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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-induced health hazards Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health hazards Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arsenic-induced health hazards Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON...

2

TOLERANCE OF HEAVY METALS IN VASCULAR PLANTS: ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATIONBY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the roots take up colossal amounts of a toxic metal from soils and rapidly sequester into their above-ground water contributed to countless cases of chronic arsenic poisoning in countries such as Chile, Argentina to both humans and animals, remediation of arsenic-contaminatedsites has become absolute priority

Ma, Lena

3

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic beryllium cadmium Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLAC-I-760-2A08Z-001-R002 HAZARDOUS WASTE DETERMINATION FORM Summary: : PCB Content: Metal Content: Antimony* Arsenic Barium Beryllium* Cadmium Source:...

4

Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Arsenic speciation in multiple metal environments: II. Micro-spectroscopic investigation of a CCA contaminated soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The speciation of arsenic (As) in a copper-chromated-arsenate (CCA) contaminated soil was investigated using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence ( ? XRF ) and micro-focused X-ray absorption fine structure ( ? XAFS ) spectroscopies to determine if and how the co-contaminating metal cations (Cu, Zn, Cr) influenced the speciation of As. 15 ? XRF images were collected on 30-?m polished thin sections and powder-on-tape samples from which Pearson correlation coefficients ( ? ) between As and various metal species were determined based on the fluorescence intensity of each element in each image pixel. 29 ? XAFS and two bulk-XAFS spectra were collected from depths of 0–20 cm (LM-A) and 20–40 cm (LM-B) to determine the chemical speciation of As in the soil by target analyses of principal components with circa 52 reference spectra and linear least-square combination fitting of individual experimental spectra with a refined reference phase list (32) of likely As species. Arsenic and metal cations (Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn) accumulated in distinct, isolated areas often not larger than 50 × 50 ?m in which the Pearson correlation between the elements was strongly positive ( ? > 0.75 ) . The correlation of As to Zn and Cr decreased from >0.9 to 0.8 with depth. Arsenic occurred predominantly in the +5 oxidation state. Abstract factor analysis and linear least square combination fit analysis suggested that As occurred as a continuum of fully and poorly-ordered copper-arsenate precipitates with additional components being characterized by surface adsorption complexes on goethite and gibbsite in the presence and absence of Zn. Precipitates other than copper-based ones, e.g., scorodite, adamite and ojuelaite were also identified. The significant co-localization and chemical speciation of As with Cu suggest that the speciation of As in a contaminated soils is not solely controlled by surface adsorption reactions, but significantly influenced by the co-contaminating metal cation fraction. Future studies into As contaminated soil therefore need to focus on identifying the speciation of As and the co-localizing metal cations.

Markus Gräfe; Ryan V. Tappero; Matthew A. Marcus; Donald L. Sparks

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Application of metal oxide heterostructures in arsenic removal from contaminated water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has become one of the major environmental problems for people worldwide to be exposed to high arsenic concentrations through contaminated drinking water, and even the long-term intake of small doses of arsenic has a carcinogenic effect. As an efficient ...

Lei Chen, Hongchuan Xin, Yuan Fang, Cong Zhang, Feng Zhang, Xing Cao, Chunhui Zhang, Xuebing Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

James T. Cobb, Jr.

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

9

Arsenic in shrimp from Kuwait  

SciTech Connect

Arsenic is ubiquitous in the environment and can accumulate in food via contaminated soil, water or air. It enters the food chain through dry and wet atmospheric deposition. Combustion of oil and coal, use of arsenical fertilizers and pesticides and smelting of ores contributes significantly to the natural background of arsenic in soils and sediments. The metal can be transferred from soil to man through plants. In spite of variation in acute, subacute, and chronic toxic effects to plants and animals, evidence of nutritional essentiality of arsenic for rats, goats, and guinea pigs has been suggested, but has not been confirmed for humans. Adverse toxic effects of arsenic as well as its widespread distribution in the environment raises concern about levels of arsenic in man`s diet. Higher levels of arsenic in the diet can result in a higher accumulation rate. Arsenic levels in marine organisms are influenced by species differences, size of organism, and human activities. Bottom dwellers such as shrimp, crab, and lobster accumulate more arsenic than fish due to their frequent contact with bottom sediments. Shrimp constitute approximately 30% of mean total seafood consumption in Kuwait. This study was designed to determine the accumulation of arsenic in the commercially important jinga shrimp (Metapenaeus affinis) and grooved tiger prawn (Penaeus semisulcatus). 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Bou-Olayan, A.H. [Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait); Al-Yakoob, S.; Al-Hossaini, M. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

