Baker Director, NOAAARLATDD Work: 865.576.1233 Bruce.Baker@noaa.gov Location: 456 South Illinois Ave. P.O. Box 2456 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-2456 Health Physics Training...

63

Health Monitoring System Technology Assessments---Cost Benefits Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of sensor-based structural health monitoring is very diverse and encompasses a wide range of activities including initiatives and innovations involving the development of advanced sensor, signal processing, data analysis, and actuation and ...

Kent Renee M.; Murphy Dennis A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

ORAU: Environmental Assessments and Health Physics fact sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

agencies target contaminated sites across the country for decontamination and decommissioning, independent environmental assessment is essential to ensure the safety of those...

65

Health and environmental effects document on geothermal energy: 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several of the important health and environmental risks associated with a reference geothermal industry that produces 21,000 MW/sub e/ for 30 y (equivalent to 20 x 10/sup 18/ J) are assessed. The analyses of health effects focus on the risks associated with exposure to hydrogen sulfide, particulate sulfate, benzene, mercury, and radon in air and arsenic in water. Results indicate that emissions of hydrogen sulfide are likely to cause odor-related problems in geothermal resources areas, assuming that no pollution controls are employed. For individuals living within an 80 km radius of the geothermal resources, chronic exposure to particulate sulfate could result in between 0 to 95 premature deaths per 10/sup 18/ J of electricity generated. The mean population risk of leukemia from the inhalation of benzene was calculated to be 3 x 10/sup -2/ cases per 10/sup 18/ J. Exposure to elemental mercury in the atmosphere could produce between 0 and 8.2 cases of tremors per 10/sup 18/ J of electricity. Inhalation of radon and its short-lived daughters poses a mean population risk of 4.2 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancers per 10/sup 18/ J. Analysis of skin cancer risk from the ingestion of surface water contaminated with geothermally derived arsenic suggests that a dose-response model is inconsistent with data showing that arsenic is an essential element and that excessive body burdens do not appear even when arsenic reaches 100 ..mu..g/liter in drinking water. Estimates of occupational health effects were based on rates of accidental deaths and occupational diseases in surrogate industries. According to calculations, there would be 14 accidental deaths per 10/sup 18/ J of electricity and 340 cases of occupational diseases per 10/sup 18/ J. The analysis of the effects of noncondensing gases on vegetation showed that ambient concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide are more likely to enhance rather than inhibit the growth of plants.

Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.; O'Banion, K.D.

1981-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

66

Health impact assessment in Australia: A review and directions for progress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides an overview of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) within Australia. We discuss the development and current position of HIA and offer some directions for HIA's progression. Since the early 1990s HIA activity in Australia has increased and diversified in application and practice. This article first highlights the emergent streams of HIA practice across environmental, policy and health equity foci, and how these have developed within Australia. The article then provides summaries of current practice provided by each Australian state and territory. We then offer some insight into current issues that require further progression or resolution if HIA is to progress effectively in Australia. This progress rests both on developing broad system support for HIA across government, led by the health sector, and developing system capacity to undertake, commission or review HIAs. We argue that a unified and clear HIA approach is required as a prerequisite to gaining the understanding and support for HIA in the public and private sectors and the wider community.

Harris, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Research Fellow, Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, Part of the Centres for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Spickett, Jeff, E-mail: J.Spickett@curtin.edu.a [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987 Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/ flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less than Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized.

Roberts, J.J.; Wood, R.A.; Haszeldine, R.S. [Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage, School of GeoSciences, Grant Institute, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Scotland (United Kingdom)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

Integrating health impact assessment into the triple bottom line concept  

SciTech Connect

This theoretical study explores the links between the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) concept and the principles of HIA and considers the potential role of HIA to provide a mechanism for integrating health concerns within a broader agenda of government and business. TBL is a framework linked to the broader sustainability agenda that underpins and reviews environmental, economic and social performance of organizations. In its simplest form, TBL acts as a tool for reporting to stakeholders/shareholders organizational performance and the nature of the impacts on the community. The links to HIA are clear as both seek to determine the impact (potential and actual) on the health and well-being of the population. The study found that TBL can operate at four levels within organizations ranging from reporting through to full integration with the organization's goals and practices. Health is narrowly defined and there are tensions about how to undertake the social accountability functions. The study shows the potential role for HIA within the broader policy and accountability agenda. As health is one of the main outcomes of an organization's activities it needs to be taken into account at all levels of activity.

Mahoney, Mary; Potter, Jenny-Lynn

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Participatory health impact assessment for the development of local government regulation on hazard control  

SciTech Connect

The Thai Public Health Act 1992 required the Thai local governments to issue respective regulations to take control of any possible health-hazard related activities, both from commercial and noncommercial sources. Since 1999, there has been centrally decentralized of power to a new form of local government establishment, namely Sub-district Administrative Organization (SAO). The SAO is asmall-scale local governing structure while its legitimate function is for community services, including control of health impact related activities. Most elected SAO administrators and officers are new and less experience with any of public health code of practice, particularly on health-hazard control. This action research attempted to introduce and apply a participatory health impact assessment (HIA) tool for the development of SAO health-hazard control regulation. The study sites were at Ban Meang and Kok See SAOs, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand, while all intervention activities conducted during May 2005-April 2006. A set of cooperative activities between researchers and community representatives were planned and organized by; surveying and identifying place and service base locally causing local environmental health problems, organizing community participatory workshops for drafting and proposing the health-hazard control regulation, and appropriate practices for health-hazard controlling measures. This action research eventually could successfully enable the SAO administrators and officers understanding of local environmental-related health problem, as well as development of imposed health-hazard control regulation for local community.

Inmuong, Uraiwan, E-mail: uraiwan@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rithmak, Panee, E-mail: panrit@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Srisookwatana, Soomol, E-mail: soomol.s@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Traithin, Nathathai, E-mail: nathathai.t@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Maisuporn, Pornpun, E-mail: pornpun.m@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Human Health Risk Assessment Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs) .......................... F-3 * Contaminant Concentrations-Near-Tern1 Ground Water Concentrations .................... F-6 Toxicity Factors ...................................... .. ............................................................ F-8 * Lower Montezuma'creek Exposure Scenario-Reasonable Maximurn Exposure ...... F-10

71

Health and Environmental Effects Document on Geothermal Energy -- 1982 update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We assess several of the important health and environmental risks associated with a reference geothermal industry that produces 21,000 MWe for 30 y (equivalent to 20 x 10{sup 18} J). The analyses of health effects focus on the risks associated with exposure to hydrogen sulfide, particulate sulfate, benzene, mercury, and radon in air and arsenic in food. Results indicate that emissions of hydrogen sulfide are likely to cause odor-related problems in 29 of 51 geothermal resources areas, assuming that no pollution controls are employed. Our best estimates and ranges of uncertainty for the health risks of chronic population exposures to atmospheric pollutants are as follows (risks expressed per 10{sup 18} J of electricity): particulate sulfate, 44 premature deaths (uncertainty range of 0 to 360); benzene, 0.15 leukemias (range of 0 to 0.51); elemental mercury, 14 muscle tremors (range of 0 to 39); and radon, 0.68 lung cancers (range of 0 to 1.8). The ultimate risk of fatal skin cancers as the result of the transfer of waste arsenic to the general population over geologic time ({approx} 100,000 y) was calculated as 41 per 10{sup 18} J. We based our estimates of occupational health effects on rates of accidental deaths together with data on occupational diseases and injuries in surrogate industries. According to our best estimates, there would be 8 accidental deaths per 10{sup 18} J of electricity, 300 cases of occupational diseases per 10{sup 18} J, and 3400 occupational injuries per 10{sup 18}J. The analysis of the effects of noncondensing gases on vegetation showed that ambient concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide are more likely to enhance rather than inhibit the growth of plants. We also studied the possible consequences of accidental releases of geothermal fluids and concluded that probably less than 5 ha of land would be affected by such releases during the production of 20 x 10{sup 18} J of electricity. Boron emitted from cooling towers in the Imperial Valley was identified as a potential source of crop damage. Our analyses, however, showed that such damage is unlikely. Finally, we examined the nonpollutant effects of land subsidence and induced seismicity. Land subsidence is possible around some facilities, but surface-related damage is not expected to be great. Induced seismic events that have occurred to date at geothermal resource areas have been nondestructive. It is not possible to predict accurately the risk of potentially destructive events, and more research is needed in this area.

Layton, David W.; Daniels, Jeffrey I.; Anspaugh, Lynn R.; O'Banion, Kerry D.

1983-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reclamation of automotive batteries: Assessment of health impacts and recycling technology. Task 2: Assessment of health impacts; Final report  

SciTech Connect

The task 2 report compares the relative health and hazard impacts of EV battery recycling technologies. Task 2 compared the relative impact of recycling EV batteries in terms of cancer, toxicity, and ecotoxicological potential, as well as leachability, flammability, and corrosivity/reactivity hazards. Impacts were evaluated for lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium sulfur, sodium-nickel chloride, lithium-iron sulfide and disulfide, lithium-polymer, lithium-ion, and zinc-air batteries. Health/hazard impacts were evaluated for recycling methods including smelting, electrowinning, and other appropriate techniques that apply to different battery technologies.

Unnasch, S.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

An assessment of mercury emissions and health risks from a coal-fired power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) mandated that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluate the need to regulate mercury emissions from electric utilities. In support of this forthcoming regulatory analysis the U.S. DOE, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the US MeHg is the predominant way of exposure to mercury originated in the atmosphere. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1,000 MW coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. This study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Even at these more elevated exposure levels, the attributable incidence in mild neurological symptoms was estimated to be quite small, especially when compared with the estimated background incidence in the population. The current paper summarizes the basic conclusions of this assessment and highlights issues dealing with emissions control and environmental transport.

Fthenakis, V.M.; Lipfert, F.; Moskowitz, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Analytical Sciences Div.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Radiological/Health physics program assessement at Rocky Flats, the process  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Office, Safety and Health Group, Health Physics Team (HPT) is responsible for oversight of the Radiation Protection and Health Physics Program (RPHP) of the Integrating Management Contractor (IMC), Kaiser-Hill (K-H) operations at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). As of 1 January 1996 the Rocky Flats Plant employed 300 DOE and 4,300 contractor personnel (K-H and their subcontractors). WSI is a subcontractor and provides plant security. To accomplish the RPHP program oversight HPT personnel developed a systematic methodology for performing a functional RPHP Assessment. The initial process included development of a flow diagram identifying all programmatic elements and assessment criteria documents. Formulation of plans for conducting interviews and performance of assessments constituted the second major effort. The generation of assessment reports was the final step, based on the results of this process. This assessment will be a 6 person-year effort, over the next three years. This process is the most comprehensive assessment of any Radiation Protection and Health Physics (RPHP) Program ever performed at Rocky Flats. The results of these efforts will establish a baseline for future RPHP Program assessments at RFETS. This methodology has been well-received by contractor personnel and creates no Privacy Act violations or other misunderstandings.

Psomas, P.O. [Department of Energy, Golden, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

NETL: Health Effects - Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Feasibility Assessment of a Retrospective Epidemiologic Study of Coal-Fired Power Plant Emissions in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Region The overall objective of this...

76

On Assessing the Robustness of Structural Health Monitoring Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) continues to gain popularity, both as an area of research and as a tool for use in industrial applications, the number of technologies associated with SHM will also continue to grow. As a result, the engineer tasked with developing a SHM system is faced with myriad hardware and software technologies from which to choose, often adopting an ad hoc qualitative approach based on physical intuition or past experience to making such decisions. This paper offers a framework that aims to provide the engineer with a quantitative approach for choosing from among a suite of candidate SHM technologies. The framework is outlined for the general case, where a supervised learning approach to SHM is adopted, and the presentation will focus on applying the framework to two commonly encountered problems: (1) selection of damage-sensitive features and (2) selection of a damage classifier. The data employed for these problems will be drawn from a study that examined the feasibility of applying SHM to the RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response observatory network.

Stull, Christopher J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

77

Shift Work and Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to inform the electric power industry of current scientific knowledge on worker health and safety risks associated with shift work in order to support future research planning. Shift work has been found to be associated with increased cancer risks8212primarily of breast cancer and (to a lesser extent) prostate and colon cancer. Risk of occupational injuries increases with several common characteristics of shift work8212particularly rotating shifts and longer shift lengths....

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation: Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Two-parameter Weibull hazard functions are recommended for estimating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid and ''other''. The category, ''other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also provided. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Linear and linear-quadratic models are also recommended for assessing genetic risks. Five classes of genetic disease -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocation and multifactorial diseases --are considered. In addition, the impact of radiation-induced genetic damage on the incidence of peri-implantation embryo losses is discussed. The uncertainty in modeling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of all model parameters. Data are provided which should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk. 22 refs., 14 figs., 51 tabs.

Abrahamson, S.; Bender, M.; Book, S.; Buncher, C.; Denniston, C.; Gilbert, E.; Hahn, F.; Hertzberg, V.; Maxon, H.; Scott, B.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

US Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The assessment, which was conducted from July 20 through August 4, 1992, included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and progress of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices; the DOE Nevada Field Office (NV); and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. This report presents a summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Human Health Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the human health risk assessment of chemicals encountered in vegetation management on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs).

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Health Consultation Assessment of Soil Exposures in Communities Adjacent to the Walter Coke, Inc. Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A health consultation is a verbal or written response from ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partners to a specific request for information about health risks related to a specific site, a chemical release, or the presence of hazardous material. In order to prevent or mitigate exposures, a consultation may lead to specific actions, such as restricting use of or replacing water supplies; intensifying environmental sampling; restricting site access; or removing the contaminated material. In addition, consultations may recommend additional public health actions, such as conducting health surveillance activities to evaluate exposure or trends in adverse health outcomes; conducting biological indicators of exposure studies to assess exposure; and providing health education for health care providers and community members. This concludes the health consultation process for this site, unless additional information is obtained by ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partner which, in the Agency’s opinion, indicates a need to revise or append the conclusions previously issued. You May Contact ATSDR Toll Free at

Birmingham Al

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

FACT SHEET: Fusion Center Assessment emergency response, public health and private sector security personnel to understand local intelligence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FACT SHEET: Fusion Center Assessment emergency response, public health and private sector security officials to better protect their communities. Fusion centers provide interdisciplinary expertise on Fusion Center Assessment: A mature, fully functioning national network of fusion centers is critical

83

Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas, Cheltenham, United Kingdom), Natural Ana- logues for the Geological Storage of CO2, IEA for assessing the health risks of CO2 leakage from on- shore storage reservoirs. Italian gas seeps have already Italian Gas Seeps. Natural CO2 degassing is most abundant in wes- tern Italy (18­20) (Fig. 1). Here

Haszeldine, Stuart

84

Quantifying the health and economic impacts of mercury : an integrated assessment approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a toxic pollutant that endangers human and ecosystem health. Especially potent in the form of methyl mercury, exposure is known to lead to adverse neurological effects, and, a growing body of evidence suggests, ...

Giang, Amanda (Amanda Chi Wen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Biosafety Manual: 6.0 Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6.0 Assessment and Improvement check mark 6.0 Assessment and Improvement check mark The fifth core function of Integrated Safety Management (ISM) requires that feedback and continuous improvement are incorporated into the work cycle for activities that involve work with biological materials or exposure to biological materials. This function is accomplished when supervisors, work leads, principal investigators (PIs), line management, Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S), and others assess and continuously improve the biosafety of work conducted at LBNL. See PUB-3000, Chapter 26, Section 26.9, for a description of how LBNL assessment and improvement processes are incorporated into work with biological materials and the Biosafety Program. The bulleted paragraphs below provide an overview of assessment and improvement processes and

86

Establishing Economic Effectiveness through Software Health-Management  

SciTech Connect

More than two thirds of the annual software budget of large-scale organizations dealing with complex software systems is spent on the perfection, correction, and operation of existing software systems. A significant part of these running costs could be saved if the software systems that need to be constantly extende, maintained and operated were in a better technical condition. This paper proposes Software Health-Checks as a method to assess the technical condition of existing software systems and to deduce measures for improving the health of software in a structured manner. Since 2006 numerous commercial software systems with a total of 30 MLOC, implemented in various technologies, were already checked with this method. The actions suggested as a result of these Software 'Health-Checks', repeatedly yielded dramatic performance improvements, risk reductions and cost savings between 30% and 80%.

Pizka, M; Panas, T

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

88

Catalog of Assessment Methods for Evaluating the Effects of Power Plant Operations on Aquatic Communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the current state of knowledge on methods for assessing the effects of stressors on the health, function, integrity and quality of aquatic populations and ecosystems. This information will be valuable to industry, resource agencies, non-governmental environmental organizations, and universities involved in research, management and protection of aquatic resources.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Health and Ecological Effects of Selenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selenium is a naturally occurring element that can be found at background levels in food, soil, and water. It is also present in coal combustion products (CCPs) and CCP leachate. While selenium is essential to human and animal life, it has the potential to cause toxicity to humans and other organisms above a certain threshold level. This report summarizes the adverse human and ecological effects that can potentially occur from overexposure to selenium and the levels at which the effects can occur, with p...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation  

SciTech Connect

The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes. (PCS)

Fabrikant, J.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

School Finance Reform: Assessing General Equilibrium Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1994 the state of Michigan implemented one of the most comprehensive school finance reforms undertaken to date in any of the states. Understanding the effects of the reform is thus of value in informing other potential reform initiatives. In addition, the reform and associated changes in the economic environment provide an opportunity to assess whether a simple general equilibrium model can be of value in framing the study of such reform initiatives. In this paper, we present and use such a model to derive predictions about the effects of the reform on housing prices and neighborhood demographic compositions. Broadly, our analysis implies that the effects of the reform and changes in the economic environment are likely to have been reflected primarily in housing prices and only modestly on neighborhood demographics. We find that evidence for the Detroit metropolitan area from the decade encompassing the reform is largely consistent with the predictions of the model (JEL codes: H42, H71, H73, I22).

Maria Marta Ferreyra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Survey to assess Persian Gulf spill effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that an international group is poised for an extensive survey of the Persian Gulf, including an assessment of the long term effects of last year's oil spill, a legacy of the Persian Gulf war. Saudi Arabia plans a $450 million cleanup program on beaches fouled by the massive spill. Plans for the survey were disclosed by the United National Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco). It is to be carried out under the auspices of the Regional Organization for the Protection of the Marine Environment (Ropme), Unesco's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Ropme member countries are Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

Not Available

1992-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 6 Dairy Products: Role in the Diet and Effects on Cardiovascular Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 6 Dairy Products: Role in the Diet and Effects on Cardiovascular Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downlo

94

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 20 Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Microbes: Role in Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 20 Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Microbes: Role in Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

95

Health effects of residential wood combustion: survey of knowledge and research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Health and safety issues related to residential wood burning are examined. Current research and findings are also described, and research status is assessed in terms of future health and safety requirements. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Metropolitan New York in the greenhouse: Air quality and health effects  

SciTech Connect

A variety of potential effects on human health resulting from climate change have been identified in several assessments. According to an international panel{sup 1} they include direct effects of extreme temperatures on cardiovascular deaths, secondary effects due to vector-borne diseases or crop yields, and tertiary effects such as those that might arise from conflicts over freshwater supplies. To this fist we add the secondary effects of increased air pollution, which may result either directly from climate change or indirectly from increased air conditioning loads and the corresponding pollutant emissions from electric utilities. Higher ozone concentrations have been linked to increased ambient temperatures by both theory and observations of monitoring data. A similar association with particulate matter has been limited to observations, thus far. The pollution-heat linkage has been recognized before` but health effects have not been evaluated in terms of predictions of the joint effects of both agents. This paper has been prepared in two sections. First, we discuss the ozone situation with special reference to the Northeast Corridor and New York. In the second section, we present estimates of the health effects of climate change on New York and discuss some mitigation options.

Kleinman, L.I.; Lipfert, F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Health and environmental effects of oil shale technology. A workshop summary and panel reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the result of a workshop which addressed the health and environmental effects of oil shale technology. The purpose of this workshop were: to assemble biomedical and environmental scientists, representative of a broad range of disciplines, to address current developments in oil shale technology; to review and identify specific health and environmental issues and problems associated with the development and commercialization of oil shale technology; and to consider the research strategies required to address them and to identify the requisite research information needs, expressed via detailed task statements, for resolving the uncertainties of assessing the relevant impacts of oil shale technology. Throughout the workshop, attendees participated in six panels: health effects; air quality; water quantity, quality, and aquatic ecology; terrestrial effects; ambient measuring and monitoring; and source characterization. This report contains a presentation of the highlights of the issues considered by the panels and the panel reports which contain specific information on environmental and health effects, information requirements, and detailed research statements.

Brown, R. (ed.)

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Health and environmental effects of synthetic fuel technologies: research priorities. Report to the Federal Interagency Committee on the health and environmental effects of energy technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an assessment of the health and environmental effects research priorities related to coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale development. It reflects the subjective judgments of well chosen research scientists in relevant disciplines. These scientists reviewed the results of workshops conducted in 1978 on coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale, background information on related federal research, and comments by relevant federal agencies. The scientists prepared a listing of current research needs according to major areas of concern. These were categorized as to generic, region-specific, or process specific research. For the latter category, various scales of development were addressed for two exemplary processes: SRC (solvent refined coal) II and above ground oil shale retorting. Subjective judgments were used to prioritize the research tasks and assess the adequacy of current research.

Brown, R.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 26 The Opposing Effects of Dietary Omega-3 and trans Fatty Acids on Health: A Yin-Yang Effect at the Molecular Level?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 26 The Opposing Effects of Dietary Omega-3 and trans Fatty Acids on Health: A Yin-Yang Effect at the Molecular Level? Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutritio

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Health Effects of CO2 in Animals of Economic Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CT&S) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in animals of economic importance. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans and selected animals, primarily labor...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

102

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual Supplemental Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-921314 1-921314 OSWER DIRECTIVE: 9285.6-03 March 25, 1991 RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE FOR SUPERFUND VOLUME I: HUMAN HEALTH EVALUATION MANUAL SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE "STANDARD DEFAULT EXPOSURE FACTORS" INTERIM FINAL Office of Emergency and Remedial Response Toxics Integration Branch U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 (202)475-9486 REPRODUCED BY U.S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE SPRINGFIELD, VA 22161 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 25 1991 S O L I D W A S T E A N D E M E R G E N C Y R E S P O N S E O F F I C E O F OSWER Directive 9285.6-03 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: FROM: Human Health Evaluation Manual, Supplemental Guidance: TO: Director, Waste Management Division, Regions I, IV, V, & VII Director, Emergency & Remedial Response Division,

103

Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Health risk assessment is based on access to comprehensive information about potentially hazardous agents in question. Relevant information is scattered throughout the literature, and often is not readily accessible. To be useful in assessment efforts, emerging scientific findings, risk assess parameters, and associated data must be compiled and evaluated systemically. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are among the federal agencies heavily involved in this effort. This symposium was a direct response by EPA and ORNL to the expressed needs of individuals involved in assessing risks from chemical exposure. In an effort to examine the state of the risk assessment process, the availability of toxicological information, and the future development and transfer of this information, the symposium provided an excellent cadre of speakers and participants from state and federal agencies, academia and research laboratories to address these topics. This stimulating and productive gathering discussed concerns associated with (1) environmental contamination by chemicals; (2) laws regulating chemicals; (3) information needs and resources; (4) applications; (5) challenges and priorities; and (6)future issues. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

An analysis of uranium dispersal and health effects using a Gulf War case study.  

