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1

An Experimental Investigaton of the Effect of Oil on Convective Heat Trasfer and Pressure Drop of a HFC-32/HRC-125 Mixture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops of HCFC-22 and a 50% mass mixture of HFC-32/HFC-125 were experimentally measured under flow boiling conditions in a smooth tube. The refrigerants were flowed through an 8 mm diameter smooth tube at mass fluxes of 277, 434, 520 and 700 kg/sm^2. Heat fluxes were applied at values of 5100, 7100 and 11000 W/m^2. The heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops were measured at refrigerant qualities of 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40 and 60 percent. The refrigerants were examined at temperatures near 4C. Oil was added to the HFC-32/HFC-125 mixture in concentrations of 2.6% and 5.4%. Experiments were repeated with the oil laden refrigerant. The heat transfer coefficients for HCFC-22 increased with quality, mass flux and heat flux. The heat transfer coefficients for HFC-32/HFC-125 often decreased at low qualities and increased with quality at high qualities. The pressure drop increased with quality and mass flux for both refrigerants. The heat transfer had a minimal effect upon pressure drop. HFC-32/HFC-125 had a lower pressure drop than HCFC-22 for all conditions. The addition of oil increased the pressure drop. A pressure drop correlation and heat transfer correlation were developed for HFC-32/HFC-125.

McJimsey, Bert Ashford

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

FLAMMABILITY OF HFC/HCFC -AIR MIXTURES AT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a hatch for inspection and cleaning, sockets for installation of pressure transducers, thermocouples and an igniter and a jacket for thermostat- ing. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

3

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Halocarbon Environmental Coefficients and Principal Uses 100-Year Global Ozone Depletion Warming Potential Potential (ODP) Compound (CO2 = 1) (Relative to CFC-11) Principal Uses Chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 1.00 Blowing Agent, Chillers CFC-12 (1) 1.00 Auto A/C, Chillers, & Blowing Agent CFC-113 0.80 Solvent CFC-114 1.00 Solvent CFC-115 (2) 0.60 Solvent, Refrigerant Hydrochlorofluorocarbons HCFC-22 (2) 0.06 Residential A/C HCFC-123 0.02 Refrigerant HCFC-124 0.02 Sterilant HCFC-141b 0.11 CFC Replacement HCFC-142b 0.07 CFC Replacement Bromofluorocarbons Halon-1211 3.00 Fire Extinguishers Halon-1301 10.00 Fire Extinguishers Hydrofluorocarbons HFC-23 0.00 HCFC Byproduct HFC-125 0.00 CFC/HCFC Replacement HFC-134a 0.00 Auto A/C, Refrigeration HFC-152a (1) 0.00 Aerosol Propellant HFC-227ea 0.00 CFC Replacement

4

Atmospheric Fluoroform (CHF3, HFC-23) at Cape Grim, Tasmania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHF3, HFC-23 at Cape Grim, Tasmania CHF3, HFC-23 at Cape Grim, Tasmania Atmospheric Fluoroform (CHF3, HFC-23) at Cape Grim, Tasmania graphics Graphics data Data Authors D. E. Oram,1 W. T. Sturges,1 S. A. Penkett,1 A. McCulloch,2 and P. J. Fraser3 1School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, United Kingdom 2ICI Chemicals & Polymers Ltd., Safety and Environment Department, Runcorn, Cheshire, WA7 4QD, United Kingdom 3CRC for Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Division of Atmospheric Research, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Private Bag No. 1, Aspendale, Victoria 3195, Australia Period of Record 1978-1995 Methods The sampling and analytical methods are described more fully in Oram et al. (1998). In summary, air samples were taken from the archive of Cape Grim,

5

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Estimated U.S. Emissions of Halocarbons, 1987-2001 (MMT CO2 Equivalent) Gas 1987 1990 1992 1995 1998 2000 2001 Chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 391 246 207 167 115 105 105 CFC-12 1,166 1,194 853 549 223 182 226 CFC-113 498 158 103 52 0 0 0 CFC-114 N.A. 46 29 16 1 N.A. N.A. CFC-115 N.A. 30 27 22 19 N.A. N.A. Bromofluorocarbons Halon-1211 N.A. 1 1 1 1 N.A. N.A. Halon-1301 N.A. 12 12 12 13 N.A. N.A. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons HCFC-22 116 136 135 123 128 134 137 HCFC-123 N.A. 0 0 0 0 N.A. N.A. HCFC-124 0 0 0 3 4 N.A. N.A. HCFC-141b N.A. 0 0 14 19 4 4 HCFC-142b N.A. 0 2 18 22 26 26 Hydrofluorocarbons HFC-23 48 36 36 28 41 31 22 HFC-125 N.A. 0 1 2 4 5 6 HFC-134a N.A. 1 1 19 35 44 41 Total 2,219 1,861 1,408 1,024 624 532 566 Source(s): Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change, Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis, Jan. 2001, Table 3, p. 47 for GWPs; EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2001, Dec. 2002, Table 29, p. 71 and Table D2, p. D-5 for 1990-2001 emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and

6

Retrofitting an automotive air conditioner with HFC-134a, additive, and mineral oil. Final report, October 1992-May 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper gives results of an evaluation of a lubricant additive developed for use in retrofitting motor vehicle air conditioners. The additive was designed to enable HFC-134a to be used as a retrofit refrigerant with the existing mineral oil in CFC-12 systems. The goal of the project was to provide preliminary feasibility testing of the additive. The cooling effect of the test system retrofitted with HFC-134a and the oil additive was nearly the same as that of the original system with CFC 12 refrigerant. If lubricant additives prove to be successful, miscible lubricants may not be needed for retrofitting some automotive systems. The retrofitting procedure might be simplified and the cost to consumers might be reduced. It has not been determined if retrofitting systems with HFC-134a and oil additives is feasible for a wider range of operating conditions and types of equipment, including the applicability of orifice tube/suction accumulator systems.

Jetter, J.J.; Delafield, F.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Total environmental warming impact (TEWI) calculations for alternative automative air-conditioning systems  

SciTech Connect

The Montreal Protocol phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has required manufacturers to develop refrigeration and air-conditioning systems that use refrigerants that can not damage stratospheric ozone. Most refrigeration industries have adapted their designs to use hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) or hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants; new automobile air- conditioning systems use HFC-134a. These industries are now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants on global warming. Automobile air-conditioning has three separate impacts on global warming; (1) the effects of refrigerant inadvertently released to the atmosphere from accidents, servicing, and leakage; (2) the efficiency of the cooling equipment (due to the emission of C0{sub 2} from burning fuel to power the system); and (3) the emission of C0{sub 2} from burning fuel to transport the system. The Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) is an index that should be used to compare the global warming effects of alternative air-conditioning systems because it includes these contributions from the refrigerant, cooling efficiency, and weight. This paper compares the TEWI of current air-conditioning systems using HFC-134a with that of transcritical vapor compression system using carbon dioxide and systems using flammable refrigerants with secondary heat transfer loops. Results are found to depend on both climate and projected efficiency of C0{sub 2}systems. Performance data on manufacturing prototype systems are needed to verify the potential reductions in TEWI. Extensive field testing is also required to determine the performance, reliability, and ``serviceability`` of each alternative to HFC-134a to establish whether the potential reduction of TEWI can be achieved in a viable consumer product.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Heat transfer during condensation of HFC-134a and R-404A inside of a horizontal smooth and micro-fin tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent small and medium capacity refrigeration systems, the condenser tubes are provided with micro-fins from inside. The vapour refrigerant at the compressor outlet and the condenser inlet is in superheat state. As it advances in the condenser it is in two phases and at the outlet it is in sub cooled liquid. The heat transfer coefficient (HTC) during condensation of HFC-134a and R-404A in a smooth (8.56 mm ID) and micro-fin tubes (8.96 mm ID) are experimentally investigated. Different from previous studies, the present experiments are performed for various condensing temperatures, with superheating and sub cooling and using hermetically sealed compressor. The test runs are done at average saturated condensing temperatures ranging from 35 C to 60 C. The mass fluxes are between 90 and 800 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The experimental results indicate that the average HTC increases with mass flux but decreases with increasing condensing temperature for both smooth and micro-fin tubes. The average condensation HTCs of HFC-134a and R-404A for the micro-fin tubes were 1.5-2.5 and 1.3-2 times larger than that in smooth tube respectively. The HTCs for R-404A are less than that of HFC-134a. New correlations based on the data gathered during the experimentation for predicting condensation HTCs are proposed for wide range of operating conditions. (author)

Sapali, S.N. [Govt. College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shivaji Nagar, Pune, Maharashtra 411 005 (India); Patil, Pradeep A. [AISSMS College of Engineering, Pune University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Kennedy Road, Near R.T.O., Pune, Maharashtra 411 001 (India)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Condensation pressure drop of HFC-134a and R-404A in a smooth and micro-fin U-tube  

SciTech Connect

The frictional pressure drop during condensation of HFC-134a and R-404A in a smooth (8.56 mm ID) and micro-fin U-tubes (8.96 mm ID) are experimentally investigated. Different from previous studies, the present experiments are performed for various condensing temperatures. The test runs are done at average saturated condensing temperatures ranging from 35 C to 60 C. The mass fluxes are between 90 and 800 kg/m{sup 2}s. The experimental results indicate that the average frictional pressure drop increases with mass flux but decreases with increasing condensing temperature for both smooth and micro-fin-tubes. The average frictional pressure drops of HFC-134a and R-404A for the micro-fin-tubes were 1-1.7 and 1-2.1 times larger than that in smooth tube respectively. New correlations based on the data gathered during the experimentation for predicting frictional pressure drop are proposed for wide range of operating conditions. (author)

Patil, Pradeep A. [AISSMS College of Engineering, Pune University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Kennedy Road, near RTO, Pune 411 001, Maharashtra (India); Sapali, S.N. [Govt. College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shivaji Nagar, Pune 411 005, Maharashtra (India)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

HFC Emissions Estinating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dioxide Emissions Reporting Year: January December, 200x Agent Type GWP Total Emission by Agent Type, kg Equivalent CO2 Emission by ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