It's Elemental - The Element Arsenic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germanium Germanium Previous Element (Germanium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Selenium) Selenium The Element Arsenic [Click for Isotope Data] 33 As Arsenic 74.92160 Atomic Number: 33 Atomic Weight: 74.92160 Melting Point: 1090 K (817°C or 1503°F) Boiling Point: 887 K (614°C or 1137°F) Density: 5.776 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Latin word arsenicum, the Greek word arsenikon and the Arabic word Az-zernikh. Say what? Arsenic is pronounced as AR-s'n-ik. History and Uses: Although arsenic compounds were mined by the early Chinese, Greek and Egyptian civilizations, it is believed that arsenic itself was first identified by Albertus Magnus, a German alchemist, in 1250. Arsenic occurs

11

Clean process to destroy arsenic-containing organic compounds with recovery of arsenic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reduction method is provided for the treatment of arsenic-containing organic compounds with simultaneous recovery of pure arsenic. Arsenic-containing organic compounds include pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents such as Lewisite. The arsenic-containing compound is decomposed using a reducing agent. Arsine gas may be formed directly by using a hydrogen-rich reducing agent, or a metal arsenide may be formed using a pure metal reducing agent. In the latter case, the arsenide is reacted with an acid to form arsine gas. In either case, the arsine gas is then reduced to elemental arsenic. 1 fig.

Upadhye, R.S.; Wang, F.T.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

Water extraction kinetics of metals, arsenic and dissolved organic carbon from industrial contaminated poplar leaves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In industrial areas, tree leaves contaminated by metals and metalloids could constitute a secondary source of pollutants. In the present study, water extraction kinetics of inorganic elements (IE: Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Fe and Mn), dissolved organic carbon, pH and biological activity were studied for industrial contaminated poplar leaves. Moreover, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the associated top soil was measured. High quantities of Mn, Zn and As and polysaccharides were released in the solution from the strongly contaminated leaves. The kinetic of release varied with time and metal type. The solution pH decreased while dissolved organic contents increased with time after 30 days. Therefore, these contaminated leaves could constitute a source of more available organic metals and metalloids than the initial inorganic process particles. However, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the top soil suggested that a great part of the released IE was adsorbed, reducing in consequence their transfers and bioavailability. It's concluded that mobility/bioavailability and speciation of metals and metalloids released from the decomposition of polluted tree leaves depends on soil characteristics, pollutant type and litter composition, with consequences for environmental risk assessment.

Muhammad Shahid; Tiantian Xiong; Maryse Castrec-Rouelle; Tibo Leveque; Camille Dumat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mercury, cadmium, lead and arsenic levels in three pelagic fish species from the Atlantic Ocean: Intra- and inter-specific variability and human health risks for consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three commonly consumed and commercially valuable fish species (sardine, chub and horse mackerel) were collected from the Northeast and Eastern Central Atlantic Ocean in Portuguese waters during one year. Mercury, cadmium, lead and arsenic amounts were determined in muscles using graphite furnace and cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. Maximum mean levels of mercury (0.1715 ± 0.0857 mg/kg, ww) and arsenic (1.139 ± 0.350 mg/kg, ww) were detected in horse mackerel. The higher mean amounts of cadmium (0.0084 ± 0.0036 mg/kg, ww) and lead (0.0379 ± 0.0303 mg/kg, ww) were determined in chub mackerel and in sardine, respectively. Intra- and inter-specific variability of metals bioaccumulation was statistically assessed and species and length revealed to be the major influencing biometric factors, in particular for mercury and arsenic. Muscles present metal concentrations below the tolerable limits considered by European Commission Regulation and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO). However, estimation of non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks by the target hazard quotient and target carcinogenic risk, established by the US Environmental Protection Agency, suggests that these species must be eaten in moderation due to possible hazard and carcinogenic risks derived from arsenic (in all analyzed species) and mercury ingestion (in horse and chub mackerel species).