SciTech Connect

The study described in this report used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War for both U.S. troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. Only a few veterans in vehicles accidentally struck by U.S. DU munitions are predicted to have inhaled sufficient quantities of DU particulate to incur any significant health risk (i.e., the possibility of temporary kidney damage from the chemical toxicity of uranium and about a 1% chance of fatal lung cancer). The health risk to all downwind civilians is predicted to be extremely small. Recommendations for monitoring are made for certain exposed groups. Although the study found fairly large calculational uncertainties, the models developed and used are generally valid. The analysis was also used to assess potential uranium health hazards for workers in the weapons complex. No illnesses are projected for uranium workers following standard guidelines; nonetheless, some research suggests that more conservative guidelines should be considered.

Marshall, Albert Christian

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk...

106

Air Pollution Health Effects: Toward an Integrated Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientists and policy makers have become increasingly aware of the need to jointly study climate change and air pollution because of the interactions among policy measures and in the atmospheric chemistry that creates the ...

Yang, Trent.

107

Urban land use, air toxics and public health: Assessing hazardous exposures at the neighborhood scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use data are increasingly understood as important indicators of potential environmental health risk in urban areas where micro-scale or neighborhood level hazard exposure data are not routinely collected. This paper aims to offer a method for estimating the distribution of air toxics in urban neighborhoods using land use information because actual air monitoring data rarely exist at this scale. Using Geographic Information System spatial modeling tools, we estimate air toxics concentrations across neighborhoods in New York City and statistically compare our model with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxic Assessment and air monitoring data across three NYC neighborhoods. We conclude that land use data can act as a good proxy for estimating neighborhood scale air toxics, particularly in the absence of monitoring data. In addition, the paper suggests that land use data can expand the reach of environmental impact assessments that routinely exclude analyses of potential exposures to urban air toxics at the neighborhood scale.

Corburn, Jason [Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and School of International and Public Affairs, 400 Avery Hall, 1172 Amsterdam Ave. New York, NY 10027 (United States)]. E-mail: jtc2105@columbia.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

EA-0921; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research 21; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Proposed Action 3.2 Project Description 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operations Activities 3.3 No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS 5.1 Construction 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources 5.1.1.1 Historic/Archeological Resources 5.1.1.2 Federal/State-Listed or Proposed Protected Species or Critical Habitats 5.1.1.3 Flood Plains/Wetlands 5.1.1.4 National Forest, Parks, Trails, etc. 5.1.1.5 Prime Farmland 5.1.1.6 Special Sources of Water

109

Radium concentration factors and their use in health and environmental risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium is known to be taken up by aquatic animals, and tends to accumulate in bone, shell and exoskeleton. The most common approach to estimating the uptake of a radionuclide by aquatic animals for use in health and environmental risk assessments is the concentration factor method. The concentration factor method relates the concentration of a contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the surrounding water. Site specific data are not usually available, and generic, default values are often used in risk assessment studies. This paper describes the concentration factor method, summarizes some of the variables which may influence the concentration factor for radium, reviews reported concentration factors measured in marine environments and presents concentration factors derived from data collected in a study in coastal Louisiana. The use of generic default values for the concentration factor is also discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Hamilton, L.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Radium concentration factors and their use in health and environmental risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium is known to be taken up by aquatic animals, and tends to accumulate in bone, shell and exoskeleton. The most common approach to estimating the uptake of a radionuclide by aquatic animals for use in health and environmental risk assessments is the concentration factor method. The concentration factor method relates the concentration of a contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the surrounding water. Site specific data are not usually available, and generic, default values are often used in risk assessment studies. This paper describes the concentration factor method, summarizes some of the variables which may influence the concentration factor for radium, reviews reported concentration factors measured in marine environments and presents concentration factors derived from data collected in a study in coastal Louisiana. The use of generic default values for the concentration factor is also discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Hamilton, L.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

112

HEALTH EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST: AN HEI PERSPECTIVE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines have many advantages, including good fuel economy, power, durability, lower emissions of some pollutants (such as carbon monoxide) and of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). However, there are a number of concerns that need to be addressed: (1) emissions of nitrogen oxides (which contribute to ozone formation) and of particulate matter (PM); (2) questions about cancer and other health effects from exposure to diesel PM; and (3) as efforts to decrease emissions progress, a need to understand whether the nature and toxicity of the PM emitted has changed. This paper focuses on (1) carcinogenicity data, (2) noncancer effects, and (3) diesel as part of the complex ambient mixture of PM.

Warren, Jane

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

Health impact assessment: A comparison of 45 local, national, and international guidelines  

SciTech Connect

This article provides a comparison of health impact assessment (HIA) guidelines from around the world and for multiple geographic scales. We identify commonalities and differences within HIA guides to discuss the plausibility of consensus guidelines and to inform guideline development. The practice of HIA has grown over the last two decades with a concurrent growth of HIA guides. This study expands on earlier review work and includes guides published since 2007 (Mindell, Boltong and Forde, 2008). From April 2010 to October 2011, 45 HIA guides were identified through an internet search and review of previous research. Common characteristics, key features, and the HIA process were analyzed. The 45 documents recommended similar but not identical processes for conducting HIAs. These analyses suggest that guidelines for HIAs are similar in many areas of the world and that new HIA practitioners can use these findings to inform their approach. Further discussion is needed to determine if the approaches established in these guidelines are followed and if one set of common guidelines could be written for use in numerous countries and regions. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze 45 health impact assessment (HIA) guidelines worldwide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine similarities and unique attributes of each guideline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of developing consensus guidelines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identifying additional guidelines aides in future HIA work and evaluation.

Hebert, Katherine A., E-mail: jsx3@cdc.gov; Wendel, Arthur M., E-mail: dvq6@cdc.gov; Kennedy, Sarah K., E-mail: heaton.sarah@gmail.com; Dannenberg, Andrew L., E-mail: adannenberg2@gmail.com

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

This National Standard for Health Assessment of Rail Safety Workers represents a significant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

step in the continuous improvement of rail safety in Australia. Approved by the Australian Transport Council (ATC) in April 2004, this is the first time all States and Territories have adopted a common system of health assessment arrangements for rail safety workers. Such national consistency will help rail organisations to operate more efficiently within and across State and Territory boundaries. The National Standard will also benefit rail safety workers by helping them maintain sound health and fitness, and will provide for equity and portability of medical certification. The Standard adopts a risk management approach and reflects contemporary medical knowledge as well as changes in societal values. It is the result of extensive research and input from a very wide range of government, industry and medical stakeholders. The Standard keeps pace with advances in medical knowledge and current understanding of the impact of certain health conditions on safe working performance and addresses the deficiencies identified in recent rail safety investigations. Contemporary anti-discrimination and privacy principles now legislated in all Australian States and Territories have also been taken into account.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. In addition, models are included for assessing the risks of several nonlethal early and continuing effects -- including prodromal vomiting and diarrhea, hypothyroidism and radiation thyroiditis, skin burns, reproductive effects, and pregnancy losses. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and other.'' The category, other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also developed. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. The models of cancer risk are derived largely from information summarized in BEIR III -- with some adjustment to reflect more recent studies. 64 refs., 18 figs., 46 tabs.

Evans, J.S. (Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (USA). School of Public Health)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Health effects associated with energy conservation measures in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air quality can conceivably be impacted by hundreds of different chemicals. More than 900 different organic compounds alone have been identified in indoor air. The health effects that could potentially arise from exposure to individual pollutants or mixtures of pollutants cover the full range of acute and chronic effects, including largely reversible responses, such as rashes and irritations, as well as irreversible toxic and carcinogenic effects. These indoor contaminants are emitted from a large variety of materials and substances that are widespread components of everyday life. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with indoor air contaminants for the Bonneville Power Administration to aid the agency in the preparation of environmental documents. The results of this search are reported in two volumes. Volume 1 is a summary of the results of the literature search; Volume 2 is the complete results of the literature search and contains all references to the material reviewed. 16 tabs.

Stenner, R.D.; Baechler, M.C.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Circuit Breaker Diagnostic Tests: Effectiveness Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents preliminary findings from a multiyear research initiative to improve the maintenance of high-voltage circuit breakers and maintain reliable performance with reduced costs through better selection and application of nonintrusive diagnostic tests and techniques. The initiative’s focus is to catalog available tests and techniques and to develop and apply assessment metrics to determine which provide the most useful information.The project team developed a set of ...

2013-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

Health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island  

SciTech Connect

Between March 28 and April 15, 1979 the collective dose resulting from the radioactivity released to the population living within a 50-mile radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant was about 2000 person-rems, less than 1% of the annual natural background level. The average dose to a person living within 5 miles of the nuclear plant was less than 10% of annual background radiation. The maximum estimated radiation dose received by any one individual in the general population (excluding the nuclear plant workers) during the accident was 70 mrem. The doses received by the general population as a result of the accident were so small that there will be no detectable additional cases of cancer, developmental abnormalities, or genetic ill-health. Three Three Mile Island nuclear workers received radiation doses of about 3 to 4 rem, exceeding maximum permissible quarterly dose of 3 rem. The major health effect of the accident at Three Mile Island was that of a pronounced demoralizing effect on the general population in the Three Mile Island area, including teenagers and mothers of preschool children and the nuclear plant workers. However, this effect proved transient in all groups studied except the nuclear workers.

Fabrikant, J.I.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized. Total waste generation increased 9.8%, but it was possible to reduce the volume of non-recyclable materials (11%) and increase the volume of recyclable materials (4%). It was also possible to segregate organic waste (7%), which was forwarded for production of compost. The rate of infectious waste generation in critical areas decreased from 0.021 to 0.018 kg/procedure. Many improvements have been observed, and now the PHC complies with most of legal requirements, offers periodic training and better biosafety conditions to workers, has reduced the volume of waste sent to sanitary landfills, and has introduced indicators for monitoring its own performance. This evaluation method might subsidize the creation and evaluation of medical waste management plans in similar heath institutions.

Moreira, A.M.M., E-mail: anamariainforme@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil); Guenther, W.M.R. [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Health assessment for Anaconda Smelter Site, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, Montana, Region 8. CERCLIS No. MTD093291656. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA,) Region VIII has requested that the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) evaluate the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Reports for the Mill Creek, Montana Anaconda Swelter Site. Extensive environmental sampling by EPA, urinary arsenic surveys conducted by the Centers for Disease Control, the Endangerment Assessment (EA,) and the RI have consistently shown extensive contamination of soils and house dust by arsenic, cadmium, and lead, and episodic contamination of drinking water with arsenic above the EPA Maximal Contaminant Level (MCL). The RI presents results of calculations showing, potentially, an elevated excess lifetime risk of skin cancer for males from chronic exposure to arsenic by ingestion. The calculations were performed only for males, the most sensitive subpopulation; however, the female subpopulation would also be expected to have a lesser but elevated excess skin cancer risk from ingestion of arsenic. The long-term health effects of cadmium and lead are additional concerns. When EPA makes a Record of Decision (ROD) for the Mill Creek site, ATSDR can more readily make a definitive statement about the adequacy of the chosen Alternative for reducing the public health risk at Mill Creek.

Not Available

1987-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

122

Health and environmental effects of synthetic fuel technologies: research priorities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an assessment of the health and environmental effects research priorities related to coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale development. It reflects the subjective judgements of well chosen research scientists in relevant disciplines. These scientists reviewed the results of workshops conducted in 1978 on coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale (see PB-296 708, PB-297 096, and PB-297 618), background information on related Federal research, and comments by relevant Federal agencies. The scientists prepared a listing of current research needs according to major areas of concern. These were categorized as to generic, region-specific, or process specific research. For the latter category, various scales of development were addressed for two exemplary processes: SRC (solvent refined coal) II and above ground oil shale retorting. Subjective judgements were used to prioritize the research tasks and assess the adequacy of current research.

Brown, R.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Method of assessing a lipid-related health risk based on ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

124

WHAT GOOD IS WEALTH WITHOUT HEALTH? THE EFFECT OF HEALTH ON THE MARGINAL UTILITY OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate how the marginal utility of consumption varies with health. To do so, we develop a simple model in which the impact of health on the marginal utility of consumption can be estimated from data on permanent income, ...

Finkelstein, Amy

125

Environmental Assessment of Photovoltaic Systems and Effectiveness...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photovoltaic Systems and Effectiveness Analysis of U.S. Renewable Energy Policies Speaker(s): Pei Zhai Date: October 25, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of...

126

SECURITY ASSESSMENTS: TOOLS FOR MEASURING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SECURITY CONTROLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SECURITY ASSESSMENTS: TOOLS FOR MEASURING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SECURITY CONTROLS Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology The selection and implementation of security controls are critical decisions for protecting

127

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

128

Health impact assessment research and practice: A place for paradigm positioning?  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we provide a critical review of the place of paradigm in health impact assessment (HIA) research and practice. We contend that most HIA practitioners have given insufficient attention to paradigm positioning when developing and applying HIA methodologies and that some concerns about current HIA practice can be attributed to this. We review HIA literature to assess the extent and nature of attention given to paradigm positioning and these related concerns. We then respond to our critique by exploring the implications, opportunities and challenges of adopting a critical realist paradigm, which we believe has the potential to help HIA practitioners to develop HIA methodology in a way that addresses these issues. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a critical review of the place of paradigm in HIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that HIA practitioners give insufficient attention to paradigm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The implications, opportunities and challenges of adopting a critical realist paradigm are explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first paper, to our knowledge, that discusses a critical realist approach to HIA.

Haigh, Fiona, E-mail: f.haigh@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation (CHETRE), Part of the UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Harris, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.harris@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation (CHETRE), Part of the UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Haigh, Neil, E-mail: neil.haigh@aut.ac.nz [Research and Scholarship Development, Centre for Learning and Teaching, AUT University, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

members) Subject: Technical evaluation of “EPA’s analysis of Florida drywall samples 1 and review of analytical results from the Florida Department of Health, ” from the EPA’s National Air

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Modifications of models resulting from recent reports on health effects of ionizing radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The most recent health effects models resulting from these efforts were published in two reports, NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990) and Part 2 (1989). Several major health effects reports have been published recently that may impact the health effects models presented in these reports. This addendum to the Part 2 (1989) report, provides a review of the 1986 and 1988 reports by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council BEAR 5 Committee report and Publication 60 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection as they relate to this report. The three main sections of this addendum discuss early occurring and continuing effects, late somatic effects, and genetic effects. The major changes to the NUREG/CR-4214 health effects models recommended in this addendum are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies like that on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. The results presented in this addendum should be used with the basic NUREG/CR-4214 reports listed above to obtain the most recent views on the potential health effects of radionuclides released accidentally from nuclear power plants. 48 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs.

Abrahamson, S. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)); Bender, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Gilbert, E.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens.

Arundel, A.V.; Sterling, E.M.; Biggin, J.H.; Sterling, T.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect Shao, Hongfei Florida State University Liu, Guosheng Florida State University Category: Aerosols The aerosol first indirect effect is known to cool the Earth radiatively. However, its magnitude is very uncertain; large discrepancies exist among the observed values published in the literature. In this study, we first survey the published values of those parameters used for describing the first indirect effect. By analyzing the discrepancies among these values, we show that the first indirect effect has been overestimated by many investigators due to an improper parameter being used. Therefore, we introduce a more meaningful parameter to measure this effect. We estimated the first indirect effect using the new parameter based on observational

133

Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Potential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - Environmental and human health salt (Proprietary) 10.0 - 30.0% #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale ActivitiesPotential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public Health Surveillance

Sibille, Etienne

135

University Health Services -Routine Fees and Charges Effective July 1, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Health Services - Routine Fees and Charges Effective July 1, 2012 Visit Fees STUDENT's Health Annual/Wellness Exam New Patient $40.00 99385 $90.00 Women's Health Annual/Wellness Exam $116.00 Yellow Fever - 0.5cc $113.00 90717 $122.00 Laboratory Fees HIV 1 + 2 $28.00 86703 $28.00 Pap

136

Worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident†  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study quantifies worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on 11 March 2011. Effects are quantified with a 3-D global atmospheric model driven by emission estimates and evaluated against daily worldwide Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) measurements and observed deposition rates. Inhalation exposure, ground-level external exposure, and atmospheric external exposure pathways of radioactive iodine-131, cesium-137, and cesium-134 released from Fukushima are accounted for using a linear no-threshold (LNT) model of human exposure. Exposure due to ingestion of contaminated food and water is estimated by extrapolation. We estimate an additional 130 (15–1100) cancer-related mortalities and 180 (24–1800) cancer-related morbidities incorporating uncertainties associated with the exposure–dose and dose–response models used in the study. We also discuss the LNT model’s uncertainty at low doses. Sensitivities to emission rates, gas to particulate I-131 partitioning, and the mandatory evacuation radius around the plant are also explored, and may increase upper bound mortalities and morbidities in the ranges above to 1300 and 2500, respectively. Radiation exposure to workers at the plant is projected to result in 2 to 12 morbidities. An additional 600 mortalities have been reported due to non-radiological causes such as mandatory evacuations. Lastly, a hypothetical accident at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant in

John E. Ten Hoeve A; Mark Z. Jacobson B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Design and implementation of a fuzzy expert system for performance assessment of an integrated health, safety, environment (HSE) and ergonomics system: The case of a gas refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to design a fuzzy expert system for performance assessment of health, safety, environment (HSE) and ergonomics system factors in a gas refinery. This will lead to a robust control system for continuous assessment and improvement ... Keywords: Environment, Ergonomics, Expert system, Fuzzy logic, Health, Safety

A. Azadeh; I. M. Fam; M. Khoshnoud; M. Nikafrouz

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Environmental Assessment of Photovoltaic Systems and Effectiveness Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment of Photovoltaic Systems and Effectiveness Analysis Environmental Assessment of Photovoltaic Systems and Effectiveness Analysis of U.S. Renewable Energy Policies Speaker(s): Pei Zhai Date: October 25, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Chris Marnay This presentation mainly covers two perspectives relevant to solar energy technologies. The first one is the environmental aspect. The questions to be answered are how "green" photovoltaic technology is (embodied energy and carbon are two main indicators); and, how have these two indicators evolved during the past 10 years. The methodology for analysis is a hybrid Life Cycle Assessment. The second part involves a policy analysis of the effectiveness of U.S. renewable energy policies, such as state-level Renewable Portfolio Standards, for supporting solar energy adoption. A

139

Technology assessment: environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with oil recovery from US tar-sand deposits  

SciTech Connect

The tar-sand resources of the US have the potential to yield as much as 36 billion barrels (bbls) of oil. The tar-sand petroleum-extraction technologies now being considered for commercialization in the United States include both surface (above ground) systems and in situ (underground) procedures. The surface systems currently receiving the most attention include: (1) thermal decomposition processes (retorting); (2) suspension methods (solvent extraction); and (3) washing techniques (water separation). Underground bitumen extraction techniques now being field tested are: (1) in situ combustion; and (2) in situ steam-injection procedures. At this time, any commercial tar-sand facility in the US will have to comply with at least 7 major federal regulations in addition to state regulations; building, electrical, and fire codes; and petroleum-industry construction standards. Pollution-control methods needed by tar-sand technologies to comply with regulatory standards and to protect air, land, and water quality will probably be similar to those already proposed for commercial oil-shale systems. The costs of these systems could range from about $1.20 to $2.45 per barrel of oil produced. Estimates of potential pollution-emisson levels affecting land, air, and water were calculated from available data related to current surface and in situ tar-sand field experiments in the US. These data were then extrapolated to determine pollutant levels expected from conceptual commercial surface and in situ facilities producing 20,000 bbl/d. The likelihood-of-occurrence of these impacts was then assessed. Experience from other industries, including information concerning health and ecosystem damage from air pollutants, measurements of ground-water transport of organic pollutants, and the effectiveness of environmental-control technologies was used to make this assessment.

Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ricker, Y.E.

1981-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

140

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 3 Soy Isoflavones: Chemistry, Processing Effects, Health Benefits, and Commercial Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 3 Soy Isoflavones: Chemistry, Processing Effects, Health Benefits, and Commercial Production Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 4 Soybean Saponins: Chemistry, Analysis, and Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 4 Soybean Saponins: Chemistry, Analysis, and Potential Health Effects Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

142

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 27 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Effects on Steroid-hormone Biosynthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 27 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Effects on Steroid-hormone Biosynthesis Health eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Ch

143

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 1 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Effects on Endothelial Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 1 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Effects on Endothelial Functions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable p

144

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I. Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publication 9285.7-01D Publication 9285.7-01D January 1998 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Revision No. 0 ii January 1998 NOTICE This document provides guidance to EPA staff. The guidance is designed to communicate National policy on the planning, reporting and review of Superfund risk assessments. The document does not, however, substitute for EPA's statutes or regulations, nor is it a regulation itself. Thus, it cannot impose legally-binding requirements on EPA, States, or the regulated community, and may not apply to a particular situation based upon

145

Development of a structural health monitoring system for the life assessment of critical transportation infrastructure.  

