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1

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

2

Cuttings Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Laughlin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Laughlin, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity...

3

Conceptual Model At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grigsby & Tester, 1989) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby & Tester,...

4

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration...

5

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity...

6

Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water-Gas...

7

Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes See linked...

8

Non-Darcy flow in geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of non-Darcy flow laws are investigated for two geothermal reservoir types: multiphase and Hot Dry Rock (HDR). Long-term thermal behavior is emphasized as short-term pressure transient behavior is addressed in the oil field literature. Comparisons of Darcy and non-Darcy flow laws are made.

Zyvoloski, G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that well blocks must geothermal reservoir s·tudies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

Pruess, Karsten

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Fenton Hill HDR Reservoir Donald W. Brown (1994) How to Achieve a Four-Fold Productivity Increase at Fenton Hill Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.org...

11

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum Reservoirs. Geothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA1970, Superheating of Geothermal Steam, Proc. of the U.N.the Development & Utilization of Geothermal Resources, Pisa.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Geothermal Resource Assessment and Reservoir EngineeriWorkshop on Geothermal Resources Assessment and ReserooirWorkshop on Geothermal Resources Assessment an ervoi r Engi

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using...

15

HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

Schroeder, R.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

Howard, J. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Paul Kruger and Henry J . Ramey, Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 THE GEOTHERMAL CHIMNEY MODEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Current Design of t h e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Geothermal Reservoir Phy.Sica1 PIodels . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 RAD3N I N GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

Stanford University

18

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling f o r Geothermal Reservoirs and Power- plants. I'Fumaroles Hunt, 1970 Geothermal power James, 1978 FusionGood a lated perfo : Geothermal Power Systems Compared. 'I

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SGP-"R- 68 Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption and Composition Michael J. Economides September, 1983 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program Contract No Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford

Stanford University

20

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Abstract The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Economic predictions for heat mining : a review and analysis of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objectives of this study were first, to review and analyze several economic assessments of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy systems, and second, to reformulate an economic model for HDR with revised cost components.

Tester, Jefferson W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

User's manual for HDR3 computer code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A description of the HDR3 computer code and instructions for its use are provided. HDR3 calculates space heating costs for a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal space heating system. The code also compares these costs to those of a specific oil heating system in use at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Flight Center at Wallops Island, Virginia. HDR3 allows many HDR system parameters to be varied so that the user may examine various reservoir management schemes and may optimize reservoir design to suit a particular set of geophysical and economic parameters.

Arundale, C.J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Reservoir Pressure Management  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reservoir Pressure Management Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot...

25

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Principal Investigator: Ahmad Ghassmi Texas A&M University EGS...

26

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Abstract An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed...

27

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and A. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Stanford Geothermal Project Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Papers Presented a t the Second United Nations Symposium on t h e Development and Use of Geothermal Resources, May 19-29, 1975, San

Stanford University

28

Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir in response to production from different horizons is studied using numerical simulation methods. The Olkaria geothermal field in Kenya is used as an example where a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlies the main liquid-dominated reservoir. The possibility of improving energy recovery from vapor-dominated reservoirs by tapping deeper horizons is considered.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, of theTransport in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs, Geothermics,Depletion of Vapor-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs, Lawrence

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Purtymun...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valles caldera in order to locate an of high heat flow that would serve as a favorable test site for the HDR concept. Notes Data from these wells are report in Reiter et al....

32

INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Pruess, K. , Analysis of injection testing of geothermalreservoirs: Geothermal Resoures Council, Vol. 4. , (into a fractured geothermal reservoir: Transactions, Vol. 4,

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 90, 6, pp. 15281534, December 2000 Spatial Correlation of Seismic Slip at the HDR-Soultz Geothermal Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correlation of Seismic Slip at the HDR-Soultz Geothermal Site: Qualitative Approach by Peter Starzec, Michael injection well at Soultz-sou-Fore^ts Hot Dry Rock geothermal site (Alsace, France). Variograms obtained properties of fractures, and their orientations. Introduction The hot dry rock geothermal energy (HDR

34

Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Abstract Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time...

35

A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia. Abstract The constitutive thermo-hydro-mechanical equations is next applied to simulate circulation tests at the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir. The finer thermo-hydro

Boyer, Edmond

36

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the authors. Wairakei geothermal field: Lawrence BerkeleyR. C. , Evaluation of potential geothermal well-head and17, "S"r78" for use in geothermal reservoir 25 p. (LBL-

Howard, J.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Heat extracted from the long term flow test in the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term flow test was carried out in the Fenton Hill HDR Phase-2 reservoir for 14 months during 1992-1993 to examine the potential for supplying thermal energy at a sustained rate as a commercial demonstration of HDR technology. The test was accomplished in several segments with changes in mean flowrate due to pumping conditions. Re-test estimates of the extractable heat content above a minimum useful temperature were based on physical evidence of the size of the Fenton Hill reservoir. A numerical model was used to estimate the extent of heat extracted during the individual flow segments from the database of measured production data during the test. For a reservoir volume of 6.5x10{sup 6}m{sup 3}, the total heat content above a minimum temperature of 150{degree} C was 1.5x10{sup 15}J. For the total test period at the three sustained mean flowrates, the integrated heat extracted was 0.088x10{sup 15}J, with no discernable temperature decline of the produced fluid. The fraction of energy extracted above the abandonment temperature was 5.9%. On the basis of a constant thermal energy extraction rate, the lifetime of the reservoir (without reservoir growth) to the abandonment temperature would be 13.3 years, in good agreement with the pre-test estimate of 15.0 years for the given reservoir volume.

Kruger, Paul; Robinson, Bruce

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their Application to Geothermal Well Testing, in Geothermalthe Performance of Geothermal Wells, Geothermal Res.of Production Data from Geothermal Wells, Geothermal Res.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigator: Roland N. Home September 1986 Second Annual Report Department of Energy Contract Number through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecastingl of field behavior with time. Injection al series of Proceedings that are a prominent literature source on geothermal energy. The Program

Stanford University

43

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigator: Roland N. Home September 1985 First Annual Report Department of Energy Contract Number, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection I I Tec hnology is a research area receiving special on geothermal energy. The Program publishes technical reports on all of its research projects. Research findings

Stanford University

44

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to t

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

45

Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate the audiovisual equipment and to Michael Riley who coordinated the meeting arrangements for a second year. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1991-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

47

Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in jointed and layered rocks in geothermal fields.of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 116, 257- 278.fracturing in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir: Results

Wessling, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

49

Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preface The Twelfth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 20-22, 1987. The year ending December 1986 was very difficult for the domestic geothermal industry. Low oil prices caused a sharp drop in geothermal steam prices. We expected to see some effect upon attendance at the Twelfth Workshop. To our surprise, the attendance was up by thirteen from previous years, with one hundred and fifty-seven registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and Turkey. Despite a worldwide surplus of oil, international geothermal interest and development is growing at a remarkable pace. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Seven technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published; they concern geothermal developments and research in Iceland, Italy, and New Zealand. In addition to these forty-eight technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was John R. Berg from the Department of Energy. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants his thoughts on the expectations of this agency in the role of alternative energy resources, specifically geothermal, within the country???s energy framework. His talk is represented as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, K. Goyal, G.S. Bodvarsson, A.S. Batchelor, H. Dykstra, M.J. Reed, A. Truesdell, J.S. Gudmundsson, and J.R. Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Marilyn King, Amy Osugi, Terri Ramey, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1987-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

50

Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

None

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Xianfa Deng who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Roland N. Home Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1986-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

54

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scien- Producing Geothermal Wells. (LA 6 5 5 3 x ) t i f i cSteam-Water Flow i n Geothermal Wells. Journal o f Petroleumo f a Hawaii Geothermal Well-- HGP-A. It Geothermal

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Real-time and post-frac' 3-D analysis of hydraulic fracture treatments in geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic power production from Hot Dry Rock (HDR) requires the establishment of an efficient circulation system between wellbores in reservoir rock with extremely low matrix permeability. Hydraulic fracturing is employed to establish the necessary circulation system. Hydraulic fracturing has also been performed to increase production from hydrothermal reservoirs by enhancing the communication with the reservoir's natural fracture system. Optimal implementation of these hydraulic fracturing applications, as with any engineering application, requires the use of credible physical models and the reconciliation of the physical models with treatment data gathered in the field. Analysis of the collected data has shown that 2-D models and 'conventional' 3-D models of the hydraulic fracturing process apply very poorly to hydraulic fracturing in geothermal reservoirs. Engineering decisions based on these more 'conventional' fracture modeling techniques lead to serious errors in predicting the performance of hydraulic fracture treatments. These errors can lead to inappropriate fracture treatment design as well as grave errors in well placement for hydrothermal reservoirs or HDR reservoirs. This paper outlines the reasons why conventional modeling approaches fall short, and what types of physical models are needed to credibly estimate created hydraulic fracture geometry. The methodology of analyzing actual measured fracture treatment data and matching the observed net fracturing pressure (in realtime as well as after the treatment) is demonstrated at two separate field sites. Results from an extensive Acoustic Emission (AE) fracture diagnostic survey are also presented for the first case study aS an independent measure of the actual created hydraulic fracture geometry.

Wright, C.A.; Tanigawa, J.J.; Hyodo, Masami; Takasugi, Shinji

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,I 2nd Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. UniversityExperiment t o Extract Geothermal Energy From Hot Dry Rock."

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a steam-filled fracture geothermal reservoir exists at Coso Hot Springs KGRA, as proposed by Combs and...

59

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: to develop a 3-D numerical model for simulating mode I; II; and III (tensile; shear; and tearing propagation of multiple fractures using the virtual multi-dimensional internal bond (VMIB); to predict geothermal reservoir stimulation.

60

Tracer measurements during long-term circulation of the Rosemanowes HDR geothermal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Circulation experiments have been in operation for over two years in the artificially stimulated hot dry rock (HDR) doublet of the Camborne School of Mines (CSM) research facility in Cornwall, England. During that period tracer tests have been run at intervals using inert and reactive compounds. Initially, the results of the inert tracer investigations showed that the active volume (indicated by modal and median volumes) of the circulating system was dormant. Then, after a period of sustained oscillation, notable increases in active volume were observed which depended on both the subsequent flow rate changes and circulation time. these dynamic changes had almost reached optimum values when a downhole pump was introduced in the production well. The drawdown in the production well caused a reduction of the modal volume, whilst the median volume remained almost the same. Since then, the active volume has remained unchanged and irresponsive to circulation time and flow rate. The results of the reactive tracer tests confirm increasing chemical reaction with increasing circulation time and correlate qualitatively with the opening of newer and hotter pathways within the reservoir. However, repeated production logs throughout the circulation have identified flow paths that have depleted thermally; a discrepancy that can be explained by the geometry of the system and the preferential downward reservoir growth.

Kwakwa, K.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

document. LBL-7094 UC-66~1 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIRInc. , 1976. Study of the geothermal reservoir underlyingtest, 1976, East Mesa geothermal field in California.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

Reed, M.J. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Using precision gravity data in geothermal reservoir engineering modeling studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precision gravity measurements taken at various times over a geothermal field can be used to derive information about influx into the reservoir. Output from a reservoir simulation program can be used to compute surface gravity fields and time histories. Comparison of such computer results with field-measured gravity data can add confidence to simulation models, and provide insight into reservoir processes. Such a comparison is made for the Bulalo field in the Philippines.

Atkinson, Paul G.; Pederseen, Jens R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation Using Geomechanics...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

into estimates of seismic hazard relationships between induced seismicity, changes in fracture density, fluid injectionwithdrawal, background stress, and geothermal production....

65

Geothermal reservoir at Tatapani Geothermal field, Surguja district, Madhya Pradesh, IN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tatapani Geothermal field, located on the Son-Narmada mega lineament is one of the most intense geothermal manifestation, with hot spring temperature of 98°c. in Central India. 21 Exploratory and thermal gradient boreholes followed by 5 production wells for proposed 300 KWe binary cycle power plant, have revealed specific reservoir parameters of shallow geothermal reservoir of 110°c in upper 350 m of geothermal system and their possible continuation to deeper reservoir of anticipated temperature of 160 ± 10°c. Testing of five production wells done by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation concurrently with drilling at different depths and also on completion of drilling, have established feeder zones of thermal water at depth of 175-200 m, 280-300 m, maximum temperature of 112.5°c and bottom hole pressure of 42 kg/cm². Further interpretation of temperature and pressure profiles, injection test, well head discharges and chemical analysis data has revealed thermal characteristics of individual production wells and overall configuration of .thermal production zones with their permeability, temperature, and discharge characteristics in the shallow thermal reservoir area. Well testing data and interpretation of reservoir parameters therefrom, for upper 350 m part of geothermal system and possible model of deeper geothermal reservoir at Tatapani have been presented in the paper.

Pitale, U.L.; Sarolkar, P.B.; Rawat, H.S.; Shukia, S.N.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 911, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stanford, California, February 9­11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL ENERGY: IMPORTANT LESSONS FROM FENTON HILL Donald W. Brown Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O. Box 1663, MS-D443 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 USA e-mail: dwb@lanl.gov ABSTRACT The concept of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy originated

Stanford University

67

CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c c c i i c I CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS to calculate the steam/water relative permeabilities in geothermal reservoirs was developed and applied curves as a basis for analysis of future well tests for geothermal reservoirs. c ii #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS

Stanford University

68

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation Using Geomechanics...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Microseismic Study with LBNL - Monitoring the Effect of Injection of Fluids from the Lake County Pipeline on...

69

Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

70

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i s maintain reservoir pressu found t o be f a i r l yPrieto. , Correlation of pressu temperature trends w i t h

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Templeton David B. Harris Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

72

Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of...

73

THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS A REPORT of experiments into the natural state of geothermal reservoirs have been conducted using porous medium models, even though geothermal systems are usually highly fractured. It is unclear whether a porous medium

Stanford University

74

Mining earth's heat: development of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy-extraction concept of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, as initially developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is to mine this heat by creating a man-made reservoir in low-permeability, hot basement rock. This concept has been successfully proven at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico by drilling two holes to a depth of approximately 3 km (10,000 ft) and a bottom temperature of 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F), then connecting the boreholes with a large-diametervertical hydraulic fracture. Water is circulated down one borehole, heated by the hot rock, and rises up the second borehole to the surface where the heat is extracted and the cooled water is reinjected into the underground circulation loop. This system has operated for a cumulative 416 days during engineering and reservoir testing. An energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t) was produced without adverse environmental problems. During one test, a generator was installed in the circulation loop and produced 60 kW of electricity. A second-generation system, recently drilled to 4.5 km (15,000 ft) and temperatures of 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F), entails creating multiple, parallel fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. This system should produce 5 to 10 MW(e) for 20 years. Significant contributions to underground technology have been made through the development of the program.

Pettitt, R.A.; Becker, N.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Chelated Indium Activable Tracers for Geothermal Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center (SLAC), for providing the califclmiurh-252 neutron source. Appreciation is extended to Lew, rock size, and temperature on the tracer adsoqjtion and ther- mal degradation. The rock employed for these measurements was gragwacke, a prek valent rock type at The Geysers, California geothermal field. The re

Stanford University

76

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Simulation of Radon Transport in Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of radon transport is a useful adjunct in the study of radon as an in situ tracer of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic numerical model has been developed to assist in the interpretation of field experiments. The model simulates transient response of radon concentration in wellhead geofluid as a function of prevailing reservoir conditions. The radon simulation model has been used to simulate radon concentration response during production drawdown and two flowrate transient tests in vapor-dominated systems. Comparison of model simulation with experimental data from field tests provides insight in the analysis of reservoir phenomena such as propagation of boiling fronts, and estimates of reservoir properties of porosity and permeability thickness.

Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Imaging the Soultz Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir using double-difference tomography and microseismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We applied the double-difference tomography method to image the P and S-wave velocity structure of the European Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir (also known as the Soultz Enhanced Geothermal System) at Soultz-sous-Forets, ...

Piñeros Concha, Diego Alvaro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University unit at the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) site at Desert Peak (Nevada) were used. Results indicate

Stanford University

80

ADVANCING REACTIVE TRACER METHODS FOR MONITORING THERMAL DRAWDOWN IN GEOTHERMAL ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to evaluate reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; George D. Redden; Laurence C. Hull

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are defined from the numerical solution of a complex hypersingular integral equation written for a given fracture configuration and loading. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures with existing discontinuities such as faults and joints. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two- and three-dimensional heat extraction solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate heat extraction and the variations of the reservoir stress with cooling. The numerical models have been developed in a user-friendly environment to create a tool for improving fracture design and investigating single or multiple fracture propagation in rock.

Ahmad Ghassemi

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Artificial Geothermal Energy Potential of Steam-flooded Heavy Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study presents an investigation of the concept of harvesting geothermal energy that remains in heavy oil reservoirs after abandonment when steamflooding is no longer… (more)

Limpasurat, Akkharachai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .Coordination with Other Geothermal Programs . . . . . . 6the Behavior of Geothermal Systems . . . . . . . . . 1 6

Bloomster, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Artificial Geothermal Energy Potential of Steam-flooded Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study presents an investigation of the concept of harvesting geothermal energy that remains in heavy oil reservoirs after abandonment when steamflooding is no longer economics. Substantial heat that has accumulated within reservoir rock and its...

Limpasurat, Akkharachai

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

85

Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

None

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clean, renewable, and safe baseload geothermal power generation. INTRODUCTION Newberry VolcanoPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University and shift stimulation to new fractures. The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration will allow geothermal

Foulger, G. R.