C. Vieira; S. Morais; S. Ramos; C. Delerue-Matos; M.B.P.P. Oliveira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Title Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6221E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Amrose, Susan, Ashok J. Gadgil, Venkat Srinivasan, Kristin Kowolik, Marc Muller, Jessica Huang, and Robert Kostecki Journal Joournal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering Volume 48 Issue 9 Pagination 1019-1030 Date Published 04/2013 Keywords arsenic, bangladesh, Cambodia, dosage rate, electrocoagulation, india, water treatment Abstract We demonstrate that electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes can reduce arsenic below 10 μg/L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater and in real groundwater from Bangladesh and Cambodia while investigating the effect of operating parameters that are often overlooked, such as charge dosage rate. We measure arsenic removal performance

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic induces apoptosis Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactive oxygen species formation... , Jenssen D (2000) Arsenic (III) and heavy metal ions induce intrachromosomal ... Source: Ma, Lena - Soil and Water Science Department,...

16

EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES RECYCLING PROGRAM Empty Chemical Bottles Recycling includes all glass, plastic and metal bottles and containers that previously  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, plastic and metal bottles and containers that previously contained hazardous or non-hazardous chemicals

Baker, Chris I.

17

Macroscopic and spectroscopic investigation of interactions of arsenic with synthesized pyrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sulfide minerals have been suggested to play an important role in regulating dissolved metal concentrations in anoxic environments. Pyrite is the most common sulfide mineral and it has shown an affinity for arsenic, but little is known about...

Kim, Eun Jung

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Arsenic Epidemiology and Drinking Water Standards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...occurrences of arsenic in ground water." Dictionaries and...History, Study and Remediation is an Arsenic Project...also provided. The Ground Water and Drinking Water Division...resource page on arsenic in ground water of the United States...

Allan H. Smith; Peggy A. Lopipero; Michael N. Bates; Craig M. Steinmaus

2002-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

20

Replacement of lead-loaded glovebox glove with attenuation medium that are not RCRA-hazardous metals  

SciTech Connect

Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through the use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Radiation shielding is commonly used to protect the glovebox worker from unintentional direct and secondary radiation exposure, while working with plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. In these environments, low-energy photons, i.e., those less than 250 keY, are encountered. Shielding glove box gloves are traditionally composed of lead-based materials, but these are now considered hazardous waste. This has prompted the development of new, nonhazardous- shielding gJovebox gloves. No studies, however, have investigated the effectiveness of these new glovebox gloves. We examined both leaded and nonhazardous- shielding glovebox gloves and compared their attenuation effectiveness over the energy range of interest at TA-55. All measurements are referenced to lead sheets, allowing direct comparisons to the common industry standard of 0.1 mm lead equivalent material. The attenuation properties of both types of glovebox gloves vary with energy, making it difficult for manufacturers to claim lead equivalency across the entire energy range used at TA-55. The positions of materials' photon energy absorption edges, which are particularly important to improved attenuation performance, depending upon the choice of radiation energy range, are discussed. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations.

Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; George, Gerald L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dodge, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chunglo, Steve [CANBERRA INDUSTRIES

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electrical hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and certification by ANL prior to use. The Control of Hazardous Energy Sources - LockoutTagout (LOTO) Types of Energy Sources 1. Electricity 2. Gas, steam & pressurized...

22

Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water  

SciTech Connect

See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention in one aspect comprises a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous-derived liquids by contacting said liquid with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene polymer (i.e. PS-DVB) having catechol ligands anchored to said polymer, said contacting being at an elevated temperature. In another aspect, the invention is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene polymer by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid in accordance with the aspect described above which regenerating process comprises: (a) treating said spent catecholated polystyrene polymer with an aqueous solution of at least one member selected from the group consisting of carbonates and bicarbonates of ammonium, alkali metals, and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10, and said treating being at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C; (b) separating the solids and liquids from each other. In a preferred embodiment the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step: (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution which includes at least one lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (c) and (d) are added. Steps (c) and (d) comprise: (c) treating the solids with an aqueous alcoholic solution of at least one ammonium, alkali or alkaline earth metal bicarbonate at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100/sup 0/C; and (d) separating the solids from the liquids.

Fish, R.H.

1984-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

25

Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including industrial and commercial facilities; 7 per- cent of these wells were unused. High arsenic con- centrations that are believed to be naturally occurring have been found in the southern High Plains (Ogallala aquifer), in several West Texas counties... treatment system will remove, its maintenance requirements and its costs. Treatment systems certified by an independent agency such as the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) usually effectively live up to manufacturer?s claims. After well owners install a...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short. 2 figures.