11

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are used in a number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s. However, in the mid-1980s, it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of these alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects in the form of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential heating and cooling, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air-conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. The discussion in this paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to refrigeration and air-conditioning. In general the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), lifetime equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions. Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are used in a number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s. However, in the mid-1980s, it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of these alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects in the form of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential heating and cooling, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air-conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. The discussion in this paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to refrigeration and air-conditioning. In general the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), lifetime equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions. Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

TEWI Analysis: Its Utility, Its Shortcomings, and Its Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past decade has been a challenging time for the refrigeration and air conditioning industry worldwide. Provisions of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments require the phaseout of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) compounds that have been used extensively as insulating foam blowing agents and refrigerants in refrigeration systems, heat pumps, and air conditioners. In response, hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) compounds were proposed, developed, and are starting to be used as the primary alternatives to CFCs and HCFCs. However, in 1997 under the Kyoto Protocol, industrialized nations have agreed to roll back emissions of HCFCs, carbon dioxide (CO*), and four other greenhouse gases which threaten to cause excessive global warming. The US. Department of Energy and the Alternative Fluorocarbon Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS) jointly sponsored research projects to identify the major applications of CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs and to examine the impacts of these compounds and the energy use of applications employing these compounds on global warming. The five major uses of fluorocarbons based on sales were automobile air conditioning, supermarket refrigeration, unitary heat pumps and air conditioning, chillers for cooling large office buildings, and household refrigeration. Almost all of the refrigerants used in these applications are global warming gases, and if the refrigerant leaks out of the system during operation, is lost during maintenance or is not recovered when the system is scraped, it contributes to global warming. But, it is also true that the energy consumed by refrigeration and air conditioning systems, in the form of electricity or the direct combustion of fossil fuel, results in the release of CO*, the primary cause of atmospheric global warming.

Baxter, V.D.; Fischer, S.K.; Sand, J.R.

1999-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

14

Prediction of solubility of gases in polystyrene by Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System and Radial Basis Function Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBF NN) have been developed for prediction of solubility of various gases in polystyrene. Solubility of butane, isobutene, carbon dioxide, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane ... Keywords: ANFIS, ANN, ARD, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS), BP, HCFC-142b, HFC-134a, HFC-l52a, MLP, PS, Polystyrene, RBF NN, Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBF NN), S-L EOS, Solubility

Aboozar Khajeh; Hamid Modarress

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Chiller Selection: CFC Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This CFC Update examines the decision factors used in selecting the most cost-effective chiller. The growing concern with emissions contributing to ozone depletion, global warming, and air pollution must be considered. Recent chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) phaseout schedules are causing some building owners to consider gas-fired chillers in place of electric chillers. The gas-fired chillers provide cooling without using ozone-depleting refrigerants, and also reduce electric d...

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

16

Final Technical Report HFC Concrete: A Low-???????­???¢???????Energy, Carbon-???????­Dioxide-???????­Negative Solution for reducing Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Solidia/CCSM received funding for further research and development of its Low Temperature Solidification Process (LTS), which is used to create hydrate-free concrete (HFC). LTS/HFC is a technology/materials platform that offers wide applicability in the built infrastructure. Most importantly, it provides a means of making concrete without Portland cement. Cement and concrete production is a major consumer of energy and source of industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The primary goal of this project was to develop and commercialize a novel material, HFC, which by replacing traditional concrete and cement, reduces both energy use and GHG emissions in the built infrastructure. Traditional concrete uses Portland Cement (PC) as a binder. PC production involves calcination of limestone at {approx}1450 C, which releases significant amounts of CO{sub 2} gas to the atmosphere and consumes a large amount of energy due to the high temperature required. In contrast, HFC is a carbonate-based hydrate-free concrete (HFC) that consumes CO{sub 2} gas in its production. HFC is made by reaction of silicate minerals with CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 100 C, more than an order-of-magnitude below the temperature required to make PC. Because of this significant difference in temperature, it is estimated that we will be able to reduce energy use in the cement and concrete industry by up to 30 trillion Btu by 2020. Because of the insulating properties of HFC, we believe we will also be able to significantly reduce energy use in the Building sector, though the extent of this saving is not yet quantified. It is estimated that production of a tonne of PC-based concrete requires about 6.2 million Btu of energy and produces over 1 tonne of CO{sub 2} emissions (Choate, 2003). These can be reduced to 1.9 million Btu and 0.025 tonnes of CO{sub 2} emissions per tonne of HFC (with overall CO{sub 2}-negativity possible by increasing carbonation yield). In this way, by replacing PC-based concrete with HFC in infrastructure we can reduce energy use in concrete production by 70%, and reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 98%; thus the potential to reduce the impact of building materials on global warming and climate change is highly significant. Low Temperature Solidification (LTS) is a breakthrough technology that enables the densification of inorganic materials via a hydrothermal process. The resulting product exhibits excellent control of chemistry and microstructure, to provide durability and mechanical performance that exceeds that of concrete or natural stone. The technology can be used in a wide range of applications including facade panels, interior tiles, roof tiles, countertops, and pre-cast concrete. Replacing traditional building materials and concrete in these applications will result in significant reduction in both energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions.

Dr. Larry McCandlish, Principal Investigator; Dr. Richard Riman, Co-Principal Investigator

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a literature review to assess the acidity characteristics of the older mineral oil and newer polyolester (POE) refrigeration systems as well as to evaluate acid measuring techniques used in other non-aqueous systems which may be applicable for refrigeration systems. Failure in the older chlorofluorocarbon/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CFC/HCFC) / mineral oil systems was primarily due to thermal degradation of the refrigerant which resulted in the formation of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids. These are strong mineral acids, which can, over time, severely corrode the system metals and lead to the formation of copper plating on iron surfaces. The oil lubricants used in the older systems were relatively stable and were not prone to hydrolytic degradation due to the low solubility of water in oil. The refrigerants in the newer hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/POE systems are much more thermally stable than the older CFC/HCFC refrigerants and mineral acid formation is negligible. However, acidity is produced in the new systems by hydrolytic decomposition of the POE lubricants with water to produce the parent organic acids and alcohols used to prepare the POE. The individual acids can therefore vary but they are generally C5 to C9 carboxylic acids. Organic acids are much weaker and far less corrosive to metals than the mineral acids from the older systems but they can, over long time periods, react with metals to form carboxylic metal salts. The salts tend to accumulate in narrow areas such as capillary tubes, particularly if residual hydrocarbon processing chemicals are present in the system, which can lead to plugging. The rate of acid production from POEs varies on a number of factors including chemical structure, moisture levels, temperature, acid concentration and metals. The hydrolysis rate of reaction can be reduced by using driers to reduce the free water concentration and by using scavenging chemicals which react with the system acids. Total acid number (TAN), which includes both mineral acids and organic acids, is therefore a useful indicator which can be used to monitor the condition of the system in order to perform remedial maintenance, when required, to prevent system failure. The critical TAN value is the acid level at which remedial action should be taken to prevent the onset of rapid acid formation which can result in system failure. The level of 0.05 mg KOH/g of oil was established for CFC/mineral oil systems based on analysis of 700 used lubricants from operating systems and failed units. There is no consensus within the refrigeration industry as to the critical TAN value for HFC/POE systems, however, the value will be higher than the CFC/mineral oil systems critical TAN value because of the much weaker organic acids produced from POE. A similar study of used POE lubricants should be performed to establish a critical TAN limit for POE systems. Titrimetric analysis per ASTM procedures is the most commonly used method to determine TAN values in lubricants in the refrigeration industry and other industries dealing with lubricating oils. For field measurements, acid test kits are often used since they provide rapid, semi-quantitative TAN results.

Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

BNL Refrigerant Overview Presentation to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.25 4700 Cold boxes, environmental chambers R-718 Water 212 0 N/A Steam-driven absorption chiller 4750 Older centrifugal chillers (>200 tons) R-12 CFC -20 1 10900 Old refrigerators and vehicle A/C R-13/C mach. R-123 HCFC 81 1.3 77 Newer centrifugal chillers (>200 tons) R-134a HFC -15 0 1430 Refrigerators

Homes, Christopher C.

19

RESULTS OF HALON 1301 AND HFC-125 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... bottles have an internal volume of 800 in3 and are pressurized to 825 psig at 70F. For cold discharges, the bottles are kept in a chiller for a ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

20

THE INFLUENCE OF OXIDATION OF HFC'S AND FC'S ON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... m3). VS2 (energetic module): Boiler room (volume 645.0 m3, potentially explosive atmosphere (diesel fuel vapours)); Fuel ...

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hcfc hydrochlorofluorocarbon hfc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Study of TCP Dynamics over HFC Networks 1 Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cornell.edu/skeshav/papers.html [17] V. Paxson, Measurements and Analysis of End-to-End Internet Dynamics, Ph.D. Thesis, LBNL-40319, UCB ...

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

22

Voluntary Code of Practice for HFC and PFC Fire Protection ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... requirements or is required by regulation or the ... C. Review of relevant regulations or standards ... benchmarks, by providing the incentives to make ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

NIST ATM/HFC Simulator V4.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Name: Delay to process a cell (usec): 0 Slot time (Mbits/sec): 0 ... Name: Delay to process a cell (usec): 0 Slot time (Mbits/sec): 0 ...

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

24

DOE/ORNL heat pump design model, overview and application to R-22 alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This computer program is a public-domain system design tool for application to air-to-air heat pumps. The main aspects of the program are reviewed with emphasis on the newest features of the current fifth-generation version (Mark V) and an upcoming more fully HFC-capable release (Mark VI). Current model predictions are compared to test data for a leading HFC alternative to HCFC-22 in heat pumps. Examples are shown of some user interfaces that have been recently developed for the program. To demonstrate the design capabilities of the model for R-22 alternatives, a refrigerant-side optimization was conducted to find the best balance of heat transfer versus pressure drop for HCFC R-22, HFCs R-134a and R-410A, and the natural refrigerant propane. COP was maximized while refrigerant charge and tube size were minimized. Independent design parameters were fraction of total area in the outdoor coil, tube diameter and number of circuits for each heat exchanger, and condenser subcooling. Heat exchanger design tradeoffs are discussed for a heat pump relative to air conditioners and heating-only units. A design optimized for heating-only operation is presented.