87

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOE), Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) proposed thatof Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy, through Lawrence

Howard, J. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWCCatcher.pngWavemillMississippi. ItsReservoir

89

Deep geothermal reservoirs evolution: from a modeling perspective BRGM, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, BP 36009 -45060 Orlans Cedex 2, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep geothermal reservoirs evolution: from a modeling perspective S. Lopez1 1 BRGM, 3 Avenue Claude deep geothermal reservoirs evolution and management based on examples ranging from direct use of geothermal heat to geothermal electricity production. We will try to focus on French experiences

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

90

Using Parallel MCMC Sampling to Calibrate a Computer Model of a Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Parallel MCMC Sampling to Calibrate a Computer Model of a Geothermal Reservoir by T. Cui, C. 686 ISSN 1178-360 #12;Using Parallel MCMC Sampling to Calibrate a Computer Model of a Geothermal of a geothermal field to achieve model `calibration' from measured well-test data. We explore three scenarios

Fox, Colin

91

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-WATER INJECTION INTO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMBINED WITH CO2 STORAGE Hamidreza Salimi of the geothermal system. In this way, synergy is established between geothermal energy production and subsurface CO) with geothermal energy. A further reduction could be achieved by capturing the remaining emitted CO2

Stanford University

92

INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications & Operations, Geothermal Energy Division of theP. , and Otte, C. , Geothermal energy: Stanford, California,Applications & Operations, Geothermal Energy Division of the

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy effort is theMission of Division of Geothermal Energy The mission of the

Bloomster, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .of the Division of Geothermal Energy and these directoratesof Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy effort is the

Bloomster, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ment methods for geothermal well system param- eters,on calcite-fouled geothermal wells (Michaels, 1979). An

Howard, J. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geology of three geothermal wells, Klamath Falls, Oregon,evaluation of five geothermal wells: in Proceedings Second

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Conceptual Model At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1988) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy,(EC-LEDS)ColumbusDHeatGeothermalEastOpenOpenOpenOpen

98

Tracer Testing At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Callahan, 1996) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Reed, 2007) Jump

99

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was elaborated to prepare the implementation of the first Hungarian geothermal pilot power plant. The hydraulicPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University FOR TRACER TRANSPORT IN A FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Aniko Toth, Peter Szucs and Elemer Bobok University

Stanford University

100

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University is of primary concern in geothermal reservoir engineering. Based on a tracer circulation test performed at the European Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) test site at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France, three different

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reveals that faster cooling rate which is equivalent to the fluid injection rate in geothermal operationsPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University IN HOT DRY GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS Xiaoxian Zhou1 , Atilla Aydin1 , Fushen Liu2 , David D. Pollard1 1

Stanford University

102

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

None

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mental Effects of Geothermal Power Production Phase IIA,"its development as a geothermal power system, Wairakei andI. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N e w Zealand,

Pritchett, J.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mental Effects of Geothermal Power Production Phase IIA,"its development as a geothermal power system, Wairakei andI. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N e w Zealand,

Pritchett, J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .Nations Symposium on Geothermal Energy, Vol. 1 , p. 487-494.Nations Symposium on Geothermal Energy, Vol. 1 p . l i i i -

Bloomster, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13. modeling of liquid geothermal systems: Ph.D. thesis,of water dominated geothermal fields with large temper~of land subsidence in geothermal areas: Proc. 2nd Int. Symp.

Lippmann, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

response to the changes in the Earth's gravitational field caused by the passage of the sun and the moon. Overall, the results of the tests indicate that the geothermal reservoir...

110

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1988; Smedley, 2002). Development of geothermal fields for power generation tends to increase the rate to constructing the geothermal power plant. The geothermal field is located in a Moil valley terraces set withinPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

111

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation project in Desert Peak (Nevada) geothermal field. As partPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM K.M. Kovac1 , Susan J. Lutz2 , Peter S. Drakos3 , Joel Byersdorfer4 , and Ann Robertson

Stanford University

112

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Future of Geothermal Energy (MIT, 2006 level geothermal systems model to enable the US Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies ProgramPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

113

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Geothermal Wayang Windu Ltd., 2. Geothermal Laboratory ITB, Bandung. mulyadiPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-DOMINATED TWO-PHASE ZONE OF THE WAYANG WINDU GEOTHERMAL FIELD, JAVA, INDONESIA Mulyadi1 and Ali Ashat2 1. Star

Stanford University

114

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The legislative framework in South Australia (Petroleum and Geothermal Energy Act 20001 ) and the behavior by the Petroleum and Geothermal Energy Act 2000 (P&GE Act), Figure 1.Geothermal licenses in South AustraliaPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

115

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

River geothermal site (from U.S. Geothermal Inc.) #12;Department of Energy from 1975 to 1982PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE Earl Mattson1 , Mitchell Plummer1 , Carl Palmer1 , Larry Hull1 , Samantha Miller1

Stanford University

116

The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is conducting a reservoir evaluation study of the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador. This work is being performed in cooperation with the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report describes the work done during the first year of the study (FY 1988--89), and includes the (1) development of geological and conceptual models of the field, (2) evaluation of the initial thermodynamic and chemical conditions and their changes during exploitation, (3) evaluation of interference test data and the observed reservoir pressure decline, and (4) the development of a natural state model for the field. The geological model of the field indicates that there are seven (7) major and five (5) minor faults that control the fluid movement in the Ahuachapan area. Some of the faults act as a barrier to flow as indicated by large temperature declines towards the north and west. Other faults act as preferential pathways to flow. The Ahuachapan Andesites provide good horizontal permeability to flow and provide most of the fluids to the wells. The underlying Older Agglomerates also contribute to well production, but considerably less than the Andesites. 84 refs.

Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal wellhead enthalpies were reviewed. A mixing tee condenser was recom- mended for use when cooling ,

Howard, J. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University along a borehole at the site was consistent with results from FMI and PTS logging. INTRODUCTION

Stanford University

119

EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE LOAD-FOLLOWING POTENTIAL OF A HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE LOAD-FOLLOWING POTENTIAL OF A HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR. The objective of this cyclic load-following experiment was to investigate the performance of the reservoir, this series of cyclic flow tests is referred to as the Load-Following Experiment, with the objective

120

Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. First annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work on energy extraction experiments concerns the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced. The work on noncondensable gas reservoir engineering covers both the completed and continuing work in these two interrelated research areas: radon emanation from the rock matrix of geothermal reservoirs, and radon and ammonia variations with time and space over geothermal reservoirs. Cooperative research programs with Italy and Mexico are described. The bench-scale experiments and well test analysis section covers both experimental and theoretical studies. The small core model continues to be used for the study of temperature effects on absolute permeability. The unconsolidated sand study was completed at the beginning of this contract period. The Appendices describe some of the Stanford Geothermal program activities that results in interactions with the geothermal community. These occur in the form of SGP Technical Reports, presentations at technical meetings and publications in the open literature.

Brigham, W.E.; Horne, R.N.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

World Geothermal Congress, Melbourne, Australia, 19-25 April, 2015 TOMO4D: Temporal Changes in Reservoir Structure at Geothermal Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Geothermal Congress, Melbourne, Australia, 19-25 April, 2015 TOMO4D: Temporal Changes in Reservoir Structure at Geothermal Areas Bruce Julian, Gillian Foulger, Andrew Sabin, Najwa Mhana Temporal geothermal areas, California, using three-dimensional local-earthquake tomography repeated on a year

Foulger, G. R.

122

Introduction to the Proceedings of the Sixth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop, Stanford Geothermal Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on thenumerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed i n these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented . Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey ( U.S.G.S.) , Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would l i k e t o thank Jean Cook and Joanne Hartford (Petroleum Engineering Department, Stanford University) without whom there may never have been a Sixth Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Ian G. Donaldson Stanford University December 31, 1980

Ramey, Henry J. Jr.; Kruger, Paul; Donaldson, Ian G.

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY J J. H. Howard and W.BY USWE/DIVISION O GEOTHERMAL ENERGY F Berkeley, CaliforniaWE), Division of Geothermal Energy (mS) proposed that

Howard, J.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive(Sichuan, Sw China) |System,on

126

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. Based on a range of well schemes, techno-economic analyses of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) are conducted to determine the economic benefits of integrating GCS with geothermal energy production. In addition to considering CO2 injection, reservoir analyses are conducted for nitrogen (N2) injection to investigate the potential benefits of incorporating N2 injection with integrated geothermal-GCS, as well as the use of N2 injection as a potential pressure-support and working-fluid option. Phase 1 includes preliminary environmental risk assessments of integrated geothermal-GCS, with the focus on managing reservoir overpressure. Phase 1 also includes an economic survey of pipeline costs, which will be applied in Phase 2 to the analysis of CO2 conveyance costs for techno-economics analyses of integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites. Phase 1 also includes a geospatial GIS survey of potential integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites, which will be used in Phase 2 to conduct sweet-spot analyses that determine where promising geothermal resources are co-located in sedimentary settings conducive to safe CO2 storage, as well as being in adequate proximity to large stationary CO2 sources.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

127

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.aniko@uni-miskolc.hu ABSTRACT Hungary has decided to implement its first geothermal pilot power plant for electricity production The implementation of the first Hungarian geothermal pilot power plant occurred in 2004. After a comprehensive sitePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

128

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly increase the costs of geothermal power plants, rendering less the feasibility of utilizationPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 - A METHODOLOGY FOR OPTIMAL GEOTHERMAL

Stanford University

129

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attention in the last five decades. Geothermal heating and cooling are possible in zones having a normalPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 SUSTAINABILITY OF GEOTHERMAL DOUBLETS

Stanford University

130

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-northeast of Reno, Nevada. It has an estimated reservoir temperature of 175-205°C at 1- 2 km depth and supports understanding permeability anisotropy in the geothermal reservoir but also for estimating the fault reactivation studies, stress modeling, and 3D structural modeling may be valuable for geothermal development where cost

Stanford University

131

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes/University of Utah, U.S. Geothermal Inc. and Apex HiPoint Reservoir Engineering. The primary objective

Stanford University

132

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University in a reservoir has been an essential part in the planning process for geothermal projects for the past 30 years of groundwater (for heating and/or cooling). The tool may be used in a preliminary planning phase to study

Stanford University

133

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University as the dynamic properties of the fluid flowing both through the wellbore and the reservoir. It is known that Petroleum and Geothermal fluids have similar properties in terms of well testing. In this regard, almost

Stanford University

134

Proceedings of the technical review on advances in geothermal reservoir technology---Research in progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This proceedings contains 20 technical papers and abstracts describing most of the research activities funded by the Department of Energy (DOE's) Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program, which is under the management of Marshall Reed. The meeting was organized in response to several requests made by geothermal industry representatives who wanted to learn more about technical details of the projects supported by the DOE program. Also, this gives them an opportunity to personally discuss research topics with colleagues in the national laboratories and universities.

Lippmann, M.J. (ed.)

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assess existing economic evaluation methods from othermerits of existing economic evaluation methods and developVI: ECONOMICS Background Economic evaluation of, geothermal

Bloomster, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report highlights the work that was done to characterize fractured geothermal reservoirs using production data. That includes methods that were developed to infer characteristic functions from production data and models that were designed to optimize reinjection scheduling into geothermal reservoirs, based on these characteristic functions. The characterization method provides a robust way of interpreting tracer and flow rate data from fractured reservoirs. The flow-rate data are used to infer the interwell connectivity, which describes how injected fluids are divided between producers in the reservoir. The tracer data are used to find the tracer kernel for each injector-producer connection. The tracer kernel describes the volume and dispersive properties of the interwell flow path. A combination of parametric and nonparametric regression methods were developed to estimate the tracer kernels for situations where data is collected at variable flow-rate or variable injected concentration conditions. The characteristic functions can be used to calibrate thermal transport models, which can in turn be used to predict the productivity of geothermal systems. This predictive model can be used to optimize injection scheduling in a geothermal reservoir, as is illustrated in this report.

Roland N. Horne, Kewen Li, Mohammed Alaskar, Morgan Ames, Carla Co, Egill Juliusson, Lilja Magnusdottir

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geological control on the reservoir characteristics of Olkaria West Geothermal Field, Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reservoir of the West Olkaria Geothermal Field is hosted within tuffs and the reservoir fluid is characterized by higher concentrations of reservoir CO{sub 2} (10,000-100,000 mg/kg) but lower chloride concentrations of about 200 mg/kg than the East and North East Fields. The West Field is in the outflow and main recharge area of the Olkaria geothermal system. Permeability is generally low in the West Field and its distribution is strongly controlled by the structures. Fault zones show higher permeability with wells drilled within the structures havin larger total mass outputs. However, N-S and NW-SE faults are mainly channels for cold water downflow into the reservoir. Well feeder zones occur mostly at lava-tuff contacts; within fractured lava flows and at the contacts of intrusives and host rocks.

Omenda, Peter A.

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research. Fourth annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reservoir definition research consisted of well test analysis and bench-scale experiments. Well testing included both single-well pressure drawdown and buildup testing, and multiple-well interference testing. The development of new well testing methods continued to receive major emphasis during the year. Work included a project on multiphase compressibility, including the thermal content of the rock. Several projects on double-porosity systems were completed, and work was done on relative-permeability. Heat extraction from rock will determine the long-term response of geothermal reservoirs to development. The work in this task area involved a combination of physical and mathematical modeling of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs. International cooperative research dealt with adsorption of water on reservoir cores, the planning of tracer surveys, and an injection and tracer test in the Los Azufres fields. 32 refs.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

142

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal Field, Monograph on The Geysers GeothermalField, Geothermal Resources Council, Special Report no. 17,Subsidence at The Geysers geothermal field, N. California

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System, Fenton Hill, New Mexico- Tracer Test Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

145

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable intensity of diagenesis is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the upper and lower Texas coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstone from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. The regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production. However, in predicting reservoir quality on a site-specific basis, locally variable factors such as relative proportions for porosity types, pore geometry as related to permeability, and local depositional environment must also be considered. Even in an area of regionally favorable reservoir quality, such local factors can significantly affect reservoir quality and, hence, the geothermal production potential of a specific sandstone unit.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal–CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations: An Approach to Improve Energy Recovery and Mitigate Risk : FY1 Final Report The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

Morgan Ames

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Abstract Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids....

149

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Energy, Geothermal Technologies Program, ofwith energy extraction at The Geysers geothermal field. We

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Improved Methods for Mapping Permeability and Heat sources in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems (EGS) experiments and other geothermal operations. With support from the Dept. of Energy, we in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering and Heat sources in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data Bruce R. Julian§ U. S. Geological Survey

Foulger, G. R.

152

Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlint GeothermalInformationGeothermalOpen

153

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, 94720, USA ABSTRACT Interactions between hydrothermal fluids and rock alter mineralogy, leading permeability reduction in fractured and intact Westerly granite due to high-temperature fluid flow through core

Stanford University

154

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, proppant will need to withstand high temperatures, acidified fluids, acid treatments, and cleanouts while in equilibrium with fluids of varying composition. TOUGHREACT was used to model one dimensional flow

Stanford University

155

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants, a pipe system is used to gather fluids from production wells and transport them to a power plant there are several geothermal power plants operational and there is potential for more. Because of the nature of the geothermal reservoirs involved, the steam supply systems for these power plants are normally designed for two

Stanford University

156

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the geothermal district heating (GDH) of approximately 150 000 dwellings. As of late 2010, thirty four GDH AT THE SCALE OF THE GEOTHERMAL HEATING DOUBLET IN THE PARIS BASIN, FRANCE. M.Le Brun1* , V.Hamm1 , S.Lopez1 , P systems apply the doublet concept in the Paris suburban area and mine the heat of the Dogger reservoir

Stanford University

157

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL POTENTIAL AT UNGARAN VOLCANO.Prof.Soedarto, Semarang, Indonesia. 2 Department of Earth Resources Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University

Stanford University

158

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is not an active volcanic region or plate boundary .Geothermal source might be from different source. The source of hot dry rock and geothermal reservoir and flow regimes have not be extensively explored. The Vijayan to geology of the study area with special emphasize on the dolerite dike which may have been the source

Stanford University

159

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system before significant cooling occursPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University cooling. Results indicate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may

Stanford University

160

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and its heat source. INTRODUCTION The Kizildere geothermal field, which is situated within the MTPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY IMAGE OF THE KIZILDERE

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, which produces fluid at temperatures in the range of 100-130 °C. Since 1979, the geothermal resource has the fluids from the entire region into distinctive units. This characterization provided valuable clues

Stanford University

162

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the main physical processes controlling the behavior of the geothermal field and help exploration commissioning of its second production unit, the Bouillante geothermal field has been supplying the Guadeloupe regional and reservoir scale data. Lumped parameters models were used as first exploration tools to test

Stanford University

163

Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

164

Geothermal reservoir assessment case study: Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two 1500 foot temperature gradient holes and two deep exploratory wells were drilled and tested. Hydrologic-hydrochemical, shallow temperature survey, structural-tectonic, petrologic alteration, and solid-sample geochemistry studies were completed. Eighteen miles of high resolution reflection seismic data were gathered over the area. The study indicates that a geothermal regime with temperatures greater than 400/sup 0/F may exist at a depth of approximately 7500' to 10,000' over an area more than ten miles in length.

Denton, J.M.; Bell, E.J.; Jodry, R.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Use of Slim Holes for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment: An Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production and injection data from slim holes and large-diameter wells in three (3) geothermal fields (Oguni, Sumikawa, Steamboat Hills) were examined to determine the effect of borehole diameter (1) on the discharge rate and (2) on the productivity/injectivity indices. For boreholes with liquid feedzones, maximum discharge rates scale with diameter according to a relationship previously derived by Pritchett. The latter scaling rule does not apply to discharge data for boreholes with two-phase feedzones. Data from Oguni and Sumikawa geothermal fields indicate that the productivity (for boreholes with liquid feeds) and injectivity indices are more or less equal. The injectivity indices for Sumikawa boreholes are essentially independent of borehole diameter. The latter result is at variance with Oguni data; both the productivity and injectivity indices for Oguni boreholes display a strong variation with borehole diameter. Based on the discharge and injection data from these three geothermal fields, the flow rate of large-diameter production wells with liquid feedzones can be predicted using data from slim holes.

Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Goranson, C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February1, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University was performed during one year on one site but injection pump failure and well damage lead to abandonment of the reservoir to the injected fluid paths. MODEL DESCRIPTION In this study we carried out numerical simulations

Boyer, Edmond

169

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University National Laboratory National Security Engineering Division, L-188 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 e to complete an EGS reservoir project are (Figure 1): (1) finding and characterizing a site by drilling

Stanford University

170

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in waste Hot reservoir: earth Cold reservoir: atmosphere Electricity Energy in raw materials Maintenance Energy Restoration Energy Heat Engine Energy in waste Figure 1: Geothermal heat engine converting raw, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 ENERGY RETURN ON ENERGY INVESTMENT, AN IMPORTANT FIGURE

Stanford University

171

EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIVISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANFORD-DOE CONTRACT DE-AT03-80SF11459 #12;EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION improvement and degradation of total energy recovery. placement of reservoir f l u i d can mean support of waste water disposal and %proved re- source recovery. I n order t o correctly apportion importance

Stanford University

172

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTagusparkCalculator JumpUnitedBeowawe Geothermal Field | Open Energy

173

Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:Job CorpPowerVerde IncStar (07) WindPraxair

174

Fluid Circulation and Heat Extraction from Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlint Geothermal AreaWister Area (DOE GTP)|

175

Tracer testing in geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Reed, 2007)testing in

176

Geothermal low-temperature reservoir assessment in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixty-four shallow temperature gradient holes were drilled on the Mesilla Valley East Mesa (east of Interstate Highways 10 and 25), stretching from US Highway 70 north of Las Cruces to NM Highway 404 adjacent to Anthony, New Mexico. Using these data as part of the site selection process, Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. of Denver, Colorado, drilled two low-temperature geothermal production wells to the immediate north and south of Tortugas Mountain and encountered a significant low-temperature reservoir, with a temperature of about 150{sup 0}F and flow rates of 750 to 1500 gallons per minute at depths from 650 to 1250 feet. These joint exploration activities resulted in the discovery and confirmation of a 30-square-mile low-temperature geothermal anomaly just a few miles to the east of Las Cruces that has been newly named as the Las Cruces east Mesa Geothermal Field. Elevated temperature and heat flow data suggest that the thermal anomaly is fault controlled and extends southward to the Texas border covering a 100-square-mile area. With the exception of some localized perturbations, the anomaly appears to decrease in temperature from the north to the south. Deeper drilling is required in the southern part of the anomaly to confirm the existence of commercially-exploitable geothermal waters.