SciTech Connect

Recent structural failures such as the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota have underscored the urgent need for improved methods and procedures for evaluating our aging transportation infrastructure. This research seeks to develop a basis for a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system to provide quantitative information related to the structural integrity of metallic structures to make appropriate management decisions and ensuring public safety. This research employs advanced structural analysis and nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for an accurate fatigue analysis. Metal railroad bridges in New Mexico will be the focus since many of these structures are over 100 years old and classified as fracture-critical. The term fracture-critical indicates that failure of a single component may result in complete collapse of the structure such as the one experienced by the I-35W Bridge. Failure may originate from sources such as loss of section due to corrosion or cracking caused by fatigue loading. Because standard inspection practice is primarily visual, these types of defects can go undetected due to oversight, lack of access to critical areas, or, in riveted members, hidden defects that are beneath fasteners or connection angles. Another issue is that it is difficult to determine the fatigue damage that a structure has experienced and the rate at which damage is accumulating due to uncertain history and load distribution in supporting members. A SHM system has several advantages that can overcome these limitations. SHM allows critical areas of the structure to be monitored more quantitatively under actual loading. The research needed to apply SHM to metallic structures was performed and a case study was carried out to show the potential of SHM-driven fatigue evaluation to assess the condition of critical transportation infrastructure and to guide inspectors to potential problem areas. This project combines the expertise in transportation infrastructure at New Mexico State University with the expertise at Sandia National Laboratories in the emerging field of SHM.

Roach, Dennis Patrick; Jauregui, David Villegas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Daumueller, Andrew Nicholas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A Historical-Data-Based Method for Health Assessment of Li-Ion Battery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nowadays, rechargeable Li-ion batteries have been widely used in laptops, cell phones and hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). The health information of battery is very important.… (more)

Dai, Wanchen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Effective dose and several factors of its identification. (Assessment of radiation hazard in space flights)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective dose and several factors of its identification. (Assessment of radiation hazard in space flights)

Farber, Yu V; Grigoriev, Yu G; Tabakova, L A

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Health information on the Internet : strategies for assessing consumer needs and improving consumer information retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patients and their family members are increasingly turning to the Internet for health information. However, the search strategies consumers are using to obtain information are often unsuccessful. Since some patients are ...

Plovnick, Robert M. (Robert Matthew), 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Preliminary environmental assessment for the satellite power system (SPS). Volume 1. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the preliminary assessment of the environmental impacts of a SPS is given. Microwave health and ecological effects, other effects on health and the environment, effects on the atmosphere, and effects on communications systems are summarized. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

University of Virginia Health Plan Effective Date: 1/1/2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Laboratory Services and XRay Procedures (Non-Urgent Only) Paid in Full2 Paid in Full2 Available In% Coinsurance #12;University of Virginia Health Plan Effective Date: 1/1/2013 2 SERVICES PROVIDED UVa PROVIDER HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES A. Inpatient Acute Care for Non-Biologically Based Mental Illnesses

Acton, Scott

152

Modeling threat assessments of water supply systems using markov latent effects methodology.  

SciTech Connect

Recent amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act emphasize efforts toward safeguarding our nation's water supplies against attack and contamination. Specifically, the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 established requirements for each community water system serving more than 3300 people to conduct an assessment of the vulnerability of its system to a terrorist attack or other intentional acts. Integral to evaluating system vulnerability is the threat assessment, which is the process by which the credibility of a threat is quantified. Unfortunately, full probabilistic assessment is generally not feasible, as there is insufficient experience and/or data to quantify the associated probabilities. For this reason, an alternative approach is proposed based on Markov Latent Effects (MLE) modeling, which provides a framework for quantifying imprecise subjective metrics through possibilistic or fuzzy mathematics. Here, an MLE model for water systems is developed and demonstrated to determine threat assessments for different scenarios identified by the assailant, asset, and means. Scenario assailants include terrorists, insiders, and vandals. Assets include a water treatment plant, water storage tank, node, pipeline, well, and a pump station. Means used in attacks include contamination (onsite chemicals, biological and chemical), explosives and vandalism. Results demonstrated highest threats are vandalism events and least likely events are those performed by a terrorist.

Silva, Consuelo Juanita

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Environment, Safety, and Health Self-Assessment Report, Fiscal Year 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Processing System (ORPS), Non-compliance TrackingFour electrical safety ORPS reports were filed during FYcorrective actions for both the ORPS and DOE assessment have

Chernowski, John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Reclamation of automotive batteries: Assessment of health impacts and recycling technology. Task 1: Assessment of recycling technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Approximately ten different candidate EV battery technologies were examined based on their performance and recyclability, and were ranked based on these examinations. The batteries evaluated were lead-acid (all types), nickel-cadmium, nickel-iron, nickel-metal hydride, sodium-sulfur, sodium-nickel chloride, lithium-iron disulfide, lithium-ion, lithium polymer, and zinc (zinc-air and zinc-bromine). Locations of present recycling facilities were identified. Markets for recycled products were assessed: the value of recycled materials were found too unstable to fully support recycling efforts. All these batteries exhibit the characteristic of hazardous waste in California, and are therefore subject to strict regulations (finalization of the new EPA Universal Waste Rule could change this).

Unnasch, S.; Montano, M.; Franklin, P.; Nowell, G.; Martin, C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Occupational Noise Exposure and its Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue brief provides the electric power industry with a snapshot of the current scientific knowledge on worker health and safety risks associated with noise exposure. Noise exposure types are varied and include continuous, intermittent and/or impulse noise. Prolonged occupational exposure to continuous noise or acoustic trauma can cause noise-induced hearing loss. Recent scientific data from the aluminum industry suggest that those exposed below levels requiring hearing protective devices may ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Health and Productivity: A Needs Assessment Pilot at Two DOE Sites (2012)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Productivity of the Productivity of the U.S. Department of Energy FINAL REPORT Prepared by the University of Maryland with the Integrated Benefits Institute 2012 FINAL REPORT 2 Executive Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been concerned about employees' health and well-being for several years, especially as they relate to workplace productivity and safety. Additionally, the DOE's reliance on an aging workforce makes it even more critical for the Department to ensure that its programs and policies support employees, regardless of their age, to perform their jobs safely, while maintaining productivity, overall health, and well-

158

The DOE/NREL Environmental Science and Health Effects Program - An Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes current work in the Environmental Science and Health Effects (ES and HE) Program being sponsored by DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The program is regulatory-driven, and focuses on ozone, airborne particles, visibility and regional haze, air toxics, and health effects of air pollutants. The goal of the ES and HE Program is to understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based and alternative transportation fuels. Each project in the program is designed to address policy-relevant objectives. Studies in the ES and HE Program have four areas of focus: improving technology for emissions measurements; vehicle emissions measurements, emission inventory development/improvement; and ambient impacts, including health effects.

Douglas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Environmental Science & Health Effects Program at the at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

Lawson, Douglas R.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

Webster, Mort D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Exploring the Effect of mHealth Technologies on Communication and Information Sharing in a Pediatric Critical Care Unit: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Communication and information sharing is an important aspect of healthcare information technology and mHealth management. A main requirement in the quality of patient care is the ability of all health care participants to communicate. Research illustrates ... Keywords: Health Care Technology, Information Technology, Management of Technology, Professional Communication, Technology Assessment, eHealth, mHealth

Rocci Luppicini; Victoria Aceti

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Health and safety. Preliminary comparative assessment of the satellite power system (SPS) and other energy alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing data on the health and safety risks of a satellite power system and four electrical generation systems are analyzed: a combined-cycle coal power system with a low-Btu gasifier and open-cycle gas turbine, a fission power system with fuel reprocessing, a central-station, terrestrial, solar-photovoltaic power system, and a first-generation design for a fusion power system. The systems are compared on the basis of expected deaths and person-days lost per year associated with 1000 MW of average electricity generation and the number of health and safety risks that are identified as potentially significant but unquantifiable. The appendices provide more detailed information on risks, uncertainties, additional research needed, and references for the identified impacts of each system.

Habegger, L.J.; Gasper, J.R.; Brown, C.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Devonian shale  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to identify and examine potential public health and safety issues and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Devonian age shale. This document will serve as background data and information for planners within the government to assist in development of our new energy technologies in a timely and environmentally sound manner. This report describes the resource and the DOE eastern gas shales project in Section 2. Section 3 describes the new and developing recovery technologies associated with Devonian shale. An assessment of the environment, health and safety impacts associated with a typical fields is presented in Section 4. The typical field for this assessment occupies ten square miles and is developed on a 40-acre spacing (that is, there is a well in each 40-acre grid). This field thus has a total of 160 wells. Finally, Section 5 presents the conclusions and recommendations. A reference list is provided to give a greater plant. Based on the estimated plant cost and the various cases of operating income, an economic analysis was performed employing a profitability index criterion of discounted cash flow to determine an interest rate of return on the plant investment.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Assessment of geothermal development in the Imperial Valley of California. Volume 1. Environment, health, and socioeconomics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utilization of the Imperial Valley's geothermal resources to support energy production could be hindered if environmental impacts prove to be unacceptable or if geothermal operations are incompatible with agriculture. To address these concerns, an integrated environmental and socioeconomic assessment of energy production in the valley was prepared. The most important impacts examined in the assessment involved air quality changes resulting from emissions of hydrogen sulfide, and increases in the salinity of the Salton Sea resulting from the use of agricultural waste waters for power plant cooling. The socioeconomics consequences of future geothermal development will generally be beneficial. (MHR)

Layton, D. (ed.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In) Symposium on Nuclear Reactor Safety: Perspective. Ahealth effects of the nuclear reactor accident at Three Mile50-mile radius of the nuclear reactor site, approximately

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NETL: Health Effects - Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the potential for adverse cardiopulmonary effects of airborne...

169

Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Comparative health and safety assessment of the satellite power system and other electrical generation alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work reported here is an analysis of existing data on the health and safety risks of a satellite power system and six electrical generation systems: a combined-cycle coal power system with a low-Btu gasifier and open-cycle gas turbine; a light water fission power system without fuel reprocessing; a liquid-metal, fast-breeder fission reactor; a centralized and decentralized, terrestrial, solar-photovoltaic power system; and a first-generation design for a fusion power system. The systems are compared on the basis of expected deaths and person-days lost per year associated with 1000 MW of average electricity generation. Risks are estimated and uncertainties indicated for all phases of the energy production cycle, including fuel and raw material extraction and processing, direct and indirect component manufacture, on-site construction, and system operation and maintenance. Also discussed is the potential significance of related major health and safety issues that remain largely unquantifiable. The appendices provide more detailed information on risks, uncertainties, additional research needed, and references for the identified impacts of each system.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems  

SciTech Connect

Systems that allow users to store and retrieve spatial data, provide for analyses of spatial data, and offer highly detailed display of spatial data are referred to as geographic information systems, or more typically, GIS. Since their initial usage in the 1960s, GISs have evolved as a means of assembling and analyzing diverse data pertaining to specific geographical areas, with spatial locations of the data serving as the organizational basis for the information systems. The structure of GISs is built around spatial identifiers and the methods used to encode data for storage and manipulation. This paper examines how GIS has been used in typical environmental assessment, its use for cumulative impact assessment, and explores litigation that occurred in the United States Federal court system where GIS was used in some aspect of cumulative effects. The paper also summarizes fifteen case studies that range from area wide transportation planning to wildlife and habitat impacts, and draws together a few lessons learned from this review of literature and litigation.

Atkinson, Samuel F., E-mail: atkinson@unt.edu [Institute of Applied Science, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 310559, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Canter, Larry W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [Environmental Impact Training, P.O. Box 9143, Horseshoe Bay, TX 78657 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Scientific Analysis Is Essential to Assess Biofuel Policy Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use change (LUC) estimated by economic models has sparked intense international debate. Models estimate how much LUC might be induced under prescribed scenarios and rely on assumptions to generate LUC values. It is critical to test and validate underlying assumptions with empirical evidence. Furthermore, this modeling approach cannot answer if any specific indirect effects are actually caused by biofuel policy. The best way to resolve questions of causation is via scientific methods. Kim and Dale attempt to address the question of if, rather than how much, market-induced land-use change is currently detectable based on the analysis of historic evidence, and in doing so, explore some modeling assumptions behind the drivers of change. Given that there is no accepted approach to estimate the global effects of biofuel policy on land-use change, it is critical to assess the actual effects of policies through careful analysis and interpretation of empirical data. Decision makers need a valid scientific basis for policy decisions on energy choices.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Guideline for Assessing Maintenance Effectiveness: A Self-Assessment Guideline for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Technologies for Equipment Assessment and Maintenance (TEAM) group has prepared this guideline to assist EPRI-member nuclear power plants in further improving their maintenance processes by presenting, in detail, a collection of the key elements and activities that contribute to a well-organized maintenance program. An honest assessment of these activities then provides tools that can be used to perform a self-assessment of an existing maintenance program. This assessment is directed toward how ...

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I-Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C, Risk C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/004 Publication 9285.7-01 C December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper NOTICE The policies set out in [his document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

176

Manage the Margins: Three Essays on Effective Policymaking for Social Inequality in Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation includes three studies, devoted to trying to understand inequality in health between people from different social groups in a democratic society. In the U.S., social inequality in health takes various forms and the key to understanding how democracy solves the problem of inequality lies in a complex set of political and social factors. I take an institutional approach and focus on examining how political and policy institutions, their administrative processes, and the policy implementation environment are linked to social inequality in health. The first essay, Whose Baby Matters More, uses a theoretical framework for evaluating heterogeneous group responses to public health policies and depicts how racial disparities in health are rooted in group heterogeneity in policy responses. The second essay, Anxious Girls and Inactive Boys, focuses on how state-level policy interventions and social capital interactively affect gender differences in health. The third essay, Responsibility for Equity, explores the link between publicness of state healthcare systems and social equity in healthcare access. In the first essay, I focus on racial disparities in infant mortality rates and pool state-level data from 1990 to 2006. The empirical analysis suggests that enhancing the capacity of state healthcare systems is critical to improving population health. Blacks and whites, nevertheless, exhibit different responses to the same policy. Racial disparities could be reduced only when policy interventions generate more relative benefits for Blacks. In the second essay, I find that social capital conditions the effect of public health policies with regard to managing childhood obesity. There are gender differences, moreover, in health outcomes and behavioral responses to state and local-level obesity policies. In the third essay, I find that different institutional factors exhibit different impact on inequality in healthcare access. While public finance resources may reduce inequality in healthcare access, public ownership and the public healthcare workforce do not have significant association with inequality in healthcare access. State Medicaid eligibility rules exhibit moderate impact on inequality in healthcare access.

Zhu, Ling

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Health assessment for Redwing Carriers, Inc. (Saraland), Saraland, Alabama, Region 4. CERCLIS No. ALD980844385. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Redwing Carriers, Inc. (Saraland) site is in the community of Saraland, in Mobile County, Alabama. The site, about 1 acre, is in an urbanized area and had been used as a truck terminal between 1961 and 1971. Redwing Carriers cleaned out trucks that transported a variety of materials, including asphalt, diesel fuel, herbicides, tall oil, and sulfuric acid. Wastes were discharged onto the ground. The property was covered with fill material, and an apartment complex, housing about 180 tenants, was developed. On-site monitoring identified polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and a few other organic compounds in surface wastes and in subsurface wastes and soils. Using the information reviewed, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry concludes that the site is of potential public health concern because humans may be exposed to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Children are the most likely to be exposed to the contaminants associated with the recurring surficial waste deposits. Available monitoring data are not sufficient to clarify whether groundwater, ambient air, air in buildings, soils, sediments, surface water, and food-chain entities contain contaminants at levels that pose public health concerns or physical hazards.

Not Available

1990-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

Health assessment for Ossineke ground water (Ossineke Residential Wells), Ossineke, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980794440. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Ossineke Residential Wells are listed on the National Priorities List. The site is located in Alpena County, Michigan. In 1977, several residential wells were determined to be contaminated with components of gasoline, benzene, toluene, xylene, phenol, and tetrachloroethylene. Possible contamination sources include leaking underground gas storage tanks, a lagoon used for waste disposal by a commercial laundromat, or an auto rustproofing operation. Ground water samples showed maximum concentrations detected in parts per billion (ppb): benzene, 21,000; toluene, 53,000; xylene, 11,000; and PCE, 7 ppb. Sampling of the residential wells in 1988 showed the following maximum concentrations in ppb: benzene, 6,590; toluene, 726; xylene, 2,500; tetrachloroethylene, 16; and phenol, 26. The site is of potential public-health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time. Human exposure to benzene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and phenol may occur via the exposure pathways of ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact.

Not Available

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Berkeley ReadyMade Impact Assessment: Developing an Effective and Efficient Assessment Template for Social Enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work lead to broader social impact. For example, a nonprofitand Resources for Assessing Social Impact (TRASI). 3 2.need to evaluate broad social impact of proposed programs

Brown, Clair; Chait, Ariel; Freeman, Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this pamphlet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. (BPA is the Pacific Northwest`s Federal electric power marketing agency.) First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are described. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns raised by these studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this pamphlet.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Real estate's market value and a pollution and health effects analysis decision support system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors of this paper participated in the project Framework 6 intelligent Cities and the Lincoln institute of Land Policy Fellowship. One of the above project's goals was to develop and improve a Real Estate's Market Value, and the Pollution and ... Keywords: air pollution, cooperative decision making, health effects, market value, multiple-user, premises microclimate, voice stress analysis

E. Zavadskas; A. Kaklauskas; E. Maciunas; P. Vainiunas; A. Marsalka

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Rapid Impedance Spectrum Measurements for State-of-Health Assessment of Energy Storage Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Harmonic compensated synchronous detection (HCSD) is a technique that can be used to measure wideband impedance spectra within seconds based on an input sum-of-sines signal having a frequency spread separated by harmonics. The battery (or other energy storage device) is excited with a sum-of-sines current signal that has a duration of at least one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured and synchronously detected at each frequency of interest to determine the impedance spectra. This technique was successfully simulated using a simplified battery model and then verified with commercially available Sanyo lithium-ion cells. Simulations revealed the presence of a start-up transient effect when only one period of the lowest frequency is included in the excitation signal. This transient effect appears to only influence the low-frequency impedance measurements and can be reduced when a longer input signal is used. Furthermore, lithium-ion cell testing has indicated that the transient effect does not seem to impact the charge transfer resistance in the mid-frequency region. The degradation rates for the charge transfer resistance measured from the HCSD technique were very similar to the changes observed from standardized impedance spectroscopy methods. Results from these studies, therefore, indicate that HCSD is a viable, rapid alternative approach to acquiring impedance spectra.

Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch; William H. Morrison

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

GRR/Section 11-FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment 11FDCNHPASection106EffectsAssessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Regulations & Policies National Historic Preservation Act 36 CFR 800 - Protection of Historic Properties Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11FDCNHPASection106EffectsAssessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Federal agency must proceed to the assessment of adverse effects when

184

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

An assessment of potential health impacts on Utrok Atoll from exposure to cesium-137 (137Cs) and plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Residual fallout contamination from the nuclear test program in the Marshall Islands is a concern to Marshall Islanders because of the potential health risks associated with exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment. Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been monitoring the amount of fallout radiation delivered to Utrok Atoll residents over the past 4 years. This briefing document gives an outline of our findings from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay monitoring programs. Additional information can be found on the Marshall Islands web site (http://eed.lnl.gov/mi/). Cesium-137 is an important radioactive isotope produced in nuclear detonations and can be taken up from coral soils into locally grown food crop products that form an important part of the Marshallese diet. The Marshall Islands whole body counting program has clearly demonstrated that the majority of Utrok Atoll residents acquire a very small but measurable quantity of cesium-137 in their bodies (Hamilton et al., 2006; Hamilton et. al., 2007a; 2007b;). During 2006, a typical resident of Utrok Atoll received about 3 mrem of radiation from internally deposited cesium-137 (Hamilton et al., 2007a). The population-average dose contribution from cesium-137 is around 2% of the total radiation dose that people normally experience from naturally occurring radiation sources in the Marshall Islands and is thousands of times lower than the level where radiation exposure is known to produce measurable health effects. The existing dose estimates from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay programs are also well below radiological protection standards for protection of the public as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies including the Marshall Islands Nuclear Claim Tribunal (NCT). Similarly, the level of internally deposited plutonium found in Utrok Atoll residents is well within the range normally expected for people living in the Northern Hemisphere. In addition, the preliminary results of the bioassay program on Utrok Atoll (Hamilton et al., 2007b) provide clear evidence that residents of Utrok Atoll have never acquired a significant uptake of plutonium either through an acute exposure event or from long-term chronic exposure to plutonium in the environment. This information and data should provide a level of assurance to the Utrok Atoll population group and its leadership that the dose contribution from exposure to residual radioactive fallout contamination on Utrok Atoll is very low, and is not likely to have any discernible impact on human health. We also estimate that the dose contribution based on current radiological exposure conditions will not produce any additional cancer fatalities (or any other measurable health condition) above that normally expected to arise in a population group of similar size. The potential risks from any genetic illnesses caused by exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment will be even lower still. In conclusion, the data and information developed from the radiological protection monitoring program on Utrok appear to support a consensus that it is safe to live on Utrok Atoll. The health risks from exposure to residual fallout contamination on the atoll are minimal when compared with other lifetime risks that people normally experience, and are very small when compared to the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a group of people.

Hamilton, T

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional FoodsChapter 8 Synergistic/Additive Health Effects of Fish Oil and Bio-Active Agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods Chapter 8 Synergistic/Additive Health Effects of Fish Oil and Bio-Active Agents Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Downloadable pdf...

187

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 7 Formation, Analysis, and Health Effects of Oxidized Sterols in Frying Fat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 7 Formation, Analysis, and Health Effects of Oxidized Sterols in Frying Fat Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

188

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 13 Effect of Feeding and Then Depleteing a High Fruit and Vegetable Diet on Oxidizability in Human Serum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 13 Effect of Feeding and Then Depleteing a High Fruit and Vegetable Diet on Oxidizability in Human Serum Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - B

189

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 14 Effect of Dietary Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Infancy on Both Visual and Neural Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 14 Effect of Dietary Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Infancy on Both Visual and Neural Development Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Bioch

190

Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Health Print E-mail Climate change can have a number of direct and indirect effects on human health. For example, rising temperatures can contribute to the number of deaths...

191

Assessing the Effect of Mercury Emissions from Contaminated Soil at Natural Gas Gate Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of mercury emissions from contaminated soil at natural gas distribution stations is presented. The effects were estimated as part of a risk assessment that included inhalation and multimedia exposure pathways. The purpose of the paper ...

A. Roffman; K. Macoskey; R. P. Shervill

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) Code are described and critiqued. The major elements analyzed are those concerning dosimetry, early effects, and late effects. The published comments on the models are summarized, as are the important findings since the publication of the RSS.