Rice, C.K.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Study on the Interaction Coefficients in PR Equation with VdW ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The values of ki for HFCs and HCs, including Propane, Isobutane, n-butane, HFC32, HFC125, HFC134a, HFC143a, HFC152a and HFC227ea ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

26

SPACESHUTTLEPROGRAMPETITIONFOR HCFC 141b Exemption Allowance Figure 3.2 Cornpleteil ET in Sliruy Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be calculated for the foam covered parts it is essential for the foam to be dimensionally stable for all connecting the ET to the Orbiter Cryogenic propellants flow between the tank and Orbiter at this critical will vaporize into gas This vaporized liquid file1 will disrupt critical tlow of propellant from the External

Christian, Eric

27

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. High-GWP gases 5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA Vintaging Model. Emissions from manufacturing and utilities are derived by the EPA from a mix of public and proprietary data, including from the EPA's voluntary emission reduction partnership programs. For this year's EIA inventory, 2008 values for HFC-23 from HCFC-22

28

On The Design Of Environmentally Benign Refrigerant Mixtures: A Mathematical Programming Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based refrigerants (such as CFC12) have found widespread uses in home refrigerators and automotive air conditioners primarily due to their nontoxic, nonflammable nature and their high overall thermodynamic efficiency. However, CFC and hydrofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerants with intermediate to high ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) will be banned during the next two decades. The outcome of replacing CFC's in the vapor recompression cycle and various other processes is vital to several industries. Feasible solutions appear to include mixtures of hydrofluorocarbons (HFC's) which have the potential for matching thermodynamic properties of current working fluids while meeting several criteria for ozone depletion potential, flammability, toxicity, materials compatibility and cost. In this paper, a proof of concept study is made to show that mathematical programming can effectively be used to identify a small set of alternative refrigerant mixtures which can then be...

Amit Duvedi; Luke E.K. Achenie; Copyright Luke Achenie

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

News From the D.C. Office: Integrated Chiller Retrofits-Sharing Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. 3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. News From the D.C. Office Integrated Chiller Retrofits: Sharing Experience Makes "Cool Sense" A recent issue of the Center for Building Science News [Spring 1996, p.2] described the opportunities for significant energy savings from replacing older, inefficient chillers. These savings can be increased greatly if building owners and managers approach the chiller replacement not just as a requirement, but also as an opportunity-that of investing in other energy-saving measures that reduce cooling loads and lead to the downsizing of the chiller and related equipment. The Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute estimates that 80,000 existing chillers using CFC refrigerants need to be replaced or converted to use HCFC or HFC refrigerants. Of these, about 20,000 will be replaced or

30

Global warming and end-use efficiency implications of replacing CFCs  

SciTech Connect

The direct contribution of CFCs to calculated global warming has been recognized for some time. As a result of the international agreement to phase out CFCs due to stratospheric ozone and the ensuing search for suitable alternatives, there has recently been increased attention on the DIRECT global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, to date there has been little focus on the INDIRECT global warming effect arising from end-use efficiency changes and associated CO{sub 2} emissions. A study being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) addresses this combined or total global warming impact of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related applications. This paper reviews selected results for air-conditioning, refrigeration, and heat pump applications. The analysis indicates that the CFC user industries have made substantial progress in approaching near-equal energy efficiency with the HCFC/HFC alternative refrigerants. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the DIRECT (chemical-related) effect in many applications. Replacing CFCs is an important step in reducing the total global warming impact, and at present the HCFC and HFCS appear to offer the best efficiency and lowest total impact of options available in the relatively short time period required for the transition away from CFCs.

Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Laminar burning speed and flame structure of 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a)/air and difluoromethane (HFC-32)/air mixtures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Of recent importance is the laminar burning speed of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in the refrigerant industry. Since the adoption of the Montreal Protocol in 1989 (more)

Bennett, Casey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.1 National Legislation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Phase Out Schedule of Halocarbons in the U.S. (1) Gas % By % By Chlorofluorocarbons 75% 1994 75% 1994 (CFCs) 100% 1996 (4) 100% 1996 Bromofluorocarbons 100% 1994 (4) 100% 1994 (Halons) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons 35.0% 2004 35% 2003 (HCFCs) 75.0% 2010 75% 2010 90.0% 2015 90% 2015 99.5% 2020 99.5% 2020 100% 2030 (4) 100% 2030 Hydrofluorocarbons N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. (HFCs) Note(s): Source(s): 1989 HCFC consumption + 2.8 % of 1989 CFC consumption 1996 N.A. N.A. 1) The phase out of halocarbons is consistent with Title VI of the Clean Air Act and is in accordance with the Montreal Protocol and Amendments. 2) The amount of gas produced and consumed in this year is established and defined as the base level. To meet basic domestic needs, levels of production are allowed to exceed the base level by up to 10%. 3) After this year, levels of production are no longer

33

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

HFC-161 (ethyl fluoride) HFC-227ea (heptafluoropropane) HFC-236cb (1,1,1,2,2,3-hexafluoropropane) HFC-236ea (1,1,1,2,3,3-hexafluoropropane)

34

Broadband Cable Access Networks: The HFC Plant, 3rd Ed edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book focuses on broadband distribution and systems architecture and concentrates on practical concepts that will allow the reader to do their own design, improvement, and troubleshooting work. The objective is to enhance the skill sets of a large ... Keywords: Data Transmission Systems, Networking

David Large; James Farmer

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

005- Densification and Oxidation Behavior of HfC and TaC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

125- Influence of Gas Flow Rate Ratio on the Structural Properties of a-SiC:H Prepared by ... 145- The Synergy of XRD and XRF in a Shale and Slate Analysis.

36

Energy and Global Warming Impacts of HFC Refrigerants and Emerging Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEATING AND COOLING LOADS AND HEAT PUMP PERFORMANCE FACTORS FOR NEW SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES AND COMMERCIAL average). . . . . . . 37 8. TEWI for residential heating and cooling options in Miami (1996 efficiency in Miami (2005 efficiency levels). . . . . . . . . . . 48 13. TEWI for residential heating and cooling

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

37

HKUPHYS-HFC-03; quant-ph/9709053 Making An Empty Promise With A Quantum Computer ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alice has made a decision in her mind. While she does not want to reveal it to Bob at this moment, she would like to convince Bob that she is committed to this particular decision and that she cannot change it at a later time. Is there a way for Alice to get Bobs trust? Until recently, researchers had believed that the above task can be performed with the help of quantum mechanics. And the security of the quantum scheme lies on the uncertainty principle. Nevertheless, such optimism was recently shattered by Mayers and by us, who found that Alice can always change her mind if she has a quantum computer. Here, we survey this dramatic development and its implications on the security of other quantum cryptographic schemes.

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

HKUPHYS-HFC-03 Making An Empty Promise With A Quantum Computer ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alice has made a decision in her mind. While she does not want to reveal it to Bob at this moment, she would like to convince Bob that she is committed to this particular decision and that she cannot change it at a later time. Is there a way for Alice to get Bobs trust? Until recently, researchers had believed that the above task can be performed with the help of quantum mechanics. And the security of the quantum scheme lies on the uncertainty principle. Nevertheless, such optimism was recently shattered by Mayers and by us, who found that Alice can always change her mind if she has a quantum computer. Here, we survey this dramatic development and its implications on the security of other quantum cryptographic schemes.

H. F. Chau; Hoi-kwong Lo

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The F-Gas Regulation and HFC Usage in Fire Suppression ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of more than 1 ton per annum of fluorinated greenhouse gases must report quantities exported, and any quantities of gas exported for recycling ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hcfc hydrochlorofluorocarbon hfc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy and global warming impacts of HFC refrigerants and emerging technologies: TEWI-III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of hydrofluorocarbons (BFCs) which were developed as alternative refrigerants and insulating foam blowing agents to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants and blowing agents on global warming. A Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) assessment analyzes the environmental affects of these halogenated working fluids in energy consuming applications by combining a direct effect resulting from the inadvertent release of HFCs to the atmosphere with an indirect effect resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels needed to provide the energy to operate equipment using these compounds as working fluids. TEWI is a more balanced measure of environmental impact because it is not based solely on the global warming potential (GWP) of the working fluid. It also shows the environmental benefit of efficient technologies that result in less CO{sub 2} generation and eventual emission to the earth`s atmosphere. The goal of TEWI is to assess total global warming impact of all the gases released to the atmosphere, including CO{sub 2} emissions from energy conversion. Alternative chemicals and technologies have been proposed as substitutes for HFCs in the vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration and air conditioning and for polymer foams in appliance and building insulations which claim substantial environmental benefits. Among these alternatives are: (1) Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants and blowing agents which have zero ozone depleting potential and a negligible global warming potential, (2) CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant and blowing agent, (3) Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor compression systems, (4) Absorption chiller and heat pumping cycles using ammonia/water or lithium bromide/water, and (5) Evacuated panel insulations. This paper summarizes major results and conclusions of the detailed final report on the TEWI-111 study.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance Title The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-47352 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., James D. Lutz, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL-47352 Date Published January 12 Abstract The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 (NAECA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consider amendments to the energy conservation standards to increase energy efficiency in residential water heaters. A driving force affecting efficiency is the ozone-depletion regulation regarding blowing agents for insulation in all water heater fuel types. This paper presents results of cost and efficiency impacts of three potential blowing agents. Residential water heaters are typically insulated with polyurethane foam in the space between the tank and the jacket. Currently, water heater manufacturers use HCFC-141b, an ozone-depleting substance, as a blowing agent. After 2003, as a result of the Montreal Protocol (1993), manufacturers must use blowing agents that do not deplete the ozone layer. The analysis presented in this paper considers three replacement candidates, HFC-245fa, HFC-134a, and cyclopentane by comparing their efficiency and cost effectiveness when applied to water heater insulation. This analysis used computer simulation models and other analytical methods to investigate the efficiency improvements due to different design options, when alternative blowing agents are applied. The calculations were based on the DOE test procedure for residential water heaters. The analysis used average manufacturer, retailer, and installer costs to calculate the total consumer costs. Consumer operating expenses were calculated based on modeled energy consumption under test procedure conditions and U.S. average energy prices. With this information, a cost-efficiency relationship was developed to show the average manufacturer and consumer cost to achieve increased efficiency.