Icerman, L.; Lohse, R.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological survey has estimated that there are up to 4,900 MWe of undiscovered geothermal resources and 92,000 MWe of enhanced geothermal potential within the state of Idaho. Of particular interest are the resources of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) which was formed by volcanic activity associated with the relative movement of the Yellowstone Hot Spot across the state of Idaho. This region is characterized by a high geothermal gradient and thermal springs occurring along the margins of the ESRP. Masking much of the deep thermal potential of the ESRP is a regionally extensive and productive cold-water aquifer. We have undertaken a study to infer the temperature of the geothermal system hidden beneath the cold-water aquifer of the ESRP. Our approach is to estimate reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. In the initial stages of this study, we apply the RTEst model to water compositions measured from a limited number of wells and thermal springs to estimate the regionally extensive geothermal system in the ESRP.

Ghanashyam Neupane; Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; Carl D. Palmer; Robert W. Smith; Thomas R. Wood

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The use of tracers to analyze the effects of reinjection into fractured geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of tracers as a reservoir engineering tool in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The principle concern in injecting cooler spent fluids into a fractured reservoir is that the fluids may move through high permeability channels and return to the production wells after contacting a relatively small volume of rock. As a consequence of this rapid transport, the fluids will be only partially reheated and after a short period time will effectively mine the heat from the limited volume of rock. The production wells will then experience a rapid and premature reduction in thermal output. Tracers can be used to infer the existence of high mobility conduits between injection and production wells and to monitor chemical changes of an injected fluid. Since tracer arrival precedes thermal breakthrough, tracer tests are a very useful forecasting tool.

Horne, R.N.; Johns, R.A.; Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N.; Stiger, S.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty- Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9- 11, 2009. Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms Bruce R. Julian, U. S

Foulger, G. R.

180

Double Difference Earthquake Locations at the Salton Sea Geothermal Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to report on processing of raw waveform data from 4547 events recorded at 12 stations between 2001 and 2005 by the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) seismic network. We identified a central region of the network where vertically elongated distributions of hypocenters have previously been located from regional network analysis. We process the data from the local network by first autopicking first P and S arrivals; second, improving these with hand picks when necessary; then, using cross-correlation to provide very precise P and S relative arrival times. We used the HypoDD earthquake location algorithm to locate the events. We found that the originally elongated distributions of hypocenters became more tightly clustered and extend down the extent of the study volume at 10 Km. However, we found the shapes to depend on choices of location parameters. We speculate that these narrow elongated zones of seismicity may be due to stress release caused by fluid flow.

Boyle, K L; Hutchings, L J; Bonner, B P; Foxall, W; Kasameyer, P W

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The future of Geothermal Energy. Massachusetts Institute ofthe exploitation of geothermal energy from such rocks. Wemethod to extract geothermal energy from tight sedimentary

Wessling, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effects of Water Injection into Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs: A Summary of Experience Worldwide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reinjection of water into fractured geothermal reservoirs holds potential both for improvement and degradation of total energy recovery. The replacement of reservoir fluid can mean support of placement of reservoir pressures and also more efficient thermal energy recovery, but at the same time the premature invasion of reinjected water back into production wells through high permeability fractures can reduce discharge enthalpy and hence deliverability and useful energy output. Increases in reservoir pressure and maintenance of field output have been observed in operating fields, but unfortunately so too have premature thermal breakthroughs. The design of reinjection schemes, therefore, requires careful investigation into the likely effects, using field experimentation. This paper summarizes field experience with reinjection around the world, with the intention of elucidating characteristics of possible problems. The results summarized in this paper fall into three categories of interest: permeability changes dye to injection (both increases and decreases); the path followed by injected water (as indicated by tracer tests); and the thermal and hydraulic influences of injection on the reinjection well itself and on surrounding producers. [DJE-2005

Horne, Roland N.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Effects of non-condensible gases on fluid recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1). In most canes, geothermal wells have only a few majorhigh temperature geothermal wells. For the fracture relative

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Gaulke, Scott

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) the reservoir permeability is often enhanced or created using hydraulic fracturing. In hydraulic fracturing, high fluid pressures are applied to confined zones in the subsurface usually using packers to fracture the host rock. This enhances rock permeability and therefore conductive heat transfer to the circulating geothermal fluid (e.g. water or supercritical carbon dioxide). The ultimate goal is to increase or improve the thermal energy production from the subsurface by either optimal designs of injection and production wells or by altering the fracture permeability to create different zones of circulation that can be exploited in geothermal heat extraction. Moreover, hydraulic fracturing can lead to the creation of undesirable short-circuits or fast flow-paths between the injection and extraction wells leading to a short thermal residence time, low heat recovery, and thus a short-life of the EGS. A potential remedy to these problems is to deploy a cementing (blocking, diverting) agent to minimize short-cuts and/or create new circulation cells for heat extraction. A potential diverting agent is the colloidal silica by-product that can be co-produced from geothermal fluids. Silica gels are abundant in various surface and subsurface applications, yet they have not been evaluated for EGS applications. In this study we are investigating the benefits of silica gel deployment on thermal response of an EGS, either by blocking short-circuiting undesirable pathways as a result of diverting the geofluid to other fractures; or creating, within fractures, new circulation cells for harvesting heat through newly active surface area contact. A significant advantage of colloidal silica is that it can be co-produced from geothermal fluids using an inexpensive membrane-based separation technology that was developed previously using DOE-GTP funding. This co-produced silica has properties that potentially make it useful as a fluid diversion agent for subsurface applications. Colloidal silica solutions exist as low-viscosity fluids during their “induction period” but then undergo a rapid increase in viscosity (gelation) to form a solid gel. The length of the induction period can be manipulated by varying the properties of the solution, such as silica concentration and colloid size. We believe it is possible to produce colloidal silica gels suitable for use as diverting agents for blocking undesirable fast-paths which result in short-circuiting the EGS once hydraulic fracturing has been deployed. In addition, the gels could be used in conventional geothermal fields to increase overall energy recovery by modifying flow.

Hunt, Jonathan

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) the reservoir permeability is often enhanced or created using hydraulic fracturing. In hydraulic fracturing, high fluid pressures are applied to confined zones in the subsurface usually using packers to fracture the host rock. This enhances rock permeability and therefore conductive heat transfer to the circulating geothermal fluid (e.g. water or supercritical carbon dioxide). The ultimate goal is to increase or improve the thermal energy production from the subsurface by either optimal designs of injection and production wells or by altering the fracture permeability to create different zones of circulation that can be exploited in geothermal heat extraction. Moreover, hydraulic fracturing can lead to the creation of undesirable short-circuits or fast flow-paths between the injection and extraction wells leading to a short thermal residence time, low heat recovery, and thus a short-life of the EGS. A potential remedy to these problems is to deploy a cementing (blocking, diverting) agent to minimize short-cuts and/or create new circulation cells for heat extraction. A potential diverting agent is the colloidal silica by-product that can be co-produced from geothermal fluids. Silica gels are abundant in various surface and subsurface applications, yet they have not been evaluated for EGS applications. In this study we are investigating the benefits of silica gel deployment on thermal response of an EGS, either by blocking short-circuiting undesirable pathways as a result of diverting the geofluid to other fractures; or creating, within fractures, new circulation cells for harvesting heat through newly active surface area contact. A significant advantage of colloidal silica is that it can be co-produced from geothermal fluids using an inexpensive membrane-based separation technology that was developed previously using DOE-GTP funding. This co-produced silica has properties that potentially make it useful as a fluid diversion agent for subsurface applications. Colloidal silica solutions exist as low-viscosity fluids during their “induction period” but then undergo a rapid increase in viscosity (gelation) to form a solid gel. The length of the induction period can be manipulated by varying the properties of the solution, such as silica concentration and colloid size. We believe it is possible to produce colloidal silica gels suitable for use as diverting agents for blocking undesirable fast-paths which result in short-circuiting the EGS once hydraulic fracturing has been deployed. In addition, the gels could be used in conventional geothermal fields to increase overall energy recovery by modifying flow.

Hunt, Jonathan

186

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources Engineering 367 Panama Street Stanford, CA 94305-2220, USA e-mail: liljam@stanford.edu ABSTRACT The optimal design of production in fractured geothermal reservoirs requires knowledge of the resource distribution in the field can be estimated by measuring potential differences between various points

Stanford University

187

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these projects there are really big challenges to be solved (extremely high overpressure, water salinity of this Study. There is no room to discuss the exploration, deep drilling, reservoir engineering and water in Hungary, their focus is on geothermal power plant project development. Having reviewed the available

Stanford University

188

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extraction from deep, hot rocks for energy production is based on water circulation through a man made TESTS IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS M.R. Safari and A. Ghassemi Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University College Station, Texas, U.S.A e-mail: ahmad.ghassemi@pe.tamu.edu ABSTRACT Heat

Stanford University

189

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; HEAd: heat exchange area density (area per volume of fluid and/or rock, to be specified); BTC: tracer. In fact, everything that matters about HEA(d) in geothermal reservoirs has already been identified is equivalent to HEAd in the first of 4 meanings discussed in the

Stanford University

190

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAND PROPPANTS UNDER GEOTHERMAL CONDITIONS Daniel Brinton, Kristie McLin, Joseph Moore Energy surfaces. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was employed to determine the composition energy produced worldwide. Central to the process of creating an EGS reservoir is hydraulic fracturing

Stanford University

191

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy resources such as geopressured geothermal brine (GGB) reservoirs and hot saline aquifers (HSA) can be potential clean energy resources provided the heat extraction from the subsurface is done in an economic equation for the thermal energy transport is given as follows (Eq. 4). · · here, (4) w 1 (5) 1 1 (6) (7

Stanford University

192

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND RECOVERABLE THERMAL ENERGY IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS BY VOLUMETRIC METHODS Hülya Sarak, �. nanç Türeyen) on to stored and recoverable thermal energy estimates calculated from volumetric methods. Effects distribution function, respectively) thermal energy "reserves" from individual wells (or fields) to get "proved

Stanford University

193

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University MWe. A geochemical assessment of the field is made based on analytical data of fluids sampled in the initial aquifer fluids were modeled. Results indicate that "excess enthalpy" discharged by some wells

Stanford University

194

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University (the better the fluid flow, the lower the calcite content). This suggests that the fracture zones acting as flow pathways for the circulation of deep and hot fluids. These are crucial conditions

Stanford University

195

Induced Microearthquake Patterns in Hydrocarbon and Geothermal Reservoirs W. Scott Phillips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improved resource management in fractured reservoirs. Running Head: Microearthquake Patterns in Reservoirs

196

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A geopressured-geothermal test of Martin Exploration Company's Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2 will be conducted in the Tuscaloosa Trend. The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 1 will be converted to a saltwater disposal well for disposal of produced brine. The well is located in the Satsuma Area, Livingston parish, Louisiana. Eaton proposes to test the Tuscaloosa by perforating the 7 inch casing from 16,718 feet to 16,754 feet. The reservoir pressure at an intermediate formation depth of 16,736 feet is anticipated to be 12,010 psi and the temperature is anticipated to be 297 F. Calculated water salinity is 16,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce a maximum of 16,000 barrels of water a day with a gas content of 51 SCF/bbl. Eaton will re-enter the test well, clean out to 17,000 feet, run production casing and complete the well. The disposal well will be re-entered and completed in the 9-5/8 inch casing for disposal of produced brine. Testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton annular flow WOO tests. An optional test from 16,462 feet to 16,490 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous tests will be utilized on this test. The equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. Weatherly Engineering will operate the test equipment. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Mr. Don Clark will handle sampling, testing and reservoir engineering evaluation, respectively. wireline work required will be awarded on basis of bid evaluation. At the conclusion of the test period, the D.O.E. owned test equipment will be removed from the test site, the test and disposal wells plugged and abandoned and the sites restored to the satisfaction of all parties.

None

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1990 - June 1996 Stanford Geothermal Program. THE EFFECTS OF ADSORPTION ON VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELDS.1 1.1 SUMMARY? ..............................................................................................2 1.4 ADSORPTION IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS ........................................................3

Stanford University

198

Analysis of Injection-Backflow Tracer Tests in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tracer tests have been an important technique for determining the flow and reservoir characteristics in various rock matrix systems. While the interwell tracer tests are aimed at the characterization of the regions between the wells, single-well injection-backflow tracer tests may be useful tools of preliminary evaluation, before implementing long term interwell tracer tests. This work is concerned with the quantitative evaluation of the tracer return profiles obtained from single well injection-backflow tracer tests. First, two mathematical models of tracer transport through fractures, have been reviewed. These two models are based on two different principles: Taylor Dispersion along the fracture and simultaneous diffusion in and out of the adjacent matrix. Then the governing equations for the transport during the injection-backflow tests have been solved. Finally the results were applied to field data obtained from Raft River and East Mesa geothermal fields. In order to determine the values of the parameters of the models that define the transport mechanisms through fractures a non-linear optimization technique was employed. 26 refs., 10 figs.

Kocabas, I.; Horne, R.N.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling of the fracture surfaces results in a significant opening of the fracture, which would influence the rate of geothermal

Wessling, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Impact of Injection on Seismicity at The Geyses, California Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Geysers, California, geothermal area, U.S. Geol. Surv.seismicity at The Geysers geothermal reservoir, Californiaseismic image of a geothermal reservoir: The Geysers,

Majer, Ernest L.; Peterson, John E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.the 5-km Deep Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir at Soultz-sous-

Pruess, Karsten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Geological Interpretation of Self-Potential Data from the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study of samples from geothermal reservoirs: Riverside,study of samples from geothermal reservoirs: petrology andat the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, in Proceedings, First

Corwin, R.F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Geothermal Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Geothermal energy is thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth. Geothermal energy can manifest on the surface of the Earth, or near the surface of the Earth, where humankind may harness it to serve our energy needs. Geothermal resources are reservoirs of hot water that exist at varying temperatures and depths below the Earth's surface. Wells can be drilled into these underground reservoirs to tap steam and very hot water that can be brought to the surface for a variety of uses.

204

Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

205

Numerical Study of Downhole Heat Exchanger Concept in Geothermal Energy Extraction from Saturated and Fractured Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Geothermal energy has gained a lot of attention recently due to several favorable aspects such as ubiquitously distributed, renewable, low emission resources while leveraging the… (more)

Feng, Yin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Republic geothermal wells, East Mesa, California.evalu- ation of five geothermal wells, Proc. second UNhydrologic continuity Geothermal Well Inferred barrier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Numerical simulation to study the feasibility of using CO2 as a stimulation agent for enhanced geothermal systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stimulation of an enhanced geothermal system using a high pHTwenty-Ninth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,Calcite dissolution in geothermal reservoirs using chelants,

Xu, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Modeling shear failure and permeability enhancement due to coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The connectivity and accessible surface area of flowing fractures, whether natural or man-made, is possibly the single most important factor, after temperature, which determines the feasibility of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Rock deformation and in-situ stress changes induced by injected fluids can lead to shear failure on preexisting fractures which can generate microseismic events, and also enhance the permeability and accessible surface area of the geothermal formation. Hence, the ability to accurately model the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) processes in fractured geological formations is critical in effective EGS reservoir development and management strategies. The locations of the microseismic events can serve as indicators of the zones of enhanced permeability, thus providing vital information for verification of the coupled THM models. We will describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled THM processes during multiphase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. We provide field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems to demonstrate the utility of the method.

Kelkar, Sharad [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project will develop a model for seismicity-based reservoir characterization (SBRC) by combining rock mechanics; finite element modeling; geo-statistical concepts to establish relationships between micro-seismicity; reservoir flow and geomechanical characteristics.

210

Radon Transect Studies in Vapor- and Liquid-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This communication describes the transect analysis conducted at the vapor-dominated reservoirs at The Geysers in California and the liquid-dominated reservoirs at Cerro Prieto in Baja, California.

Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

211

3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

130, 475-496. the Coso Geothermal Field, Proc.28 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanfords ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California: J.

Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, G. Michael; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Gasperikova, Erika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir...

213

Evaluation of potential geothermal reservoirs in central and western New York state. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer processes geophysical well logs from central and western New York State were analyzed to evaluate the potential of subsurface formations as a source for low-temperature geothermal water. The analysis indicated that porous sandstone sections at the top of the Ordovician Theresa Formation and at the base of the Cambrian Potsdam Formation have the required depth, porosity, and permeability to act as a source for geothermal fluids over a relatively large area in the central part of the state. The fluid potential plus an advantageous geothermal gradient and the results of the test well drilled in the city of Auburn in Cayuga County suggest that low temperature geothermal energy may be a viable alternative to other more conventional forms of energy that are not indigenous to New York State.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

215

Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study we analyze relative contributions to the cause and mechanism of injection-induced micro-earthquakes (MEQs) at The Geysers geothermal field, California. We estimated the potential for inducing seismicity by coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical analysis of the geothermal steam production and cold water injection to calculate changes in stress (in time and space) and investigated if those changes could induce a rock mechanical failure and associated MEQs. An important aspect of the analysis is the concept of a rock mass that is critically stressed for shear failure. This means that shear stress in the region is near the rock-mass frictional strength, and therefore very small perturbations of the stress field can trigger an MEQ. Our analysis shows that the most important cause for injection-induced MEQs at The Geysers is cooling and associated thermal-elastic shrinkage of the rock around the injected fluid that changes the stress state in such a way that mechanical failure and seismicity can be induced. Specifically, the cooling shrinkage results in unloading and associated loss of shear strength in critically shear-stressed fractures, which are then reactivated. Thus, our analysis shows that cooling-induced shear slip along fractures is the dominant mechanism of injection-induced MEQs at The Geysers.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Oldenburg, C.M.