Cooper, D.W.; Evans, J.S.; Jacob, N.; Kase, K.R.; Maletskos, C.J.; Robertson, J.B.; Smith, D.G.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

New Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New Zealand Agency/Company /Organization New Zealand Ministry of the Environment Sector Energy, Climate Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publica Country New Zealand Australia and New Zealand References Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New Zealand [1] "This Guidance Manual: provides projections of future climate change around New Zealand compares these projections with present climate extremes and variations identifies potential effects on local government functions and

194

EA-0896; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center For Nuclear Medicine Research In Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West 6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 1.1. Description 1.2 Alternatives 1.3 Affected Environment 1.4 Construction Impacts 1.5 Operating Impacts 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Description of the Proposed Action 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operation Activities 3.3 The No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources

195

Risk assessment of the health liabilities from exposure to toxic metals found in the composted material of Air Force municipal solid waste. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis assesses the risk of the health liabilities from exposure to toxic metals found in the composted material of Air Force municipal solid waste (MSW). The goal is to determine the probability that the composted MSW could be a health hazard if it were used as a soil amendment. The research limited the assessment of the exposure risk to heavy metals found in raw MSW and its resulting compost. The thesis uses reviews of present literature to examine the food and soil ingestion exposure pathways. These pathways are assessed using the heavy metal concentrations found in MSW compost and the soil-plant partition coefficients of vegetables grown in soil mixed with sewage sludge or soil irrigated with sewage sludge or soil irrigated with sewage sludge leachate. The recommendation resulting from this research is that the Air Force should not use MSW composting as part of its future solid waste management plan. This alternative to landfilling contains a chronic health risk that is greater than the Environmental Protection Agency's guideline. If the Air Force would use MSW composting in the future, it may endanger Air Force personnel and others who use the compost created from Air Force MSW. Risk assessment, Heavy metals, Recycling municipal solid waste, Pollution, Composting.

Merrymon, T.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Research Programs on Low-Level Radiation Health Effects Supported by FEPCO  

SciTech Connect

The federation of Electric Power Companies (FEPCO) of Japan has been supporting several research projects on low-level radiation health effects for the purpose of the following: 1. to assist in the establishment of a reasonable system of radiation protection; 2. to release the public from unnecessary fear of ionizing radiation. We present some of the findings and current research programs funded or supported by FEPCO.

Kaneko, Masahito

1999-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

197

Program on Technology Innovation: Health Effects of Organic Aerosols: An EPRI/NARSTO Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI-NARSTO Health Effects of Organic Aerosols Workshop was held in Palo Alto, California on October 24-25, 2006. The workshop was intended to further our understanding of the organic fraction of ambient particulate matter (PM) and associated organic gases. The composition of organic aerosol is very complex, varying in accordance with physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere and comprising numerous organic compounds of both anthropogenic and natural origin. The workshop focused on organic ae...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Health Effects of Subchronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive laboratory-based evaluation of selected respiratory and cardiac health hazards of subchronic (up to 6 months) inhalation of simulated key components of 'downwind plume' emissions of coal combustion. This project was performed as an integral part of a joint government-industry program termed the 'National Environmental Respiratory Center' (NERC), which is aimed at disentangling the roles of different physical-chemical air pollutants and their sources in the health effects associated statistically with air pollution. The characterization of the exposure atmosphere and the health assays were identical to those employed in the NERC protocols used to evaluate other pollution source emissions, such as diesel, gasoline, and wood combustion. The project had two phases, each encompassing multiple tasks. Guidelines for the composition of the exposure atmosphere were set by consensus of an expert workshop. Development of the capability to generate the exposure atmosphere and pilot studies of the comparative exposure composition using two coal types were accomplished in Phase 1. In Phase 2, the toxicological study was conducted using Powder River Basin Sub-bituminous coal. NETL provided 50% support for the work in Phase 1 and had intended to provide 20% support for the work in Phase 2. Phase 1 is completed and Phase 2 is in the final stages. All animal exposures were completed without incident, and the composition of the exposure atmospheres met the targets. All of the health sample collections are completed, but some samples remain to be analyzed. Data summaries and final statistical analysis of results remain to be completed. The goal is to submit all publications before the end of FY-08. Repeated exposure to simulated downwind coal emissions caused some significant health effects, but the number of effects tended to be fewer than those caused by the other NERC exposures (diesel and gasoline emissions and hardwood smoke). the lowest concentration, a dilution containing approximately 100 {micro}g particulate matter (PM)/m{sup 3}, was a no-effects level for nearly all measured variables. One of the most interesting findings was that few, if indeed any, health outcomes appeared to be caused by the PM component of the exposure. This finding strongly suggests that PM simulating the major contributions of coal combustion to environmental PM is of very low toxicity.

Joe Mauderly

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

199

Assessment of transboundary environmental effects in the Pearl River Delta Region: Is there a role for strategic environmental assessment?  

SciTech Connect

China's EIA Law does not require transboundary proposals to be assessed, despite recognition of this globally, for example in the Espoo Convention and Kiev Protocol, and in the European EIA and SEA Directives. In a transboundary context assessment within a state is unusual, as regulating these effects is primarily about the relationship between states. However where a state has more than one legal system such as in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Region of southern China, transboundary effects should also be addressed. Yet despite the geographical connections between Guangdong Province in mainland China (where the EIA Law applies) and the Hong Kong and Macau Special Administrative Regions (which have their own provisions, neither of which requires transboundary assessments), EIA and SEA are carried out separately. Coordinated or joint approaches to transboundary assessment are generally absent, with the legal autonomy of Hong Kong and Macau a major constraint. As a result institutional responses at the policy level have developed. The article considers global experiences with regulating transboundary EIA and SEA, and analyses potential application to land use, transport and air and water planning in the PRD Region. If applied, benefits may include prevention or mitigation of cumulative effects, broader public participation, and improvements to environmental governance. The PRD Region experience may encourage China to conduct and coordinate EIA and SEA processes with neighbouring states, which has been non-existent or extremely limited to date.

Marsden, Simon, E-mail: simon.marsden@flinders.edu.au

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Evaluating the Effects of Power Plants on Aquatic Communities: Guidelines for Selection of Assessment Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines for selecting methods to estimate effects of cooling water withdrawals on aquatic populations and communities. The report is a companion to the EPRI 1999 report TR-112013, "Catalog of Assessment Methods for Evaluating Effects of Power Plant Operations on Aquatic Communities." These two documents describe approaches for estimating the magnitude of cooling water intake structure effects as part of assessing the potential for adverse environmental impact (AEI) under Section 3...

2002-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Human Health Risk Assessment for Petroleum Refining Industry of the Remaining Air Toxics after MACT I Emissions Reductions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inhalation risks on human health for hazardous air pollutants emitted from MACT I petroleum refining industry were determined using EPA HEM-3 Program. Methodology included compiling… (more)

Roa, Nadia C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Health Effects of SubChronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sara M. Pletcher sara M. Pletcher Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4236 sara.pletcher@netl.doe.gov Joe L. Mauderly Principal Investigator Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute 2425 Ridgecrest Drive, SE Albuquerque, NM 87108-5129 505-348-9432 jmauderl@lrri.org Environmental and Water Resources HealtH effects of sub-cHronic inHalation of simulated downwind coal combustion emissions Background Emissions from coal-fired power plants and their associated atmospheric reaction products contribute to environmental air pollution and are often cited as a critical cause of pollution-related health risks. However, there have been few toxicological evaluations of the heath hazards resulting from the inhalation of coal combustion

204

Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

Tenforde, T.S.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

207

Health and environmental effects of oil and gas technologies: research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses health and environmental issues associated with oil and gas technologies as they are currently perceived - both those that exist and those that are expected to emerge over the next two decades. The various sections of this report contain discussions of specific problem areas and relevant new research activities which should be pursued. This is not an exhaustive investigation of all problem areas, but the report explores a wide range of issues to provide a comprehensive picture of existing uncertainties, trends, and other factors that should serve as the focus of future research. The problem areas of major concern include: effects of drilling fluids, offshore accidents, refineries and worker health, and biota and petroleum spills, indoor air pollution, information transfer, and unconventional resources. These are highlighted in the Executive Summary because they pose serious threats to human health and the environment, and because of the sparcity of accumulated knowledge related to their definition. Separate abstracts have been prepared for selected sections of this report for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

Brown, R. D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Economic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax Increase in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tobacco Control Section California Department of HealthExcise Tax Increase in California Table 1 – Tax increase= Tobacco Control Section California Department of Health

California Department of Health Services; Tobacco Control Section

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Economic and Health Effects of a State Cigarette Excise Tax Increase in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tobacco Control Section California Department of HealthExcise Tax Increase in California Table 1 – Tax increase= Tobacco Control Section California Department of Health

California Department of Health Services

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Organizational Readiness in Specialty Mental Health Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the organizational social context (OSC) of mental healthOrganizational Readiness in Specialty Mental Health Careorganizational assessment in specialty mental health, in

Hamilton, Alison B.; Cohen, Amy N.; Young, Alexander S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

ORISE: Capabilities in Worker Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Research Worker Health Research ORISE performs statistical analyses, epidemiologic research and hazards assessments to evaluate workforce health. Medical Data Management...

212

Assessment of Environmental Effects of Current Underground and Overhead Transmission Line Construction and Maintenance in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses environmental effects of current underground and overhead transmission line construction and maintenance in the United States.

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

213

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data on an actual power plant transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: methane from coal seams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from the recovery of gas from coalbeds are identified and examined. The technology of methane recovery is described and economic and legal barriers to production are discussed. (ACR)

Ethridge, L.J.; Cowan, C.E.; Riedel, E.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Production of thin-film photovoltaic cells: health and environmental effects  

SciTech Connect

Health and safety hazards in production of major thin-film photovoltaic cells are identified and characterized for their potential to cause health effects. These hazards are identified by examining process data, control technology availability, biomedical effects, and environmental standards. Quantitative estimates of material inputs and outputs and control costs were made on the basis of preliminary engineering designs of hypothetical facilities capable of manufacturing 10 MWp photovoltaic cells a year. The most significant potential hazards are associated with toxic and explosive gases. Emissions of toxic gases during normal operation can be controlled using available control technology. Accidental release of stored gases, however, will pose significant risks to both workers and the public, as atmospheric dispersion computer studies indicate. Possible release preventing options and release control options are examined. Explosive and flammable gases may present significant occupational safety hazards; gas handling systems will need to be carefully designed. High voltages and radio frequency equipment also require close attention for their potential to present occupational hazards. 10 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Fthenakis, V.M.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part 1, Introduction, integration, and summary: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ``other``. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk.

Evans, J.S. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Abrahmson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilbert, E.S. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

IMAGE: An integrated model to assess the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This book is the result of a research project entitled Reference Function for Global Air Pollution CO{sub 2}. It deals with the description of a computer simulation model of the greenhouse effect. This model, IMAGE, tries to capture the fundamentals of the complex problem of climate change in a simplified way. The model is a multidisciplinary product and is based on knowledge from disciplines as economics, atmospheric chemistry, marine and terrestrial biogeochemistry, ecology, climatology, and glaciology. This book might be of interest to any one working in the broad field of climate change. Furthermore, it can be useful for model builders, simulation experts, and mathematicians.

Rotmans, J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

DOE/EA-1329; Environmental Assessment for the Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (8/10/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

329 329 Environmental Assessment for the Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico Final Document Date Prepared: August 10, 2000 Prepared by: Department of Energy, Los Alamos Area Office Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at LANL Environmental Assessment iii August 10, 2000 Contents ACRONYMS AND TERMS ....................................................................................................................................................... v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................................................................................................ vii 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED .......................................................................................................................................................1

219

Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contains varying amounts of radon-222 which becomes dispersed within homes when LPG is used in unvented appliances. Radon-222 decays to alpha-emitting daughter products which are associated with increased lung cancer when inhaled and deposited in the respiratory system. The average dose equivalents to the bronchial epithelium from the use of LPG in unvented kitchen ranges and space heaters are estimated to be about 0.9 and 4.0 mrem/year, respectively. When extrapolated to the United States population at risk, the estimated tracheobronchial dose equivalents are about 20,000 and 10,000 person-rems/year for these appliances, or a total of about 30,000 person-rems/year. These doses are very small compared to other natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation. It is estimated that these low doses would result in less than one lung cancer a year for the total U.S. population. Consequently, the use of LPG containing radon-222 does not contribute significantly to the incidence of lung cancer in the United States.

Gesell, T.F.; Johnson, R.H. Jr; Bernhardt, D.E.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

None

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Health assessment for Alsco Anaconda National Priorities List (NPL) site, Gnadenhutten, Ohio, Region 5. CERCLIS No. OHD057243610. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Alsco Anaconda plant is listed on the National Priorities List. The soil, sludge, ground water, and sediment were sampled. On-site soils are contaminated with manganese at levels of public health concern, 480-7,200 parts per million (ppm). The swamp sediment is contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (Aroclor 1242, 1248, and 1254) at levels of public health concern, less than 0.16-3,000 ppm. Ground water samples show that cyanide (total) (less than 0.02-0.47 ppm), fluoride (less than 0.1-8.7 ppm), nitrate (less than 0.1-21 ppm), and selenium (less than 0.001-0.015 ppm) are at levels of public health concern. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via the ingestion of contaminated biota found in the swamp and of river water after the site has been flooded.

Not Available

1989-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community impacts; environmental and safety engineering for LNG, oil spills, LPG, shale oil waste waters, geothermal liquid waste disposal, compressed air energy storage, and nuclear/fusion fuel cycles; operational and environmental safety studies of decommissioning, environmental monitoring, personnel dosimetry, and analysis of criticality safety; health physics studies; and epidemiological studies. Also included are an author index, organization of PNL charts and distribution lists of the annual report, along with lists of presentations and publications. (DLS)

Baalman, R.W.; Hays, I.D. (eds.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community impacts; environmental and safety engineering for LNG, oil spills, LPG, shale oil waste waters, geothermal liquid waste disposal, compressed air energy storage, and nuclear/fusion fuel cycles; operational and environmental safety studies of decommissioning, environmental monitoring, personnel dosimetry, and analysis of criticality safety; health physics studies; and epidemiological studies. Also included are an author index, organization of PNL charts and distribution lists of the annual report, along with lists of presentations and publications. (DLS)

Baalman, R.W.; Hays, I.D. (eds.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Balancing health effects and economics in the management of radioactive materials  

SciTech Connect

The public perception of the benefits offered by nuclear energy and the risks to health and safety from ionizing radiation has dramatically altered over the fifty years since the advent of nuclear fission. The {open_quotes}Atomic Age{close_quotes} is seldom mentioned anymore. The attitudinal change from the acceptance of nuclear energy as an essential component of national defense, {open_quotes}Atoms for Peace,{close_quotes} and a new, abundant, and clean energy source for mankind to the perception of it as an object of protest and fear has resulted from events that included nuclear fallout from atmospheric weapons testing, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, classified radiation experiments, and a generally hostile news media. As a reflection of public concerns over radiation, federal, state, and local regulations have greatly multiplied in both the types of radioactive materials addressed and the threshold activity levels at which these regulations become effective.

Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M.; Rogers, V.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Health assessment for Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, Palm Beach County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD001447952. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Pratt and Whitney Government Engine Business Division has been in operation as a division of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC) plant since 1958. In the past, materials disposed of in the landfill/incineration trenches at the plant included construction debris, discarded equipment, unknown solid waste from Air Force Plant Number 74, solvents and solvent sludges, asbestos, fuels, paints, pesticide and herbicide container residues, benzonitrite and solvent-contaminated soils, mercury (from bulbs and thermometers), discarded equipment from metal finishing operations, commercial and laboratory chemicals, garbage, and sewage sludge. Based on available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via chemicals in the groundwater and air (wind-blown) and possibly through ingestion of contaminated wildlife.

1989-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

226

Health assessment for Thompson-Hayward Chemical Company, Fresno, Fresno County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD009106220. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Thompson-Hayward Chemical Company site is on the National Priorities List. The five-acre site is part of the former location of an agricultural chemical formulation, packaging, and warehousing plant that was in operation from 1942 until 1981. The environmental contamination on-site consists of pesticides, including DDT (3,800 ppm), toxaphene (100 ppm), dieldrin (5 ppm), Dinoseb (1,000 ppm), PCNB (pentachloronitrobenzene), Guthion, DEF (s,s,s-tributylphosphorotrithioate), chlordane, DBCP, chloroform, and 1,2-dichloroethane in ground water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated ground water.

Not Available

1988-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

227

Health assessment for Cape Fear Wood Preserving, Fayetteville, North Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. NCD003188828. Preliminary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cape Fear Wood Preserving site is listed on the National Priorities List. The site is located in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on the western side of Fayetteville near Highway 401. The site consists of 41 acres of which less than 10 acres were developed by the facility. Wood preserving operations began at the facility in 1953 and continued until 1983. Wood was treated using both creosote and the chromium-copper-arsenic process. Contaminants detected in water samples from on-site monitoring wells included benzene, chromium, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. During earlier investigations, 7 nearby domestic wells in the area were sampled for contamination. The site is considered to be of potential health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances.

Not Available

1989-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

Improving Performance and Quality of Working Life: A Model for Organizational Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving Performance and Quality of Working Life: A Model for Organizational Health Assessment of organizational health blends the pursuit of individual wellness with organiza- tional effectiveness to yield a strategy for economic resilience. This article introduces a novel model for organizational health

Huang, Samuel H.

229

Health assessment for Texarkana Wood Preserving Company, Texarkana, Bowie County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD008056152. Addendum. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Texarkana Wood Preserving Company (TWPC) is a National Priorities List site located in northeastern Texas, at the southern extremity of the City of Texarkana in Bowie County. The TWPC site has been used for various lumber-related activities since the early 1900s and for creosoting operations since the early 1950s. Contaminated soils, groundwater, surface water, and surface water sediments have been detected on and off of the TWPC site. The primary contaminants of concern are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pentachlorophenol, chlorinated dibenzodioxins and chlorinated dibenzofurans. The population at greatest risk of exposure to these contaminants are on-site workers engaged in remedial activities. There are currently no residences or businesses located immediately adjacent to the site and no documentation that contaminated groundwater is being used for potable purposes. The Texarkana Wood Preserving Company site has been evaluated by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) for appropriate follow-up with respect to health activities.

Not Available

1992-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Health assessment for Adrian Municipal Well Field, Adrian, Minnesota, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MND980904023. Preliminary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Adrian Municipal Well Field is listed on the National Priorities List. Adrian is located in Nobles County which is in southwestern Minnesota. In September 1983, 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), a volatile organic compound (VOC), was detected in Municipal Wells 3 and 4. Subsequent sampling in January 1984 indicated increased levels of VOC contamination in Wells 3 and 4. In these sampling events, a number of VOCs were detected. Source identification has also focused on a number of underground storage tanks (USTs) used to store gasoline and fuel oil. Twelve contaminants have been identified in ground water from the surficial aquifer. Subsurface soil contamination has also been detected. A Soil Organic Vapor survey measured both total ionizable hydrocarbons and the gasoline constituents benzene, toluene, and total xylenes at 2-3 feet feet above the water table. Because of the high concentrations of gasoline contaminants in the soil and ground water at the site, there exists the potential for combustion or explosion if gasoline vapors migrate from these media into nearby businesses or homes. Several of the USTs contained or did contain fuel oil. Fuel oil contains semi-volatile constituents (e.g., polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, etc.) not found in gasoline. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ground water, and potentially surface water, air, and biota.

Not Available

1989-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

231

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI HEALTH SYSTEM NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES Effective Date: December 1, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for intelligence, counter-intelligence, and other national security activities authorized by law. v) Protective Security and Intelligence Activities. We may release Health Information to authorized federal officials

Miami, University of

232

The Effect of Placement Change on Foster Children's Utilization of Emergency Mental Health Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. R. (2008). Children's mental health emergencies- part2: Emergency department evaluation and treatment of childrenhealth disorders. Pediatric Emergency Care, 24(7), Barth, R.

Fawley-King, Kya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Can tailoring increase elaboration of health messages delivered via an adaptive educational site on adolescent sexual health and decision making?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tailoring, the development of health messages based on assessment of key psychosocial variables that influence a prescribed behavior, has been gaining ground as an effective health education approach. The efficacy of this approach is based on the assumption ... Keywords: human computer interaction, information processing

Juliann Cortese; Mia Liza A. Lustria

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Public health assessment for Redwing Carriers Inc. /Saraland, Saraland, Mobile County, Alabama, Region 4. Cerclis No. ALD980844385. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Redwing Carriers, Inc.,/ Saraland Apartment site is located at 527 U.S. Highway 43 in the City of Saraland, Mobile County, Alabama. Redwing Carriers, Inc. owned and operated a trucking terminal used for parking, maintaining, and cleaning trucks and trailers. Redwing transported a variety of substances including asphalt, diesel fuel, chemicals, and pesticides. The operation began in 1961 and continued until 1971. Redwing emptied residue from cleaning the trucks into pits and surrounding ditches at the site. Investigations since then have revealed on-site contamination of soil and groundwater. Contaminants of concern include volatile organic compounds, heavy metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and pesticides. The Redwing Carriers/Saraland Apartments site is categorized as a public health hazard based on potential for skin irritation and exposure to benzo(a)pyrene and other PAHs from the ingestion of 5 grams per day of tar-like material by pica children at the site.

Not Available

1994-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

235

Health assessment for Radiation Technology, Inc. , Rockaway, Morris County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD047684451. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Radiation Technology, Incorporated (RTI) is currently on the National Priorities List. The RTI property is located at 108 Lake Denmark Road, in Rockaway Township, Morris County, New Jersey. Beginning in 1980, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and the Rockaway Township Health Department (RTHD) conducted numerous facility and area inspections of the RTI site. NJDEP undertook a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) in 1986. Groundwater sampling results from Phase I of RI/FS revealed excessive amount of VOCs in the RTI study area. The potential human exposures may include ingestion of the VOCs-contaminated well water, dermal absorption and/or inhalation from cleaning or showering activities.