43

An evaluation on the environmental consequences of residual CFCs from obsolete household refrigerators in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) contained in household refrigerators consist mainly of CFC-11 and CFC-12, which will be eventually released into the environment. Consequentially, environmental releases of these refrigerants will lead to ozone depletion and contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect, if waste refrigerators are not disposed of properly. In the present paper, the potential release of residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China is examined, and their contributions to ozone depletion and greenhouse effect are compared with those of other recognized ozone-depleting substances (ODS) and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The results imply that annual potential amounts of released residual CFC-11 and CFC-12 will reach their maximums at 4600 and 2300 tons, respectively in 2011, and then decrease gradually to zero until 2020. Meanwhile, the amounts of their most widely used substitutes HCFC-141b and HFC-134a will keep increasing. Subsequently, the contribution ratio of these CFCs and their substitutes to ozone depletion will remain at 25% through 2011, and reach its peak value of 34% by 2018. The contribution to greenhouse effect will reach its peak value of 0.57% by 2010. Moreover, the contribution ratio of these CFCs to the total global release of CFCs will steadily increase, reaching its peak of 15% by 2018. Thus, this period from 2010 to 2018 is a crucial time during which residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China will contribute significantly to ozone depletion.

Zhao Xiangyang; Duan Huabo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Li Jinhui, E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0{sub 2} emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations  

SciTech Connect

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0{sub 2} emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 12.7 - Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (100-year time horizon) Gas GWP SAR 900 Carbon dioxide (CO2) 1 Methane (CH 4 ) 1 21 Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) 310 HFC-23 11,700 HFC-32 650...

47

Office of Facilities and Grounds Future Power Distribution Grid Requirements for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). · This will require the combination of alternate generation (PV, SNG, HFC, etc.), storage, Demand Response switchable circuits ­ Scalable power production (Diesel, SNG, HFC, Batteries) ­ Combine Thermal power

48

RECOMMENDING EXPOSURE LIMITS FOR HALON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... negative. In the laboratory, HCFC-123 is a mild anesthetic 65 Page 4. ... No epidemiology In vitro tests - Ames test negative Acute ...

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

Project: Novel Working Fluids for High-Efficiency HVAC&R ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the best replacements for high-GWP hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants; and to demonstrate improved energy efficiency of chillers through ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Performance Evaluation of Two Azeotropic Refrigerant Mixtures of HFC-134a With R-290 (Propane) and R-600a (Isobutane). ...

51

SUBMISSION BY FINLAND ON BEHALF OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY AND ITS MEMBER STATES OF INFORMATION ON AVAILABLE AND POTENTIAL WAYS AND MEANS OF LIMITING HFC, PFC AND SF 6 EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6) are used in a wide variety of applications ranging from aerosol cans to industrial refrigeration and electrical systems which may contain thousands of kilograms of these substances. The paper at hand describes the uses and emission sources of these gases

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Section 5.2.3 Chillers: Greening Federal Facilities; Second Edition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleting HFC-134a refrigerant. Source: Carrier Corporation References Energy Management: A Program to Reduce Cost and Protect the Environment, Facility Management Divi-...

53

Intermediate Species Profiles in Low-Pressure Methane ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... inhibited by CHF3 at an equal loading of ffuo ... 10 using the experimental temperature profile as input ... HFC mechanism may be down- loaded from http ...

2012-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

54

EXTINGUISHMENT TESTS OF CONTINUOUSLY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 8. Table 2. Summary of Conductive Heating Tests with HFC-227ea. CONDOM CONDO06 CONDO07 CONDO13 CONDO 1 8 SAMPLE -=I=- ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Greenhouse Gases and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605) GREENHOUSE GAS NAME GREENHOUSE GAS CODE FORMULA GWP TAR1 AR42 (1) Carbon Dioxide CO2 CO2 1 1 (2) Methane CH4 CH4 23 25 (3) Nitrous Oxide N2O N2O 296 298 (4) Hydroflourocarbons HFC-23 (trifluoromethane) 15 CHF3 12000 14800 HFC-32 (difluoromethane) 16 CH2F2 550 675 HFC-41 (monofluoromethane) 43 CH3F 97 -3 HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane) 17 CHF2CF3 3400 3500 HFC-134 (1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) 44 CHF2CHF2 1100 -3 HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) 18 CH2FCF3 1300 1430 HFC-143 (1,1,2-trifluorethane) 45 CHF2CH2F 330 -3 HFC-143a (1,1,1-trifluoroethane) 46 CF3CH3 4300 4470 HFC-152 (1,2-difluorethane) 47 CH2FCH2F

56

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation compared the performance of R22 to the performance of propane (R290) and zeotropic mixtures of HFC's and hydrocarbons in a ...

57

PROCESS FOR CONVERSION OF SURPLUS HALONS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... banned in 1996 and strict import-export and recycling ... of minor products during the gas-phase reaction of ... a) halogen in product HFC gases which is ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

58

Standard scales used in the measurement of AGAGE species at Cape...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scales used in archived species from the measurement of AGAGE GC-MS Medua instrument species formula scale units comments CFCs CFC-113 CCl 2 FCClF 2 SIO-2005 ppt HCFCs HCFC-22...

59

Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

"GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP)" Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP)" "(From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP" ,,,"TAR1","AR42" "(1) Carbon Dioxide","CO2","CO2",1,1 "(2) Methane","CH4","CH4",23,25 "(3) Nitrous Oxide","N2O","N2O",296,298 "(4) Hydroflourocarbons" "HFC-23 (trifluoromethane)",15,"CHF3",12000,14800 "HFC-32 (difluoromethane)",16,"CH2F2",550,675 "HFC-41 (monofluoromethane)",43,"CH3F",97,92 "HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane)",17,"CHF2CF3",3400,3500

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hcfc hydrochlorofluorocarbon hfc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ThermoML Data for IJT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Saturated Liquid Viscosity of Ethyl Fluoride (HFC161) from 233 K to 373 K. Pages: 2243-2250. DOI: 10.1007/s10765-012-1309-7. ...

62

xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hcfc hydrochlorofluorocarbon hfc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a
real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cal Poly Initiates R-407C Chiller Replacement: Commercial Cooling Update--Case Study in Southern California Edison Territory, Issue 4, June 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern California Edison and EPRI have teamed with students at California State Polytechnic University in Pomona (Cal Poly) to evaluate the performance of what is thought to be the first chiller in the United States using R-407C, a promising replacement for HCFC-22. Once optimized, the 160-ton screw chiller should reduce annual energy use by 44% compared to the 24-year old, 204-ton CFC-11 unit it replaces, while providing a 6.7 year payback. Researchers are currently focusing on testing--which began in...

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-GWP Refrigerants Mark O. McLinden National Institute of Standards and Technology markm@boulder.nist.gov; 303-497-3580 April 3, 2013 Optimization Fluid Modeling Cycle Modeling Final Candidates Optimum Thermo Parameters 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: HFC refrigerants face restrictions: U.S./Canada/Mexico proposal to Montreal Protocol (85 % cut) EU regulations likely on all application areas (79 % cut)

83

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

table 1 \\p bub cf_co2c cf_stmt ec_c2f6 ec_cf4 ec_cfc113 ec_cfc114 ec_cfc115 ec_hfc23 ec_n2o_bus ec_n2o_heavytruck ec_n2o_motorcyc ef_n2o_coal ef_n2o_gas ef_n2o_oil

84

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-GWP Refrigerants Mark O. McLinden National Institute of Standards and Technology markm@boulder.nist.gov; 303-497-3580 April 3, 2013 Optimization Fluid Modeling Cycle Modeling Final Candidates Optimum Thermo Parameters 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: HFC refrigerants face restrictions: U.S./Canada/Mexico proposal to Montreal Protocol (85 % cut) EU regulations likely on all application areas (79 % cut)

85

Investigation of Chlorine-Free Refrigerants for Low-Temperature Supermarket Refrigeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the phaseout of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, supermarkets are seeking a replacement for R-502, the refrigerant of choice for low-temperature (frozen food) refrigeration. EPRI has conducted field testing to characterize the performance of the new hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) nonchlorinated refrigerants replacements for R-502. Results showed that energy and demand savings can be obtained using these alternative refrigerants with zero ozone-depleting potential.

1996-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

International research into chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selected researchers from 21 countries were queried through questionnaires about their current and planned research activities. The results of the survey show that the majority of research being conducted by the respondents is devoted to investigating the hydrogenated fluorocarbon HFC-134a as a replacement for CFC-12 in refrigeration applications. The main issue with this alternative is identifying compatible lubricants that do not reduce its effectiveness.

Marseille, T.J.; Shankle, D.L.; Thurman, A.G.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Comparison of global warming impacts of automobile air-conditioning concepts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The global warming impacts of conventional vapor compression automobile air conditioning using HFC-134a are compared with the potential impacts of four alternative concepts. Comparisons are made on the basis of total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) which accounts for the effects of refrigerant emissions, energy use to provide comfort cooling, and fuel consumed to transport the weight of the air conditioning system. Under the most favorable assumptions on efficiency and weight, transcritical compression using CO{sub 2} as the refrigerant and adsorption cooling with water and zeolite beds could reduce TEWI by up to 18%rlative to HFC-134a compression air conditioning. Other assumptions on weight and efficiency lead to significant increases in TEWI relative to HFC-134a, and it is impossible to determine which set of assumptios is valid from existing data, Neither Stirling cycle or thermoelectric cooling will reduce TEWI relative to EFC-134a. Brief comments are also made concerning technical barriers that must be overcome for succesful development of the new technologies.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-effective Wall, Roof, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Insulation for High Performance Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into advanced insulation for high performance wall, roof, and foundation systems. Heat flows from hotter to colder spaces, and insulation is designed to resist this flow by keeping hot air out in the summer and in during the winter. Project Description This project seeks to develop high performing, durable, hydrofluorocarbon and hydrochlorofluorocarbons -free insulation with an R-value greater than 7.5-per-inch and a Class A fire performance. Project Partners Research is being undertaken between DOE and Dow Chemical.