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

Greg N. Boitnott

2003-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recipients. The Australian Geothermal Energy Group (AGEG) has also seen significant changes and developments. Additionally the joint AGEG ­ Australian Geothermal Energy Association (AGEA) Geothermal Reporting Code Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence at the University of Queensland, the Western Australian Geothermal

Stanford University

220

Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California. Part of the third year report, 1980-81, of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs; South San Bernardino; and Harlem Hot Springs - in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the south San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142/sup 0/C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the south San Bernardino geothermal area was 56/sup 0/C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area was 49.5/sup 0/C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well. The geophysical and geological surveys delineated fault traces in association with all three of the designated geothermal areas.

Youngs, L.G.; Bezore, S.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Present Status and Future Prospects of Geothermal Development in Italy with an Appendix on Reservoir Engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper consists of two parts and an appendix. In the first part a review is made of the geothermal activity in Italy from 1975 to 1982, including electrical and non-electrical applications. Remarks then follow on the trends that occurred and the operational criteria that were applied in the same period, which can be considered a transitional period of geothermal development in Italy. Information on recent trends and development objectives up to 1990 are given in the second part of the paper, together with a summary on program activities in the various geothermal areas of Italy. The appendix specifically reviews the main reseroir engineering activities carried out in the past years and the problems likely to be faced in the coming years in developing Itallian fields.

Cataldi, R.; Calamai, A.; Neri, G.; Manetti, G.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which has potential for a geothermal sitting at the eastern flanks INTRODUCTION The geothermal energy), which is green geothermal area and as a lesson learned to apply in the similar area in order

Stanford University

224

The Role of Cost Shared R&D in the Development of Geothermal Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Program Review starts with two interesting pieces on industries outlook about market conditions. Dr. Allan Jelacics introductory talk includes the statistics on the impacts of the Industry Coupled Drilling Program (late-1970's) on geothermal power projects in Nevada and Utah (about 140 MWe of power stimulated). Most of the papers in these Proceedings are in a technical report format, with results. Sessions included: Exploration, The Geysers, Reservoir Engineering, Drilling, Energy Conversion (including demonstration of a BiPhase Turbine Separator), Energy Partnerships (including the Lake County effluent pipeline to The Geysers), and Technology Transfer (Biochemical processing of brines, modeling of chemistry, HDR, the OIT low-temperature assessment of collocation of resources with population, and geothermal heat pumps). There were no industry reviews at this meeting.

None

1995-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

225

Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop reactive tracer method for monitoring thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems.

226

Issues surrounding fracturing of geothermal systems - predicting thermal conductivity of reservoir rocks and evaluating performance of fracture proppants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Traditional geothermal systems have been limited to geologic systems in which elevated temperatures, abundant water, and high porosity and permeability are found. Engineered geothermal systems… (more)

Brinton, Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

ANALYSIS O F HEAT TRANSFER AND ENERGY RECOVERY I N FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Produced . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5 Experimental Reservoir Rock Energy Extracted Fraction . 4.6 Cold-Water Fraction Produced . . . . . . . . 3.6.4 Energy Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.7 One-Dimensional Model of a Cold-Water Sweep Process . . 4 . RESULTS

Stanford University

228

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book is a detailed prognosis covering the acquisition, completion, drilling, testing and abandonment of the Frank A. Godchaux, III, Well No. 1 under the Wells of Opportunity Program. The well is located approximately 12 miles southeast of the city of Abbeville, Louisiana. Eaton Operating Company proposes to test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure is estimated to be 14,480 psi and the temperature of the formation water is expected to be 298 F. The water salinity is calculated to be 75,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce 20,000 barrels of water per day with a gas content of 44 standard cubic feet pre barrel. The well was acquired from C and K Petroleu, Inc. on March 20, 1981. C and K abandoned the well at a total depth of 16,000 feet. The well has a 7-5/8 inches liner set at 13,387 feet. Eaton proposes to set 5-1/2 inch casing at 16,000 feet and produce the well through the casing using a 2-3/8 inch tubing string for wireline protection and for pressure control. A 4,600 foot saltwater disposal well will be drilled on the site and testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton tests. The total estimated cost to perform the work is $2,959,000. An optional test from 14,905 to 15,006 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous Eaton WOO tests will be utilized on this test. This equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. The Institute of Gas Technology and Mr. Don Clark will handle the sampling and testing and reservoir evaluation, respectively, as on the previous Eaton tests.

Godchaux, Frank A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

data for the National Geothermal Database * Validate state-of-the-art reservoir simulation techniques to reduce model uncertainty and project risk 4 | US DOE Geothermal...

230

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Fracture Characterization in...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log...

231

Integrated Chemical Geothermometry System for Geothermal Exploration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Develop practical and reliable system to predict geothermal reservoir temperatures from integrated chemical analyses of spring and well fluids.

232

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-conditioning. According to the most recent and conservative USGS estimate, in the US alone the geothermal resource base geothermal resource in the US Gulf of Mexico region. In particular, geopressured sandstones near salt domes gravity segregation of the fluids. GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT Geothermal systems provide

Stanford University

233

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ogiri geothermal power plant located in the West Kirishima area was opened in early 1996. Nittetsu Kagoshima Geothermal Co. (NKGC) supplies the geothermal steam to the power plant with installed capacity wells were completed when the power plant started its operation (Japan Geothermal Energy Association

Stanford University

234

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are associated with the Northern German Basin, a geothermal power plant will need to incorporate an Enhanced to reduce the probability of downtime in such geothermal power systems in order to achieve higher plant geothermal power plants in Germany. There are three potential regions for geothermal energy production

Stanford University

235

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 ARE GEOTHERMAL ENERGY RETURNS ON INVESTMENT as the investment energy for the next generation system. In the case of geothermal energy that means using on geothermal EROI of closing the loop is examined. The benefit of using geothermal energy, as compared

Stanford University

236

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE GEOTHERMAL PARAMETERS OF THE GROUND IN CYPRUS FOR THE EXPLOITATION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY AND THE IMPACT aware of the benefits of geothermal energy and in order to increase the share of energy from renewable sources consumed in heating and cooling in 2020, promotes the geothermal energy systems through a Scheme

Stanford University

237

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) has long been recognized by geothermal energy experts as being the necessary technology for substantially increasing the contribution of geothermal energy DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled "The Future of Geothermal Energy", hereafter referred

Stanford University

238

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tracers in the Raft River geothermal system. INTRODUCTION Geothermal energy will be one component by geothermal energy, like all energy sources, will depend on a combination of viable engineering and uncertainty will be critical to the design and operation of future geothermal energy sources. This paper

Stanford University

239

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditioning via sorption chillers and geothermal desalination. The technologies are not new in their basic

Stanford University

240

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR GEOTHERMAL ENERGY of the Caribbean islands have great potential for Geothermal Energy. These islands have been formed partially for geothermal energy. The only operating geothermal plant in the Caribbean is at Bouillante in Guadeloupe

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the geothermal wells have been stimulated, both hydraulically and chemically, in order to improve the connection

Stanford University

242

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal wells producing acidic fluid have been abandoned because of high corrosion potential on casing. In the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica, there are geothermal wells producing acidic fluid. For these wells, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 ANALYSIS OF NEUTRALIZATION REACTION IN A GEOTHERMAL

Stanford University

243

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the planned geothermal wells. A second Monte Carlo simulation provides the probability distributions

Stanford University

244

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOTHERMAL SIPHON Edited by Hal Gurgenci Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence School a small Workshop organised by the Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence in Brisbane on 25. The second day of the Workshop discussed the future research strategies for the Queensland Geothermal Energy

Stanford University

245

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program. Annual report, fiscal year 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fenton Hill Project is still the principal center for developing methods, equipment, and instrumentation for creating and utilizing HDR geothermal reservoirs. The search for a second site for a similar experimental system in a different geological environment has been intensified, as have the identification and characterization of other HDR areas that may prove suitable for either experimental or commercial development. The Phase I fracture system was enlarged during FY79. Drilling of the injection well of the Phase II system began at Fenton Hill in April 1979. Environmental monitoring of the Fenton Hill area continued through FY79. The environmental studies indicate that the hot dry rock operations have caused no significant environmental impact. Other supporting activities included rock physics, rock mechanics, fracture mapping, and instrumentation development. Two closely related activities - evaluation of the potential HDR energy resource of the US and the selection of a site for development of a second experimental heat-extraction system generally similar to that at Fenton Hill - have resulted in the collection of geology, hydrology, and heat-flow data on some level of field activity in 30 states. The resource-evaluation activity included reconnaissance field studies and a listing and preliminary characterization of US geothermal areas in which HDR energy extraction methods may be applicable. The selection of Site 2 has taken into account such legal, institutional, and economic factors as land ownership and use, proximity to possible users, permitting and licensing requirements and procedures, environmental issues, areal extent of the geothermal area, and visibility to and apparent interest by potential industrial developers.

Cremer, G.M.; Duffield, R.B.; Smith, M.C.; Wilson, M.G. (comps.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program Annual Report Fiscal Year 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complete list of HDR objectives is provided in Reference 10, and is tabulated below in Tables 1 and 2 for the reader's convenience. The primary, level 1, objective for HDR is ''to improve the technology to the point where electricity could be produced commercially from a substantial number of known HDR resource sites in a cost range of 5 to 8 cents/kWh by 1997''. A critically important milestone in attaining this cost target is the level II objective: ''Evaluate the performance of the Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir''. To appreciate the significance of this objective, a brief background is helpful. During the past 14 years the US DOE has invested $123 million to develop the technology required to make Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy commercially useful. The Governments of Japan and the Federal Republic of Germany have contributed an additional $32 million to the US program. The initial objectives of the program were met by the successful development and long-term operation of a heat-extraction loop in hydraulically-fractured hot dry rock. This Phase I reservoir produced pressurized hot water at temperatures and flow rates suitable for many commercial uses such as space heating and food processing. It operated for more than a year with no major problems or detectable environmental effect. With this accomplished and the technical feasibility of HDR energy systems demonstrated, the program undertook the more difficult task of developing a larger, deeper, hotter reservoir, called ''Phase II'', capable of supporting pilot-plant-scale operation of a commercial electricity-generating power plant. As described earlier in ''History of Research'', such a system was created and operated successfully in a preliminary 30-day flow test. However, to justify capital investment in HDR geothermal technology, industry now requires assurance that the reservoir can be operated for a long time without major problems or a significant decrease in the rate and quality of energy production. Industrial advisors to the HDR Program have concluded that, while a longer testing period would certainly be desirable, a successful and well-documented flow test of this high-temperature, Phase II reservoir lasting at least one year should convince industry that HDR geothermal energy merits their investment in its commercial development. This test is called the Long Term Flow Test (LTFT), and its completion will be a major milestone in attaining the Level 1 objective. However, before the LTFT could be initiated, well EE-2 had to be repaired, as also briefly described in the ''History of Research''. During this repair operation, superb progress was made toward satisfying the next most critically important Level II objective: Improve the Performance of HDR Drilling and Completion Technology. During the repair of EE-2, Los Alamos sidetracked by drilling out of the damaged well at 2.96 km (9700 ft), and then completed drilling a new-wellbore (EE-2A) to a total depth of 3.78 km (12,360 ft). As a consequence of this drilling experience, Los Alamos believes that if the original wells were redrilled today their combined cost would be only $8 million rather than the $18.8 million actually spent (a 60% cost saving). Further details, particularly of the completion of the well, can be found in the major section, ACCOMPLISHMENTS, but it can be seen that the second, Level II objective is already nearing attainment.

Dash, Zora V.; Murphy, Hugh D.; Smith, Morton C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal systemdeep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approachusing two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modeling of coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in geothermal systems is complicated by reservoir conditions such as high temperatures, elevated pressures and sometimes the high salinity of the formation fluid. Coupled THC models have been developed and applied to the study of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to forecast the long-term evolution of reservoir properties and to determine how fluid circulation within a fractured reservoir can modify its rock properties. In this study, two simulators, FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT, specifically developed to investigate EGS, were applied to model the same geothermal reservoir and to forecast reservoir evolution using their respective thermodynamic and kinetic input data. First, we report the specifics of each of these two codes regarding the calculation of activity coefficients, equilibrium constants and mineral reaction rates. Comparisons of simulation results are then made for a Soultz-type geothermal fluid (ionic strength {approx}1.8 molal), with a recent (unreleased) version of TOUGHREACT using either an extended Debye-Hueckel or Pitzer model for calculating activity coefficients, and FRACHEM using the Pitzer model as well. Despite somewhat different calculation approaches and methodologies, we observe a reasonably good agreement for most of the investigated factors. Differences in the calculation schemes typically produce less difference in model outputs than differences in input thermodynamic and kinetic data, with model results being particularly sensitive to differences in ion-interaction parameters for activity coefficient models. Differences in input thermodynamic equilibrium constants, activity coefficients, and kinetics data yield differences in calculated pH and in predicted mineral precipitation behavior and reservoir-porosity evolution. When numerically cooling a Soultz-type geothermal fluid from 200 C (initially equilibrated with calcite at pH 4.9) to 20 C and suppressing mineral precipitation, pH values calculated with FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT/Debye-Hueckel decrease by up to half a pH unit, whereas pH values calculated with TOUGHREACT/Pitzer increase by a similar amount. As a result of these differences, calcite solubilities computed using the Pitzer formalism (the more accurate approach) are up to about 1.5 orders of magnitude lower. Because of differences in Pitzer ion-interaction parameters, the calcite solubility computed with TOUGHREACT/Pitzer is also typically about 0.5 orders of magnitude lower than that computed with FRACHEM, with the latter expected to be most accurate. In a second part of this investigation, both models were applied to model the evolution of a Soultz-type geothermal reservoir under high pressure and temperature conditions. By specifying initial conditions reflecting a reservoir fluid saturated with respect to calcite (a reasonable assumption based on field data), we found that THC reservoir simulations with the three models yield similar results, including similar trends and amounts of reservoir porosity decrease over time, thus pointing to the importance of model conceptualization. This study also highlights the critical effect of input thermodynamic data on the results of reactive transport simulations, most particularly for systems involving brines.

Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz,Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Sizing of a hot dry rock reservoir from a hydraulic fracturing experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs do not lend themselves to the standard methods of reservoir sizing developed in the petroleum industry such as the buildup/drawdown test. In a HDR reservoir the reservoir is created by the injection of fluid. This process of hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock usually involves injection of a large volume (5 million gallons) at high rates (40BPM). A methodology is presented for sizing the HDR reservoir created during the hydraulic fracturing process. The reservoir created during a recent fracturing experiment is sized using the techniques presented. This reservoir is then investigated for commercial potential by simulation of long term power production. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Zyvoloski, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

STATE-OF-THE-ART OF MODELS FOR GEOTHERMAL RECOVERY PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent interest in geothermal energy development hasassociated with a geothermal energy reservoir are describeddevelopment and use of geothermal energy. Many ex- periments

Tsang, C.F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Development of a Plan to Implement Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) in the Animas Valley, New Mexico - Final Report - 07/26/2000 - 02/01/2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of producing energy from hot dry rock (HDR), originally proposed in 1971 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, contemplated the generation of electric power by injecting water into artificially created fractures in subsurface rock formations with high heat flow. Recognizing the inherent difficulties associated with HDR, the concept of Enhanced Geothermal Systems was proposed. This embraces the idea that the amount of permeability and fluid in geothermal resources varies across a spectrum, with HDR at one end, and conventional hydrothermal systems at the other. This report provides a concept for development of a ''Combined Technologies Project'' with construction and operation of a 6 MW (net) binary-cycle geothermal power plant that uses both the intermediate-depth hydrothermal system at 1,200 to 3,300 feet and a deeper EGS capable system at 3,000 to 4,000 feet. Two production/injection well pairs will be drilled, one couplet for the hydrothermal system, and one for the E GS system. High-pressure injection may be required to drive fluid through the EGS reservoir from the injection to the production well.

Schochet, Daniel N.; Cunniff, Roy A.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollution and save conventional energy, geothermal energy as a heat source for district heating on some typical geothermal wells. 1.2 Cliamte Air temperature affects the indoor temperature through heat

Stanford University

252

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail: wcumming@wcumming.com ABSTRACT The most important element of an analysis to target a geothermal well geothermal wells, how should resource capacity be assessed at different project stages, what are the basic

Stanford University

253

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the measurement of distributed temperature and pressure in geothermal wells. Our effort in the first year has been a MEMS pressure sensor at the bottom of the geothermal well. Another fiber will be used to interrogate

Stanford University

254

Stress and Permeability Heterogeneity within the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir: Recent Results from Well 82-5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We collected borehole televiewer, temperature and flowmeter logs and conducted a hydraulic fracturing test in a well (82-5) that penetrated the SFZ within the known boundaries of the geothermal field but which failed to encounter significant permeability. Although stuck drill pipe prevented direct access to the SFZ, borehole breakouts and cooling cracks indicated a {approximately}90 degree rotation in the azimuth of the least horizontal principal stress (Shmin) in well 82-5 at about 2.7 km depth. This rotation, together with the low (Shmin) magnitude measured at 2.5 km depth in well 82-5, is most readily explained through the occurrences of one or more normal faulting earthquakes in the hanging wall of the SFZ in the northern part of the reservoir. The orientation of (Shmin) below 2.7 km (i.e., {approximately}20 to 50 m above the top of the SFZ) is such that both the overall SFZ and natural fractures directly above the SFZ are optimally oriented for normal faulting failure. If these fracture and stress orient ations persist into the SFZ itself, then the existence of a local stress relief zone (i.e., anormalously high (Shmin) magnitude) is the most likely explanation for the very low fault zone permeability encountered in well 82-5.

S. H. Hickman; M. D. Zoback; C. A. Barton; R. Benoit; J. Svitek; R. Summers

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS Frederick Libert1 , Peter1 , Riza Pasikki1 , Keita Yoshioka2 , and Mark Looney2 1. Chevron

Stanford University

257

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Figure 2: Map showing the location of the geothermal wells outside the city of Lund. All the wells

Stanford University

258

Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

geothermal reservoir using novel technologies and integrating this information into a 3D geologic and reservoir model numerical model to determine the efficacy of future...