Phillips, D.R.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

28

Geochemistry of arsenic and metals in stored tailings of a Co–Ni arsenide-ore, Khovu-Aksy area, Russia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interest in the redistribution of As-bearing species during long-term storage of hydrometallurgical tailings is motivated partly by the need to prevent As from being released into the environment. The speciation of As in mine wastes from the Tuva Cobalt Plant (Khovu-Aksy mine site, Tuva Republic, Russia) has been studied using mineralogical techniques, and chemical analyses of solids (tailings, soils, vegetation) and solutions (recovered pore waters, leach solutions). Ore at the plant was processed by hot autoclave leaching with an ammoniacal carbonate solution followed by treatment with CO2(gas) and caustic magnesite, MgO. Pronounced differences in element concentrations were measured in the five separate tailings ponds and one trench that were filled sequentially during operation of the plant. The concentration of each element was relatively uniform within each pond but the correlations among solid-phase Co, Ni, Zn and Cu gradually decrease from the most recent to oldest ponds as does the correlation between solid-phase As, Ag, Cd and Pb. In the oldest ponds, significant correlations are present between solid-phase Fe–As, Fe–Sb and Fe–Zn. High carbonate content in the ores and leaching reagents control the pH of the pore waters (pH = 7.27–9.10) where the major cation is Ca2+, followed by NH 4 + and Mg2+. Concentrations of As in pore solutions reach up to 140 mg L?1, and average 15 mg L?1. The high pore-water As concentrations are a consequence of instability of the processing residues, which include Mg(NH4)AsO4?nH2O and Mg3(AsO4)2?nH2O. The concentrations of Zn, Cu and As in pore waters increase from the youngest pond to the oldest storage impoundment (trench), which is evidence of the increase in element mobility with time. In contrast to the metals, As is preferentially sorbed to Fe oxides formed in the tailings. Aerosol transport of dust from the dry ponds has produced anomalies of As and metals in the surrounding area with As in the most polluted soils reaching up to 540 ppm. Moreover, vegetation growing on the surface of the disposal ponds absorbs solutes from the soil.

S. Bortnikova; E. Bessonova; O. Gaskova

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Arsenic species in soil solution and plant uptake of arsenic under flooded conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCIION OBJECTIVES . LITERATURE REVIEW. Sources of Arsenic in the Environment. Stability of Arsenic Microbial Methylation and Volatilization of Arsenic, Adsorption/Desorption/Displacement Mobility of Arsenic. MATERIALS AND METHODS . Soil... biologically to methylated species. Soil adsorption, plant uptake, leaching, transport via erosion, and reduction to arsines are all possible pathways in the natural As cycle. Arsenic, a multivalent element, has valence states of 0, 3 and 5. Arsenic in the 0...

Onken, Blake Morgan

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Portable sensor for hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

Objective was to develop a field-portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection using active nitrogen energy transfer (ANET) excitation of atomic and molecular fluorescence (active nitrogen is made in a dielectric-barrier discharge in nitrogen). It should provide rapid field screening of hazardous waste sites to map areas of greatest contamination. Results indicate that ANET is very sensitive for monitoring heavy metals (Hg, Se) and hydrocarbons; furthermore, chlorinated hydrocarbons can be distinguished from nonchlorinated ones. Sensitivity is at ppB levels for sampling in air. ANET appears ideal for on-line monitoring of toxic heavy metal levels at building sites, hazardous waste land fills, in combustor flues, and of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels at building sites and hazardous waste dumps.

Piper, L.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Application of colloidal gas aphron suspensions produced from Sapindus mukorossi for arsenic removal from contaminated soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Colloidal gas aphron dispersions (CGAs) can be described as a system of microbubbles suspended homogenously in a liquid matrix. This work examines the performance of \\{CGAs\\} in comparison to surfactant solutions for washing low levels of arsenic from an iron rich soil. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and saponin, a biodegradable surfactant, obtained from Sapindus mukorossi or soapnut fruit were used for generating \\{CGAs\\} and solutions for soil washing. Column washing experiments were performed in down-flow and up flow modes at a soil pH of 5 and 6 using varying concentration of SDS and soapnut solutions as well as CGAs. Soapnut \\{CGAs\\} removed more than 70% arsenic while SDS \\{CGAs\\} removed up to 55% arsenic from the soil columns in the soil pH range of 5–6. \\{CGAs\\} and solutions showed comparable performances in all the cases. \\{CGAs\\} were more economical since it contains 35% of air by volume, thereby requiring less surfactant. Micellar solubilization and low pH of soapnut facilitated arsenic desorption from soil column. FT-IR analysis of effluent suggested that soapnut solution did not interact chemically with arsenic thereby facilitating the recovery of soapnut solution by precipitating the arsenic. Damage to soil was minimal arsenic confirmed by metal dissolution from soil surface and SEM micrograph.