89

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

90

United States Department of Energy large commercial absorption chiller development program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas cooling industry to improve energy efficiency and US competitiveness by using advanced absorption technologies that eliminate the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), refrigerants that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. Absorption cooling uses natural gas as the heat source, which produces much lower NO{sub x} emissions than oil- or coal-generated electricity. Gas-fired chillers also have the advantage of helping reduce peak electrical usage during summer months. To assist industry in developing advanced absorption cooling technologies, DOE sponsors the Large Commercial Chiller Development Program. The goal of the program is to improve chiller cooling efficiency by 30--50% compared with the best currently available absorption systems.

Garland, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.; Zaltash, A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

High temperature materials technology research for advanced thermionic systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tungsten and tungsten alloys are candidate materials for the thermionic emitter in the space nuclear power convertor. In this work, the creep behavior of HfC strengthened tungsten alloys was studied. An ultrahigh vacuum, high precision creep test system was constructed for this purpose so that the samples could be heated up to 3,000 K for heat treatment and creep strain could be measured from the creep sample inside the UHV chamber. To explain the creep behavior observed in this dispersion strengthened alloy, a creep model was proposed which accounted for the presence of HfC particles in the form of a back stress generated by these particles. This model was verified by the creep test data of W-0.37 HfC alloys tested under both extruded and recrystallized microstructural conditions. According to this model, the steady state creep of this type of alloys was expected to increase with time due to coarsening of HfC particle and recrystallization of the alloys under high temperatures. In contrast, conventional simple power law creep model only predicts a constant steady state creep for these materials, which does not represent the microstructural evolution of the materials. The creep of solid solution alloys such as W-Re, W-Nb and W-Hf and Mo-Nb was also studied. These materials are expected to be more stable in creep properties due to the absence of coarsening particles. These solid solution alloys, in their single crystalline state, are reported possessing better corrosion resistance over their polycrystalline counterparts. Existing creep data of both solid solution tungsten and molybdenum alloys were re-analyzed. The data of these alloys showed two distinct different creep mechanisms: Class I and Class II. The dominating creep mechanism at low stresses could be explained by the Takuchi-Argon model (Class I). At higher stresses, the data could not be explained by any of the existing creep models. A creep model was thus proposed that contained a shift factor due to the effect of the solute in these alloys. In this model, the Class II creep behavior of these solution alloys were found as a function of the alloy concentration and atomic size mismatch.

Zee, R.H.; Rose, M.F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Frequently Asked Global Change Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asked Global Change Questions Asked Global Change Questions This page lists global change questions that have been received at CDIAC and the answers that were provided to a diverse audience. If you have a question relating to carbon dioxide and global change and cannot find the answer you need here, you can "Ask Us a Question", and we will be glad to try to help you. Questions Should we grow trees to remove carbon in the atmosphere? What are the present tropospheric concentrations, global warming potentials (100 year time horizon), and atmospheric lifetimes of CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CCl4, methyl chloroform, HCFC-22, sulphur hexafluoride, trifluoromethyl sulphur pentafluoride, perfluoroethane, and surface ozone? Where can I find information on the naming of halocarbons?

93

Energy and global warming impacts of next generation refrigeration and air conditioning technologies  

SciTech Connect

Significant developments have occurred in hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and the application of ammonia and hydrocarbons as refrigerant working fluids since the original TEWI (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) report in 1991. System operating and performance data on alternative refrigerants and refrigeration technologies justify and updated evaluation of these new alternative refrigerants and competing technologies in well-characterized applications. Analytical and experimental results are used to show quantitative comparisons between HFCS, HFC blends, hydrocarbons, and ammonia, used as refrigerants. An objective evaluation is presented for commercial and near commercial non-CFC refrigerants/blowing agents and alternative refrigeration technologies. This information is needed for objective and quantitative decisions on policies addressing greenhouse gas emissions from refrigeration and air conditioning equipment. The evaluation assesses the energy use and global warming impacts of refrigeration and air conditioning technologies that could be commercialized during the phase out of HCFCS. Quantitative comparison TEWI for two application areas are presented. Opportunities for significant reductions in TEWI are seen with currently known refrigerants through improved maintenance and servicing practices and improved product designs.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The LiveWire Project final report  

SciTech Connect

Utilities across the US have begun pilot testing a variety of hardware and software products to develop a two-way communications system between themselves and their customers. Their purpose is to reduce utility operating costs and to provide new and improved services for customers in light of pending changes in the electric industry being brought about by deregulation. A consortium including utilities, national labs, consultants, and contractors, with the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), initiated a project that utilized a hybrid fiber-coax (HFC) wide-area network integrated with a CEBus based local area network within the customers home. The system combined energy consumption data taken within the home, and home automation features to provide a suite of energy management services for residential customers. The information was transferred via the Internet through the HFC network, and presented to the customer on their personal computer. This final project report discusses the design, prototype testing, and system deployment planning of the energy management system.

Brown, C.D.; Nelson, T.T. [Enova Technology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kelly, J.C.; Dominguez, H.A. [Paragon Consulting Services, La Verne, CA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Thermodynamic Prediction of Compositional Phases Confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy on Tantalum-Based Alloy Weldments  

SciTech Connect

Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for radioisotope based thermal to electrical power systems since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. Tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive prolonged exposure to the radioisotope power-system working environment. Typically, the fabrication of power systems requires the welding of various components including the structural members made of tantalum alloys. Issues such as thermodynamics, lattice structure, weld pool dynamics, material purity and contamination, and welding atmosphere purity all potentially confound the understanding of the differences between the weldment properties of the different tantalum-based alloys. The objective of this paper is to outline the thermodynamically favorable material phases in tantalum alloys, with and without small amounts of hafnium, during and following solidification, based on the results derived from the FactSage(c) Integrated Thermodynamic Databank. In addition, Transition Electron Microscopy (TEM) data will show for the first time, the changes occurring in the HfC before and after welding, and the data will elucidate the role HfC plays in pinning grain boundaries.

Moddeman, William E.; Birkbeck, Janine C. [BWXT Pantex, Amarillo, Texas 79120-0020 (United States); Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P. [University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton OH 45469-0102 (United States); Miller, Roger G.; Allard, Lawrence F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

New concepts for refrigerant leak detection and mixture measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the discovery that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) destroy the ozone layer, the need to reduce the release of these refrigerants into the environment has become critical. A total ban of ozone-depleting CFCs is expected within a few years, and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and fluorocarbons (FCs) and their mixtures are expected to be used during a transition period. Several HFC and FC refrigerants are currently being considered as CFC substitutes. The electronic refrigerant leak detectors currently being considered as CFC substitutes. The electronic refrigerant leak detectors currently on the market were developed to detect CFCs and are not as sensitive to HFCs. Although incremental improvement can be made to these devices to detect HFCs, they often lead to increased false signals. Also, there is no simple device available to measure the composition of a refrigerant mixture. The authors present two new concepts to aid in the development of two portable instruments that can be used for HFC leak detection and for quantitative measurement of refrigerant mixture compositions. The development of simple, easy-to-use portable leak detectors and refrigerant mixture meters is essential to the wide use of alternative refrigerants in industry.

Chen, F.C.; Allman, S.L.; Chen, C.H.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Stratospheric ozone protection: The Montreal Protocol and Title VI of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stratospheric ozone layer protects the surface of the Earth from harmful ultraviolet (UV-B) radiation, which has been causally linked to skin cancer and cataracts, suppression of the human immune system, damage to crops and aquatic organisms, the formation of ground-level zone and the rapid weathering of outdoor plastics. In recent years, scientists have observed a significant deterioration of the ozone layer, particularly over the poles, but increasingly over populated regions as well. This deterioration has been attributed to the atmospheric release of certain man-made halocarbons, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons, methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. Once used extensively as propellants for aerosol sprays (but generally banned for such purposes since 1978), CFCs are widely used today as refrigerants, foams and solvents. All of these chlorinated (CFC, methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride) and brominated (halon) compounds are classified for regulatory purposes as Class I substances because of their significant ozone-depleting potential. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), developed as alternatives to CFCs and halons for many different applications, have been classified for regulatory purposes as Class II substances because of their relatively less destructive impact on stratospheric ozone. This paper describes the following regulations to reduce destruction of the ozone layer: the Montreal Protocol; Title VI of the Clean air Act Amendments of 1990; Accelerated Phase-out schedules developed by the countries which signed the Montreal Protocol; Use restrictions; Recycling and Emission reduction requirements; Servicing of motor vehicle air conditions; ban on nonessential products; labeling requirements; safe alternatives. 6 refs.

Babst, C.R. III

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Heat Pump Design Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Pump Design Model Heat Pump Design Model Heat Pump Design Model logo. Research tool for use in the steady-state simulation and design analysis of air-to-air heat pumps and air conditioners. The program can be used with most of the newer HFC refrigerants as well as with HCFCs and CFCs. The standard vapor-compression cycle is modeled with empirical representations for compressor performance and first-principle region-by-region modeling of the heat exchangers. An online Web version is available that can be used with default configurations or with user-specified component and operating parameters for analyzing the performance of single-speed, air-to-air equipment. User configurations can be saved for later use. Parametric analyses can be made and performance trends plotted online.

99

Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project The Department of Energy is currently researching the development of building superinsulation through a carbon dioxide (CO2) foaming process. Project Description This project seeks to develop building super insulation through a carbon dioxide foaming process that does not use hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and which produces insulation with a high R-value. Project Partners Research is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and The Industrial Science & Technology Network. Project Goals The goal of this project is to develop advanced insulation without HFC, and to achieve a competitive processing cost for CO2 foaming technology.