259

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the conditions of developing of the geothermal power engineering on Kamchatka there is an important question in the areas of the geothermal power plants. The utilization can be carried out in two directions: injection it is profitable to extract boron from technogenic solutions of the working geothermal power plants: Pauzhetsky

Stanford University

260

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems associated with geothermal utilization. Hellisheiði Power Plant annually emits around 13000 tons The emission of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal power plants is one of the main environmental concerns is 101 µg/m3 . A review of the processes available for H2S abatement in geothermal power plant

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Takigami geothermal field in Central Kyushu, Japan, where the Takigami power plant has been generating generation at the Takigami geothermal power plant, and we have detected the gravity changes which were of the absolute gravity measurement was strict. INTRODUCTION When the geothermal power plant starts electricity

Stanford University

262

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of commercial power generation at The Geysers geothermal field in California as six distinct and consecutive the largest source of commercial geothermal power tapped to date in the world, and its history presents geothermal field in California has been supplying commercial electric power continuously for the last half

Stanford University

263

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the production of power from coproduced and low temperature geothermal resources. To this end, and through a collaborative effort, RMOTC is being used as a test-bed for promising low temperature geothermal power overcome challenges currently faced with low temperature geothermal power production systems. Details

Stanford University

264

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are all directed at achieving the Australian Geothermal Energy Group's (AGEG) aspirational targets (the Australian Geothermal Energy Association, AGEA) and the AGEG is to see geothermal energy providing the lowest cost, emissions-free, renewable base load energy for centuries to come. This paper summarizes: (1

Stanford University

265

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the efficiency of geothermal power plants. In particular, EGS exploit the geothermal energy that is stored few thermal energy is converted into electrical power. The accurate modeling of the physical phenomena and artificially created fracture networks in the subsurface, thus increasing the efficiency of geothermal power

Stanford University

266

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), water consumption, and land use from geothermal electricity generation than from traditional fossil-fuel­based electricity generators. However, the environmental impacts from the construction of geothermal energy. INTRODUCTION It is generally recognized that electricity production from geothermal power plants releases fewer

Stanford University

267

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 FUTURE OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY Subir K. Sanyal Geotherm This paper first describes the salient features of the various types of geothermal energy resources) geopressured systems, and (6) magma energy. Of these six types, only hydrothermal systems have been

Stanford University

268

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Park, CA 94025 2. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program Washington, DC e-mail: colin of energy resources, including geothermal energy. Stakeholders at all levels of government, within in the 1970s during a time of rapid development and new interest in geothermal energy. That many

Stanford University

269

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geothermal wells that are effectively cemented and durable poses a significant operational challenge used is critical to the long-term durability of a geothermal well. Conventional cement systems are high systems, they typically fail. More ductile cement systems have been introduced and applied in geothermal

Stanford University

270

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Sites at McGee Mountain, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of two innovative technologies in early-stage geothermal exploration:a) shallow (2m) survey; b) hydroprobe; and Identify a geothermal resource at the project site.

271

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences Stanford University Stanford, California A LABORATORY MODEL OF STWLATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS by A. Hunsbedt P. Kruger created by artificial stimulation of geothermal reservoirs has been con- structed. The model has been used

Stanford University

273

Integrated Chemical Geothermometry System for Geothermal Exploration...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

geothermal reservoir temperatures from integrated chemical analyses of spring and well fluids. tracersspycherintegratedchemical.pdf More Documents & Publications Integrated...

274

Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase distribution as well as mass flow and heat transfer behavior in two-phase geothermal systems have been studied by numerical modeling. A two-dimensional porous-slab model was used with a non-uniform heat flux boundary conditions at the bottom. Steady-state solutions are obtained for the phase distribution and heat transfer behavior for cases with different mass of fluid (gas saturation) in place, permeabilities, and capillary pressures. The results obtained show very efficient heat transfer in the vapor-dominated zone due to the development of heat pipes and near-uniform saturations. The phase distribution below the vapor-dominated zone depends on permeability. For relatively high-permeability systems, single-phase liquid zones prevail, with convection providing the energy throughput. For lower permeability systems, a two-phase liquid-dominated zone develops, because single-phase liquid convection is not sufficient to dissipate heat released from the source. These results are consistent with observations from the field, where most high-temperature liquid-dominated two-phase systems have relatively low permeabilities e.g. Krafla, Iceland; Kenya; Baca, New Mexico. The numerical results obtained also show that for high heat flow a high-temperature single-phase vapor zone can develop below a typical (240 C) vapor-dominated zone, as has recently been found at the Geysers, California, and Larderello, Italy.

Lai, C.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Truesdell, A.H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Rock failure during massive hydraulic stimulation of the Baca location geothermal reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analyses of microearthquake signals occurring during hydraulic stimulation provide an estimate of the size and location of the fractures thus produced. Studies of microearthquakes occurring during two large (> 10/sup 3/m/sup 3/) hydraulic stimulations of the hydrothermal reservoir at the Baca Location in the Jemez Mountains of northeastern New Mexico are reported. Both stimulations consisted of water, viscosity enhancer, and proppant. The microearthquake event rate was low but variable throughout most of the treatment. Rock failure as indicated by the distribution of the microearthquakes' foci appeared restricted to a nearly vertical NE striking zone. This orientation is in good agreement with the local earth stresses inferred from geological considerations. The second stimulation which occurred in a neighboring well was similar to the first except for a larger injected volume. The lateral extent of the detected fracture system was 600 m in both stimulations.

Pearson, C.; Keppler, H.; Albright, J.; Potter, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 heat sweep model for estimating energy recovery from fractured geothermal reservoirs based on earlySTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary

Stanford University

277

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 34105 Stanford Geothermal, California SGP-TR-72 A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING ANALYSIS OF A VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELD BY John Forrest Dee June 1983 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department

Stanford University

278

Session: Reservoir Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail: hector.carlos.pulido@pemex.com ABSTRACT Complex reservoir geometries can influence the results obtained

Stanford University

280

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the generation of electrical energy at the Los Azufres geothermal system, Mexico (Ruíz et al., 2010). The project

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February 1, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the geothermal wells predicts fluid convection with permeability up to 3x10-14 m2 in these strongly fractured

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

282

Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

283

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structural controls, and potential subsurface reservoir temperatures of geothermal fluids. An example is provided by the Salt Wells geothermal system in Churchill County,...

284

Oregon: DOE Advances Game-Changing EGS Geothermal Technology...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

demonstration project, at Newberry Volcano near Bend, Oregon, represents a key step in geothermal energy development, demonstrating that an engineered geothermal reservoir can...

285

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in...

286

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in...

287

Geothermal resources in Southwestern Utah: gravity and magnetotelluric investigations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Recent geothermal studies on sedimentary basins in Western Utah suggest the possibility of significant geothermal reservoirs at depths of 3 to 5 km. This research… (more)

Hardwick, Christian Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal field, Nevada, using temporal moment analysis of tracer tests Author Marshall J. Reed Conference Proceedings, 32nd Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering;...

289

Inverse modeling and forecasting for the exploitation of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field, Kamchatka, Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned, poorly cemented wells allow the inflow of shallow groundwater into the geothermal reservoir.

Kiryukhin, A.V.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal resource of Germany with an estimated utilizable energy of about 180'000 EJ in a depth of 3-7 km and south German Variscian crystalline basement is considered to be the largest geothermal resource require complex and costly processing. Often they are anyhow limited to the topmost part of the basement

Stanford University

291

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford University 367 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA e and geometry are key for the optimum energy extraction from geothermal resources. Existing fracture systems, enhanced geothermal systems do not require natural convective hydrothermal resources, but rather

Stanford University

292

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the simulation of steam flow in a geothermal power plant network". The fluid movement is governed. In the pipeline network of geothermal power plant the steam flows from high to low pressure and heat flows from, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 GeoSteamNet: 2. STEAM FLOW SIMULATION IN A PIPELINE

Stanford University

293

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 2010 PRESENT STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY IN TURKEY capacity in Turkey is about 100 MWe, while that of direct use installations is around 795 MWt. Direct use, solar, etc. Geological studies indicate that the most important geothermal systems of Turkey are located

Stanford University

294

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. MOL, Enex ehf. of Iceland and Vulcan Kft. (its owner is Green Rock Energy Ltd. of Australia EXPLORATION IN HUNGARY Attila Kujbus CEGE Central-European Geothermal Energy Production Plc. Infopark D of this fact, there are hardly any geothermal energy facilities in Hungary, and those few are operated

Stanford University

295

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characteristics with unique problems caused by high-volume, hot water flows. This paper is an overview of state, geothermal electric plants have been built on the edges of tectonic plates where high temperature geothermal blanketing effect resulting in #12;temperatures as high as 270°C. The high-heat producing granite formations

Stanford University

296

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carlo Simulation results, these eleven fields have 453 MWe of power generation potential and 13 876 MWt). As a third step, the producible thermal power values of the 19 relatively medium temperature geothermal and encouraging the installation of power generating plant are underway. New geothermal legislation calls

Stanford University

297

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 2015 nine units of geothermal electric power plants with a total capacity 450 MW are planned to be set of Mutnovsky volcano was studied by the method of numerical simulation. The distribution of temperature of natural heat carrier extraction to obtain geothermal energy are the subject of studying of mining thermal

Stanford University

298

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Australia and Western Australia, that have been established with complementary programs to achieve research for industry and government to access research services Geothermal energy development in Australia will be best and Resources SA, Petroleum and Geothermal Group GPO Box 1671 Adelaide, SA, 5000, Australia e-mail: alexandra

Stanford University

299

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence, The University of Queensland, Queensland 4072, Australia 2 Radiogenic, Australia 3 School of Earth Sciences, The University of Queensland, Queensland 4072, Australia e-mail: t travertine vein and breccia deposits in the CO2-rich Pamukkale and Kirsehir geothermal fields in western

Stanford University

300

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND PDM SYSTEMS IMPROVE DRILLING PERFORMANCE IN A CALIFORNIA GEOTHERMAL WELL Dennis Lovett, Terra and reliability in drilling operations by utilizing a specially designed positive displacement motor (PDM system allows data transmission without a continuous fluid column. Operating the Coso geothermal field

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an important parameter in geothermal drilling since it affects drilling fluid, operations and equipment THE INLET AND OUTLET MUD TEMPERATURES WHILE DRILLING GEOTHERMAL FORMATIONS Sema Tekin1 and Serhat Akin2 1-Omerbeyli field were estimated by using mud inlet and outlet temperatures obtained during drilling. GTEMP wellbore

Stanford University

302

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

city, capital of the province (Fig.1). The field has been proved to be one of the geothermal prospects in Indonesia (Hochstein and Sudarman, 2008). PT. Pertamina Geothermal Energy (PT.PGE) conducted reconnaissance not been developed yet. Thus, we have carried out geochemical survey in this area and tried to develop

Stanford University

303

PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Ninth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 26-28, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Soultz-sous-Forêts. #12;Figure 2a. Location map and profiles of the geothermal wells (From Gentier et al., 2003a; 2003b). Figure 2b. Geological cross-section between the geothermal wells (From Gentier et al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

304

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3000 feet. However, the detailed subsurface geologic structures of the Indian Springs area are mostly- scale geothermal energy potential in the area. To explore the geothermal resource at Jemez Pueblo area. Seismic and MT imaging can provide complementary information to reveal detailed geologic

Stanford University

305

Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: to characterize the geothermal reservoir using novel technologies and integrating this information into a 3D geologic and reservoir model numerical model to determine the efficacy of future geothermal production.

306

A Comprehensive Study of Fracture Patterns and Densities in The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Using Microearthquake Shear-Wave Splitting Tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project we developed a method for using seismic S-wave data to map the patterns and densities of sub-surface fractures in the NW Geysers Geothermal Field/ (1) This project adds to both the general methods needed to characterize the geothermal production fractures that supply steam for power generation and to the specific knowledge of these in the Geysers area. (2)By locating zones of high fracture density it will be possible to reduce the cost of geothermal power development with the targeting of high production geothermal wells. (3) The results of the project having been transferred to both US based and international geothermal research and exploration agencies and concerns by several published papers and meeting presentations, and through the distribution of the data handling and other software codes we developed.

Peter E. Malin; Eylon Shalev; Min Lou; Silas M. Simiyu; Anastasia Stroujkova; Windy McCausland

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

Geothermal energy abstract sets. Special report No. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains annotated citations in the following areas: (1) case histories; (2) drilling; (3) reservoir engineering; (4) injection; (5) geothermal well logging; (6) environmental considerations in geothermal development; (7) geothermal well production; (8) geothermal materials; (9) electric power production; (10) direct utilization of geothermal energy; (11) economics of geothermal energy; and (12) legal, regulatory and institutional aspects. (ACR)

Stone, C. (comp.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Geothermal-reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Second annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the following tasks is discussed: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs, noncondensable gas reservoir engineering, well test analysis and bench-scale experiments, DOE-ENEL Cooperative Research, Stanford-IIE Cooperative Research, and workshop and seminars. (MHR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Micro-earthquake monitoring and tri-axial drill-bit VSP in NEDO {open_quotes}Deep-seated geothermal reservoir survey{close_quotes} in Kakkonda, Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization has been drilling well WD-1 and employing micro-earthquake monitoring and tri-axial drill-bit VSP as the exploration techniques for the deep geothermal reservoir in the Kakkonda geothermal field, Japan. The results of them are as follows: (1) More than 1000 micro-earthquakes were observed from December 23, 1994 to July 1, 1995 in the Kakkonda geothermal field. Epicenters are distributed NW-SE from a macroscopic viewpoint; they distribute almost in the same areas as the fractured zone in the Kakkonda shallow reservoir as pointed out by Doi et al. (1988). They include three groups trending NE-SW. Depths of hypocenters range from the ground surface to about -2.5 km Sea level; they seem to be deeper in the western part. (2) Well WD-1 drilled into a swarm of micro-earthquakes at depths 1200 to 2200 m and encountered many lost circulations in those depths. However, these earthquakes occurred before well WD-1 reached those depths. (3) The bottom boundary of micro-earthquake distribution has a very similar shape to that of the top of the Kakkonda granite, though all of the micro-earthquakes are plotted 300 m shallower than the top of the granite. (4) The TAD VSP shows a possibility of existence of seismic reflectors at sea levels around -2.0, -2.2 and -2.6 km. These reflectors seem to correspond to the top of the Pre-Tertiary formation, the top of the Kakkonda granite and reflectors within the Kakkonda granite.

Takahashi, M.; Kondo, T.; Suzuki, I. [Japan Metals and Chemicals Co., Ltd., Iwate (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California`s prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

Jager, A.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D.W. : A hot dry rock geothermal energy concept utilizingtwenty-?fth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering,the development of enhanced geothermal systems? In: Paper

Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) using CO2 as working fluid - A novelapproach for generating renewable energy with simultaneous sequestration of carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, of the

Pruess, Karsten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

Nancy Moller Weare

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Callahan1 , Will Osborn1 , Stephen Hickman2 and Nicholas Davatzes3 1 AltaRock Energy, 7900 E. Green Lake by AltaRock Energy (ARE) with participants from Newberry Geothermal, Davenport Power, Temple University

Stanford University

315

Geothermal Resource/Reservoir Investigations Based on Heat Flow and Thermal Gradient Data for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of the use and applications of the database are described. The database and results are available on the world wide web. In this report numerical models are used to establish basic qualitative relationships between structure, heat input, and permeability distribution, and the resulting geothermal system. A series of steady state, two-dimensional numerical models evaluate the effect of permeability and structural variations on an idealized, generic Basin and Range geothermal system and the results are described.

D. D. Blackwell; K. W. Wisian; M. C. Richards; J. L. Steele

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOTHERMAL PRODUCTION FIELD, PHILIPPINES R. N. Colina, J. B. Omagbon, G. E. Parayno, R. P. Andrino, D. M. Yglopaz, R. C. M. Malate, F. X. M. Sta. Ana and J. J. C. Austria Energy Development Corporation Merritt

Stanford University

317

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

than Aus$110 million (US$77 million) in Australian Federal and State government grants to meet up geothermal projects co- funded by investors and governments in Australia; (2) policies, programs

Stanford University

318

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February 1, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Organic Rankine Cycle) with maximal installed net capacity of 1.5MWe (Figure 1). Several deep geothermal wells penetrated a hidden fractured granite located in this Tertiary graben. For the sub

Boyer, Edmond

319

Validation of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Quantum Dot...