Soumyadeep Mukhopadhyay; Sumona Mukherjee; Mohd. Ali Hashim; Bhaskar Sen Gupta

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

de Haas-van Alphen Effect in Arsenic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The de Haas-van Alphen effect has been studied in single crystals of rhombohedral (metallic) arsenic in the liquid helium temperature range and in magnetic fields up to 25 kilogauss. The effect in arsenic is characterized by long-period (up to ?4×10-5 gauss-1) oscillations upon which are superposed three short period (up to ?6×10-7 gauss-1) terms. Analysis in terms of existing theory attributes the long-period oscillations to electrons occupying a constant energy surface in momentum or wave-number space which to a first approximation is an ellipsoid of revolution with a degeneracy energy E0l=1.59×10-14 erg. The pertinent electrons in the case of the short-period oscillations can be attributed to three identical ellipsoidal constant-energy surfaces oriented so as to satisfy the trigonal symmetry of the arsenic lattice and having a degeneracy energy E0s=29.4×10-14 erg. In addition, the electronic effective masses have been evaluated.A method for growing arsenic single crystals is described.

Ted G. Berlincourt

1955-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72.

Phillips, D.R.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Arsenic in your water?: Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic in water?your tx H2O | pg. 27 Story by Kathy Wythe Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic In several ?hot spots? across the United States people may be drinking water with high levels of naturally... occurring arsenic without understanding the associated risks, according to agricultural economists. ?Many households in arsenic ?hot spots? are in fact being exposed to harmful doses of arsenic,? said Dr. Douglass Shaw, professor of agricultural...

Wythe, Kathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Arsenic in human history and modern societies  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 5 contains a section titled: Arsenic in coal and oil shale utilization and their by-products.

Kevin R. Henke; David A. Atwood [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Surface characterizatin of palladium-alumina sorbents for high-temperature capture of mercury and arsenic from fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

Coal gasification with subsequent cleanup of the resulting fuel gas is a way to reduce the impact of mercury and arsenic in the environment during power generation and on downstream catalytic processes in chemical production, The interactions of mercury and arsenic with PdlAl2D3 model thin film sorbents and PdlAh03 powders have been studied to determine the relative affinities of palladium for mercury and arsenic, and how they are affected by temperature and the presence of hydrogen sulfide in the fuel gas. The implications of the results on strategies for capturing the toxic metals using a sorbent bed are discussed.

Baltrus, J.P.; Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Stanko, D.; Hamilton, H.; Rowsell, L.; Poulston, S.; Smith, A.; Chu, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Removal of arsenic compounds from spent catecholated polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Biological monitoring of arsenic exposure of gallium arsenide- and inorganic arsenic-exposed workers by determination of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites in urine and hair  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to establish a method for biological monitoring of inorganic arsenic exposure, the chemical species of arsenic were measured in the urine and hair of gallium arsenide (GaAs) plant and copper smelter workers. Determination of urinary inorganic arsenic concentration proved sensitive enough to monitor the low-level inorganic arsenic exposure of the GaAs plant workers. The urinary inorganic arsenic concentration in the copper smelter workers was far higher than that of a control group and was associated with high urinary concentrations of the inorganic arsenic metabolites, methylarsonic acid (MAA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA). The results established a method for exposure level-dependent biological monitoring of inorganic arsenic exposure. Low-level exposures could be monitored only by determining urinary inorganic arsenic concentration. High-level exposures clearly produced an increased urinary inorganic arsenic concentration, with an increased sum of urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites (inorganic arsenic + MAA + DMAA). The determination of urinary arsenobetaine proved to determine specifically the seafood-derived arsenic, allowing this arsenic to be distinguished clearly from the arsenic from occupational exposure. Monitoring arsenic exposure by determining the arsenic in the hair appeared to be of value only when used for environmental monitoring of arsenic contamination rather than for biological monitoring.

Yamauchi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Mashiko, M.; Yamamura, Y. (St. Marianna Univ. School of Medicine, Kawasaki (Japan))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 . Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 ....

40

Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM); Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumhansl, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Chwirka, Joseph D. (Tijeras, NM)

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic Release from Shallow Sediments to Groundwaters of the Mekong Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving...

43

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

44

Ferrihydrite as an Enterosorbent for Arsenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic in drinking water is a problem in many developing nations such as Taiwan and Bangladesh. Currently, no oral binding agent exists for the mitigation of arsenic toxicity. The goals of this research were to 1) screen a variety of sorbents...