100

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Air Conditioning and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioning and Emissions Conditioning and Emissions Air conditioning and indirect emissions go together in the sense that when a vehicle's air conditioning system is in use, fuel economy declines. When more petroleum fuel is burned, more pollution and greenhouse gases are emitted. An additional, "direct" source of greenhouse gas emissions is the refrigerant used in air conditioning. Called HFC-134a, this pressurized gas tends to seep through tiny openings and escapes into the atmosphere. It can also escape during routine service procedures such as system recharging. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction team applied its vehicle systems modeling expertise in a study to predict fuel consumption and indirect emissions resulting from the use of vehicle air conditioning. The analysis

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101

Global warming impacts of ozone-safe refrigerants and refrigeration, heating, and air-conditioning technologies  

SciTech Connect

International agreements mandate the phase-out of many chlorine containing compounds that are used as the working fluid in refrigeration, air-conditioning, and heating equipment. Many of the chemical compounds that have been proposed, and are being used in place of the class of refrigerants eliminated by the Montreal Protocol are now being questioned because of their possible contributions to global warming. Natural refrigerants are put forth as inherently superior to manufactured refrigerants because they have very low or zero global warming potentials (GWPs). Questions are being raised about whether or not these manufactured refrigerants, primarily hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), should be regulated and perhaps phased out in much the same manner as CFCs and HCFCs. Several of the major applications of refrigerants are examined in this paper and the results of an analysis of their contributions to greenhouse warming are presented. Supermarket refrigeration is shown to be an application where alternative technologies have the potential to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) significantly with no clear advantage to either natural or HFC refrigerants. Mixed results are presented for automobile air conditioners with opportunities to reduce GHG emissions dependent on climate and comfort criteria. GHG emissions for hermetic and factory built systems (i.e. household refrigerators/freezers, unitary equipment, chillers) are shown to be dominated by energy use with much greater potential for reduction through efficiency improvements than by selection of refrigerant. The results for refrigerators also illustrate that hydrocarbon and carbon dioxide blown foam insulation have lower overall effects on GHG emissions than HFC blown foams at the cost of increased energy use.

Fischer, S.; Sand, J.; Baxter, V.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Greenhouse warming potential of candidate gaseous diffusion plant coolants  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary estimate has been made of the greenhouse warming potential (GWP) of coolants under consideration as substitutes for CFC-114 in the gaseous diffusion plants. Coolants are not at present regulated on the basis of GWP, but may well be in the future. Use of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} or n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10} is estimated to have three to four times the greenhouse impact of an equivalent use of CFC-114. Neither of the substitutes, of course, would cause any ozone depletion. HCFC-124 (a probable commercial substitute for CFC-114, but not presently under serious consideration due to its relatively high UF{sub 6} reactivity) would have much less greenhouse and ozone depletion impact than CFC-114. The GWP estimates derive from a simple model that approximately reproduces literature values for similar compounds. The major uncertainty in these estimates lies in the atmospheric lifetime, especially of the perfluorocarbon compounds, for which little reliable information exists. In addition to GWP estimates for coolants, the overall greenhouse impact of the gaseous diffusion plants is calculated, including indirect power-related CO{sub 2} emissions. This result is used to compare greenhouse impacts of nuclear- and coal-produced electricity. 11 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Aspects of CFC relative ozone destruction efficiencies determined in the LLNL 2-D model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the efficiency of surface emission of several individual chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrogen-containing chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) for reducing the calculated steady state total ozone column in both one- and two-dimensional models, relative to the effects of CFC-11 (CFCl/sub 3/) emission. We find that CFC and HCFC relative efficiencies can vary over two orders of magnitude, mostly as a result of atmospheric lifetimes. For CFCs and HCFCs with long stratospheric lifetimes the calculated efficiency is also reduced by the effects of lower and mid stratospheric photochemistry. Ozone in this region changes according to the net effect of changing rates of oxygen photolysis, direct chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss and interference by active chlorine species in the nitrogen oxide-catalyzed ozone loss process. In these cases, the relative efficiencies show a marked latitudinal dependence, being larger at high latitudes and smaller at lower latitudes. Additionally in these cases, the one-dimensional model appears to overestimate the globally and annually averaged result that is obtained from the two-dimensional model. These considerations should be taken into account when quantities similar to the relative efficiency defined here are applied to CFC production and emission decisions. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Connell, P.; Grant, K.; Wuebbles, D.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Potentially useful polyolester lubricant additives an overview of antioxidants, antiwear and antiseize compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable service lubrication of compressors with polyolesters that do not contain additives is the optimal goal for hermetic compressor use. Chlorine derived from CFC and HCFC refrigerants is reported to have effective antiwear properties and negates the widespread use of additives in mineral oil lubricated systems. The use of antioxidants for mineral oil and polyolesters have been reported; antioxidant additive activity seems essential for polyolesters.- Antiwear and antiseize additives seem to be a short term goal for use with polyolesters. High silicone aluminum to steel wear seems to be a primary target for additive use. The interaction of specific heteroatom organic compounds with highly polar surface active synthetic polyolester lubricants is complex. Results of an extensive literature search describe results from a service base determined at ambient conditions. Known lubricant additives used in the hermetic compressor industry, the. mode of action of several types of additives and some lubricant additive chemistry that demonstrates selective thermal stability in conjunction with the chemical structure are examined.

Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Reconciling uncertainties in integrated science and policy models: Applications to global climate change  

SciTech Connect

In this thesis tools of data reconciliation are used to integrate available information into scientific and policy models of greenhouse gases. The role of uncertainties in scientific and policy models of global climate change is examined, and implications for global change policy are drawn. Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas. Global sources and sinks of methane have significant uncertainties. A chance constrained methodology was developed and used to perform inversions on the global methane cycle. Budgets of methane that are consistent with source fluxes, isotopic and ice core measurements were determined. While it is not possible to come up with a single budget for CH{sub 4}, performing the calculation with a number of sets of assumed priors suggests a convergence in the allowed range for sources. In some cases -- wetlands (70-130 Tg/yr), rice paddies (60-125 Tg/yr) a significant reduction in the uncertainty of the source estimate is achieved. Our results compare favorably with the most recent measurements of flux estimates. For comparison, a similar analysis using bayes monte carlo simulation was performed. The question of the missing sink for carbon remains unresolved. Two analyses that attempt to quantify the missing sink were performed. First, a steady state analysis of the carbon cycle was used to determine the pre-industrial inter-hemispheric carbon concentration gradient. Second, a full blown dynamic inversion of the carbon cycle was performed. An advection diffusion ocean model with surface chemistry, coupled to box models of the atmosphere and the biosphere was inverted to fit available measurements of {sup 12}C and {sup 14}C carbon isotopes using Differential-Algebraic Optimization. The model effectively suggests that the {open_quotes}missing{close_quotes} sink for carbon is hiding in the biosphere. Scenario dependent trace gas indices were calculated for CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, HCFC-22.

Kandlikar, M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Hackensack University Medical Center's major initiative to create a cleaner healthier and safer environment for patients, employees and the community served by the medical center is built on its commitment to protect the environment and conserve precious energy resources. Since 2004 the Medical Center launched a long term campaign to temper the negative environmental impact of proposed and existing new construction at the medical center and to improve campus wide overall energy efficiency. The plan was to begin by implementing a number of innovative and eco-friendly enhancements to the Gabrellian Women's and Children's Pavilion, in construction at the time, which would lead to Certification by the US Green Building Councils Leadership & Environmental Design (LEED) program. In addition the medical center would evaluate the feasibility of implementing a photovoltaic system in the new construction (in development and planned) to provide clean pollution free electricity. The steps taken to achieve this included conducting a feasibility study complete with architectural and engineering assessments to determine the potential for implementation of a photovoltaic system on the campus and also to conduct an energy survey that would focus on determining specific opportunities and upgrades that would lead to a healthier energy efficient interior environment at the medical center. The studies conducted by the medical center to determine the viability of installing a photovoltaic system identified two key issues that factored into leaderships decision not to implement the solar powered system. These factors were related to the advanced phase of construction of the women's and children's pavilion and the financial considerations to redesign and implement in the ambulatory cancer center. The medical center, in spite of their inability to proceed with the solar aspect of the project upheld their commitment to create a healthier environment for the patients and the community. To achieve a healthier energy efficient interior environment the medical center made substantive upgrades and improvements to the HVAC, plumbing electrical and other operating systems. Measures that were implemented range from use of lighting and plumbing fixture sensors , to reduce electrical and water usage, to use of refrigerants containing hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) which cause significantly less depletion of the ozone layer than the refrigerants more commonly used. Additional appropriate energy efficiency component upgrades include the installation of Chiller plants with variable frequency drives (VFDs) and harmonic filters, high efficiency motors, solar window glazing, and lighting/motion sensors.

Helen Cunning

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

Final Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hackensack University Medical Center's major initiative to create a cleaner healthier and safer environment for patients, employees and the community served by the medical center is built on its commitment to protect the environment and conserve precious energy resources. Since 2004 the Medical Center launched a long term campaign to temper the negative environmental impact of proposed and existing new construction at the medical center and to improve campus wide overall energy efficiency. The plan was to begin by implementing a number of innovative and eco-friendly enhancements to the Gabrellian Women's and Children's Pavilion, in construction at the time, which would lead to Certification by the US Green Building Councils Leadership & Environmental Design (LEED) program. In addition the medical center would evaluate the feasibility of implementing a photovoltaic system in the new construction (in development and planned) to provide clean pollution free electricity. The steps taken to achieve this included conducting a feasibility study complete with architectural and engineering assessments to determine the potential for implementation of a photovoltaic system on the campus and also to conduct an energy survey that would focus on determining specific opportunities and upgrades that would lead to a healthier energy efficient interior environment at the medical center. The studies conducted by the medical center to determine the viability of installing a photovoltaic system identified two key issues that factored into leaderships decision not to implement the solar powered system. These factors were related to the advanced phase of construction of the women's and children's pavilion and the financial considerations to redesign and implement in the ambulatory cancer center. The medical center, in spite of their inability to proceed with the solar aspect of the project upheld their commitment to create a healthier environment for the patients and the community. To achieve a healthier energy efficient interior environment the medical center made substantive upgrades and improvements to the HVAC, plumbing electrical and other operating systems. Measures that were implemented range from use of lighting and plumbing fixture sensors, to reduce electrical and water usage, to use of refrigerants containing hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) which cause significantly less depletion of the ozone layer than the refrigerants more commonly used. Additional appropriate energy efficiency component upgrades include the installation of Chiller plants with variable frequency drives (VFDs) and harmonic filters, high efficiency motors, solar window glazing, and lighting/motion sensors.