320

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Abstract In...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Olkaria I (East) reservoir began producing steam for the 45 MWe Olkaria I power plant. During the twenty to this good performance, numerical simulation was done to establish how much more additional power could (Figure 3 & 4). Olkaria I reservoir serves the pioneer 45 MWe plant which was commissioned between 1981

Stanford University

322

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] Basics of Geological Carbon Sequestration and Well Integrity (Adapted from Carbon Sequestration Research may lead to compromising the integrity of the reservoir. Results, obtained using LDEC, which analyze the integrity of the reservoir, the containment of the working geofluid, the surface deformation and ultimately

Stanford University

323

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geosciences energy technology, the success of old and new approaches remain limited by the sparse knowledge an EGS reservoir project are (Figure 1): (1) finding and characterizing a site by drilling and logging exploratory wells; (2) creating the reservoir by drilling an injection well, stimulating the fractures

Stanford University

324

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

should be regarded as a continuing process ­ from the early exploration phase to the time when and production provides continuing refinement of reservoir parameters and, therefore, the electrical capacity estimates of reservoir capacity for electrical generation. INTRODUCTION In the early stage exploration

Stanford University

325

Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy under grant number DE-FG07-95ID13370 Stanford Geothermal Program Department of PetroleumStanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1996 - June 1999 Funded by the U.S. Department ....................................................................................................................6 2. THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

Stanford University

326

Stanford Geothermal Program Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Stanford Geothermal Program Stanford University Stanford, California RADON MEASUEMENTS I N GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS ? d by * ** Alan K. Stoker and Paul Kruger SGP-TR-4 January 1975 :: raw at Lcs Alams S c i and water, o i l and n a t u r a l gas wells. with radon i n geothermal reservoirs. Its presence i n

Stanford University

327

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-35 SECOND ANNUAL #12;INTRODUCTION The research e f f o r t of t h e Stanford Geothermal Program is focused on geothermal reservoir engineering. The major o b j e c t i v e of t h e protiram is t o develop techniques f o

Stanford University

328

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 1 Borehole Instruments for Supercritical Geothermal Reservoirs Nigel Halladay1 , Jean-Luc Deltombe2 , Jean-Marc Naisse2 , Colin Johnston3 Geothermal Reservoirs ABSTRACT Exploration and exploitation of supercritical geothermal reservoirs requires

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

329

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supercritical geothermal resources located at depths 4-5 km or deeper, where the temperature estimates could of the estimates was carried out using the temperature records not involved in the calibration. The results%. This result makes it possible to increase significantly the deepness of indirect temperature estimations

Stanford University

330

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel, geothermal energy is generally considered to be a benign energy source in regard to environmental characterized by two organisms: firstly, the photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium (blue-green microalgae), which represents the primary producers, using light as the energy source, gradually dominating the ecosystem

Stanford University

331

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DIRECTIONAL WELLS AT THE PAILAS GEOTHERMAL Costa Rica. Since 2009, the Costa Rican Electricity Company (ICE) has drilled 7 deep directional boreholes (in addition to the 9 existing vertical boreholes). The purpose of directional drilling has been

Stanford University

332

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HISTORIES AT MAHIAO AND MAHANAGDONG SECTOR OF LEYTE GEOTHERMAL PRODUCTION FIELD, PHILIPPINES J.D. Villacorte1 , R.C.M. Malate1 and R. N. Horne2 1 Energy Development Corporation, Energy Center, Merritt Road function for measuring well-to-well connectivity index is defined as: = = n j jiii txf n I 1 ))(( 1 (2

Stanford University

333

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Takenaka and Furuya (1991). Relatively low salinity and the low non-condensable gas concentration in steam, there is no surface manifestation in the immediate area. The nearest hot springs are located 1-2 km north and east Geothermal Co., Ltd is in charge of production and reinjection operations and supplies separated steam

Stanford University

334

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Relatively low salinity and the low non-condensable gas concentration in steam characterize the Takigami). Although the Takigami system lies within the very active Hohi geothermal region, there is no surface separated steam to the power station that is operated by Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. #12;A three

Stanford University

335

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" drilling of a geothermal well with a stimulation treatment that involves cold water injection over time of stimulation treatments in terms of enhanced permeability of the fracture network, and exposure of additional. Enhancements in fracture-matrix heat transfer areas from stimulation treatments cannot be assessed by such flow

Stanford University

336

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and containing a lot of natural gas. It is very suitable for development and utilization, including geothermal energy (and natural gas) electricity generation, heating and cooling, bathing and swimming, tourism , Xuanpeng Liu1 1 China University of Geosciences (Beijing), 29 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District 2 Pi

Stanford University

337

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Borozdina1 , Laura Foulquier1 , Maria Papachristou2 1 GPC IP, PARIS-NORD 2 ­ Immeuble Business Park ­ Bât. 4@geo.auth.gr ABSTRACT Three-dimensional modelling of geologic structures is routinely applied in petroleum and, at a lesser extent though, in geothermal engineering and has proven an efficient tool in investigating complex

Stanford University

338

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, spistone@stanford.edu 2 GeothermEx Inc., Richmond, CA ABSTRACT Carbon CO2 sequestration via subsurface fluid loss. In order to entertain this idea seriously in water, as can be observed in carbonated beverages. Furthermore, you can observe that the CO2 gas comes

Stanford University

339

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(DOE, 2008). Because exploitation of EGS resources incorporates the augmentation or creation of 6km yield an estimated mean electric power resource on private and accessible public land in the United States and an order of magnitude larger than the conventional geothermal resource. Another recent

Stanford University

340

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy (MOE) and Renewable Energy Organization of Iran (SUNA). In this study, an attempt was made with some mitigation plans and monitoring program is accepted. INTRODUCTION Geothermal energy is generally accepted as being an environmentally benign energy source, particularly when compared to fossil fuel energy

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401, USA ABSTRACT In order for enhanced of the amount of energy generated from enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), which allows for the exploitation distinguishes EGS from most other energy sources is the difficulty and expense associated with characterizing

Stanford University

342

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Innovation Center Iceland, Department of Materials, Biotechnology and Energy, Keldnaholt in a bulge in the wall of the casing and is detrimental to the geothermal energy production and the lifetime. This deformation of the casing can lead to reduced energy output and in worst cases render the well inoperative

Stanford University

343

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building area in Shenyang City has harvested 330 days of excellent atmosphere environment. It shows Keyan Zheng1 Fang He2 1 Geothermal Council of China Energy Society 20 Da Hui Si Road, Haidian District Beijing, 100081, China e-mail: kyzheng@punlic3.bta.net.cn 2 GHP Council of China Renewable Energy Society

Stanford University

344

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of low- temperature heat source [5], that enables the regime of heat supply with the temperature regime of traditional buildings in the temperature regime of 90°/70 ° (194°/158°F) in the presence of geothermal heat supply is shown. INTRODUCTION Currently, widespread adoption of heat pump plants (HPP) in Ukraine, Russia

Stanford University

345

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sensors are mainly developed for gas and oil exploration, applied to an environment of relatively low and the decay products of radioactive rock (Gupta and Roy, 2007). The traditional geothermal energy process is typically higher than 200°C, which limits direct applications of the current gas/oil well instruments

Stanford University

346

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to geothermal heat mining using carbon dioxide instead of water. While manometric, volumetric, and gravimetric techniques have been used successfully to investigate adsorption of low-density subcritical vapors demonstrated using propane at subcritical and supercritical temperatures between 35 °C and 97 °C confined

Stanford University

347

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR PLANNING OF AN EGS STIMULATION IN THE DESERT PEAK GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEVADA Stephen H. Hickman1 and Nicholas C. Davatzes2 1 U.S. Geological Survey 345 Middlefield Road, MS977 Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA e of silicified rhyolite tuffs and metamorphosed mudstones at ambient temperatures of ~180 to 195° C. Our previous

Stanford University

348

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) plant having a net power capacity of 1,5MWe. Surface equipments (turbine fluid geochemistry, the temperature field and the hydraulic properties of the deep crystalline basement). The geothermal wells were hydraulically and chemically stimulated between 2000 and 2007 in order to enhance

Stanford University

349

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the turbine is in the range of 1-6 mol%. Some condensation is likely to always occur in surface cooling generation equipment, similar to traditional steam geothermal power plants. Carbon-dioxide-based EGS systems water is present in the carbon dioxide, a water-rich phase will condense in surface equipment

Stanford University

350

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These include steam- water flow (Li and Horne, 2001 and 2004), gas- condensate flow (App and Burger, 2009; Kumar out from reservoirs and bringing it to the surface, and it is almost impossible either to obtain

Stanford University

351

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, there has been some interest in the use of carbon dioxide as a heat extraction fluid. CO2 offers a number and geological sequestration of CO2 within the reservoir · Possibility of direct use of produced CO2

Stanford University

352

Development of a dual-porosity model for vapor-dominated fractured geothermal reservoirs using a semi-analytical fracture/matrix interaction term  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of dual-porosity model is being developed to simulate two-phase flow processes in fractured geothermal reservoirs. At this time it is assumed that the liquid phase in the matrix blocks remains immobile. By utilizing the effective compressibility of a two-phase water/steam mixture in a porous rock, flow within the matrix blocks can be modeled by a single diffusion equation. This equation in turn is replaced by a non-linear ordinary differential equation that utilizes the mean pressure and mean saturation in the matrix blocks to calculate the rate of fluid flow between the matrix blocks and fractures. This equation has been incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH to serve as a source/sink term for computational gridblocks that represent the fracture system. The new method has been compared with solutions obtained using fully-discretized matrix blocks, on a problem involving a three-dimensional vapor-dominated reservoir containing an injection and a production well, and has been found to be quite accurate.

Zimmerman, R.W.; Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report P. R. Girouard Well No. 1, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The P.R. Girouard No. 1 Well, located approximately 10 miles southeast of Lafayette, Louisiana, was the fourth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through 3-1/2 inch tubing set on a packer at 14,570 feet without major problems. The geological section tested was the Oligocene Marginulina Texana No. 1 sand of upper Frio age. The interval tested was from 14,744 to 14,819 feet. Produced water was piped down a disposal well perforated from 2870 to 3000 feet in a Miocene saltwater sand. Four flow tests were conducted for sustained production rates of approximately 4000 BWPD to approximately 15,000 BWPD. The highest achieved, during a fifth short test, was 18,460 BWPD. The test equipment was capable of handling higher rates. The gas-to-water ratio was relatively uniform at approximately 40 SCF/bbl. The heating value of the gas is 970 Btu/SCF. The reservoir tests show that is is doubtful that this well would sustain production rates over 10,000 BWPD for any lengthy period from the sand zone in which it was completed. This limited flow capacity is due to the well's poor location in the reservoir and is not a result of any production deficiencies of the Marginulina Texana sand.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic geothermal springs Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University... BINARY POWER PLANTS IN REMOTE GEOTHERMAL AREAS OF INDONESIA Huenges E., K. Erbas, M. Jaya, and A. ... Source:...

355

The Patuha geothermal system: a numerical model of a vapor-dominated system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Patuha geothermal system is a vapor-dominated reservoir located about 40 kilometers southwest of Bandung on western Java, Indonesia. The geothermal system consists of a… (more)

Schotanus, M.R.J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characteriza...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Systems (EGS). This research will help developers learn more about the fracture systems in geothermal reservoirs, so that they may better predict the results of...

357

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.go.cr, SCastroZ@ice.go.cr, WTaylor@ice.go.cr ABSTRACT The Miravalles Geothermal Field has been producing electric Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad P. O. Box 10032-1000 San José, Costa Rica PMoya@ice.go.cr, FNietzen@ice to 3,000 meters. Individual wells produce enough steam to generate between 3 and 12 MW; injection wells

Stanford University

358

Reservoir environment of the Onuma geothermal power plant, northeast Japan, estimated by forward analysis of long-term artificial-tracer concentration change, using single-box-model simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A single-box-model numerical simulator for personal computer analysis was developed in order to estimate macroscopic parameter values for exploited geothermal reservoirs and essential fluids coming from the depth. The simulator was designed to compute history data concerning total production and reinjection fluids at geothermal power plants from the assumed parameter values, based on conservation laws for water mass, heat energy and masses of conservative chemical constituents of geothermal fluids. Using two kinds of forward analysis techniques, i.e. the cast-net and pursuit methods, programs containing the simulator can semiautomatically select the optimum combination of the unknown parameter values by minimizing the differences between the simulated and measured history data for specific enthalpy and chemical compositions of the production fluids. The forward analysis programs were applied to the history data from the Onuma geothermal power plant (production capacity, 10MWe) where waste hot water reinjection, chemical monitoring and artificial tracer tests have been conducted since 1970, almost the beginning of the geothermal exploitation. Using the history data, enthalpy and iodine concentrations of the total production fluids with the amounts of KI tracer injected as spikes, the macroscopic parameter values for the exploited reservoir and the essential hot water from the depth were uniquely determined as follows: mass of the hot water convecting in the exploited reservoir (M0), 3.23x109kg; recycling fraction of the reinjected waste hot water to the reservoir (R), 0.74; specific enthalpy of the essential water from the depth (H1), 385kcalkg; iodine concentration of the water (I1), 0.086mg/kg with chlorine concentration (C1), 259mg/kg. These results support the conceptual model that the exploited Onuma reservoir mainly in the Tertiary volcanics is supplied with the neutral Na-Cl type hot water of abnormally high B/CI mole ratio of around 1.0 by a large essential reservoir distributed at depth in the Paleozoic to Mesozoic detrital marine sedimentary rocks.

Shigeno, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Tetsuro, Noda

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program DOE Geothermal Technologies Program presentation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Principal Investigator: John H. Queen Hi-Q Geophysical Inc. Track Name: Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture...

362

Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

363

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, are as follows: (a) reduce the operations and maintenance cost; (b) reduce the power plant cost; (c) choose, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 OPTIMIZATION OF THE ECONOMICS OF ELECTRIC POWER FROM) developed to date, numerical simulation of idealized EGS reservoirs, economic sensitivity analysis

Stanford University

364

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to hydraulic short-circuiting and inefficient heat transfer. The establishment of hydraulic connectivity geochemical and thermodynamic conditions in the reservoir to avoid degradation or adsorption of the tracer pumping tests conducted in heterogeneous transmissivity fields result in an overestimation of storativity

Stanford University

365

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA e-mail: dconcha@mit.edu ABSTRACT We used the double-difference tomography method-sous-Forets, France with 45000 m3 of water resulted in over 12,000 microseismic events (also known as microearthquakes the reservoir. The 1993 stimulations at Soultz consisted of the injection of 45,000 m3 of water into an open

Stanford University

366

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS hydraulic fractures formed in naturally fractured crystalline rock masses. The propped fractures were formed on injection of thin or low viscosity fluids (e.g. water) at pressures that are below the fracture opening

Stanford University

367

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatments have been limited, however, to only fractures that are or will open by pumping water from by pumping water from the surface to create a limited number of fractures in the open hole reservoir rock be to temporarily hydraulically isolate the stimulated fractures in the well and then create and/or stimulate

Stanford University

368

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoirs where there exist coupled interactions among fluid and heat flow, and mechanical response, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 SIMULATION OF FLUID FLOW IN FRACTURED PORO and fracture pressure variation. This is accomplished by considering fluid flow and heat transport in a 2D

Stanford University

369

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 1 Istanbul Technical University, Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, Maslak. In order to evaluate the ACE approach, we applied it to a subset of the Palinpinon data set and checked, prolonging the economic life of the reservoir. Presently, the developer relies on a variety of ways ranging

Stanford University

370

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monitoring between 1999 and 2005 at 51 benchmarks are interpreted in terms of a change of mass. The amount, the 1999-2005 gravity changes in the reservoir area indicate that the system of the KGF has mass decrease) (Figure 1). The area of KGF is about 21 km2 and it has altitude of about 1400 - 1800 m above sea level

Stanford University

371

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-elastic deformation with damage evolution, and groundwater flow are solved using the Explicit Finite Difference Lagrangian Method for solid deformation and the Finite Element Method for fluid mass conservation. Rock, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013 SGP-TR-198 MODELING RESERVOIR STIMULATION INDUCED BY WELLBORE

Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

372

In-situ stress and fracture permeability in a fault-hosted geothermal reservoir at Dixie Valley, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study relating fractured rock hydrology to in-situ stress and recent deformation within the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, borehole televiewer logging and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements were conducted in a 2.7-km-deep geothermal production well (73B-7) drilled into the Stillwater fault zone. Borehole televiewer logs from well 73B-7 show numerous drilling-induced tensile fractures, indicating that the direction of the minimum horizontal principal stress, S{sub hmin}, is S57{degrees}E. As the Stillwater fault at this location dips S50{degrees}E at {approximately}53{degrees}, it is nearly at the optimal orientation for normal faulting in the current stress field. Analysis of the hydraulic fracturing data shows that the magnitude of S{sub hmin} is 24.1 and 25.9 MPa at 1.7 and 2.5 km, respectively. In addition, analysis of a hydraulic fracturing test from a shallow well 1.5 km northeast of 73B-7 indicates that the magnitude of S{sub hmin} is 5.6 MPa at 0.4 km depth. Coulomb failure analysis shows that the magnitude of S{sub hmin} in these wells is close to that predicted for incipient normal faulting on the Stillwater and subparallel faults, using coefficients of friction of 0.6-1.0 and estimates of the in-situ fluid pressure and overburden stress. Spinner flowmeter and temperature logs were also acquired in well 73B-7 and were used to identify hydraulically conductive fractures.

Hickman, S. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Barton, C.; Zoback, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir Longevity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir Longevity and Productivity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir...

374

Geothermometry At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S. Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geothermometry analysis was done on geothermal fluids from the first production well to estimate the reservoirs temperature at deeper...

375

Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Stanford geothermal program. Final report, July 1990--June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following: (1) improving models of vapor-dominated geothermal fields: the effects of adsorption; (2) adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA; (3) optimizing reinjection strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines based on chloride data; (4) optimization of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs; and (5) steam-water relative permeability.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

THE CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO ETHANOL USING GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DERIVED FROM HOT DRY ROCK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

97505 THE CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO ETHANOL USING GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DERIVED FROM HOT DRY ROCK of biomass to fuel ethanol is considerable. In addition, combining these two renewable energy resources of wedding an HDR geothermal power source to a biomass conversion process is flexibility, both in plant

378

Geothermal Energy Development annual report 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an exerpt from Earth Sciences Division Annual Report 1979 (LBL-10686). Progress in thirty-four research projects is reported including the following area: geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, and geothermal environmental research. Separate entries were prepared for each project. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL SIMULATION OF GEOTHERMAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL SIMULATION OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR STIMULATIONRESERVOIR STIMULATION Silvia Seminario del Grupo de Hidrologìa Subterrànea - UPC, Barcelona #12;INTRODUCTION Enhanced geothermal systems Geothermal gradient ~ 33 °C/Km Hydraulic stimulation enhances fracture permeability (energy

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

380

. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR- 80 DEPLETION MODELING OF LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS BY Gudmund 01sen June 1984 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORTI UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR-85 ANALYSIS OF THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR MODEL EXPERIMENTS

Stanford University

382

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy since 1975. research i n geothermal r e s e r v o i r engineering techniques t h a t w iSTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD,CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-5 1 GEOTHERMAL Implications of Adsorption and Formation Fluid Composition on Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation . . 40 TASK 5

Stanford University

383

Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- Geothermal Technologies Office Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office Presentation by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford...

384

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Pauline Kraft Well No. 1, Nueces County, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pauline Kraft Well No. 1 was originally drilled to a depth of 13,001 feet and abandoned as a dry hole. The well was re-entered in an effort to obtain a source of GEO/sup 2/ energy for a proposed gasohol manufacturing plant. The well was tested through a 5-inch by 2-3/8 inch annulus. The geological section tested was the Frio-Anderson sand of Mid-Oligocene age. The interval tested was from 12,750 to 12,860 feet. A saltwater disposal well was drilled on the site and completed in a Micocene sand section. The disposal interval was perforated from 4710 to 4770 feet and from 4500 to 4542 feet. The test well failed to produce water at substantial rates. Initial production was 34 BWPD. A large acid stimulation treatment increased productivity to 132 BWPD, which was still far from an acceptable rate. During the acid treatment, a failure of the 5-inch production casing occurred. The poor production rates are attributed to a reservoir with very low permeability and possible formation damage. The casing failure is related to increased tensile strain resulting from cooling of the casing by acid and from the high surface injection pressure. The location of the casing failure is now known at this time, but it is not at the surface. Failure as a result of a defect in a crossover joint at 723 feet is suspected.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential of geothermal energy for future electric power generation in New York State is evaluated using estimates of temperatures of geothermal reservoir rocks. Bottom hole temperatures from over 2000 oil and gas wells in the region were integrated into subsurface maps of the temperatures for specific geothermal reservoirs. The Theresa/Potsdam formation provides the best potential for extraction of high volumes of geothermal fluids. The evaluation of the Theresa/Potsdam geothermal reservoir in upstate New York suggests that an area 30 miles east of Elmira, New York has the highest temperatures in the reservoir rock. The Theresa/Potsdam reservoir rock should have temperatures about 136 {degrees}C and may have as much as 450 feet of porosity in excess of 8%. Estimates of the volumes of geothermal fluids that can be extracted are provided and environmental considerations for production from a geothermal well is discussed.