Taylor, John Floyd

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

The effect of variable environmental arsenic contamination on urinary concentrations of arsenic species  

SciTech Connect

Urinary arsenic species have been determined for approximately 3,000 urine samples obtained from residents of a community surrounding an arsenic-emitting copper smelter. Levels of inorganic, monomethylated and dimethylated arsenic species ranged from less than 1 {mu}g/L (the instrumental detection limit) to 180 {mu}g/L seen for dimethyl arsenic. Comparison of a subsample of this population that had the least environmental contamination with the subsample having highest environmental arsenic concentrations showed small but statistically significant differences in urinary arsenic levels for all species except dimethylated arsenic. However, for children under 7 years of age living in areas with increased environmental arsenic contamination, there was a larger and equally significant increase in all urinary species. This effect was more pronounced and was observed as a weaker effect in the next higher age group (7-13 years of age). Reported consumption of seafood also was significantly related to increased urinary dimethyl arsenic, but changes in distribution among the urinary arsenic species detected was not a sensitive indicator of recent seafood consumption.

Kalman, D.A.; Hughes, J.; van Belle, G.; Mottet, N.K.; Polissar, L. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA)); Bolgiano, D. (Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Coble, K. (Tacoma-Pierce County Health Dept., WA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A review on environmental factors regulating arsenic methylation in humans  

SciTech Connect

Subjects exposed to arsenic show significant inter-individual variation in urinary patterns of arsenic metabolites but insignificant day-to-day intra-individual variation. The inter-individual variation in arsenic methylation can be partly responsible for the variation in susceptibility to arsenic toxicity. Wide inter-ethnic variation and family correlation in urinary arsenic profile suggest a genetic effect on arsenic metabolism. In this paper the environmental factors affecting arsenic metabolism are reviewed. Methylation capacity might reduce with increasing dosage of arsenic exposure. Furthermore, women, especially at pregnancy, have better methylation capacity than their men counterparts, probably due to the effect of estrogen. Children might have better methylation capacity than adults and age shows inconsistent relevance in adults. Smoking and alcohol consumption might be associated with a poorer methylation capacity. Nutritional status is important in the methylation capacity and folate may facilitate the methylation and excretion of arsenic. Besides, general health conditions and medications might influence the arsenic methylation capacity; and technical problems can cause biased estimates. The consumption of seafood, seaweed, rice and other food with high arsenic contents and the extent of cooking and arsenic-containing water used in food preparation may also interfere with the presentation of the urinary arsenic profile. Future studies are necessary to clarify the effects of the various arsenic metabolites including the trivalent methylated forms on the development of arsenic-induced human diseases with the consideration of the effects of confounding factors and the interactions with other effect modifiers.

Tseng, C.-H. [National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Development, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin, Taiwan (China); School of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine of the National Health Research Institutes, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: ccktsh@ms6.hinet.net

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hazard Analysis Database report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

48

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals ACETALDEHYDE ACETAMIDE ACETIC ACID ACETIC ANHYDRIDE ACETONE ACETONItr ILE ACETYLAMINOFLUORENE, 2- ACETYLENE ACETYLENE DICHLORIDE ACETYLENE TETRABROMIDE ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID (ASPIRIN) ACROLEIN ACRYLAMIDE ACRYLIC ACID ACRYLONITRILE ACTINOMYCIN D ADRIAMYCIN AFLATOXINS ALDRIN ALLYL ALCOHOL ALLYL CHLORIDE ALLYL GLYCIDYL ETHER (AGE) ALLYL PROPYL DISULFIDE ALUMINA ALUMINUM, METAL DUST, AS AL ALUMINUM, PYRO POWDERS, AS AL ALUMINUM, SOLUBLE SALTS, AS AL ALUMINUM, WELDING FUMES, AS AL ALUMINUM, ALKYLS, NOT OTHERWISE CLASSIFIED, AS AL ALUMINUM OXIDE, AS AL AMINOANTHRAQUINONE (AAQ), AMINOAZOTOLUENE, O- AMINOBIPHENYL, 4- AMINOETHANOL, 2- AMINO-2-METHYLANTHRAQUINONE, 1- AMINO-5-(5-NITRO-2-FURYL)- -1, 3,4-THIADIADIAZOLE, 2- AMINOPYRIDINE, 2- AMINO-1,2,4-TRIAZOLE, 3-

49

Hazardous Materials and Controlled Hazardous Substances (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A permit is required to own, establish, operate, or maintain a facility in the state of Maryland that transfers quantities of a single hazardous material in excess of 100,000 pounds at any time...