Suzanne Lutwick; Helen Cunning

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

109

California's new mandatory greenhouse gas reporting regulation  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in early 2009, approximately 1000 California businesses will begin reporting their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based on the requirements of a new regulation adopted by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) in December 2007. California's mandatory GHG reporting regulation is the first rule adopted as a requirement of the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, passed by the California Legislature as Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32; Nunez, Chapter 488, Statutes of 2006) and signed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger in September 2006. The regulation is the first of its kind in the United States to require facilities to report annual GHG emissions. In general, all facilities subject to reporting are required to report their on-site stationary source combustion emissions of CO{sub 2}, nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and methane (CH{sub 4}). Some industrial sectors, such as cement producers and oil refineries, also must report their process emissions, which occur from chemical or other noncombustion activities. Fugitive emissions from facilities are required to be reported when specified in the regulation. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) use is prevalent in electricity facilities and must be reported. CO{sub 2} emissions from biomass-derived fuels must be separately identified during reporting, and reporters must also provide their consumption of purchased or acquired electricity and thermal energy; these requirements will assist facilities in evaluating changes in their fossil fuel carbon footprints. 1 tab.

Patrick Gaffney; Doug Thompson; Richard Bode [California Air Resources Board, CA (United States)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evaporation heat transfer and friction characteristics of R-134a flowing downward in a vertical corrugated tube  

SciTech Connect

Differently from most previous studies, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the pure refrigerant HFC-134a during evaporation inside a vertical corrugated tube are experimentally investigated. The double tube test sections are 0.5 m long with refrigerant flowing in the inner tube and heating water flowing in the annulus. The inner tubes are one smooth tube and two corrugated tubes, which are constructed from smooth copper tube of 8.7 mm inner diameter. The test runs are performed at evaporating temperatures of 10, 15, and 20 C, heat fluxes of 20, 25, and 30 kW/m{sup 2}, and mass fluxes of 200, 300, and 400 kg/m{sup 2} s. The quality of the refrigerant in the test section is calculated using the temperature and pressure obtained from the experiment. The pressure drop across the test section is measured directly by a differential pressure transducer. The effects of heat flux, mass flux, and evaporation temperature on the heat transfer coefficient and two-phase friction factor are also discussed. It is found that the percentage increases of the heat transfer coefficient and the two-phase friction factor of the corrugated tubes compared with those of the smooth tube are approximately 0-10% and 70-140%, respectively. (author)

Aroonrat, Kanit; Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Lab. (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Saturated critical heat flux in a multi-microchannel heat sink fed by a split flow system  

SciTech Connect

An extensive experimental campaign has been carried out for the measurement of saturated critical heat flux in a multi-microchannel copper heat sink. The heat sink was formed by 29 parallel channels that were 199 {mu}m wide and 756 {mu}m deep. In order to increase the critical heat flux and reduce the two-phase pressure drop, a split flow system was implemented with one central inlet at the middle of the channels and two outlets at either end. The base critical heat flux was measured using three HFC Refrigerants (R134a, R236fa and R245fa) for mass fluxes ranging from 250 to 1500 kg/m{sup 2} s, inlet subcoolings from -25 to -5 K and saturation temperatures from 20 to 50 C. The parametric effects of mass velocity, saturation temperature and inlet subcooling were investigated. The analysis showed that significantly higher CHF was obtainable with the split flow system (one inlet-two outlets) compared to the single inlet-single outlet system, providing also a much lower pressure drop. Notably several existing predictive methods matched the experimental data quite well and quantitatively predicted the benefit of higher CHF of the split flow. (author)

Mauro, A.W.; Toto, D. [Department of Energetics, Applied Thermofluidynamics and Air Conditioning Systems, FEDERICO II University, p.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Thome, J.R. [Laboratory of Heat and Mass Transfer (LTCM), Faculty of Engineering (STI), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 9, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland); Vanoli, G.P. [Engineering Department, Sannio University, Corso Garibaldi 107, Palazzo dell'Aquila Bosco Lucarelli, 82100 Benevento (Italy)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

DOE Hanford Network Upgrades and Disaster Recovery Exercise Support the Cleanup Mission Now and into the Future - 14303  

SciTech Connect

In 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Hanford Site, located in Washington State, funded an update to the critical network infrastructure supporting the Hanford Federal Cloud (HFC). The project, called ET-50, was the final step in a plan that was initiated five years ago called ?Hanford?s IT Vision, 2015 and Beyond.? The ET-50 project upgraded Hanford?s core data center switches and routers along with a majority of the distribution layer switches. The upgrades allowed HFC the network intelligence to provide Hanford with a more reliable and resilient network architecture. The culmination of the five year plan improved network intelligence and high performance computing as well as helped to provide 10Gbps capable links between core backbone devices (10 times the previous bandwidth). These improvements allow Hanford the ability to further support bandwidth intense applications, such as video teleconferencing. The ET-50 switch upgrade, along with other upgrades implemented from the five year plan, have prepared Hanford?s network for the next evolution of technology in voice, video, and data. Hand-in-hand with ET-50?s major data center outage, Mission Support Alliance?s (MSA) Information Management (IM) organization executed a disaster recovery (DR) exercise to perform a true integration test and capability study. The DR scope was planned within the constraints of ET-50?s 14 hour datacenter outage window. This DR exercise tested Hanford?s Continuity of Operations (COOP) capability and failover plans for safety and business critical Hanford Federal Cloud applications. The planned suite of services to be tested was identified prior to the outage and plans were prepared to test the services ability to failover from the primary Hanford datacenter to the backup datacenter. The services tested were: ? Core Network (backbone, firewall, load balancers) ? Voicemail, ? Voice over IP (VoIP) ? Emergency Notification ? Virtual desktops and; ? Select set of production applications and data. The primary objective of the exercise was to test COOP around the emergency operations at Hanford to provide information on capabilities and dependencies of the current system to insure improved focus of emergency, safety and security capacity in a disaster situation. The integration of the DR test into the ET-50 project allowed the testing of COOP at Hanford and allowed the lessons learned to be defined. These lessons learned have helped improve the understanding of Hanford?s COOP capabilities and will be critical for future planning. With the completion of the Hanford Federal Cloud network upgrades and the disaster recovery exercise, the MSA has a clearer path forward for future technology implementations as well as network improvements to help shape the usability and reliability of the Hanford network in support of the cleanup mission.

Eckman, Todd J.; Hertzel, Ali K.; Lane, James J.

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Evaluation of design options for improving the energy efficiency of an environmentally safe domestic refrigerator-freezer  

SciTech Connect

In order to reduce greenhouse emissions from power plants and respond to regulatory actions arising from the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA), several design options were investigated for improving the energy efficiency of a conventionally designed, domestic refrigerator-freezer. The options, such as improved cabinet insulation and high-efficiency compressor and fans, were incorporated into a prototype refrigerator-freezer cabinet and refrigeration system to produce a unit that is superior from an environmental viewpoint due to its lower energy consumption and the use of refrigerant HFC-134a as a replacement for CFC-12. Baseline energy performance of the original 1993 production refrigerator-freezer, along with cabinet heat load and compressor calorimeter test results, were extensively documented to provide a firm basis for experimentally measured energy savings. A detailed refrigerator system computer model was used to evaluate the energy savings for several design modifications that, collectively, could achieve a targeted energy consumption of 1.00 kWh/d for a 20 ft{sup 3} (570 l) top-mount, automatic-defrost, refrigerator-freezer. The energy consumption goal represents a 50% reduction in the 1993 NAECA standard for units of this size. Following the modeling simulation, laboratory prototypes were fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the analytical results and aid in improving the model in those areas where discrepancies occurred. While the 1.00 kWh/d goal was not achieved with the modifications, a substantial energy efficiency improvement of 22% (1.41 kWh/d) was demonstrated using near-term technologies. It is noted that each improvement exacts a penalty in terms of increased cost or system complexity/reliability. Further work on this project will analyze cost-effectiveness of the design changes and investigate alternative, more-elaborate, refrigeration system changes to further reduce energy consumption.

Vineyard, E.A.; Sand, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bohman, R.H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Overview of CFC replacement issues for household refrigeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1974, the famous ozone depletion theory of Rowland and Molina claimed that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) diffuse into the stratosphere where they are broken down by photolysis to release chlorine atoms that catalytically destroy ozone. Although the understanding of the science is still imperfect, there is little doubt that CFCs play a major role in the Antarctic ozone hole phenomenon and the decline in ozone observed in the rest of the world. Another issue that has become increasingly important is the potential of CFCs to change the earth's temperature and to modify the climate. While the main impact in global warming is made by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide, CFCs and other trace gases also contribute to this effect. In an effort to respond to the global environmental threat, a CFC protocol was adopted during a diplomatic conference in Montreal. This document, known as the Montreal Protocol, was ratified in 1988 and put into effect on January 1, 1989. In accordance with Article 6 of the Montreal Protocol, the countries that signed the agreement shall periodically assess the control measures provided for in the Protocol. As part of that assessment process, household refrigeration was investigated to determine the status of CFC-12 replacements. The conclusion was that much progress has been made towards finding a suitable replacement. Compressors designed for HFC-134a have efficiencies comparable to those for CFC-12 and acceptable reliability tests have been obtained with ester lubricants. In addition, other replacements such as R-152a and refrigerant mixtures exist, but will require more study. Cycle options, such as the Stirling cycle, may be viable, but are further out in the future. The impact of new refrigerants is expected to result in elimination of CFC-12 consumption in developed countries by 1997 and in developing countries by 2005.