Hodge, D.S. [SUNY, Buffalo, NY (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Geothermal program review 16: Proceedings. A strategic plan for geothermal research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proceedings contain 21 papers arranged under the following topical sections: Exploration technology (4 papers); Reservoir technology (5 papers); Energy conversion technology (8 papers); Drilling technology (2 papers); and Direct use and geothermal heat pump technology (2 papers). An additional section contains a report on a workshop on dual-use technologies for hydrothermal and advanced geothermal reservoirs.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Assessing the role of ancient and active geothermal systems in oil-reservoir evolution in the eastern Basin and Range province, western USA. Annual progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of our research on the oil fields of the Basin and Range province of the western USA continue to support the following concept: Convecting, moderate-temperature geothermal systems in this region have fostered and in some cases critically influenced the generation, migration, and entrapment of oil. At one Basin-Range field (Grant Canyon), oil-bearing and aqueous fluid inclusions in late-stage hydrothermal quartz were entrapped at temperatures comparable to those now prevailing at reservoir depths (120--130{degrees}C); apparent salinities of the aqueous varieties match closely the actual salinity of the modern, dilute oil-field waters. The inclusion-bearing quartz has the oxygen-isotopic signature for precipitation of the mineral at contemporary temperatures from modern reservoir waters. Measured and fluid-inclusion temperatures define near-coincident isothermal profiles through the oil-reservoir interval, a phenomenon suggesting ongoing heat and mass transfer. These findings are consistent with a model whereby a still-active, convectively circulating, meteoric-hydrothermal system: (1) enhanced porosity in the reservoir rock through dissolution of carbonate; (2) hydrothermally sealed reservoir margins; (3) transported oil to the reservoirs from a deep source of unknown size and configuration; and (4) possibly accelerated source-rock maturation through an increase in the local thermal budget. Grant Canyon and other Basin-Range oil fields are similar to the oil-bearing, Carlin-type, sediment-hosted, disseminated gold deposits of the nearby Alligator Ridge district. The oil fields could represent either weakly mineralized analogues of these deposits, or perhaps an incipient phase in their evolution.

Hulen, J.B.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Iceland Geothermal...

389

Fluid Circulation and Heat Extraction from Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs Abstract A large amount of fluid circulation and heat extraction (i.e., thermal power production) research and testing has been conducted...

390

A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

geothermalhistory1exploration.pdf More Documents & Publications A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States: Reservoir Engineering...

391

Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Abstract The...

392

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salak geothermal field in Indonesia. The ultimate goal is to characterize subsurface fracture system and reservoir permeability (possibly, their temporal evolution) using...

393

Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

defining an operating geothermal reservoir's lateral extent and hydrologically active fracture systems. InSAR reveals millimeter-level surface change due to volume change in the...

394

Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and Proppant Behavior in EGS Reservoirs Economic Impact Analysis for EGS...

395

U.S. and Australian Advanced Geothermal Projects Face Setbacks...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EGS involves injecting water at high pressure into deep, hot rock formations to fracture the rock, creating either a new geothermal reservoir of hot water embedded in hot...

396

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 4.6.4 Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis Presentation Number: 031 Investigator: Horne, Roland (Stanford University)...

397

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 4.6.1 Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs Presentation Number: 028 Investigator: Ghassemi, Ahmad (Texas A&M University) Objectives: To...

398

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Economics of Developing Hot...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

399

Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M.C . Richards, J. L. Steele (2000) Geothermal Resource-Reservoir...

400

Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mahesh Thakur, Fletcher H. Ibser, Jennifer Lewicki, B. Mack. Kennedy and Michael Swyer Conference Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering; Stanford,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McKenzie, A. H. Truesdell (1977) Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures Estimated from the Oxygen Isotope Compositions of Dissolved Sulfate and Water from Hot Springs and Shallow...

402

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

403

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A. E.; Copp, J. F. . 111991. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field. Proceedings of () ; () : Sixteenth workshop on...

404

Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

Joe Beall; Mark Walters

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Simulation of geothermal subsidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of an assessment of existing mathematical models for subsidence simulation and prediction are summarized. The following subjects are discussed: the prediction process, physical processes of geothermal subsidence, computational models for reservoir flow, computational models for deformation, proficiency assessment, and real and idealized case studies. (MHR)

Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K.; Schauer, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and Fracture/Heat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and surface area available for heat transfer in EGS.

407

Unique aspects of drilling and completing hot-dry-rock geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drilling operations at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site have led to numerous developments needed to solve the problems caused by a very harsh downhole environment. A pair of deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures were in excess of 600/sup 0/F (300/sup 0/C). The wells were directionally drilled, inclined at 35/sup 0/, one above the other, in a direction orthogonal to the least principal stress field. The well site is near the flank of a young silicic composite volcano in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. The completion of this pair of wells is unique in reservoir development. The lower well was planned as a cold water injector which will be cooled by the introduced water from the static geothermal gradient to about 80/sup 0/F (25/sup 0/C). The upper well will be heated during production to over 500/sup 0/F (250/sup 0/C). The well pair is designed to perform as a closed loop heat-extraction system connected by hydraulic fractures with a vertical spacing of 1200 ft between the wells. These conditions strongly constrain the drilling technique, casing design, cement formulation, and cementing operations.

Carden, R.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Pettitt, R.A.; Rowley, J.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Thin sections were prepared of the different lithologies from each...

409

Petrography Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Laughlin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Technique Petrography Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Thin sections were prepared of the different lithologies from each...

410

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well is relatively low in total dissolved solids and shows little tendency for corrosion or scaling. The authors attempt to relate the changes in the liquid and gas...

411

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interpretation of 36Cl- concentrations of the water samples measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). 36ClCl ratios indicate that deeply circulating meteoric waters derive...

412

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interpretation of 36Cl- concentrations of the water samples measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). 36ClCl ratios indicate that deeply circulating meteoric waters derive...

413

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Janik, 1992). Hot spring gas samples were collected by submerging a 20-cm-diameter plastic funnel into the pool over the bubble stream. Fumarole gas samples were collected by...

414

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Janik, 1992). Hot spring gas samples were collected by submerging a 20-cm-diameter plastic funnel into the pool over the bubble stream. Fumarole gas samples were collected by...

415

Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

between core and acoustic borehole imagery. Detailed structural analysis of the fracture population indicates that fractures are grouped in two principal fractures sets...

416

A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to the most hydraulically conductive fractures in two orthogonal and vertical fracture sets. The mathematical model representing the hydro-mechanical interactions that are...

417

Development Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Dreesen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

into EE-2 at an average flow rate of 100 Ls and downhole pressure of 83 MPa, the fracture pattern produced again failed to connect the two wells. A third attempt to fracture...

418

HDR Geothermal Energy: Important Lessons From Fenton Hill  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACMEFUTURE MOBILITY INPROCEEDINGS,

419

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy,(EC-LEDS)ColumbusDHeat Ltd2002) | Open Energy(Brookins

420

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy,(EC-LEDS)ColumbusDHeat Ltd2002) | Open

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy,(EC-LEDS)ColumbusDHeat Ltd2002) | Open(Grigsby, Et Al.,

422

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy,(EC-LEDS)ColumbusDHeat Ltd2002) | Open(Grigsby, Et

423

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy,(EC-LEDS)ColumbusDHeat Ltd2002) | Open(Grigsby,

424

Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37.California: EnergyFeilden Clegg Bradley Studios Jump to:FenixArea Jump to:

425

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration DOE Geothermal...

426

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 1 Fracture of the fracture network organization. In the specific case of the Soultz-Sous-Forêts geothermal reservoir, a new to constrain stochastic simulation of a discrete fracture network (DFN) in the geothermal reservoir. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

427

HDR CFA IMAGE RENDERING David Alleysson,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HDR CFA IMAGE RENDERING David Alleysson,1 Laurence Meylan,2 and Sabine S¨usstrunk2 1Laboratory of the already demosaiced image. This render- ing is closer to retinal processing where an image is acquired framework, demosaicing is the final step of the rendering. Our method, inspired by retinal sampling

Alleysson, David

428

Thermal drawdown analysis of the Hijiori HDR 90-day circulation test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hijiori 90-day circulation test is unique in the development of HDR technology in that it was the first (and thus far the only) multiproduction well test run for a sufficient production period to obtain observed cooldown curves at multiple production horizons in the stimulated reservoir volume. The experimental data have been analyzed by the SGP 1-D linear heat sweep model to examine the extent of thermal cooldown in this relatively small, multi-well, multi-zone reservoir. Although changes in production flow were carried out in specific wells at specific times during the 90 days of circulation, matching of the observed cooldown curves in conjunction with the structural and temperature logging data allows estimation of the reservoir volume and the mean fracture spacing between rock blocks for heat extraction during the 90-day test.

Kruger, Paul; Yamaguchi, Tsutomu

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Geothermal development in Australia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Australia, natural hot springs and hot artesian bores have been developed for recreational and therapeutic purposes. A district heating system at Portland, in the Otway Basin of western Victoria, has provided uninterrupted service for 12 Sears without significant problems, is servicing a building area of 18 990 m{sup 2}, and has prospects of expansion to manufacturing uses. A geothermal well has provided hot water for paper manufacture at Traralgon, in the Gippsland Basin of eastern Victoria. Power production from hot water aquifers was tested at Mulka in South Australia, and is undergoing a four-year production trial at Birdsville in Queensland. An important Hot Dry Rock resource has been confirmed in the Cooper Basin. It has been proposed to build an HDR experimental facility to test power production from deep conductive resources in the Sydney Basin near Muswellbrook.

Burns, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Creelman, R.A. [Creelman (R.A.) and Associates, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Buckingham, N.W. [Glenelg Shire Council, Portland, VIC (Australia); Harrington, H.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)]|[Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG07-90IDI2934,and by the Department of PetroleumSGP-TR-148 Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal Reservoir Rocks Shubo Shang Engineering, Stanford University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering

Stanford University

431

NANOSENSORS AS RESERVOIR ENGINEERING TOOLS TO MAP IN-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................. 1 1.1.1. The Role of Geothermal Energy........................................................ IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS By Morgan Ames June 2011 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy (under contract number DE-FG36-08GO18192). Stanford University Stanford

Stanford University

432

Geothermal energy production with supercritical fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There has been invented a method for producing geothermal energy using supercritical fluids for creation of the underground reservoir, production of the geothermal energy, and for heat transport. Underground reservoirs are created by pumping a supercritical fluid such as carbon dioxide into a formation to fracture the rock. Once the reservoir is formed, the same supercritical fluid is allowed to heat up and expand, then is pumped out of the reservoir to transfer the heat to a surface power generating plant or other application.

Brown, Donald W.

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

International Partnership for Geothermal Technology - 2012 Peer...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Systems (EGS) IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and Proppant Behavior in EGS Reservoirs...

434

Geothermal Energy Association Recognizes the National Geothermal...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Geothermal Energy Association Recognizes the National Geothermal Data System Geothermal Energy Association Recognizes the National Geothermal Data System July 29, 2014 - 8:20am...

435

Numerical Investigation of Fractured Reservoir Response to Injection/Extraction Using a Fully Coupled Displacement Discontinuity Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In geothermal reservoirs and unconventional gas reservoirs with very low matrix permeability, fractures are the main routes of fluid flow and heat transport, so the fracture permeability change is important. In fact, reservoir development under...

Lee, Byungtark

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

436

G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acquisition, completion, and testing of a geopressured-geothermal well are described. The following are covered: geology; petrophysics; re-entry and completion operations - test well; drilling and completion operations - disposal well; test objectives; surface testing facilities; pre-test operations; test sequence; test results and analysis; and return of wells and location to operator. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

SGP-TR-32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SGP- TR- 32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT NO. 7 t o U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Recent Radon Transient Experiments Energy Recovery from Fracture-Stimulated Geothermal Reservoirs 1 2 October 1, 1978 through December 31, 1978. Research is performed under t h e Department of Energy Contract

Stanford University

438

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir simulation: final task report (year 4). Final report, 1 August 1979-31 July 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the short-term production tests run on the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well are summarized. These tests were analyzed using conventional pressure test analysis methods. The effects of reservoir heterogeneties onm production behavior and, in particular, permeability distribution and faulting of reservoir sand were studied to determine the sensitivity of recovery to these parameters. A study on the effect of gas buildup around a producing well is reported. (MHR)

MacDonald, R.C.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Ohkuma, H.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Geothermal program overview: Fiscal years 1993--1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Geothermal Energy Program is involved in three main areas of research: finding and tapping the resource; power generation; and direct use of geothermal energy. This publication summarizes research accomplishments for FY 1993 and 1994 for the following: geophysical and geochemical technologies; slimhole drilling for exploration; resource assessment; lost circulation control; rock penetration mechanics; instrumentation; Geothermal Drilling Organization; reservoir analysis; brine injection; hot dry rock; The Geysers; Geothermal Technology Organization; heat cycle research; advanced heat rejection; materials development; and advanced brine chemistry.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal Fluid Injection, Reservoir Engineering D. E.engineering op- erations, management o the chemical f process fluidEngineering are primarily concerned with predicting the effects of in- jecting fluids

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Geothermal Case Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment (Williams et al., 2009) outlined a mean 30GWe of undiscovered hydrothermal resource in the western US. One goal of the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development of this undiscovered resource. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) Blue Ribbon Panel (GTO, 2011) recommended that DOE focus efforts on helping industry identify hidden geothermal resources to increase geothermal capacity in the near term. Increased exploration activity will produce more prospects, more discoveries, and more readily developable resources. Detailed exploration case studies akin to those found in oil and gas (e.g. Beaumont, et al, 1990) will give operators a single point of information to gather clean, unbiased information on which to build geothermal drilling prospects. To support this effort, the National Renewable Energy laboratory (NREL) has been working with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a template for geothermal case studies on the Geothermal Gateway on OpenEI. In fiscal year 2013, the template was developed and tested with two case studies: Raft River Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Raft_River_Geothermal_Area) and Coso Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Coso_Geothermal_Area). In fiscal year 2014, ten additional case studies were completed, and additional features were added to the template to allow for more data and the direct citations of data. The template allows for: Data - a variety of data can be collected for each area, including power production information, well field information, geologic information, reservoir information, and geochemistry information. Narratives ? general (e.g. area overview, history and infrastructure), technical (e.g. exploration history, well field description, R&D activities) and geologic narratives (e.g. area geology, hydrothermal system, heat source, geochemistry.) Exploration Activity Catalog - catalog of exploration activities conducted in the area (with dates and references.) NEPA Analysis ? a query of NEPA analyses conducted in the area (that have been catalogued in the OpenEI NEPA database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

Young, Katherine

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Novel Multi-dimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-wall Diagnostics...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and FractureHeat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs Use of Tracers to Characterize...

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - architecture reservoir properties Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Virginia University Collection: Fossil Fuels 3 PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31...

444

Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal downhole conditions that may affect the performance and reliability of selected materials and components used in the drilling, completion, logging, and production of geothermal wells are reviewed. The results of specific research and development efforts aimed at improvement of materials and components for downhole contact with the hostile physicochemical conditions of the geothermal reservoir are discussed. Materials and components covered are tubular goods, stainless steels and non-ferrous metals for high-temperature downhole service, cements for high-temperature geothermal wells, high-temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downhole pumps. (MHR)

Ellis, P.F. II, Smith, C.C.; Keeney, R.C.; Kirk, D.K.; Conover, M.F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume II. Well test data: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are included in the appendices: field test data, combined and edited raw data, time/pressure data, sample log, reservoir fluid study, gas data, sample collection and analysis procedure, scale monitoring and water analysis, sand detector and strip charts, and Horner-type plot data. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update, FY 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: 1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and 2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

Renner, Joel Lawrence

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Idaho Geothermal Commercialization Program. Idaho geothermal handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: geothermal resources in Idaho, market assessment, community needs assessment, geothermal leasing procedures for private lands, Idaho state geothermal leasing procedures - state lands, federal geothermal leasing procedures - federal lands, environmental and regulatory processes, local government regulations, geothermal exploration, geothermal drilling, government funding, private funding, state and federal government assistance programs, and geothermal legislation. (MHR)

Hammer, G.D.; Esposito, L.; Montgomery, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas: Barrier-bar tidal-channel reservoir facies architecture, Jackson Group, Prado field, South Texas; Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandstone reservoirs in the Jackson barrier/strandplain play are characterized by low recovery efficiencies and thus contain a large hydrocarbon resource target potentially amenable to advanced recovery techniques. Prado field, Jim Hogg County, South Texas, has produced over 23 million bbl of oil and over 32 million mcf gas from combination structural-stratigraphic traps in the Eocene lower Jackson Group. Hydrocarbon entrapment at Prado field is a result of anticlinal nosing by differential compaction and updip pinch-out of barrier bar sandstone. Relative base-level lowering resulted in forced regression that established lower Jackson shoreline sandstones in a relatively distal location in central Jim Hogg County. Reservoir sand bodies at Prado field comprise complex assemblages of barrier-bar, tidal-inlet fill, back-barrier bar, and shoreface environments. Subsequent progradation built the barrier-bar system seaward 1 to 2 mi. Within the barrier-bar system, favorable targets for hydrocarbon reexploration are concentrated in tidal-inlet facies because they possess the greatest degree of depositional heterogeneity. The purpose of this report is (1) to describe and analyze the sand-body architecture, depositional facies variations, and structure of Prado field, (2) to determine controls on distribution of hydrocarbons pertinent to reexploration for bypassed hydrocarbons, (3) to describe reservoir models at Prado field, and (4) to develop new data affecting the suitability of Jackson oil fields as possible candidates for thermally enhanced recovery of medium to heavy oil.

Seni, S.J.; Choh, S.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.] [eds.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saldana Well No. 2, approximately 35 miles Southeast of the city of Laredo, Texas, was the sixth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity Program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 9745 to 9820 feet. The geological section was the 1st Hinnant Sand, an upper member of the Wilcox Group. Produced water was injected into the Saldana Well No. 1, which was also acquired from Riddle Oil Company and converted to a disposal well. A Miocene salt water sand was perforated from 3005 to 3100 feet for disposal. One pressure drawdown flow test and one pressure buildup test were conducted during a 10-day period. A total of 9328 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was 1950 BWPD.