50

Ecotoxicology of arsenic in the marine environment  

SciTech Connect

Arsenic has a complex marine biogeochemistry that has important implications for its toxicity to marine organisms and their consumers. The average concentration of total arsenic in the ocean is about 1.7 {micro}g/L, about two orders of magnitude higher than the US Environmental Protection Agency`s human health criterion value of 0.0175 {micro}g/L. The dominant form of arsenic in oxygenated marine and brackish waters in arsenate (As V). The more toxic and potentially carcinogenic arsenite (As III) rarely accounts for more than 20% of total arsenic in seawater. Uncontaminated marine sediments contain from 5 to about 40 {micro}g/g dry weight total arsenic. Arsenate dominates in oxidized sediments and is associated primarily with iron oxyhydroxides. In reducing marine sediments, arsenate is reduced to arsenite and is associated primarily with sulfide minerals. Marine algae accumulate arsenate from seawater, reduce it to arsenite, and then oxidize the arsenite to a large number of organoarsenic compounds. The algae release arsenite, methylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid to seawater. Dissolved arsenite and arsenate are more toxic to marine phytoplankton than to marine invertebrates and fish. This may be due to the fact that marine animals have a limited ability to bioconcentrate inorganic arsenic from seawater but can bioaccumulate organoarsenic compounds from their food. Tissues of marine invertebrates and fish contain high concentrations of arsenic, usually in the range of about 1 to 100 {micro}g/g dry weight, most of it in the form of organoarsenic compounds, particularly arsenobetaine. Organoarsenic compounds are bioaccumulated by human consumers of seafood products, but the arsenic is excreted rapidly, mostly as organoarsenic compounds. Arsenobetaine, the most abundant organoarsenic compound in seafoods, is not toxic or carcinogenic to mammals. Little of the organoarsenic accumulated by humans from seafood is converted to toxic inorganic arsenite.

Neff, J.M. [Battelle Ocean Sciences Lab., Duxbury, MA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Workshop overview: Arsenic research and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The chronic exposure of humans through consumption of high levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs)-contaminated drinking water is associated with skin lesions, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, and cancers. Additionally, humans are exposed to organic arsenicals when used as pesticides and herbicides (e.g., monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) also known as cacodylic acid). Extensive research has been conducted to characterize the adverse health effects that result from exposure to iAs and its metabolites to describe the biological pathway(s) that lead to adverse health effects. To further this effort, on May 31, 2006, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) sponsored a meeting entitled 'Workshop on Arsenic Research and Risk Assessment'. The invited participants from government agencies, academia, independent research organizations and consultants were asked to present their current research. The overall focus of these research efforts has been to determine the potential human health risks due to environmental exposures to arsenicals. Pursuant in these efforts is the elucidation of a mode of action for arsenicals. This paper provides a brief overview of the workshop goals, regulatory context for arsenical research, mode of action (MOA) analysis in human health risk assessment, and the application of MOA analysis for iAs and DMA{sup V}. Subsequent papers within this issue will present the research discussed at the workshop, ensuing discussions, and conclusions of the workshop.

Sams, Reeder [Integrated Risk Information System Program, National Center for Environmental Assessment, MC: B-243 01, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)], E-mail: sams.reeder@epa.gov; Wolf, Douglas C. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Ramasamy, Santhini; Ohanian, Ed [Health and Ecological Criteria Division, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Chen, Jonathan [Antimicrobials Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Lowit, Anna [Health Effects Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

53

In Situ Iron Oxide Emplacement for Groundwater Arsenic Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for additional arsenic removal. Several bench-scale experiments revealed that the resultant IOCS could treat arsenic-laden groundwater for extended periods of time before approaching its effective life cycle. The adsorption capacity for As(III) and As...

Abia, Thomas Sunday

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

54

Natural Remediation Potential of Arsenic-Contaminated Ground Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Migration of leachate from a municipal landfill in Saco, Maine has resulted in arsenic concentrations in ground water as high as 647 ?g/L.... Laboratory experimental data indicate the primary source of arsenic to...