Not Available

1990-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Incentives in Water Management Reform: Assessing the Effect on Water Use,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incentives in Water Management Reform: Assessing the Effect on Water Use, Incentives in Water Management Reform: Assessing the Effect on Water Use, Production and Poverty in the Yellow River Basin Speaker(s): Jinixia Wang Date: May 22, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The purpose of this presentation is to better understand water management reform in China's rural communities, focusing on the effect of incentives to water managers on the nation's water resources and the welfare of the rural population. Based on a survey study in the Yellow River Basin, our findings show that Water User Associations and contracting have begun to systematically replace traditional forms of collective management. The analysis demonstrates, however, that it is not a nominal implementation of the reform that matters, but rather it is a creation of new management

238

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B, B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/003 Publication 9285.7-01 B December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper N O T I C E The policies set out in this document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

239

Public health assessment for Rockwool Industries, Belton, Bell County, Texas, Region 6, CERCLIS number TXD066379645. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Rockwool Industries, Inc. (RWI) National Priorities List site is a 100 acre site one-mile east of downtown Belton in Bell County, Texas. The Facility manufactured two types of mineral wool insulation: Blow wool and batt wool. Three main contaminant source areas have been identified at the site. Source 1, in the middle portion of the site, includes contaminated soil associated with the South Shot Pile. Source 2, in the northern portion of the site, includes contaminated soils associated with the Cemetery Shot Pile. Source 3, in the northwest portion of the site includes contaminated soils associated with the Cemetery Shot Pile. The primary waste types at the site include spent iron shot and baghouse dust. Secondary waste types include boiler blowdown water, stormwater runoff, recovered groundwater, and bricks. The Texas Department of Health (TDH) and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) evaluated the environmental information available for the site and identified several exposure situations for evaluation. These exposure situations include possible contact with site contaminants in the soil, surface water, sediment, and groundwater. The potential for exposure to site contaminants through the food chain was also examined. A brief review of the evaluation, organized by hazard category, is presented.

NONE

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Review A New Tool for Epidemiology: The Usefulness of Dynamic-Agent Models in Understanding Place Effects on Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major focus of recent work on the spatial patterning of health has been the study of how features of residential environments or neighborhoods may affect health. Place effects on health emerge from complex interdependent processes in which individuals interact with each other and their environment and in which both individuals and environments adapt and change over time. Traditional epidemiologic study designs and statistical regression approaches are unable to examine these dynamic processes. These limitations have constrained the types of questions asked, the answers received, and the hypotheses and theoretical explanations that are developed. Agent-based models and other systems-dynamics models may help to address some of these challenges. Agent-based models are computer representations of systems consisting of heterogeneous microentities that can interact and change/adapt over time in response to other agents and features of the environment. Using these models, one can observe how macroscale dynamics emerge from microscale interactions and adaptations. A number of challenges and limitations exist for agent-based modeling. Nevertheless, use of these dynamic models may complement traditional epidemiologic analyses and yield additional insights into the processes involved and the interventions that may be most useful. computer simulation; environment and public health; epidemiologic methods; health behavior; models, theoretical; residence characteristics; systems theory

Amy H. Auchincloss; Ana V. Diez Roux

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Chernobyl Studies Project - working group 7.0 environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, October 1993--January 1994  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project was begun as part of a cooperative agreement between the US and the former USSR, (quote) To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future reactor accident (quote). Most of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus has now turned primarily to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are extensively engaged in case-control and cohort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children and in the Ukraine. A major part of the effort is providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and providing support and equipment for the medical teams. This document contains reports on progress in the following task areas: Management; External Dose; Hydrological Transport; Chromosome Painting Dosimetry; Stochastic Effects; Thyroid Studies; and Leukemia Studies.

Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Appraising the sustainability of project alternatives: An increasing role for cumulative effects assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating and comparing development alternatives with regard to sustainability is an important goal for comprehensive project appraisal. In the United States, this component has been largely missing from standard environmental impact assessment practice. Cumulative effects assessment provides a way to appraise the sustainability of project alternatives in terms of their probable contributions to long-term trends affecting the condition of valued environmental components. Sustainability metrics and predictors are being developed as criteria for rating systems and evaluation processes that are applied to community planning, building design, and transportation infrastructure. Increasing interest in adaptive management is also providing cost-effective solutions to optimizing safety and function throughout the long-term operation of a facility or infrastructure. Recent federal legislation is making it easier to integrate sustainability features into development alternatives through early, community-based planning.

Senner, Robert, E-mail: robin.senner@ch2m.com

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Containing a trans Double Bond on Body Composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Containing a trans Double Bond on Body Composition eChapters Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Contai

244

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system concept development and evaluation program: atmospheric effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken a preliminary, three-year program to investigate the impacts of the construction and operation of a satellite power system, of unprecedented scale. The Department of Energy's program, titled The Concept Development and Evaluation Program, focused its investigations on a Reference System description that calls for the use of either silicon (Si) or gallium aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) photovoltaic cells on 60 satellites to be constructed in GEO over a 30-yr period. Rectennas would be constructed on the ground to receive microwave energy from the satellites. Each satellite-rectenna pair is designed to produce 5 GW of power on an essentially continuous basis for use as a baseload power source for an electric power distribution system. The environmental assessment part of the program was divided into five interdependent task areas. The present document constitutes the final technical report on one of the five task areas, the Assessment of the Atmospheric Effects, and as such presents an in-depth summary of work performed during the assessment program. The issues associated with SPS activities in the troposphere are examined. These include tropospheric weather modification related to rectenna operations and rocket launches, and air quality impacts related to rocketlaunch ground clouds. Then progressing upward through the various levels of the atmosphere, the principal middle and upper atmospheric effects associated with rocket effluents are analyzed. Finally, all of the potential SPS atmospheric effects are summarized.

Rote, D.M.; Brubaker, K.L.; Lee, J.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Solar energy research at Sandia Laboratories and its effects on health and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various solar energy research and development projects at Sandia Laboratories are discussed with emphasis on the primary health and safety hazard associated with solar concentration systems. This limiting hazard is chorioretinal damage. The unique safety and health hazards associated with solar energy collector and receiver systems cannot be measured yet, but progress is being made rapidly. Research is continuing, especially for eye hazards, with more extensive work planned.

Young, L.L. III

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The potential human health effect(s) of the metal uranium in the environment. Report on the known human health effects associated with the exposure to the metal uranium  

SciTech Connect

Concern over the levels of the metal uranium in the environment as a result of industrial activities has been expressed by several Federal and State agencies. This concern is associated with potential human health effects of this metal on kidney function and bone formation. Although limits for the Metal uranium in the environment remain to be set, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently in the process of establishing guidance limits for this metal in water and soil. These limits will be established for both the metal and the associated radioactivity. The suggested limits currently being considered for water and soil are, 20 pCi/liter and 10 pCi/gram wet weight, respectively. For naturally occurring uranium EPA assumes that 1 ug of uranium metal equals 0.67 pCi at equilibrium (i.e. at equilibrium the mass ratio of {sup 234}uranium to {sup 238}uranium is small but their activities are equal). Thus the limits for water and soil on weight basis for the uranium metal would be 30 ug/liter and 15 ug/gram wet weight, respectively. These limits are being established based on the potential increase in cancer death in populations that exceed this limit. Since there does not appear to be a significant correlation between cancer deaths and.uranium metal exposure (see discussion below), these limits will probably be established based on the known association between radionuclides exposure and cancer deaths. The exposure limits for other health effects such as kidney damage and retardation in bone formation apparently are not being considered by EPA.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

ORISE: Worker Health Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Health Research Worker Health Research Worker Health Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides technical assistance to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies by performing specialized worker health research to assess the health of workers and other populations. Statistical methods, epidemiologic research and hazard assessments are core ORISE worker health research competencies. Because information technology is an integral part of the epidemiologic research process, ORISE also capitalizes on its benefits by organizing worker health research data into manageable databases. By providing DOE and the scientific community with accessible information on the long-term health outcomes of occupational exposures, ORISE is helping improve the

248

Assessment of the Effective Dose Equivalent for External Photon Radiation: Volume 2: Calculational Techniques for Estimating Externa l Effective Dose Equivalent from Dosimeter Readings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent revisions to the radiation protection standards contained in Title 10 Part 20 of the Code of Federal Regulations require nuclear power plants to assess a worker's "effective dose equivalent" (EDE). This report explains the concept of effective dose equivalent and describes research to improve the dosimetric methods presently used for assessing EDE.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

A consensus support model based on linguistic information for the initial-self assessment of the EFQM in health care organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The improvement of the quality of the services is one of the primary sources of competitive advantage in health care organizations. As customers typically search for higher quality of care when choosing treatments, health plans and providers, the health ... Keywords: Consensus, EFQM, Group decision making, Health care organizations, Linguistic modeling

J. M. Moreno-Rodr?Guez; F. J. Cabrerizo; I. J. PéRez; M. A. Mart?Nez

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Long-Term Benthic Macroinvertebrate Community Monitoring to Assess Pollution Abatement Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

The benthic macroinvertebrate community of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in East Tennessee was monitored for 18 years to evaluate the effectiveness of a water pollution control program implemented at a major United States (U.S.) Department of Energy facility. Several actions were implemented to reduce and control releases of pollutants into the headwaters of the stream. Four of the most significant actions were implemented during different time periods, which allowed assessment of each action. Macroinvertebrate samples were collected annually in April from three locations in EFPC (EFK24, EFK23, and EFK14) and two nearby reference streams from 1986 through 2003. Significant improvements occurred in the macroinvertebrate community at the headwater sites (EFK24 and EFK23) after implementation of each action, while changes detected 9 km further downstream (EFK14) could not be clearly attributed to any of the actions. Because the stream was impacted at its origin, invertebrate recolonization was primarily limited to aerial immigration, thus, recovery has been slow. As recovery progressed, abundances of small pollution-tolerant taxa (e.g., Orthocladiinae chironomids) decreased and longer lived taxa colonized (e.g., hydropsychid caddisflies, riffle beetles, Baetis). While assessments lasting three to four years may be long enough to detect a response to new pollution controls at highly impacted locations, more time may be needed to understand the full effects. Studies on the effectiveness of pollution controls can be improved if impacted and reference sites are selected to maximize spatial and temporal trending, and if a multidisciplinary approach is used to broadly assess environmental responses (e.g., water quality trends, invertebrate and fish community assessments, toxicity testing, etc.).

Smith, John G [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Christensen, Sigurd W [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Trust in health infomediaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health infomediaries play an increasingly critical role in providing support for people's health and wellness decisions. Effectiveness of health infomediaries depends on people's trust in them. In this paper, we conceptualize a comprehensive synthesis ... Keywords: Health infomediary, Information quality, Risk belief, System quality, Trust, Trust beliefs, Trust signs

Jaeki Song; Fatemeh "Mariam" Zahedi

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Chernobyl Studies Project: Working group 7.0, Environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, March--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1988, the US and the former-USSR signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MOC) for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety; this MOC was a direct result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4 and the following efforts by the two countries to implement a joint program to improve the safety of nuclear power plants and to understand the implications of environmental releases. A Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS) was formed to implement the MOC. The JCCCNRS established many working groups; most of these were the responsibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as far as the US participation was concerned. The lone exception was Working Group 7 on Environmental Transport and Health Effects, for which the US participation was the responsibility of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of Working Group 7 was succintly stated to be, ``To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future nuclear reactor accident.`` To implement the work DOE then formed two subworking groups: 7.1 to address Environmental Transport and 7.2 to address Health Effects. Thus, the DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project began. The majority of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus is now turned to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are involved in and making progress on the case-control and co-hort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children. Dosimetric aspects are a fundamental part of these studies. We are currently working to implement similar studies in Ukraine. A major part of the effort of these projects is supporting these studies, both by providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and by providing support and equipment for the medical teams.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory  

SciTech Connect

Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m{sup 3} (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

Al-Khatib, Issam A. [Institute of Environmental and Water Studies, Birzeit University, P.O. Box 14, Birzeit, Ramallah, West Bank (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)], E-mail: ikhatib@birzeit.edu; Sato, Chikashi [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

THE HEALTH EFFECTS IN WOMEN EXPOSED TO LOW-LEVELS OF IONIZING RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Effects of Ionizing Radiation. New York, United Nations,Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR III). The EffectsLevels of Ionizing Radiation. Washington, D.C. , National

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

www.elsevier.com/locate/econbase School finance reform: Assessing general equilibrium effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1994 the state of Michigan implemented one of the most comprehensive school finance reforms undertaken to date in any of the states. Understanding the effects of the reform is thus of value in informing other potential reform initiatives. In addition, the reform and associated changes in the economic environment provide an opportunity to assess whether a simple general equilibrium model can be of value in framing the study of such reform initiatives. In this paper, we present and use such a model to derive predictions about the effects of the reform on housing prices and neighborhood demographic compositions. Broadly, our analysis implies that the effects of the reform and changes in the economic environment are likely to have been reflected primarily in housing prices and only modestly on neighborhood demographics. We find that evidence for the Detroit metropolitan area from the decade encompassing the reform is largely consistent with the predictions of the model.

Maria Marta Ferreyra A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Risk Assessment of Toxic Pollutants From Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities operating coal-fired power plants must weigh the cost of controlling toxic releases against the risk of adverse human health effects. An EPRI-developed analytic framework offers guidance for such assessments, outlining mathematical modeling procedures for tracking pollutants in the environment and for estimating potential health risks to nearby populations.

1987-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 3. Generator routines  

SciTech Connect

The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for utilization by the hydraulic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System, a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display is described. This is the third of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

Friedrichs, D.R.; Argo, R.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Review and Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential health effects of low levels of radiation have predominantly been based on those effects observed at high levels of radiation. The authors have reviewed more than 200 percent publications in radiobiology and epidermiology related to low dose radiation and concluded that recent radiobiological studies at low-doses; that doses low dose radiation research should to holistic, systems-based approaches to develop models that define the shape of the dose-response relationships at low doses; and that these results should be combined with the latest epidermiology to produce a comprehensive understanding of radiation effects that addresses both damage, likely with a linear effect, and response, possibly with non-linear consequences.

Dauer, Lawrence T.; Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Morgan, William F.; Stram, Daniel; Tran, Phung

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Assessment of the Effects of Tidal Mixing in the Kuril Straits on the Formation of the North Pacific Intermediate Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess accurately the effect of tidal mixing in the Kuril Straits on the formation of the North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW), the spatial distribution of diapycnal diffusivity recently obtained by the present authors is incorporated into ...

Yuki Tanaka; Toshiyuki Hibiya; Yoshihiro Niwa

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Potential Health Effects of Crystalline Silica Exposures from Coal Fly Ash: A Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of crystalline silica in coal fly ash (CFA) depends on a variety of factors, including the amount of silica in the pre-combustion coal, the combustion process, and emission control technologies among others. Occupational exposures to crystalline silica in CFA are related to these factors as well as activities associated with exposures and durations of exposure. This review summarizes the occupational and environmental health literature relevant to the presence of crystalline silica in CFA from...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed ProcessingChapter 1 Oil and Oilseed-Based Bioactive Compounds and Their Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed Processing Chapter 1 Oil and Oilseed-Based Bioactive Compounds and Their Health Effects Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Oil and Oil

263

ORISE: Hazard Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and collaborators have, for example, conducted an assessment of health outcomes among nuclear technology workers at the RocketdyneAtomics International (AI) Santa Susana Field...

264

PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND SURVEILLANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery #12;2 Louisiana State University Health Sciences CenterDISASTER PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND SURVEILLANCE TOOLKIT (Disaster-PAST) Methods to Enhance

265

Health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Volume 6 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. [In California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants, emphasizing impacts which may occur through emissions into the atmosphere, and treating other impacts briefly. Federal regulations as well as California state and local regulations are reviewed. Emissions are characterized by power plant type, including: coal-fired, oil-fired, gas-fired, combined cycle and advanced fossil-fuel plants; and liquid and vapor geothermal systems. Dispersion and transformation of emissions are treated. The state of knowledge of health effects, based on epidemiological, physiological, and biomedical studies, is reviewed.

Case, G.D.; Bertolli, T.A.; Bodington, J.C.; Choy, T.A.; Nero, A.V.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Ocean Health and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2002. Indicators of ocean health and human health:Nature 423:280–283. Oceans and Human Health Act. 2003. S.Editorial Guest Editorial Ocean Health and Human Health

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

An evaluation of theories concerning the health effects of low-dose radiation exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The danger of high, acute doses of radiation is well documented, but the effects of low-dose radiation below 100 mSv is still heavily debated. Four theories concerning the effects of lowdose radiation are presented here: ...

Wei, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Jay)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Addendum to the User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an addendum to the User's Guide for EPRI's RIVRISK analytic framework, Version 5.0. RIVRISK can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. Some minor inconsistencies between the original User's Guide (EPRI Report 1000733) and the model examples were discovered during model applications. This addendum provides modified pages of the User's Guide that correct those inconsistencies. Those planning to use RIVR...

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

269

Biological and Health Effects of EM and Acoustic - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009... ago suggested that simple plants – grasses, beans, and corn-exhibited varying effects in simulated geomagnetic fields and in electric fields.

270

Medicaid Expansions and Welfare Contractions: Offsetting Effects on Prenatal Care and Infant Health?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ruggles. "When Do Women Use AFDC & Food Stamps? The Dynamicsthe Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program.Thus, the loss of AFDC effectively raised the administrative

Currie, Janet; Grogger, Jeffrey

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Independent Oversight Assessment of Environmental Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site May 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety...

272

Is Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) an Effective Tool to Conserve Biodiversity Against Transport Infrastructure Development?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of transport infrastructure plans and programmes.national trans- port infrastructure developments includingnationwide transport infrastructure developments including

Varga, Csaba

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An Improved Model for Assessing the Effectiveness of Hydrogen Water Chemistry in Boiling Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For nearly two decades, hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) has been used as a remedial measure to protect boiling water reactor (BWR) structural components against intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In this paper, computer modeling is used to evaluate the effectiveness of HWC for BWRs. The DEMACE computer code, equipped with an updated chemical reaction set, G values, and a Sherwood number, is adopted to predict the chemical species concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) responses to HWC in the primary heat transport circuit of a typical BWR. In addition, plant-specific neutron and gamma dose rate profiles are reported. DEMACE is calibrated against the data of oxygen concentration variation as a function of feedwater hydrogen concentration in the recirculation system of the Chinshan Unit 2 BWR.The determinant result for assessing the effectiveness of HWC is the ECP. For a typical BWR/4-type reactor such as Chinshan Unit 2, it is found that protecting the core channel and the lower plenum outlet is quite difficult even though the feedwater hydrogen concentration is as high as 2 ppm, based on the predicted species concentration and ECP data. However, for regions other than those mentioned earlier, a moderate amount of hydrogen added to the feedwater (0.9 ppm) is enough to achieve the desired protection against IGSCC.

Yeh, T.-K. [National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan (China); Chu Fang [Taiwan Power Company (China)

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sleep Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleep Assessment Sleep Assessment 1 | Thank you for taking the time to complete this extensive form. Sleep disturbances and/or fatigue are most often the result of many factors. In order to best treat your condition we need to understand your symptoms and history. Please bring your completed assessment form to your appointment. To schedule an appointment please call 505 844-HBES (4237). Name: Employee ID#: Date: Male Female Age: Health Plan : United BCBSNM Other: Referred by: Sleep and Health History In general, would you describe your sleep as: Refreshing Not Refreshing How would you rate your sleep? Very Good Good Adequate Poor Very Poor How would you describe your sleep problem? Sleep Problem (indicate all that apply) Duration of problem

275

Medicaid Expansions and Welfare Contractions: Offsetting Effects on Prenatal Care and Infant Health?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ruggles. "When Do Women Use AFDC & Food Stamps? The DynamicsA i d to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program.Thus, the loss of AFDC effectively raised the administrative

Currie, Janet; Grogger, Jeffrey T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1978 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is in four sections, corresponding to the program elements: technology impacts, environmental control engineering, operational and environmental compliance and human health studies. Each section was abstracted and indexed separately. (JGB)

Bair, W.J.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant Using a Revised Arsenic Bioconcentratio n Factor for Edible Fish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data from an actual power plant that have been transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state. Values of arsenic concentrations in similar ecosystem settings were applied to calculate its contributions to risk.BackgroundThere is increased scientific and regulatory interest in the suite of risks to human health and ecosystems ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1979 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health, and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Part 5 of the 1979 Annual Report to the Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for the Environment presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Technology Impacts, the Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview, and the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The report is in four sections, corresponding to the program elements: technology impacts, environmental control engineering, operational and environmental compliance, and human health studies. In each section, articles describe progress made during FY 1979 on individual projects.

Baalman, R.W.; Dotson, C.W. (eds.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Health assessment for Ellsworth Air Force Base, Ellsworth AFB, Pennington County, South Dakota, Region 8. Cerclis No. SD2571924644. September 30, 1993. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Ellsworth Air Force Base (EAFB) is a 4,858 acre facility in southwestern South Dakota, 5.7 miles northeast of Rapid City. EAFB has handled or disposed of general refuse, construction debris, and hazardous chemicals (primarily fuels and solvents) since it was activated in July of 1942. ATSDR has determined that EAFB is an indeterminate public health hazard because all of the information needed to evaluate the health hazards posed by the nine sites on EAFB has not been collected.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Policy to implementation: evidence-based practice in community mental health ¿ study protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institutes of Health; OSC: Organizational Social Context;evidence from organizational theory to mental health serviceon Youth Mental health: Assessing the organizational social

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Distribution Principles in Health Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that "the organizational model for the health care system wehealth care system functioned effectively to implement central plans ("the organizational

Bringedal, Berit

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

PUBLIC HEALTH STATEMENT MERCURY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Public Health Statement is the summary chapter from the Toxicological Profile for Mercury. It is one in a series of Public Health Statements about hazardous substances and their health effects. A shorter version, the ToxFAQs™, is also available. This information is important because this substance may harm you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as other federal and state agencies. From radiological facility audits and reviews to dose modeling and technical evaluations, ORISE is nationally-recognized for its health physics support to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the United States. Our health physics services include: Environmental survey Applied health physics projects We work with government agencies and organizations to identify, measure and assess the presence of radiological materials during the D&D process. ORISE

284

Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and post-burn to determine changes in the gravel content of the surface layer so as to quantify inflationary or deflationary responses to fire and to reveal the ability of the surface to resist post-fire erosive stresses. Measures of bulk density, water repellency, water retention, and hydraulic conductivity will be used to characterize changes in infiltration rates and water storage capacity following the fire. Samples will also be analyzed to quantify geochemical changes including changes in soil pH, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, and the concentration of macro nutrients (e.g. N, P, K) and other elements such as Na, Mg, Ca, that are critical to the post-fire recovery revegetation. Soil CO2 emissions will be measured monthly for one year following the burn to document post-fire stimulation of carbon turnover and soil biogenic emissions. Surface and subsurface temperature measurements at and near monitoring installations will be used to document fire effects on electronic equipment. The results of this study will be used to bridge the gaps in knowledge on the effects of fire on engineered ecosystems (e.g. surface barriers), particularly the hydrologic and biotic characteristics that govern the water and energy balance. These results will also support the development of practical fire management techniques for barriers that are compatible with wildfire suppression strategies. Furthermore, lessons learned will be use to develop installation strategies needed to protect electronic monitoring equipment from the intense heat of fire and the potential damaging effects of smoke and fire extinguishing agents. Such information is needed to better understand long-term barrier performance under extreme conditions, especially if site maintenance and operational funding is lost for activities such as barrier revegetation.

Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

285

Environmental and Potential Health Effects of High Voltage Direct Current Transmission Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-voltage direct current (HVDC) technology plays an important but highly selective role in the U.S. power delivery system. It is a cost-effective technology for transferring bulk power over long distances, a critical technology for asynchronous grid interconnection, and the preferred technology for long-distance underwater cable transmission. Current interest in renovating the national grid for greater loads and higher reliability as well as unique applications for renewable energy projects, including...

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Methodologies for Assessing the Cumulative Environmental Effects of Hydroelectric Development of Fish and Wildlife in the Columbia River Basin, Volume 1, Recommendations, 1987 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume is the first of a two-part set addressing methods for assessing the cumulative effects of hydropower development on fish and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin. Species and habitats potentially affected by cumulative impacts are identified for the basin, and the most significant effects of hydropower development are presented. Then, current methods for measuring and assessing single-project effects are reviewed, followed by a review of methodologies with potential for use in assessing the cumulative effects associated with multiple projects. Finally, two new approaches for cumulative effects assessment are discussed in detail. Overall, this report identifies and reviews the concepts, factors, and methods necessary for understanding and conducting a cumulative effects assessment in the Columbia River Basin. Volume 2 will present a detailed procedural handbook for performing a cumulative assessment using the integrated tabular methodology introduced in this volume. 308 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

Stull, Elizabeth Ann

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site`s self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Evaluation of medical records and completion of a health needs assessment for Hispanic type 2 diabetics in a rural area of Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to evaluate medical records and to assess the needs of Hispanic type 2 diabetics who receive care from one… (more)

Nash, Anita C

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Office of International Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Health Studies International Health Studies Home Mission and Functions Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Studies Marshall Islands Program Russian Health Studies Program Russian Radiobiology Human Tissue Repository Spain (Palomares) Program Health and Safety HSS Logo Office of International Health Studies Reports to the Office of Health and Safety Mission and Functions Mission The Office of International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents. The mission includes providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

290

National Climate Assessment: Available Technical Inputs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Available Technical Inputs Print E-mail Available Technical Inputs Print E-mail Technical inputs for the 2013 National Climate Assessment were due March 1, 2012. Please note that these reports were submitted independently to the National Climate Assessment for consideration and have not been reviewed by the National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee. Links to agency-sponsored reports will be posted here as they are made available. Sectors National Climate Assessment Health Sector Literature Review and Bibliography. Technical Input for the Interagency Climate Change and Human Health Group, September 2012. Overview Bibliography Bibliography User's Guide Search Strategy and Results Walthall et al. 2012. Climate Change and Agriculture in the United States: Effects and Adaptation. USDA Technical Bulletin 1935. Washington, DC. 186 pages. | Report FAQs

291

An integrated assessment tool to define effective air quality policies at regional scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the Integrated Assessment of air quality is dealt with at regional scale. First the paper describes the main challenges to tackle current air pollution control, including economic aspects. Then it proposes a novel approach to manage the ... Keywords: Air quality modeling, Decision support, Integrated assessment modeling, Model reduction, Multi-objective optimization

Claudio Carnevale; Giovanna Finzi; Enrico Pisoni; Marialuisa Volta; Giorgio Guariso; Roberta Gianfreda; Giuseppe Maffeis; Philippe Thunis; Les White; Giuseppe Triacchini

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Workshop on short-term health effects of reactor accidents: Chernobyl  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-dose early-effects research that has been continued has been done in the context of infrequent accidents with large radiation sources and the use of bone marrow transfusions for treating malignancies, especially leukemia. It thus seemed appropriate to bring together those who have done research on and have had experience with massive whole-body radiation. The objectives were to review what is known about the acute effects of whole-body irradiation, to review the current knowledge of therapy, and particularly of the diagnostic and immunologic problems encountered in bone marrow therapy, and to compare this knowledge with observations made to date on the Chernobyl accident radiation casualties. Dr. Robert Gale, who had helped to care for these casualties, was present at the Workshop. It was hoped that such a review would help those making continuing clinical and pathological observations on the Chernobyl casualties, and that these observations would provide a basis for recommendations for additional research that might result in improved ability to manage successfully this type of severe injury.

Not Available

1986-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

Problem Formulations for Ecological Risk Assessments Conducted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- deformities, fin erosion, lesions, and tumors ERA - ecological risk assessment HHRA - human health risk assessments ow K - octanol-water partition coefficients oc K - organic...

294

Supplemental Guidance for Assessing Susceptibility from Early...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment, ORD Michael P. Firestone, Office of Children's Health Protection, OA Lynn Flowers, National Center for Environmental Assessment, ORD R. Woodrow Setzer,...

295

Alternative Exposure Metrics and Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure assessments are critical components of human health studies. These assessments may be geared toward defining where an environmental agent might be present, its levels or concentrations, the conditions under which exposure occurs, those exposed, and additional details of possible exposure scenarios. The assessments may also be used by epidemiologists to address potential linkages between the exposure and health outcomes.Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure science has evolved due ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

Health assessment for 19th Avenue Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona, Region 9. CERCLIS No. AZD980496780. Preliminary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 19th Avenue Landfill is an National Priorities List site located in Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizona. The site was operated as a sanitary landfill between 1957 and 1979. Most of the waste disposed of at the landfill was from municipal sources; however, old gasoline storage tanks, radioactive waste, hospital waste, industrial waste, and old transformers were also landfilled. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ingestion, dermal contact, or inhalation of contaminants in subsurface soil and refuse, soil-gas, and air.

Not Available

1989-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Public health assessment for Seattle Municipal Landfill/Kent Highlands, Kent, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD980639462. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle Municipal Landfill, better known as the Kent Highlands Landfill, is located in the City of Kent, approximately 14 miles south of the City of Seattle, Washington, at 23076 Military Road South. Surface water settling ponds, a leachate collection system, and gas collection system have been constructed. Only one completed pathway exists, which is the use of Midway Creek by recreationists. However, worst case scenarios were evaluated and there did not appear to be a human health threat. Two potential pathways were analyzed, for landfill gas and ground water. Again the worst case scenarios did not reveal any imminent human health threat.

1994-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

299

Healthful Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids addresses critical and current regulatory issues and emerging technologies, as well as the efforts made toward the production of healthier lipids. Healthful Lipids Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants d

300

Effective use of environmental impact assessments (EIAs) for geothermal development projects  

SciTech Connect

Both the developed and developing nations of the world would like to move toward a position of sustainable development while paying attention to the restoration of natural resources, improving the environment, and improving the quality of life. The impacts of geothermal development projects are generally positive. It is important, however, that the environmental issues associated with development be addressed in a systematic fashion. Drafted early in the project planning stage, a well-prepared Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) can significantly add to the quality of the overall project. An EIA customarily ends with the decision to proceed with the project. The environmental analysis process could be more effective if regular monitoring, detailed in the EIA, continues during project implementation. Geothermal development EIAs should be analytic rather than encyclopedic, emphasizing the impacts most closely associated with energy sector development. Air quality, water resources and quality, geologic factors, and socioeconomic issues will invariably be the most important factors. The purpose of an EIA should not be to generate paperwork, but to enable superb response. The EIA should be intended to help public officials make decisions that are based on an understanding of environmental consequences and take proper actions. The EIA process has been defined in different ways throughout the world. In fact, it appears that no two countries have defined it in exactly the same way. Going hand in hand with the different approaches to the process is the wide variety of formats available. It is recommended that the world geothermal community work towards the adoption of a standard. The Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)(OLADE, 1993) prepared a guide that presents a comprehensive discussion of the environmental impacts and suggested mitigation alternatives associated with geothermal development projects. The OLADE guide is a good start for providing the geothermal community a standard EIA format. As decision makers may only read the Executive Summary of the EIA, this summary should be well written and present the significant impacts (in order of importance), clarifying which are unavoidable and which are irreversible; the measures which can be taken to mitigate them; the cumulative effects of impacts; and the requirements for monitoring and supervision. Quality plans and Public Participation plans should also be included as part of the environmental analysis process.

Goff, S.J.

2000-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Building Assessment and Energy Coordinator | Princeton Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities Environment, Safety & Health Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Jobs Building Assessment and Energy Coordinator Department:...

302

Exploring early evaluation techniques of ambient health promoting devices in home environments of senior citizens living independently  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, our goal is to explore different early evaluation techniques and their effectiveness for designing better ambient health- promoting devices for the elderly. One cannot assess the complete impact of these devices without full implementation ... Keywords: Wizard of Oz, ambient technology, early evaluation methods, health monitoring devices, senior citizens, storyboarding, technology probe

Rajasee Rege; Heekyoung Jung; William Hazelwood; Greg Orlov; Kay Connelly; Kalpana Shankar

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A Further Assessment of Treatment Effects in the Florida Area Cumulus Experiment through Guided Linear Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Florida Area Cumulus Experiment (FACE) was a two-stage program dedicated to assessing the potential of “dynamic seeding” for enhancing convective rainfall in a fixed target area. FACE-1 (1970–76) was an exploratory cloud seeding experiment ...

J. A. Flueck; W. L. Woodley; A. G. Barnston; T. J. Brown

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

011B. Office of Research and Development, Washington, D.C. 1992. Exposure Factors Handbook. EPA6008- 89043. Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Washington, D.C....

305

Health assessment for Rhone Poulenc (ZOECON), East Palo Alto, San Mateo County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAT000611350. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Rhone Poulenc site has been proposed for listing on the National Priorities List. The site has been the location of chemical manufacturing since before 1926. Flue dust from Anaconda, Montana copper-smelting operations was used to manufacture sodium arsenate from 1920s to 1960s. The current owners have manufactured insecticides at the site from 1972 to the present. The environmental contamination on-site consists of arsenic, lead, cadmium, selenium, mercury, copper, and zinc in soil and surface water. The environmental contamination off-site consists of arsenic in surface water in the adjacent tidal marsh; and arsenic, lead, cadmium, selenium, copper, mercury, zinc in seasonally pounded surface water. In addition, soil contamination has been detected on the levy and in the tidal marsh. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated surface soil, sediment, and water.

Not Available

1988-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

306

Improving Demographic Components of Integrated Assessment Models: The Effect of Changes in Population Composition by Household Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of the research project on "Improving Demographic Components of Integrated Assessment Models: The Effect of Changes in Population Composition by Household Characteristics". The overall objective of this project was to improve projections of energy demand and associated greenhouse gas emissions by taking into account demographic factors currently not incorporated in Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) of global climate change. We proposed to examine the potential magnitude of effects on energy demand of changes in the composition of populations by household characteristics for three countries: the U.S., China, and Indonesia. For each country, we planned to analyze household energy use survey data to estimate relationships between household characteristics and energy use; develop a new set of detailed household projections for each country; and combine these analyses to produce new projections of energy demand illustrating the potential importance of consideration of households.

Brian C. O'Neill

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

307

Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For inhalation or ingestion of soluble or moderately soluble compounds such as uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) or uranium tetrafluoride (UF4), the uranium enters the bloodstream and...

308

health effects Flow cytometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Geothermal Energy Engineered Geothermal Systems Nonproliferation and Verificatio n Seismic Modeling

Kurien, Susan

309

Risk identification and assessment in a risk based audit environment: the effects of budget constraints and decision aid use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk based audit (RBA) approaches represent a major trend in current audit methodology. The approach is based on risk analysis used to identify business strategy risk. The RBA has created a new set of research issues that need investigation. In particular, this approach has important implications for risk identification and risk assessment. The success of the RBA approach is contingent on understanding what factors improve or interfere with the accuracy of these risk judgments. I examine how budget constraints and decision aid use affect risk identification and risk assessment. Unlike previous budget pressure studies, I cast budget constraints as a positive influence on auditors. I expect more stringent budget constraints to be motivating to the auditor as they provide a goal for the auditor to achieve. I also expect budget constraints to induce feelings of pressure leading to the use of time-pressure adaptation strategies. When auditors have use of a decision aid, they take advantage of these motivational goals and/or use beneficial adaptive strategies. Overall, I find that auditor participants tend to be more accurate when identifying financial statement risks compared to business risks. Budget constraints have no effect on risk identification for financial or business risks; they also have no effect on financial risk assessments. On the other hand, business risk assessments are improved by implementing more stringent budget constraints, but only when a decision aid is also provided. Budget constraints can affect performance through a goal theory route or a time-pressure adaptation route. I investigate the paths through which budget constraints improve business risk assessments under decision aid use. I find that budget constraints directly affect performance, supporting a goal theory route. However, I do not find that budget constraints are mediated by perceived budget pressure as expected. Auditors appear to use a positive adaptive strategy to respond to perceived budget pressure, however perceived budget pressure is not induced by providing a more stringent budget.

Diaz, Michelle Chandler

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

LANL Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medical Screening Program for Medical Screening Program for Former Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers United States Department of Energy Office of Occupational Medicine and Medical Surveillance Final Phase I Needs Assessment Report submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environment, Safety and Health Division National Jewish Medical and Research Center February 1999 Department of Environmental Health Sciences 615 North Wolfe Street Baltimore, Maryland 21205 Development of a Medical Screening Program for Former.Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers Phase I Needs Assessment Submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America

311

LANL Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medical Screening Program for Medical Screening Program for Former Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers United States Department of Energy Office of Occupational Medicine and Medical Surveillance Final Phase I Needs Assessment Report submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environment, Safety and Health Division National Jewish Medical and Research Center February 1999 Department of Environmental Health Sciences 615 North Wolfe Street Baltimore, Maryland 21205 Development of a Medical Screening Program for Former.Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers Phase I Needs Assessment Submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America

312

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Health, Safety and Security (HSS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within Health, Safety and Security (HSS).

313

Preliminary environmental assessment for the satellite power system (SPS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment of the impact of the Satellite Power System (SPS) on the environment is presented. Information that has appeared in documents referenced herein is integrated and assimilated. The state-of-knowledge as perceived from recently completed DOE-sponsored studies is disclosed, and prospective research and study programs that can advance the state-of-knowledge and provide an expanded data base for use in an assessment planned for 1980 are defined. Alternatives for research that may be implemented in order to achieve this advancement are also discussed in order that a plan can be selected which will be consistent with the fiscal and time constraints on the SPS Environmental Assessment Program. Health and ecological effects of microwave radiation, nonmicrowave effects on health and the environment (terrestrial operations and space operations), effects on the atmosphere, and effects on communications systems are examined in detail. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the ecological assessment task, Kingfisher Study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation Ecological Assessment Task, Kingfisher Study, including information that will contribute to safe completion of the project. The report includes historical background; a site map; project organization; task descriptions and hazard evaluations; controls; and monitoring, personal protective equipment, decontamination, and medical surveillance program requirements. The report also includes descriptions of site personnel and their certifications as well as suspected WAG 2 contaminants and their characteristics. The primary objective of the WAG 2 Kingfisher Study is to assess the feasibility of using kingfishers as biological monitors of contaminants on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Kingfisher sample collection will be used to determine the levels of contaminants and degree of bioaccumulation within a common piscivorous bird feeding on contaminated fish from streams on the ORR.

Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Allergy arising from exposure to airborne contaminants in an insect rearing facility: Health effects and exposure control  

SciTech Connect

In agricultural crop improvement, yield under various stress conditions and limiting factors is assessed experimentally. Of the stresses on plants which affect yield are those due to insects. Ostrinia nubilalis, the European corn borer (corn borer) is a major pest in sweet and field corn in the U.S. There are many ways to fight crop pests such as the corn borer, including (1) application of chemical insecticides, (2) application of natural predators and, (3) improving crop resistance through plant genetics programs. Randomized field trials are used to determine the effectiveness of pest management programs. These trials frequently consist of randomly selected crop plots to which well-defined input regimes are instituted. For example, corn borers might be released onto crop plots in several densities at various stages of crop development, then sprayed with different levels of pesticide. These experiments are duplicated across regions and, in some cases across the country, to determine, in this instance for example, the best pesticide application rate for a given pest density and crop development stage. In order to release these pests onto crop plots, one must have an adequate supply of the insect pest. In winter months studies are carried out in the laboratory to examine chemical and natural pesticide effectiveness, as well as such things as the role of pheromones in moth behavior. The advantage in field trials is that yield data can be garnered directly. In this country, insects are raised for crop research primarily through the US Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with public Land Grant Universities and, by the private sector agricultural concerns - seed companies and others. This study quantifies the airborne allergen exposure of persons working in a Land Grant University entomology lab were allergy to European corn borer was suspected.

Wolff, D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Data driven health system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective use of data is believed to be the key to address systemic inefficiencies in health innovation and delivery, and to significantly enhance value creation for patients and all stakeholders. However, there is no ...

Rosen Ceruolo, Melissa Beth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Health News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Open Data for Climate and Health Insights Print E-mail Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health (MATCH) Website Thursday, May 9, 2013 Posted by Tom Armstrong, Executive...

318

PM, Mercury, and Health Effects: A Workshop for Technical and Communications Staff: Proceedings of Air Quality Workshop Held on Octo ber 2, 2002, Atlanta, GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An EPRI-sponsored workshop, entitled "PM, Mercury, and Health Effects: A Workshop for Technical and Communications Staff," was held in Atlanta, Georgia on October 2, 2002. Members of the Air Quality and Media Relations Groups conducted the workshop. Attendees were all utility-associated, although several attendees were from non-utility companies. In all, there were 69 attendees, of whom 39 had technical positions and 30 were involved with communications. The workshop was intended to serve as a primer for...

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

319

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects and Risks Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has performed a systematic review of recently published, peer-reviewed scientific studies in the fields of epidemiology and radiobiology that discuss health risks associated with exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. As a result of this study, the EPRI team concludes that there is a need to re-evaluate the magnitude of dose and dose-rate effectiveness factors (DDREF), including the significant body of radiobiology data that suggests non-linear risks at...

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

US EPA: OSWER: Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, January 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

540-R-070-002 540-R-070-002 OSWER 9285.7-82 January 2009 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part F, Supplemental Guidance for Inhalation Risk Assessment) Final Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ....................................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Scope .........................................................................................................2 1.3 Effects on Other Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5: Appendix F -- Baseline human health risk assessment report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix F documents potential risks and provides information necessary for making remediation decisions. A quantitative analysis of the inorganic, organic, and radiological site-related contaminants found in various media is used to characterize the potential risks to human health associated with exposure to these contaminants.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Innovative approaches in integrated assessment modelling of European air pollution control strategies - Implications of dealing with multi-pollutant multi-effect problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, crucial aspects of the implications and the complexity of interconnected multi-pollutant multi-effect assessments of both air pollution control strategies and the closely related reduction of greenhouse gas emissions will be discussed. ... Keywords: Emission control, Integrated assessment, Optimisation

Stefan Reis; Steffen Nitter; Rainer Friedrich

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

WIDER Working Paper No. 2013/017 Assessing the effectiveness of World Bank investments The gender dimension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today it is widely acknowledged that increasing the gender sensitivity of development aid increases its effectiveness. This report evaluates the extent to which the World Bank integrates gender concerns into its policies and investments, pointing out structural, financial and policy gaps that risk negatively impacting women in countries with Bank investments. The report evaluates Bank investments in ‘agriculture and rural development’; ‘sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS’; and ‘conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction’, finding that though the Bank has made important progress in recognizing gender equality as a goal in its own right, many of its investments still superficially include women’s concerns. The report concludes with recommendations for making World Bank investments responsive to women’s needs and rights.

Claire Lauterbach; Elaine Zuckerman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

An issue of permanence: assessing the effectiveness of temporary carbon storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a method to quantify the effectiveness of carbon mitigation options taking into account the "permanence" of the emissions reduction. While the issue of permanence is most commonly associated with ...

Herzog, Howard J.

326

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following chemical terrorist attack: Introduction and key assessment considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While restoration timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical terrorist release. What follows is the first of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information, and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. A conceptual site model and human health-based exposure guidelines are developed and reported as an aid to site-specific pre-planning in the current absence of U.S. state or Federal values designated as compound-specific remediation or re-entry concentrations, and to safely expedite facility recovery to full operational status. Chemicals of concern include chemical warfare nerve and vesicant agents and the toxic industrial compounds phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Health Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Investigators Health Physics The March 2011 special issue of Health Physics highlights the Victor Bond Workshop held May 2-5, 2010, in Richland, Wash. The workshop honored the late Dr. Victor (Vic) Bond for his lifetime achievement in the radiation sciences. Dr. Bond's research resulted in numerous influential scientific papers that contributed greatly to the understanding of radiation effects in biological systems. The workshop attracted internationally recognized experts in biophysics, experimental radiation biology, epidemiology, and risk assessment to discuss issues of low-dose risk. Participants included current and previously funded U.S. Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research

329

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 4. Driller's logs, stratigraphic cross section and utility routines  

SciTech Connect

The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for use by the hydrologic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System is a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display. This is the fourth of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

Friedrichs, D.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgThe Health Effects of Coal Electricity Generation in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To help inform pollution control policies in the Indian electricity sector we estimate the health damages associated with particulate matter, sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from individual coal-fired power plants. We calculate the damages per ton of pollutant for each of 89 plants and compute total damages in 2008, by pollutant, for 63 plants. We estimate health damages by combining data on power plant emissions of particulate matter, SO2 and NOx with reduced-form intake fraction models that link emissions to changes in population-weighted ambient concentrations of fine particles. Concentration-response functions for fine particles from Pope et al. (2002) are used to estimate premature cardiopulmonary deaths associated with air emissions for persons 30 and older. Our results suggest that 75 percent of premature deaths are associated with fine particles that result from SO2 emissions. After characterizing the distribution of premature mortality across plants we calculate the health benefits and cost-per-life saved of the flue-gas desulfurization unit installed at the Dahanu power plant in Maharashtra and the health benefits of coal washing at the Rihand power plant in Uttar Pradesh.