Not Available

1981-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

451

Geothermal Technologies Program Geoscience and Supporting Technologies 2001 University Research Summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Wind and Geothermal Technologies (DOE) is funding advanced geothermal research through University Geothermal Research solicitations. These solicitations are intended to generate research proposals in the areas of fracture permeability location and characterization, reservoir management and geochemistry. The work funded through these solicitations should stimulate the development of new geothermal electrical generating capacity through increasing scientific knowledge of high-temperature geothermal systems. In order to meet this objective researchers are encouraged to collaborate with the geothermal industry. These objectives and strategies are consistent with DOE Geothermal Energy Program strategic objectives.

Creed, R.J.; Laney, P.T.

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

452

Geothermal Technologies Program Geoscience and Supporting Technologies 2001 University Research Summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Wind and Geothermal Technologies (DOE) is funding advanced geothermal research through University Geothermal Research solicitations. These solicitations are intended to generate research proposals in the areas of fracture permeability location and characterization, reservoir management and geochemistry. The work funded through these solicitations should stimulate the development of new geothermal electrical generating capacity through increasing scientific knowledge of high-temperature geothermal systems. In order to meet this objective researchers are encouraged to collaborate with the geothermal industry. These objectives and strategies are consistent with DOE Geothermal Energy Program strategic objectives.

Creed, Robert John; Laney, Patrick Thomas

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Models of Geothermal Brine Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many significant expenses encountered by the geothermal energy industry are related to chemical effects. When the composition, temperature of pressure of the fluids in the geological formation are changed, during reservoir evolution, well production, energy extraction or injection processes, the fluids that were originally at equilibrium with the formation minerals come to a new equilibrium composition, temperature and pressure. As a result, solid material can be precipitated, dissolved gases released and/or heat lost. Most geothermal energy operations experience these phenomena. For some resources, they create only minor problems. For others, they can have serious results, such as major scaling or corrosion of wells and plant equipment, reservoir permeability losses and toxic gas emission, that can significantly increase the costs of energy production and sometimes lead to site abandonment. In future operations that exploit deep heat sources and low permeability reservoirs, new chemical problems involving very high T, P rock/water interactions and unknown injection effects will arise.

Nancy Moller Weare; John H. Weare

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

454

Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Neutron imaging for geothermal energy systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal systems extract heat energy from the interior of the earth using a working fluid, typically water. Three components are required for a commercially viable geothermal system: heat, fluid, and permeability. Current commercial electricity production using geothermal energy occurs where the three main components exist naturally. These are called hydrothermal systems. In the US, there is an estimated 30 GW of base load electrical power potential for hydrothermal sites. Next generation geothermal systems, named Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), have an estimated potential of 4500 GW. EGSs lack in-situ fluid, permeability or both. As such, the heat exchange system must be developed or engineered within the rock. The envisioned method for producing permeability in the EGS reservoir is hydraulic fracturing, which is rarely practiced in the geothermal industry, and not well understood for the rocks typically present in geothermal reservoirs. High costs associated with trial and error learning in the field have led to an effort to characterize fluid flow and fracturing mechanisms in the laboratory to better understand how to design and manage EGS reservoirs. Neutron radiography has been investigated for potential use in this characterization. An environmental chamber has been developed that is suitable for reproduction of EGS pressures and temperatures and has been tested for both flow and precipitations studies with success for air/liquid interface imaging and 3D reconstruction of precipitation within the core.

Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Geothermal Literature Review At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County,Information(EC-LEDS)Et Al., 1996)Al., 2012) |

458

Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Geophys. J. Int. (1999) 139, 317324 Fractal clustering of induced seismicity in The Geysers geothermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal area, California J. R. Henderson, D. J. Barton and G. R. Foulger Department of Geological Sciences geothermal field in California, an area where industrial activity induces seismicity. The seismicity of the build-up of the rate of water injection into the reservoir. Key words: fractal, geothermal, seismicity

Foulger, G. R.

460

Stanford Geothermal Program Interd is c i p l inary Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.E geothermal energy from artificially stimu- lated systems by in-place flashing was studied experimentally. Although improved geothermal energy recovery from stimulated reservoirs by in-place flashing appears promStanford Geothermal Program Interd is c i p l inary Research i n Engineering and Earth Sciences

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NORM in the petroleum and geothermal industries: evolution of the French radioprotection legislation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NORM in the petroleum and geothermal industries: evolution of the French radioprotection. Thus, natural radionuclides can be carried away towards surface when petroleum or geothermal reservoirs concerning the protection of workers in the petroleum and geothermal industries are formulated in a specific

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

462

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 1 Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin, USA, and Western Turkey: Developing 89557, USA 2 Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA 3 BRGM

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

463

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2015 Melbourne, Australia, 19-25 April 2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2015 Melbourne, Australia, 19-25 April 2015 1 TOMO4D: Temporal Changes in Reservoir Structure at Geothermal Areas Bruce R. Julian1 , Gillian R. Foulger1 , Andrew.r.foulger@durham.ac.uk najwa.mhanna@durham.ac.uk 2 Geothermal Program Office, China Lake, CA 93555 andrew

Foulger, G. R.

464

European Geothermal Congress 2013 Pisa, Italy, 3-7 June 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European Geothermal Congress 2013 Pisa, Italy, 3-7 June 2013 1 Relative chronology of deep Rhine Graben, the deep geothermal reservoirs constitute fractured dominated systems. However constitute recharge drain. 1. INTRODUCTION In France, the geothermal heating production is mainly located

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

465

Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensor Technology for Geothermal Instrumentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Develop advanced sensor technology for the direct monitoring of geothermal reservoirs. Engineer sensors to survive and operate in H2O pressures up to 220 bar and temperatures as high as 374o C.

466

Geothermal Energy Research and Development Program; Project Summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program document. This document contains summaries of projects related to exploration technology, reservoir technology, drilling technology, conversion technology, materials, biochemical processes, and direct heat applications. [DJE-2005

None

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project will provide the first ever formal evaluation of fracture and fracture flow evolution in an EGS reservoir following a hydraulic stimulation.

468

Stanford Geothermal Program I n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r y Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Geothermal Program I n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r y Research i n Engineering and Earth stimulation is expected to increase the productivity of geothermal reservoirs by providing increased

Stanford University

469

A semi-analytical model for heat and mass transfer in geothermal reservoirs to estimate fracture surface-are-to-volume ratios and thermal breakthrough using thermally-decaying and diffusing tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A semi-analytical model was developed to conduct rapid scoping calculations of responses of thermally degrading and diffusing tracers in multi-well tracer tests in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The model is based on an existing Laplace transform inversion model for solute transport in dual-porosity media. The heat- and mass-transfer calculations are decoupled and conducted sequentially, taking advantage of the fact that heat transfer between fractures and the rock matrix is much more rapid than mass transfer and therefore mass transfer will effectively occur in a locally isothermal system (although the system will be nonisothermal along fracture flow pathways, which is accounted for by discretizing the flow pathways into multiple segments that have different temperature histories). The model takes advantage of the analogies between heat and mass transfer, solving the same governing equations with k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub w} being substituted for {phi}D{sub m} in the equation for fracture transport and k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub m} being subsituted for D{sub m} in the equation for matrix transport; where k = thermal conductivity (cal/cm-s-K), {rho} = density (g/cm{sup 3}), C{sub p} = heat capacity (at constant pressure) (cal/g-K), {phi} = matrix porosity, and D = tracer diffusion coefficient (cm{sup 2}/s), with the subscripts w and m referring to water and matrix, respectively. A significant advantage of the model is that it executes in a fraction of second on a single-CPU personal computer, making it very amenable for parameter estimation algorithms that involve repeated runs to find global minima. The combined thermal-mass transport model was used to evaluate the ability to estimate when thermal breakthrough would occur in a multi-well EGS configuration using thermally degrading tracers. Calculations were conducted to evaluate the range of values of Arrhenius parameters, A and E{sub {alpha}} (pre-exponential factor, 1/s, and activation energy, cal/mol) required to obtain interpretable responses of thermally-degrading tracers that decay according to the rate constant k{sub d} = Ae{sup -E{sub {alpha}}/RT}, where k{sub d} = decay rate constant (1/s), R = ideal gas constant (1.987 cal/mol-K), and T = absolute temperature (K). It is shown that there are relatively narrow ranges of A and E{sub {alpha}} that will result in readily interpretable tracer responses for any given combination of ambient reservoir temperature and working fluid residence time in a reservoir. The combined model was also used to simulate the responses of conservative tracers with different diffusion coefficients as a way of estimating fracture surface-area-to-volume ratios (SA/V) in multi-well EGS systems. This method takes advantage of the fact that the differences in breakthrough curves of tracers with different matrix diffusion coefficients are a function of SA/V. The model accounts for differences in diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature so that tracer responses obtained at different times can be used to obtain consistent estimates of SA/V as the reservoir cools down. Some single-well applications of this approach are simulated with a numerical model to demonstrate the potential to evaluate the effectiveness of EGS stimulations before a second well is drilled.

Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

470

Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months.

Steele, B.C.; Pichiarella, L.S. [eds.; Kane, L.S.; Henline, D.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Geothermal Program Review XI: proceedings. Geothermal Energy - The Environmental Responsible Energy Technology for the Nineties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers pertaining to current research and development of geothermal energy in the USA. The seven sections of the document are: Overview, The Geysers, Exploration and Reservoir Characterization, Drilling, Energy Conversion, Advanced Systems, and Potpourri. The Overview presents current DOE energy policy and industry perspectives. Reservoir studies, injection, and seismic monitoring are reported for the geysers geothermal field. Aspects of geology, geochemistry and models of geothermal exploration are described. The Drilling section contains information on lost circulation, memory logging tools, and slim-hole drilling. Topics considered in energy conversion are efforts at NREL, condensation on turbines and geothermal materials. Advanced Systems include hot dry rock studies and Fenton Hill flow testing. The Potpourri section concludes the proceedings with reports on low-temperature resources, market analysis, brines, waste treatment biotechnology, and Bonneville Power Administration activities. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

California Geothermal Energy Collaborative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Geothermal Energy Collaborative Geothermal Education and Outreach Guide of California Davis, and the California Geothermal Energy Collaborative. We specifically would like to thank support of the California Geothermal Energy Collaborative. We also thank Charlene Wardlow of Ormat for her

473

Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Smith, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal...

475

National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs Abstract To satisfy the critical need for geothermal data to advance geothermal energy as...

476

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basalt K Eburru Geothermal Area Eburru Geothermal Area East African Rift System Kenya Rift Basalt Fukushima Geothermal Area Fukushima Geothermal Area Northeast Honshu Arc...

477

Geothermal Energy Resources (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Louisiana developed policies regarding geothermal stating that the state should pursue the rapid and orderly development of geothermal resources.

478

Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume I. Citation extracts. Second edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annoted bibliography contains 1131 citations. It represents reports, papers, and articles appearing over the past eighteen years covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources. Six indexes include: author, conference title, descriptor, journal title, report number, and sponsor. (MHR)

Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Pueblo of Jemez Geothermal Feasibility Study Fianl Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project assessed the feasibility of developing geothermal energy on the Pueblo of Jemez, with particular attention to the Red Rocks area. Geologic mapping of the Red Rocks area was done at a scale of 1:6000 and geophysical surveys identified a potential drilling target at a depth of 420 feet. The most feasible business identified to use geothermal energy on the reservation was a greenhouse growing culinary and medicinal herbs. Space heating and a spa were identified as two other likely uses of geothermal energy at Jemez Pueblo. Further geophysical surveys are needed to identify the depth to the Madera Limestone, the most likely host for a major geothermal reservoir.

S.A. Kelley; N. Rogers; S. Sandberg; J. Witcher; J. Whittier

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Research Program for Fiscal Year 1998. The Exploration Technology research area focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to expose the deep portions of known systems. The Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. The Drilling Technology projects focus on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. The Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Direct use research covers the direct use of geothermal energy sources for applications in other than electrical production.

Keller, J.G.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hdr geothermal reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Geothermal Data Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) has designed and tested a comprehensive, federated information system that will make geothermal data widely available. This new National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) will provide access to all types of geothermal data to enable geothermal analysis and widespread public use, thereby reducing the risk of geothermal energy development.

482

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: (1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and (2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

Renner, J.L.

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- State geothermal commercialization...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

State geothermal commercialization programs in seven Rocky Mountain states. Semiannual progress report, July-December 1980 Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site...

484

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

485

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cotton City, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlem...

486

Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume 1 (citation extracts)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography was compiled by the Center for Energy Studies at The University of Texas at Austin to serve as a tool for researchers in the field of geopressured geothermal energy resources. The bibliography represents citations of papers on geopressured geothermal energy resources over the past eighteen years. Topics covered in the bibliography range from the technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to social, environmental, and legal aspects of tapping those reservoirs for their energy resources. The bibliography currently contains more than 750 entries. For quick reference to a given topic, the citations are indexed into five divisions: author, category, conference title, descriptor, and sponsor. These indexes are arranged alphabetically and cross-referenced by page number.

Hill, T.R.; Sepehrnoori, K.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 4: Bibliography (annotated only for all major reports)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains US Department of Energy sponsored Geopressured-Geothermal reports published after 1984. Reports published prior to 1984 are documented in the Geopressured Geothermal bibliography Volumes 1, 2, and 3 that the Center for Energy Studies at the University of Texas at Austin compiled in May 1985. It represents reports, papers and articles covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Efficient Geomechanical Simulations of Large-Scale Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Using the Fast Multipole-Displacement Discontinuity Method (FM-DDM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal and unconventional reservoirs play an important role in supplying fuel for a growing energy demand in the United States. The development of such reservoirs relies on creating a fracture network to provide flow and transport conduits...

Verde Salas, Alexander José

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

489

Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop General overview of Geothermal...

490

Geothermal heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the study is to demonstrate the viability of geothermal heating projects in energy and economic terms and to provide nomograms from which an initial estimate may be made without having to use data-processing facilities. The effect of flow rate and temperature of the geothermal water on drilling and on the network, and the effect of climate on the type of housing are considered.

Aureille, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Geothermal: About  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermal Heat Pumps Geothermal

492

THE LEAD AND COPPER RULE Anne Sandvig, HDR-EES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE LEAD AND COPPER RULE Anne Sandvig, HDR-EES 2008 Historical Background The 1986 Safe Drinking districts and was not mandated. In 1991, the USEPA finalized the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) in response components and by August 1998 manufacturers were required to comply. The Lead and Copper Rule #12;The USEPA

Maynard, J. Barry

493

Geothermal direct use engineering and design guidebook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook is designed to be a comprehensive, thoroughly practical reference guide for engineers and designers of direct heat projects. These projects could include the conversion of geothermal energy into space heating cooling of buildings, district heating, greenhouse heating, aquaculture and industrial processing. The Guidebook is directed at understanding the nature of geothermal resources and the exploration of these resources, fluid sampling techniques, drilling, and completion of geothermal wells through well testing, and reservoir evaluation. It presents information useful to engineers on the specification of equipment including well pumps, piping, heat exchangers, space heating equipment, heat pumps and absorption refrigeration. A compilation of current information about greenhouse, aquaculture and industrial applications is included together with a discussion of engineering cost analysis, regulation requirements, and environmental considerations. The purpose of the Guidebook is to provide an integrated view for the development of direct use projects for which there is a very potential in the United States.

Bloomquist, R.G.; Culver, G.; Ellis, P.F.; Higbee, C.; Kindle, C.; Lienau, P.J.; Lunis, B.C.; Rafferty, K.; Stiger, S.; Wright, P.M.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Geothermal direct use engineering and design guidebook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook is designed to be a comprehensive, thoroughly practical reference guide for engineers and designers of direct heat projects. These projects could include the conversion of geothermal energy into space heating and cooling of buildings, district heating, greenhouse heating, aquaculture and industrial processing. The Guidebook is directed at understanding the nature of geothermal resources and the exploration of the resources, fluid sampling techniques, drilling, and completion of geothermal wells through well testing, and reservoir evaluation. It presents information useful to engineers on the specification of equipment including well pumps, piping, heat exchangers, space heating equipment, heat pumps and absorption refrigeration. A compilation of current information about greenhouse aquaculture and industrial applications is included together with a discussion of engineering cost analysis, regulation requirements, and environmental consideration. The purpose of the Guidebook is to provide an integrated view for the development of direct use projects for which there is a very large potential in the United States.

Lienau, P.J.; Lunis, B.C. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite--FOR IMMEDIATEDOEFinalFracturePlantSoutheastern

496

Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Curve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents the approach used to update the U.S. geothermal supply curve. The analysis undertaken in this study estimates the supply of electricity generation potential from geothermal resources in the United States and the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs associated with developing these geothermal resources. Supply curves were developed for four categories of geothermal resources: identified hydrothermal (6.4 GWe), undiscovered hydrothermal (30.0 GWe), near-hydrothermal field enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) (7.0 GWe) and deep EGS (15,900 GWe). Two cases were considered: a base case and a target case. Supply curves were generated for each of the four geothermal resource categories for both cases. For both cases, hydrothermal resources dominate the lower cost range of the combined geothermal supply curve. The supply curves indicate that the reservoir performance improvements assumed in the target case could significantly lower EGS costs and greatly increase EGS deployment over the base case.

Augustine, C.; Young, K. R.; Anderson, A.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Symposium in the field of geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mexico and the US are nations with abundant sources of geothermal energy, and both countries have progressed rapidly in developing their more accessible resources. For example, Mexico has developed over 600 MWe at Cerro Prieto, while US developers have brought in over 2000 MWe at the Geysers. These successes, however, are only a prologue to an exciting future. All forms of energy face technical and economic barriers that must be overcome if the resources are to play a significant role in satisfying national energy needs. Geothermal energy--except for the very highest grade resources--face a number of barriers, which must be surmounted through research and development. Sharing a common interest in solving the problems that impede the rapid utilization of geothermal energy, Mexico and the US agreed to exchange information and participate in joint research. An excellent example of this close and continuing collaboration is the geothermal research program conducted under the auspices of the 3-year agreement signed on April 7, 1986 by the US DOE and the Mexican Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). The major objectives of this bilateral agreement are: (1) to achieve a thorough understanding of the nature of geothermal reservoirs in sedimentary and fractured igneous rocks; (2) to investigate how the geothermal resources of both nations can best be explored and utilized; and (3) to exchange information on geothermal topics of mutual interest.

Ramirez, Miguel; Mock, John E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well – Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

Z. Adam Szybinski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. and Abe, H. Shape by Hydraulic Fracturing s e r v o i rprinciples involved i n hydraulic fracturing are out1 ined.crack during hydraulic fracturing has been investigated. I t

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of Primary Oil Reserves, Trans. AlME, 207 Arps,and codified work on oil reserve estimation that had beenExtrapolation and Reserve Calculation, The Oil Weekly, Sept.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z