Vineyard, E.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Roke, L. (Fisher and Paykel, Auckland (New Zealand)); Hallett, F. (Frigidaire, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Overview of CFC replacement issues for household refrigeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1974, the famous ozone depletion theory of Rowland and Molina claimed that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) diffuse into the stratosphere where they are broken down by photolysis to release chlorine atoms that catalytically destroy ozone. Although the understanding of the science is still imperfect, there is little doubt that CFCs play a major role in the Antarctic ozone hole phenomenon and the decline in ozone observed in the rest of the world. Another issue that has become increasingly important is the potential of CFCs to change the earth`s temperature and to modify the climate. While the main impact in global warming is made by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide, CFCs and other trace gases also contribute to this effect. In an effort to respond to the global environmental threat, a CFC protocol was adopted during a diplomatic conference in Montreal. This document, known as the Montreal Protocol, was ratified in 1988 and put into effect on January 1, 1989. In accordance with Article 6 of the Montreal Protocol, the countries that signed the agreement shall periodically assess the control measures provided for in the Protocol. As part of that assessment process, household refrigeration was investigated to determine the status of CFC-12 replacements. The conclusion was that much progress has been made towards finding a suitable replacement. Compressors designed for HFC-134a have efficiencies comparable to those for CFC-12 and acceptable reliability tests have been obtained with ester lubricants. In addition, other replacements such as R-152a and refrigerant mixtures exist, but will require more study. Cycle options, such as the Stirling cycle, may be viable, but are further out in the future. The impact of new refrigerants is expected to result in elimination of CFC-12 consumption in developed countries by 1997 and in developing countries by 2005.

Vineyard, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Roke, L. [Fisher and Paykel, Auckland (New Zealand); Hallett, F. [Frigidaire, Washington, DC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable transportation energy capable system. The prime energy for this project comes from an agreement with a wind turbine operator.

Garabedian, Harold T.

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Properties and Cycle Performance of Refrigerant Blends Operating Near and Above the Refrigerant Critical Point, Task 2: Air Conditioner System Study  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this project was to investigate and compare the performance of an R410A air conditioner to that of an R22 air conditioner, with specific interest in performance at high ambient temperatures at which the condenser of the R410A system may be operating above the refrigerant's critical point. Part 1 of this project consisted of conducting comprehensive measurements of thermophysical for refrigerant R125 and refrigerant blends R410A and R507A and developing new equation of state formulations and mixture models for predicting thermophysical properties of HFC refrigerant blends. Part 2 of this project conducted performance measurements of split-system, 3-ton R22 and R410A residential air conditioners in the 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C) outdoor temperature range and development of a system performance model. The performance data was used in preparing a beta version of EVAP-COND, a windows-based simulation package for predicting performance of finned-tube evaporators and condensers. The modeling portion of this project also included the formulation of a model for an air-conditioner equipped with a thermal expansion valve (TXV). Capacity and energy efficiency ratio (EER) were measured and compared. The R22 system's performance was measured over the outdoor ambient temperature range of 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C). The same test range was planned for the R410A system. However, the compressor's safety system cut off the compressor at the 135.0 F (57.2 C) test temperature. The highest measurement on this system was at 130.0 F (54.4 C). Subsequently, a custom-manufactured R410A compressor with a disabled safety system and a more powerful motor was installed and performance was measured at outdoor temperatures up to 155.0 F (68.3 C). Both systems had similar capacity and EER performance at 82.0 F (27.8 C). The capacity and EER degradation of both systems were nearly linearly dependent with rising ambient outdoor ambient test temperatures. The performance degradation of R410A at higher temperatures was greater than R22. However, the R22 and R410A systems both operated normally during all tests. Visual observations of the R410A system provided no indication of vibrations or TXV hunting at high ambient outdoor test conditions with the compressor operating in the transcritical regime.

Piotr A. Domanski; W. Vance Payne

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

High Technology Centrifugal Compressor for Commercial Air Conditioning Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R&D Dynamics, Bloomfield, CT in partnership with the State of Connecticut has been developing a high technology, oil-free, energy-efficient centrifugal compressor called CENVA for commercial air conditioning systems under a program funded by the US Department of Energy. The CENVA compressor applies the foil bearing technology used in all modern aircraft, civil and military, air conditioning systems. The CENVA compressor will enhance the efficiency of water and air cooled chillers, packaged roof top units, and other air conditioning systems by providing an 18% reduction in energy consumption in the unit capacity range of 25 to 350 tons of refrigeration The technical approach for CENVA involved the design and development of a high-speed, oil-free foil gas bearing-supported two-stage centrifugal compressor, CENVA encompassed the following high technologies, which are not currently utilized in commercial air conditioning systems: Foil gas bearings operating in HFC-134a; Efficient centrifugal impellers and diffusers; High speed motors and drives; and System integration of above technologies. Extensive design, development and testing efforts were carried out. Significant accomplishments achieved under this program are: (1) A total of 26 builds and over 200 tests were successfully completed with successively improved designs; (2) Use of foil gas bearings in refrigerant R134a was successfully proven; (3) A high speed, high power permanent magnet motor was developed; (4) An encoder was used for signal feedback between motor and controller. Due to temperature limitations of the encoder, the compressor could not operate at higher speed and in turn at higher pressure. In order to alleviate this problem a unique sensorless controller was developed; (5) This controller has successfully been tested as stand alone; however, it has not yet been integrated and tested as a system; (6) The compressor successfully operated at water cooled condensing temperatures Due to temperature limitations of the encoder, it could not be operated at air cooled condensing temperatures. (7) The two-stage impellers/diffusers worked well separately but combined did not match well.

Ruckes, John

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Properties and Cycle Performance of Refrigerant Blends Operating Near and Above the Refrigerant Critical Point, Task 2: Air Conditioner System Study  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this project was to investigate and compare the performance of an R410A air conditioner to that of an R22 air conditioner, with specific interest in performance at high ambient temperatures at which the condenser of the R410A system may be operating above the refrigerant's critical point. Part 1 of this project consisted of conducting comprehensive measurements of thermophysical for refrigerant R125 and refrigerant blends R410A and R507A and developing new equation of state formulations and mixture models for predicting thermophysical properties of HFC refrigerant blends. Part 2 of this project conducted performance measurements of split-system, 3-ton R22 and R410A residential air conditioners in the 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C) outdoor temperature range and development of a system performance model. The performance data was used in preparing a beta version of EVAP-COND, a windows-based simulation package for predicting performance of finned-tube evaporators and condensers. The modeling portion of this project also included the formulation of a model for an air-conditioner equipped with a thermal expansion valve (TXV). Capacity and energy efficiency ratio (EER) were measured and compared. The R22 system's performance was measured over the outdoor ambient temperature range of 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C). The same test range was planned for the R410A system. However, the compressor's safety system cut off the compressor at the 135.0 F (57.2 C) test temperature. The highest measurement on this system was at 130.0 F (54.4 C). Subsequently, a custom-manufactured R410A compressor with a disabled safety system and a more powerful motor was installed and performance was measured at outdoor temperatures up to 155.0 F (68.3 C). Both systems had similar capacity and EER performance at 82.0 F (27.8 C). The capacity and EER degradation of both systems were nearly linearly dependent with rising ambient outdoor ambient test temperatures. The performance degradation of R410A at higher temperatures was greater than R22. However, the R22 and R410A systems both operated normally during all tests. Visual observations of the R410A system provided no indication of vibrations or TXV hunting at high ambient outdoor test conditions with the compressor operating in the transcritical regime.

Piotr A. Domanski; W. Vance Payne

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump for Near-Zero Energy Houses: Technology Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy service needs of a net-zero-energy house (ZEH) include space heating and cooling, water heating, ventilation, dehumidification, and humidification, depending on the requirements of the specific location. These requirements differ in significant ways from those of current housing. For instance, the most recent DOE buildings energy data (DOE/BED 2007) indicate that on average {approx}43% of residential buildings primary energy use is for space heating and cooling, vs. {approx}12% for water heating (about a 3.6:1 ratio). In contrast, for the particular prototype ZEH structures used in the analyses in this report, that ratio ranges from about 0.3:1 to 1.6:1 depending on location. The high-performance envelope of a ZEH results in much lower space heating and cooling loads relative to current housing and also makes the house sufficiently air-tight to require mechanical ventilation for indoor air quality. These envelope characteristics mean that the space conditioning load will be closer in size to the water heating load, which depends on occupant behavior and thus is not expected to drop by any significant amount because of an improved envelope. In some locations such as the Gulf Coast area, additional dehumidification will almost certainly be required during the shoulder and cooling seasons. In locales with heavy space heating needs, supplemental humidification may be needed because of health concerns or may be desired for improved occupant comfort. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that achieving their ZEH goal will require energy service equipment that can meet these needs while using 50% less energy than current equipment. One promising approach to meeting this requirement is through an integrated heat pump (IHP) - a single system based on heat pumping technology. The energy benefits of an IHP stem from the ability to utilize otherwise wasted energy; for example, heat rejected by the space cooling operation can be used for water heating. With the greater energy savings the cost of the more energy efficient components required for the IHP can be recovered more quickly than if they were applied to individual pieces of equipment to meet each individual energy service need. An IHP can be designed to use either outdoor air or geothermal resources (e.g., ground, ground water, surface water) as the environmental energy source/sink. Based on a scoping study of a wide variety of possible approaches to meeting the energy service needs for a ZEH, DOE selected the IHP concept as the most promising and has supported research directed toward the development of both air- and ground-source versions. This report describes the ground-source IHP (GS-IHP) design and includes the lessons learned and best practices revealed by the research and development (R&D) effort throughout. Salient features of the GS-IHP include a variable-speed rotary compressor incorporating a brushless direct current permanent magnet motor which provides all refrigerant compression, a variable-speed fan for the indoor section, a multiple-speed ground coil circuit pump, and a single-speed pump for water heating operation. Laboratory IHP testing has thus far used R-22 because of the availability of the needed components that use this refrigerant. It is expected that HFC R-410A will be used for any products arising from the IHP concept. Data for a variable-speed compressor that uses R-410A has been incorporated into the DOE/ORNL Mark VI Heat Pump Design Model (HPDM). HPDM was then linked to TRNSYS, a time-series-dependent simulation model capable of determining the energy use of building cooling and heating equipment as applied to a defined house on a sub-hourly basis. This provided a highly flexible design analysis capability for advanced heat pump equipment; however, the program also took a relatively long time to run. This approach was used with the initial prototype design reported in Murphy et al. (2007a) and in the business case analysis of Baxter (2007).

Murphy, Richard W [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Craddick, William G [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z