Shama Gamkhar; Kabir Malik; Alex Limonov; Ian Partridge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

IAAP Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 Burlington Atomic Energy Commission Plant- Former Worker Program A US DOE funded project conducted by: Dr. Laurence Fuortes, Principal Investigator The University of Iowa College of Public Health Department of Occupational and Environmental Health 5 2940 Steindler Building Iowa City, IA 52242 TEL: 319 335 9819 FAX: 319 335 9200 BACEP-FWP Needs Assessment 1. INTRODUCTION In August of 2000, the University of Iowa College of Public Health initiated a needs assessment study to evaluate whether or not individuals formerly employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) near Burlington, Iowa, would benefit from a Former Worker Medical Surveillance Program. These workers were employed at IAAP in the atomic weapons industry on what was known at the facility as Line 1 or Division B at the

332

Powering Health | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powering Health Powering Health Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Powering Health Agency/Company /Organization: USAID Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Health Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.poweringhealth.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America Language: English Related Tools SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook ProForm Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) ... further results

333

Assessing the effectiveness of voluntary solid waste reduction policies: Methodology and a Flemish case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the use of statistical techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of voluntary policy instruments for waste management. The voluntary character of these instruments implies that latent characteristics, unobserved by the analyst, might influence the subscription decision and might lead to biased estimates of the effectiveness of the policy instrument if standard techniques are used. We propose an extension of the difference-in-differences (DiD) estimator to evaluate the effectiveness of voluntary policy instruments, which is termed the dynamic difference-in-differences (or DDD) estimator. We illustrate the technique by estimating the effectiveness of voluntary cooperation agreements between the Flemish environmental administration and individual municipalities aimed at curbing residential solid waste. Using a dataset covering all 308 Flemish municipalities for the period 2000-2005, our results indicate that municipalities subscribing to the agreement accomplished less reduction of their waste levels compared to what could be expected on the basis of their own performance prior to subscription and the performance of the non-subscribers. This result might be explained by the rising marginal cost of extra residential solid waste reduction policies. In addition, there are indications that subscribing municipalities refrain from additional reduction efforts once the target waste level of the program is achieved. The more complicated DDD methodology is shown to generate additional insight over the ordinary DiD analysis.

Jaeger, Simon de [EHSAL - European University College Brussels, Stormstraat 2 (Belgium)], E-mail: simon.dejaeger@ehsal.be; Eyckmans, Johan [EHSAL - European University College Brussels, Stormstraat 2 (Belgium); K.U. Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studien (Belgium)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Instructional video in e-learning: assessing the impact of interactive video on learning effectiveness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interactive video in an e-learning system allows proactive and random access to video content. Our empirical study examined the influence of interactive video on learning outcome and learner satisfaction in e-learning environments. Four different settings ... Keywords: e-learning, interactive video, learning effectiveness

Dongsong Zhang; Lina Zhou; Robert O. Briggs; Jay F. Nunamaker, Jr.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Instructional video in e-learning: Assessing the impact of interactive video on learning effectiveness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interactive video in an e-learning system allows proactive and random access to video content. Our empirical study examined the influence of interactive video on learning outcome and learner satisfaction in e-learning environments. Four different settings ... Keywords: E-learning, Interactive video, Learning effectiveness

Dongsong Zhang; Lina Zhou; Robert O. Briggs; Jay F. Nunamaker, Jr.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Effective Grid Utilization: A Technical Assessment and Application Guide; April 2011 - September 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to more fully integrate renewable resources, such as wind and solar, into the transmission system, additional capacity must be realized in the short term using the installed transmission capacity that exists today. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Transmission and Grid Integration Group supported this study to assemble the history of regulations and status of transmission technology to expand existing grid capacity. This report compiles data on various transmission technology methods and upgrades for increased capacity utilization of the existing transmission system and transmission corridors. The report discusses the technical merit of each method and explains how the method could be applied within the current regulatory structure to increase existing transmission conductor and/or corridor capacity. The history and current state of alternatives to new construction is presented for regulators, legislators, and other policy makers wrestling with issues surrounding integration of variable generation. Current regulations are assessed for opportunities to change them to promote grid expansion. To support consideration of these alternatives for expanding grid capacity, the report lists relevant rules, standards, and policy changes.

Balser, S.; Sankar, S.; Miller, R.; Rawlins, A.; Israel, M.; Curry, T.; Mason, T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Environmental assessment of the potential effects of aquifer thermal energy storage systems on microorganisms in groundwater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential environmental effects (both adverse and beneficials) of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) technology pertaining to microbial communities indigenous to subsurface environments (i.e., aquifers) and the propagation, movement, and potential release of pathogenic microorganisms (specifically, Legionella) within ATES systems. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in aquifers shows great promise to reduce peak demand; reduce electric utility load problems; contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems; and reduce pollution from extraction, refining, and combustion of fossil fuels. However, concerns that the widespread implementation of this technology may have adverse effects on biological systems indigeneous to aquifers, as well as help to propagate and release pathogenic organisms that enter thee environments need to be resolved. 101 refs., 2 tabs.

Hicks, R.J.; Stewart, D.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Steam Generator Management Program: Assessment of the Effect of Deposit Removal Frequency on Sludge Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a PWR steam generator, the buildup of deposits on the tubes near the tubesheet can increase the risk of tube degradation. To ensure the integrity of the tubes which are part of the primary-to-secondary side pressure boundary, various repair and/or mitigation techniques are available which have attendant benefits, risks, and costs. To mitigate deposit buildup, utilities employ a variety of deposit removal techniques, such as sludge lancing and chemical cleaning. This report addresses the effect of ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

339

Health IT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fewer errors and redundant tests. ... Since 2004, NIST has worked closely with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the National ...

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

340

Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Management Subteam conducted a management and organization assessment of environment, safety, and health (ES H) activities performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and onsite contractor personnel. The objectives of the assessment were to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of management systems and practices in terms of ensuring environmental compliance and the safety and health of workers and the general public, (2) identify key findings, and (3) identify root causes for all ES H findings and concerns. The scope of the assessment included examinations of the following from an ES H perspective: (1) strategic and program planning; (2) organizational structure and management configuration; (3) human resource management, including training and staffing; (4) management systems, including performance monitoring and assessment; (5) conduct of operations; (6) public and institutional interactions; and (7) corporate'' parent support.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis  

SciTech Connect

Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R. (eds.)

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Assessment of RANS-based turbulent combustion models for prediction of gas turbine emissions: turbulence model and reaction mechanism effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to assess current, commonly applied turbulence and combustion models with respect to their performance in gas-turbine combustion (GTC). Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-based turbulence and chemistry models are two primary factors influencing the uncertainty in predicting turbulent combustion characteristics, especially for GTC. RANS-based methods are the design tools of choice in the gas turbine industry due to the high computational costs of LES (Large Eddy Simulation). In this study, lean premixed combustion of methane was simulated using two different reduced mechanisms (ARM9 and ARM19) along with the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) turbulent chemistry interaction model to calculate the CO and NOx emissions. The effect of turbulence models was assessed by considering two different models. Both of the models tested performed well in the prediction of temperature and major species profiles. Predicted values of NO emission profiles showed an average difference of ±5 ppm compared to experimental values. Computed intermediate species profiles showed large qualitative and quantitative errors when compared with the experimental data. These discrepancies, especially the intermediate species hydrogen, indicate the challenges these reduced mechanisms and turbulence models can present when modeling pollutant emissions from gas turbine combustors.

Nanduri, J.R.; Celik, I.B.; Strakey, P.A.; Parsons, D.R.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Preliminary environmental assessment for the satellite power system (SPS). Revision 1. Volume 1. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment of the environmental impacts of the proposed satellite power system (SPS) is summarized here. In this system, satellites would collect solar energy in space, convert it to microwaves, and transmit the microwaves to receiving antennas (rectennas) on earth. At the rectennas, the microwaves would be converted to electricity. The assessment considers microwave and nonmicrowave effects on the terrestrial environment and human health, atmospheric effects, and disruption of communications and other electromagnetic systems.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Multiple uses of indicators and indices in cumulative effects assessment and management  

SciTech Connect

Both environmental indicators and multi-metric indices are useful for describing baseline conditions and qualitatively predicting the cumulative consequences of multiple actions. Several examples and case studies associated with indicators and/or indices are presented herein. They can be easily modified for usage in CEAM. Habitat suitability models reflect special indices related to habitat needs and quality for specific species or broad habitat types. Such models have been used to address direct and indirect effects, and with some modification, they can be also used to address cumulative effects of multiple actions. This review has indicated that there are numerous examples of such tools which have been or could be used in both EIA and CEAM. Some key lessons are: (1) in conducting CEAM studies, it is useful to think from the mindset that 'I am the VEC or indicator, and what is my historical and current condition and how have I, or will I, be affected by multiple past, present, and future actions?'; (2) due to the likely absence of detailed information on future actions, the described tools can still be used to 'predict' future conditions by focusing on qualitative up-or-down changes in individual indicators or indices with their aggregated displays; and (3) numerous regional and site-specific tools are currently available, with one example being indices of biological integrity for specific watersheds and water bodies. Such tools, even though they may not have been developed for CEAM usage, can certainly benefit CEAM studies and practice. Finally, usage of selected and appropriate tools as described herein can aid in conducting science-based, systematic, and documentable CEAM studies.

Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma and Environmental Impact Training, Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Atkinson, S.F. [Institute of Applied Science, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Arsenic Health Research Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes EPRI-sponsored arsenic health research results to date, examines implications of these results for reducing uncertainties in arsenic cancer risk assessment, and identifies remaining research needs. The most important contributions of this research toward reducing key uncertainties for arsenic cancer risk estimates include a revised arsenic inhalation unit risk value, support for a nonlinear dose-response relationship, an estimate of bioavailability of arsenic in coal fly ash, deter...

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

346

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix F: Assessment Methodologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX F: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES Assessment Methodologies F-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Assessment Methodologies F-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX F: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES In general, the activities assessed in this environmental impact statement (EIS) could affect workers, members of the general public, and the environment during construction of new facilities, during routine operation of facilities, during transportation, and during facility or transportation accidents. Activities could have adverse effects (e.g., human health impairment) or positive effects (e.g., regional socioeconomic benefits, such as the creation of jobs). Some impacts would result primarily from the unique characteristics of the uranium and other chemical

347

Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art  

SciTech Connect

A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

Kaye, S.V.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Mercury Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS: IMPACTS OF LOCAL DEPOSITIONS *T.M. Sullivan 1 , F.D. Lipfert 2 , S.M. Morris 2 , and S. Renninger 3 1 Building 830, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 2 Private Consultants 3 Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to regulate emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants. However, there is still debate over whether the limits should be placed on a nationwide or a plant-specific basis. Before a nationwide limit is selected, it must be demonstrated that local deposition of mercury from coal-fired power plants does not impose an excessive local health risk. The principal health

351

Preliminary environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS). Revision 1. Volume 2. Detailed assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering several options for generating electrical power to meet future energy needs. The satellite power system (SPS), one of these options, would collect solar energy through a system of satellites in space and transfer this energy to earth. A reference system has been described that would convert the energy to microwaves and transmit the microwave energy via directive antennas to large receiving/rectifying antennas (rectennas) located on the earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted into electricity. The potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the satellite power system are being assessed as a part of the Department of Energy's SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This report is Revision I of the Preliminary Environmental Assessment for the Satellite Power System published in October 1978. It refines and extends the 1978 assessment and provides a basis for a 1980 revision that will guide and support DOE recommendations regarding future SPS development. This is Volume 2 of two volumes. It contains the technical detail suitable for peer review and integrates information appearing in documents referenced herein. The key environmental issues associated with the SPS concern human health and safety, ecosystems, climate, and electromagnetic systems interactions. In order to address these issues in an organized manner, five tasks are reported: (I) microwave-radiation health and ecological effects; (II) nonmicrowave health and ecological effectss; (III) atmospheric effects; (IV) effects on communication systems due to ionospheric disturbance; and (V) electromagnetic compatibility. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Office of Health & Safety - Health Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search System Public Health Activities Agenda for Public Health Activities Access Handbook - Guidelines for Researchers Conducting Health Studies at DOE HHS Communication...

353

National Climate Assessment: Production Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NCA & Development Advisory Committee NCA & Development Advisory Committee Production Team Indicators System Coastal Resilience Resources Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally National Climate Assessment: Production Team Print E-mail National Climate Assessment Staff (USGCRP National Coordination Office) Current NCA Staff Dr. Fabien Laurier, Director, Third National Climate Assessment Dr. Glynis Lough, Chief of Staff for the National Climate Assessment Emily Therese Cloyd, Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Bryce Golden-Chen, Program Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Alison Delgado, Scientist Dr. Ilya Fischhoffkri, Scientist Melissa Kenney, Indicators Coordinator Dr. Fred Lipschultz, Regional Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment

354

Hanford Needs Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 1997 This Needs Assessment for former Hanford production workers was developed for the purpose of collecting existing information relevant to exposure and health outcomes...

355

Hanford Needs Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 1997 This Needs Assessment for former Hanford construction workers was developed for the purpose of collecting existing information relevant to exposure and health outcomes...

356

Independent Oversight Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed an assessment of environmental monitoring and surveillance at...

357

Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. INEL is a multiprogram, laboratory site of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Overall site management is provided by the DOE Field Office, Idaho; however, the DOE Field Office, Chicago has responsibility for the Argonne National Laboratory-West facilities and operations through the Argonne Area Office. In addition, the Idaho Branch Office of the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office has responsibility for the Naval Reactor Facility (NRF) at the INEL. The assessment included all DOE elements having ongoing program activities at the site except for the NRF. In addition, the Safety and Health Subteam did not review the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. facilities and operations. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from June 17 to August 2, 1991, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal INEL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Evaluation of means used to access the impacts of energy production on human health. LASL third life sciences symposium, Los Alamos, New Mexico, October 15--17, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The symposium explored the various techniques and methods available to study the potential effects that various energy-producing industries may have on human health. Three papers presented at Session I dealt with national energy needs, resources, and future developments; responsibilities and capabilities in ERDA as related to the health and environmental impacts of energy productions; and health hazards associated with alternate energy sources. Four papers presented at Session II reviewed standards setting for the worker and for the public; the radiation experience; and developing health policies and standards as the responsibility of the scientist. Eight papers in Sessions III and IV, Sources of Information, dealt with developing a health standard from epidemiological and clinical data and from laboratory animal data; carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, teratogenesis, and behavior changes as end points in health impact assessments; new methods and approaches to health impact assessment; problems in sampling for health impact; and the application of scientific data to worker/workplace health decision making. Two papers at Session V covered bases for the application of scientific data to health standards and health and environmental standards from a legal viewpoint. A final discussion, Room for Controversy, was conducted by four panelists. (MCW)

Anderson, E.C.; Sullivan, E.M. (eds.) [eds.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Developing a CD-CBM Anticipatory Approach for Cavitation - Defining a Model-Based Descriptor Consistent Across Processes, Phase 1 Final Report Context-Dependent Prognostics and Health Assessment: A New Paradigm for Condition-based Maintenance SBIR Topic No. N98-114  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research, and subsequent testing, was to identify specific features of cavitation that could be used as a model-based descriptor in a context-dependent condition-based maintenance (CD-CBM) anticipatory prognostic and health assessment model. This descriptor is based on the physics of the phenomena, capturing the salient features of the process dynamics. The test methodology and approach were developed to make the cavitation features the dominant effect in the process and collected signatures. This would allow the accurate characterization of the salient cavitation features at different operational states. By developing such an abstraction, these attributes can be used as a general diagnostic for a system or any of its components. In this study, the particular focus will be pumps. As many as 90% of pump failures are catastrophic. They seem to be operating normally and fail abruptly without warning. This is true whether the failure is sudden hardware damage requiring repair, such as a gasket failure, or a transition into an undesired operating mode, such as cavitation. This means that conventional diagnostic methods fail to predict 90% of incipient failures and that in addressing this problem, model-based methods can add value where it is actually needed.

Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Health and EPA/600/8-91/011B Environmental Protection Environmental Assessment January 1992 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Interim Report Research and Development Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications EPA/600/8 -91/OllB January 1992 Interim Report DERMAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS Exposure Assessment Group Office of Health and Environmental Assessment U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 DISCLAIMER This document is an interim report subject to review by the Science Advisory Board. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.

Uhart, M.; et al.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Tiger Team Assessment of the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) and the Bartlesville Project Office (BPO) of the Department of Energy (DOE), co-located in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The assessment investigated the status of the environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) programs of the two organizations. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from April 6 to May 1, 1992, under the auspices of DOE`s Office of Special Projects (OSP) in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health issues; management practices; quality assurance; and NIPER and BPO self-assessments. Compliance with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal IITRI requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation was conducted of the adequacy and effectiveness of BPO and IITRI management of the ES&H and self-assessment processes. The NIPER/BPO Tiger Team Assessment is part of a larger, comprehensive DOE Tiger Team Independent Assessment Program planned for DOE facilities. The objective of the initiative is to provide the Secretary with information on the compliance status of DOE facilities with regard to ES&H requirements, root causes for noncompliance, adequacy of DOE and contractor ES&H management programs, response actions to address the identified problem areas, and DOE-wide ES&H compliance trends and root causes.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Tiger Team Assessment of the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) and the Bartlesville Project Office (BPO) of the Department of Energy (DOE), co-located in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The assessment investigated the status of the environmental, safety, and health (ES H) programs of the two organizations. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from April 6 to May 1, 1992, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects (OSP) in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health issues; management practices; quality assurance; and NIPER and BPO self-assessments. Compliance with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal IITRI requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation was conducted of the adequacy and effectiveness of BPO and IITRI management of the ES H and self-assessment processes. The NIPER/BPO Tiger Team Assessment is part of a larger, comprehensive DOE Tiger Team Independent Assessment Program planned for DOE facilities. The objective of the initiative is to provide the Secretary with information on the compliance status of DOE facilities with regard to ES H requirements, root causes for noncompliance, adequacy of DOE and contractor ES H management programs, response actions to address the identified problem areas, and DOE-wide ES H compliance trends and root causes.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evaluation of Cultural Competence and Health Disparities Knowledge and Skill Sets of Public Health Department Staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life expectancy and overall health have improved in recent years for most Americans, thanks in part to an increased focus on preventive medicine and dynamic new advances in medical technology. However, not all Americans are benefiting equally. This suggests a level of urgency for need to assist our public health professionals in obtaining specific skills sets that will assist them in working better with ethnic and racial minority populations. The overall goal of the research was to assess cultural competence knowledge and programmatic skill sets of individuals employed by an urban department of health located in the southwest region of the US. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) guided the research design to effectively evaluate the correlation between behavior and beliefs, attitudes and intention, of an individual, as well as their level of perceived control. Within the program design, 90 participants were identified using convenience sampling. In order to effectively evaluate these constructs, a quantitative research approach was employed to assess attitudes, beliefs, knowledge and competencies of the subject matter. Participants completed the Cultural Competence Assessment (CCA), which is designed to explore individual knowledge, feelings and actions of respondents when interacting with others in health service environments (Schim, 2009). The instrument is based on the cultural competence model, and measures cultural awareness and sensitivity; cultural competence behaviors and cultural diversity experience on a 49 item scale. It seeks to assess actual behaviors through a self report, rather than self-efficacy of performing behaviors. In addition, information was obtained to assess participant perception of organizational promotion of culturally competent care and; availability of opportunities to participate in professional development training. The analysis suggested healthcare professionals who are more knowledgeable and possess attitudes which reflect increased cultural sensitivity, are more likely to engage in culturally competent behaviors. In addition, positive attitudes and increased knowledge were associated with diversity training participation. Respondents reported high levels of interaction with patients from ethnic and racial minorities. Observing the clinical and non-clinical respondents, approximately 47% and 57% respectively, stated their cultural diversity training was an employer sponsored program.

Hall, Marla

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Link Climate Change and Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Make Our Science Accessible Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Link Climate Change and Human Health Print E-mail Health News Check out the latest climate change and human health news and announcements in our Health News Feed. Climate change poses unique challenges to human health. Unlike health threats caused by a particular toxin or disease pathogen, there are many ways that climate change can lead to potentially harmful health effects. Direct health impacts may include increased illnesses and deaths from extreme heat events, injuries and deaths from extreme weather events, and respiratory illnesses due to changes in air quality Indirect health impacts include illnesses and deaths that may arise from

368

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health. Topics of discussion included in this manuscript are related to responding to a radiation emergency, and the necessary balance between desired high accuracy laboratory results and rapid turnaround requirements. Considerations are addressed for methodology with which to provide the most competent solutions despite challenges presented from incomplete datasets and, at times, limited methodology. An emphasis is placed on error and uncertainty of sample analysis results, how error affects products, and what is communicated in the final product.

Mena, R., Pemberton, W., Beal, W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH (MPH) DISTANCE PROGRAM www.usask.ca/sph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trains public health professionals to measure, assess and manage increasingly complex population of health data; design and analysis of health-related surveys and experiments; and concepts and practice public health professionals to measure, assess, and manage increasingly complex population and public

Saskatchewan, University of

370

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Health FY Fiscal Year HAD Hazards Assessment Document ISM Integrated Safety Management KAFB Kirtland Air Force Base MDL Microelectronics Development Laboratory NNSA...

371

Exercises in Emergency Preparedness for Health Professionals in Community Clinics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health centers and emergency preparedness: An assessment ofSandrock, C. E. (2007). Emergency preparedness for healthcare association. Clinic emergency prepared- ness; website

Fowkes, Virginia; Blossom, H. John; Sandrock, Christian; Mitchell, Brenda; Brandstein, Kendra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Environmental monitoring, restoration and assessment: What have we learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Twenty-Eighth Hanford Symposium on Health and the Environment was held in Richland, Washington, October 16--19, 1989. The symposium was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The symposium was organized to review and evaluate some of the monitoring and assessment programs that have been conducted or are currently in place. Potential health and environmental effects of energy-related and other industrial activities have been monitored and assessed at various government and private facilities for over three decades. Most monitoring is required under government regulations; some monitoring is implemented because facility operators consider it prudent practice. As a result of these activities, there is now a substantial radiological, physical, and chemical data base for various environmental components, both in the United States and abroad. Symposium participants, both platform and poster presenters, were asked to consider, among other topics, the following: Has the expenditure of millions of dollars for radiological monitoring and assessment activities been worth the effort How do we decide when enough monitoring is enough Can we adequately assess the impacts of nonradiological components -- both inorganic and organic -- of wastes Are current regulatory requirements too restrictive or too lenient Can monitoring and assessment be made more cost effective Papers were solicited in the areas of environmental monitoring; environmental regulations; remediation, restoration, and decommissioning; modeling and dose assessment; uncertainty, design, and data analysis; and data management and quality assurance. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

Gray, R.H. (ed.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Analysis of Regulatory Guidance for Health Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess the connection between current FAA regulations and the incorporation of Health Management (HM) systems into commercial aircraft. To address the overall objectives ARINC (1) investigated FAA regulatory guidance, ...

Munns Thomas E.; Beard Richard E.; Culp Aubrey M.; Murphy Dennis A.; Kent Renee M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Role of prostaglandin-H synthase in mediating genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of estrogens. Environ. Health Perspect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been found to be oxidized in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells by prostaglandin-H synthase (PGH synthase). It is hypothesized that PGH synthase mediates adverse effects of DES and other carcinogenic estrogens such as induction of neoplastic transformation and genotoxicity. Interest in PGH synthase-catalyzed reactions focuses on two aspects: oxidation and metabolic activation of stilbene and steroid estrogens by PGH synthase, and modulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis via effects of these compounds on PGH synthase. Studies of the former aspect of PGH synthase-catalyzed in vitro metabolism have revealed that cooxidation of DES, DES analogues, and steroid estrogens gives rise to reactive intermediates; DES and DES analogues known to transform SHE cells are metabolized by PGH synthase in vitro; PGH synthase catalyzes both the formation and oxidation of catechol metabolites from steroid estrogens, and reactive intermediates from DES and from steroid estrogens are stable enough to bind both to the catalytic enzyme PGH synthase and to other proteins. The data support the contention that PGH synthase-catalyzed metabolic activation plays a role in the induction of neoplastic transformation by stilbene and steroid estrogens but is not conclusive evidence for a cause-effect relationship. More recently, two closely related DES indanyl analogues have been found to differ in their interaction with PGH synthase: indenestrol A is cooxidized and activated like DES, whereas indenestrol B inhibits the enzyme. They provide useful tools to test the above hypothesis from a new perspective. The interaction between estrogens and PGH synthase is also viewed with respect to its potential role in tumor promotion and progression, processes in which prostaglandins have been implicated as important mediators. Cooxidation of estrogens in vitro is accompanied by a stoichiometric increase in prostaglandin production. Useful approaches to study this and other effects of estrogens on PGH synthase that could result in a modulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis are discussed.

Gisela H. Degen

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Initial assessment of environmental effects on SiC/SiC composites in helium-cooled nuclear systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarized the information available in the literature on the chemical reactivity of SiC/SiC composites and of their components in contact with the helium coolant used in HTGR, VHTR and GFR designs. In normal operation conditions, ultra-high purity helium will have chemically controlled impurities (water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, hydrogen) that will create a slightly oxidizing gas environment. Little is known from direct experiments on the reactivity of third generation (nuclear grade) SiC/SiC composites in contact with low concentrations of water or oxygen in inert gas, at high temperature. However, there is ample information about the oxidation in dry and moist air of SiC/SiC composites at high temperatures. This information is reviewed first in the next chapters. The emphasis is places on the improvement in material oxidation, thermal, and mechanical properties during three stages of development of SiC fibers and at least two stages of development of the fiber/matrix interphase. The chemical stability of SiC/SiC composites in contact with oxygen or steam at temperatures that may develop in off-normal reactor conditions supports the conclusion that most advanced composites (also known as nuclear grade SiC/SiC composites) have the chemical resistance that would allow them maintain mechanical properties at temperatures up to 1200 1300 oC in the extreme conditions of an air or water ingress accident scenario. Further research is needed to assess the long-term stability of advanced SiC/SiC composites in inert gas (helium) in presence of very low concentrations (traces) of water and oxygen at the temperatures of normal operation of helium-cooled reactors. Another aspect that needs to be investigated is the effect of fast neutron irradiation on the oxidation stability of advanced SiC/SiC composites in normal operation conditions.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL] ORNL

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Assessing uncertainties in the relationship between inhaled particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing uncertainties in the relationship between inhaled particle Assessing uncertainties in the relationship between inhaled particle concentration, internal deposition and health effects, Chapter 9 Title Assessing uncertainties in the relationship between inhaled particle concentration, internal deposition and health effects, Chapter 9 Publication Type Book Chapter Year of Publication 2005 Authors Price, Phillip N. Secondary Authors Ruzer, Lev S., and Naomi H. Harley Book Title Aerosols Handbook: Measurement, Dosimetry and Health Effects Chapter Chapter Pagination 157-188 Publisher CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL Abstract The question that ultimately motivates most aerosol inhalation research is: for a given inhaled atmosphere, what health effects will result in a specified population? To attempt to address this question, quantitative research on inhaled aerosols has been performed for at least fifty years (Landahl et al, 1951). The physical factors that determine particle deposition have been determined, lung morphology has been quantified (particularly for adults), models of total particle deposition have been created and validated, and a large variety of inhalation experiments have been performed. However many basic questions remain, some of which are identified by the U.S. Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter (NRC 1998a) as high-priority research areas. Among these are: What are the quantitative relationships between outdoor concentrations measured at stationary monitoring stations, and actual personal exposures? What are the exposures to biologically important constituents of particulate matter that cause responses in potentially susceptible subpopulations and the general population? What is the role of physicochemical characteristics of particulate matter in causing adverse health effects? As these questions show, in spite of significant progress in all areas of aerosol research, many of the most important practical questions remain unanswered or inadequately answered.In this chapter, we discuss the sources and magnitudes of error that hinder the ability to answer basic questions concerning the health effects of inhaled aerosols. We first consider the phenomena that affect the epidemiological studies, starting with studies of residential radon and moving on to fine particle air pollution. Next we discuss the major uncertainties in physical and physiological modeling of the causal chain that leads from inhaled aerosol concentration, to deposition in the airway, to time-dependent dose (that is, the concentration of particles at a given point in the lungs as function of time), to physiological effects, and finally to health effect.

377

Integrating Equipment Health Information Into Grid Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, grid operators have expressed keen interest in having equipment health information available in real time. The health status of critical power system equipment can help operators assess situations, identify associated risks, and develop mitigation strategies/solutions in a time frame commensurate with the risk level. Health status information can also help operators recognize potential failures and take proactive actions, such as unloading a transformer or breaker that has shown signs of...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

378

Superfund Cleanups and Infant Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989 and 2003 ...

Currie, Janet

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

379

Influence of the greenhouse effect on human health through stratospheric cooling: Possible increase in acquired immunodeficient syndrome  

SciTech Connect

The greenhouse effect cools the stratosphere and increases formation of PSC (polar stratospheric cloud) in polar regions and enhances ozone depletion. If the enhanced ozone depletion diffused to lower latitudes, it could increase ultraviolet radiation (UV), which might increase acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemiological studies are made to test this hypothesis. The relation between AIDS prevalence R and latitude {theta}. Comparison of analyses shows that R of Caucasians would be higher than Non-Caucasians at the same {theta}. These trends are similar to those of skin cancers known to be caused by UV. In developing countries poverty, malnutrition, etc., could cause high R, and since most developing countries are located at low {theta}, the low {theta} increase may be due to these factors. However if so in Africa they are about the same and the low {theta} increase would disappear, but data on African countries also show the low {theta} increase and the significant correlation. Some countries at low {theta} have low R, probably because HIV is not prevalent for them. Then the upper envelope of the distribution of R would be cases when HIV is prevalent and UV is most effective. Therefore analyses are repeated using maxima of R within intervals of {theta} of 1, 3 and 5{degree}. In all cases the low {theta} increase and the correlation becomes more significant. These results support the hypothesis that AIDS is promoted by UV.

Okamoto, Kazuto; Tsushima, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Shin [Toyo Gakuen Univ. Chiba (Japan)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Treatment of Parameter and Modeling Uncertainty for Probabilistic Risk Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both the industry and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) incorporate risk concepts and techniques into activities for effective risk management. The NRC is using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in its regulatory activities in a manner that promotes consistency, predictability, and efficiency in the performance of the NRCs roles of risk manager and protector of public health and safety. The nuclear industry uses PRA to identify and manage risks, as a tool to promote efficient regulatory inte...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

Assessing the Influence of Regional SST Modes on the Winter Temperature in China: the Effect of Tropical Pacific and Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the influence of different sea surface temperature (SST) modes on the winter temperature in China using the Generalized Equilibrium Feedback Assessment (GEFA). It is found that the second EOF mode of winter temperature in ...

Zhihong Jiang; Hao Yang; Zhengyu Liu; Yanzhu Wu; Na Wen

383

Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions and non-CO? combustion effects from alternative jet fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-term viability and success of a transportation fuel depends on both economic and environmental sustainability. This thesis focuses specifically on assessing the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and non-CO ...

Stratton, Russell William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

ANDROS: A code for Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ANDROS (Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection) is a computer code written to compute doses and health effects from atmospheric releases of radionuclides. ANDROS has been designed as an integral part of the CRRIS (Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System). ANDROS reads air concentrations and environmental concentrations of radionuclides to produce tables of specified doses and health effects to selected organs via selected pathways (e.g., ingestion or air immersion). The calculation may be done for an individual at a specific location or for the population of the whole assessment grid. The user may request tables of specific effects for every assessment grid location. Along with the radionuclide concentrations, the code requires radionuclide decay data, dose and risk factors, and location-specific data, all of which are available within the CRRIS. This document is a user manual for ANDROS and presents the methodology used in this code.

Begovich, C.L.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Ohr, S.Y.; Chester, R.O.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

ORNL Health Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page ORNL Home | ESH&Q Home | Health Services Internal A division in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Directorate The Health Services Division at Oak Ridge...

386

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self-assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect

387

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self-assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect

388

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forms Beryllium Health Surveillance Program Summary Beryllium-Associated Workers: Medical Surveillance Beryllium Health Surveillance Program Forms Appendix B to the Preamble...

389

Chief Medical Officer: Occupational Medicine in Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Safety Health and Safety Occupational health requirements provide for the medical support of employees through the prevention, management, and compensation of occupational injuries and illnesses. In addition, requirements for the medical assessment of employees working in the nuclear environment provide protection for those employees, their coworkers, and the public. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. A. General Occupational Health B. Hazard-Specific Occupational Health C. Hazardous Materials Occupational Health D. Nuclear Safety E. Medical Screening and Surveillance F. Former Worker Medical Screening and Compensation G. Epidemiology H. Injury and Illness Reporting and Recordkeeping A. General Occupational Health Federal Employees

390

Assessment Handbook Creating and Enacting An  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Assessment Handbook Creating and Enacting An Effective Assessment Program For Student Learning Outcomes January 2013 #12;Assessment Handbook 2 Table of Contents Table of Contents............................................................................................1 Assessment Handbook

Hemmers, Oliver

391

Assessment Handbook Creating and Enacting An  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment Handbook Creating and Enacting An Effective Assessment Program For Student Learning Outcomes July 2012 #12;Assessment Handbook University of Nevada, Las Vegas 1 Table of Contents Assessment Handbook

Hemmers, Oliver

392

SAR/QSAR methods in public health practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship ((Q)SAR) modeling play an important and active role in ATSDR programs in support of the Agency mission to protect human populations from exposure to environmental contaminants. They are used for cross-chemical extrapolation to complement the traditional toxicological approach when chemical-specific information is unavailable. SAR and QSAR methods are used to investigate adverse health effects and exposure levels, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetic properties of hazardous chemical compounds. They are applied as a part of an integrated systematic approach in the development of Health Guidance Values (HGVs), such as ATSDR Minimal Risk Levels, which are used to protect populations exposed to toxic chemicals at hazardous waste sites. (Q)SAR analyses are incorporated into ATSDR documents (such as the toxicological profiles and chemical-specific health consultations) to support environmental health assessments, prioritization of environmental chemical hazards, and to improve study design, when filling the priority data needs (PDNs) as mandated by Congress, in instances when experimental information is insufficient. These cases are illustrated by several examples, which explain how ATSDR applies (Q)SAR methods in public health practice.

Demchuk, Eugene, E-mail: edemchuk@cdc.gov; Ruiz, Patricia; Chou, Selene; Fowler, Bruce A.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000) found useful turbine passage survival data for only 30 species. Tests of advanced hydropower turbines have been limited to seven species - Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow trout, alewife, eel, smallmouth bass, and white sturgeon. We are investigating possible approaches for extending experimental results from the few tested fish species to predict turbine passage survival of other, untested species (Cada and Richmond 2011). In this report, we define the causes of injury and mortality to fish tested in laboratory and field studies, based on fish body shape and size, internal and external morphology, and physiology. We have begun to group the large numbers of unstudied species into a small number of categories, e.g., based on phylogenetic relationships or ecological similarities (guilds), so that subsequent studies of a few representative species (potentially including species-specific Biological Index Testing) would yield useful information about the overall fish community. This initial effort focused on modifying approaches that are used in the environmental toxicology field to estimate the toxicity of substances to untested species. Such techniques as the development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) and Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models rely on a considerable amount of data to establish the species-toxicity relationships that can be extended to other organisms. There are far fewer studies of turbine passage stresses from which to derive the turbine passage equivalent of LC{sub 50} values. Whereas the SSD and ICE approaches are useful analogues to predicting turbine passage injury and mortality, too few data are available to support their application without some form of modification or simplification. In this report we explore the potential application of a newer, related technique, the Traits-Based Assessment (TBA), to the prediction of downstream passage mortality at hydropower projects.

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Tiger Team assessment of the Pinellas Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Document contains findings identified during the Tiger Team Compliance Assessment of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Pinellas Plant, Pinellas County, Florida. The assessment wa directed by the Department's Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) from January 15 to February 2, 1990. The Pinellas Tiger Team Compliance Assessment is comprehensive in scope. It covers the Environment Safety and Health, and Management areas and determines the plant's compliance with applicable Federal (including DOE), State, and local regulations and requirements.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades. Author(s) ... is mandatory for the cost-effective operation of an offshore wind power plant.

397

Review of air quality modeling techniques. Volume 8. [Assessment of environmental effects of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air transport and diffusion models which are applicable to the assessment of the environmental effects of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation are reviewed. The general classification of models and model inputs are discussed. A detailed examination of the statistical, Gaussian plume, Gaussian puff, one-box and species-conservation-of-mass models is given. Representative models are discussed with attention given to the assumptions, input data requirement, advantages, disadvantages and applicability of each.

Rosen, L.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Leaching Assessment Methods for the Evaluation of the Effectiveness of In Situ Stabilization of Soil Material at Manufactured Gas Pl ant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the effectiveness of in situ stabilization and solidification (ISS) as a means of remediating manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, it is necessary to predict the leaching behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Current approaches to predicting this behavior have significant limitations. This technical update provides an overview and status report on a project to develop an alternative leaching assessment methodology for estimating the release of PAHs from ISS-treated soils.

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of technology today, promising emerging technologies and references for further reading.

Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

400

Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL. This volume contains appendices.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Arsenic Health Research Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research program investigating the health effects of inorganic arsenic continues to focus on understanding the biological significance of low-level inorganic arsenic exposure. The major component of ongoing work is the development of an alternative, nonlinear approach to revising the inorganic arsenic cancer potency value (or cancer slope factor). Current, default linear approaches for establishing a cancer slope factor do not account for the biological mode o...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 1993 30, 1993 EA-0921: Final Environmental Assessment Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University July 1, 1993 EA-0847: Final Environmental Assessment Live Fire Range at the Central Training Academy, Albuquerque, New Mexico June 25, 1993 EA-0841: Final Environmental Assessment Import of Russian Plutonium-238 June 3, 1993 EA-0923: Final Environmental Assessment Winnett School District Boiler Replacement Project June 1, 1993 EA-0792: Final Environmental Assessment Nonnuclear Consolidation Environmental Assessment April 2, 1993 EA-0822: Final Environmental Assessment Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Consolidated Transportation Facility January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Final Environmental Assessment Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

403

title Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources volume year month abstract p The application of life cycle assessment LCA to electric power EP technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life cycle energy GHG emissions air pollutant emissions and water use implications of EP technologies With continued progress LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically thorough and environmentally holistic manner for more robust deployment

404

Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 January 2012 Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment at the DOE Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to evaluate the current status of the nuclear safety culture and the effectiveness of DOE and contractor management in addressing nuclear safety concerns at WTP. This assessment provides DOE management with a follow-up on the October 2010 HSS review of the WTP

405

EA-1312: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1312: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1312: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1312: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) This document is the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed action to address ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Grand Junction, Colorado. This site is also known as the former Climax uranium millsite. The purpose of this EA is to present the proposed action and alternatives and discuss their environmental effects. The EA presents a strategy for achieving compliance with requirements established in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (42 United States Code 7901 et seq.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency' (EPA's) "Health and Environmental Protection Standards

406

Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Characterization of energy production and health impact in Romanian context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main aim of the paper is to establish appropriate approaches for assessing the impact of power generation plants on human health, considering the Romanian situation. As a consequence of the technology used in energy production and of the type of ... Keywords: air pollution, assessment, health impact, power plants

Diana Mariana Cocarta; Adrian Badea; Tiberiu Apostol

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

HOTSPOT Health Physics codes for the PC  

SciTech Connect

The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes are a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT codes produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly or scaling a universal nomogram during an emergency. The HOTSPOT codes are designed for short-term (less than 24 hours) release durations. Users requiring radiological release consequences for release scenarios over a longer time period, e.g., annual windrose data, are directed to such long-term models as CAPP88-PC (Parks, 1992). Users requiring more sophisticated modeling capabilities, e.g., complex terrain; multi-location real-time wind field data; etc., are directed to such capabilities as the Department of Energy`s ARAC computer codes (Sullivan, 1993). Four general programs -- Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension -- calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Other programs deal with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from the inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides; calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground-survey measurements; and screen plutonium uptake in the lung (see FIDLER Calibration and LUNG Screening sections).

Homann, S.G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Health benefits of particle filtration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health benefits of particle filtration Health benefits of particle filtration Title Health benefits of particle filtration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fisk, William J. Journal Indoor Air Date Published 02/12/2013 Abstract The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

410

Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleteduranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime because of the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation, and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Construction at Locations B or C would not result in direct impacts to wetlands. However, the hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. The impacts at Location A may potentially be avoided by an alternative routing of the entrance road, or mitigation may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the State of Ohio. Unavoidable impacts to isolated wetlands may require an Isolated Wetlands Permit from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor for the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found in this part of Ohio, which in many cases involve previously disturbed habitats.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

Millersville University Health Services Health Form Instructions Millersville University Health Services is dedicated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratories as ordered by a medical provider. Health Services works cooperatively with Quest, ACM, and CDDMillersville University Health Services Health Form Instructions Millersville University Health, and health education. Health Services Information Millersville University Health Services is centrally

Hardy, Christopher R.

412

Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010 Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010 On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009-1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. This recommendation focused on the need for clear direction on use of quantitative risk assessments in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently analyzing directives, standards, training, and other tools that may support more effective development and use of risk assessment. Working with the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Nuclear Safety, staff from the Office of Health,

413

Dose assessment for potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site: NESHAP compliance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to present the assessment results for the registered stacks on the Hanford Site for potential emissions, i.e. emissions with no control devices in place. Further, the document will identify those stacks requiring continuous monitoring, i.e. the effective dose equivalent from potential emissions >0.1 mrem/yr. The stack assessment of potential emissions was performed on 84 registered stacks on the Hanford Site. These emission sources represent individual point sources presently registered under Washington Administrative code 246-247 with the Washington Department of Health. The methods used in assessing the potential emissions from the stacks are described.

Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kenoyer, J.L. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Environmental Services Group (ESG)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Services Group Environmental Services Group Whom To Call Operating Permits For LBNL Activities Publications Advisories Internal Documents Environmental Management System Environmental Restoration Program Weather Data Image of Chicken Creek The Environmental Services Group, within the Environment, Health and Safety Division, provides a comprehensive range of cost-effective environmental management services to Berkeley Lab by working with research and support staff. Services include: Your visit may be enhanced by upgrading or installing the latest Flash Player. ESG sampling activity Air and Water Quality Management Hazardous Materials Management Environmental Monitoring Radiological Dose and Environmental Risk Assessment Environmental Management System Environmental Restoration News & Updates

415

Integrated assessment briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment can be used to evaluate and clarify resource management policy options and outcomes for decision makers. The defining characteristics of integrated assessment are (1) focus on providing information and analysis that can be understood and used by decision makers rather than for merely advancing understanding and (2) its multidisciplinary approach, using methods, styles of study, and considerations from a broader variety of technical areas than would typically characterize studies produced from a single disciplinary standpoint. Integrated assessment may combine scientific, social, economic, health, and environmental data and models. Integrated assessment requires bridging the gap between science and policy considerations. Because not everything can be valued using a single metric, such as a dollar value, the integrated assessment process also involves evaluating trade-offs among dissimilar attributes. Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recognized the importance and value of multidisciplinary approaches to solving environmental problems early on and have pioneered the development of tools and methods for integrated assessment over the past three decades. Major examples of ORNL`s experience in the development of its capabilities for integrated assessment are given.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health,...

417

EA-0970: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project No. 94-AA-01 Pantex Plant Amarillo, TX This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to...

418

EA-0642: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications EA-1092: Final Environmental Assessment FEMA Good Ideas Book EPA -- Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National...

419

journal Environmental Health Perspectives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners A simulation Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners A simulation based assessment for Southern California journal Environmental Health Perspectives year month abstract p Background Residential natural gas cooking burners NGCBs can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting p p Objective Quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes p p Methods A mass balance model was applied to estimate time dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the exposure concentrations experienced by individual occupants The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide NO2 carbon monoxide CO and formaldehyde HCHO concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample

420

INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "health effects assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Comment on “Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop”  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the authors comment on several mistakes made in a journal paper "Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop" published on Environmental Scienece & Technology, based on field measurements from Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems, and published literature. Our comment has led to the development of another version of SWAT to include better process based description of radiation use efficiency and root-shoot growth.

Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Arnold, J. G.; Sammons, N. B.; Manowitz, David H.; Thomson, Allison M.; Williams, J.R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Assessment of Tidal Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Development of MHK Module and Analysis of Effects on Hydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect

In this report we describe (1) the development, test, and validation of the marine hydrokinetic energy scheme in a three-dimensional coastal ocean model (FVCOM); and (2) the sensitivity analysis of effects of marine hydrokinetic energy configurations on power extraction and volume flux in a coastal bay. Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics and Subtask 2.1.2.3, Screening Analysis, for fiscal year 2011 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423