Kenneth G. Stollenwerk; John A. Colman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

56

Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

ORIGINAL PAPER Fractionation and speciation of arsenic in fresh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal waste Á Arsenic Á Species Á HPLC-ICP-MS Á Environmental pollution Introduction Arsenic (As to harm- ful levels in air, water, food, and forage (Blssen and Frimmel 2003; Yudovich and Ketris 2005, such as coal-mining activities, and to understand the fate of arsenic following environmen- tal release

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

58

Arsenic Speciation in Humans and Food Products: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......arsenic (As) is still a dangerous pollution agent for industrial...arsenic (As) is still a dangerous pollution agent for industrial...without any consequence on health, because absorbed arsenic...emitted. Therefore, it is a dangerous pollution agent for industrial......

L. Benramdane; F. Bressolle; J.J. Vallon

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Arsenic in drinking water Increases mortality from cardiovascular disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic in drinking water Increases mortality from cardiovascular disease Allan H Smith professor of inorganic arsenic in drinking water causes cancer of the skin, bladder, lung, liver, and kidney.1 2 Mounting of a link between cardiovascular disease and arsenic in drinking water came in 1980 from Antofagasta, Chile

California at Berkeley, University of

60

Prediction of the thermodynamic properties of gold, arsenic, and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The Hydrothermal Chemistry of Gold, Arsenic, Antimony, Mercury and Silver Brad Bessinger Exponent, Inc. 5335 Meadows Road, Suite 365 Lake Oswego, OR 97035 John A. Apps Earth Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 March 2005 This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Abstract A comprehensive thermodynamic database based on the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state was developed for metal complexes in hydrothermal systems. Because this equation of state has been shown to accurately predict standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ARSENIC UPTAKE BY TWO HYPERACCUMULATOR FERNS FROM FOUR ARSENIC CONTAMINATED SOILS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Cai et al., 2002). Smelting and mining sites are often significant sources Water, Air, and Soil Pollution (2005) 168: 71­89 C Springer 2005 #12;72 A. O. FAYIGA AND L. Q. MA of arsenic contamination

Ma, Lena

62

Residues of lead, cadmium, and arsenic in livers of Mexican free-tailed bats  

SciTech Connect

Since 1936, the size of the summer population of Mexican free-tailed bats, Tadarida brasiliensisat Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico, declined from an estimated 8.7 million to 700,000 in 1991. This decline has been attributed primarily to human disturbance and the heavy agricultural use of organochlorine pesticides. Members of this species forage extensively over heavily agricultural areas, feeding on insects potentially contaminated with high levels of insecticides and trace metals. However, contamination from elements such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic have not been examined. The accumulation of these elements in wild vertebrates is often a primary reflection of contamination of the food supply. The presence of elemental contaminants in body tissues of bats is poorly documented. The objectives of this study were to examine and compare lead, cadmium, and arsenic contamination in livers of adult T. Brasiliensis from Carlsbad Caverns and Vickery Cave, a maternity colony in northwestern Oklahoma. Lead, cadmium, and arsenic were specifically selected because of their documented toxic and/or reproductive effects and their potential availability to this species. Large quantities of tetraethyl lead have been released into the environment and other lead compounds continue to be released by industrial manufacturing and petroleum refinement processes. Cadmium is used in a number of industrial processes such as metal plating and fabrication of alloys and is released from phosphate fertilizers and combusted coals. Teratogenicity appears to be greater for cadmium than for other elements. Arsenical compounds have been commonly used as herbicides and defoliants. These compounds have been demonstrated to cause abnormal embryonic development, degenerative tissue changes, cancer, chromosomal damage, and death in domestic animals.

Thies, M.; Gregory, D. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazards Control Hazards Control 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and environment. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of DOE 450.4-1A Volume 2 Appendix E core expectation #3 (CE II-3). CE II-3: An integrated process has been established and is utilized to develop controls which mitigate the identified hazards present within a facility or activity. The set of controls ensure adequate protection of the public, worker, and the environment and are established as agreed upon by DOE.

64

CHSP: HAZARD CONTROLS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP HAZARD CONTROLS CONTROLS FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS arrow image WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS arrow image CHEMICAL STORAGE GUIDELINES DECOMISSIONING LAB AND SHOP SPACES SPECIFIC CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES arrow image EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND EQUIPMENT arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image spacer image HAZARD CONTROLS This section discusses control procedures for limiting employee exposure to chemical hazards. Technical Areas Technical areas include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas where non-administrative activities are performed. For the purpose of the

65

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

66

WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Wildfires (Jun 02) Recent Declared Disasters in Colorado No Map from FEMA provided #12;National WeatherWEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral

67

Automated Job Hazards Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute arsenic exposure Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chloride 100-44-7) and benzoyl chloride 98-88-4 (combined exposures) IARC-2A Acrolein Acutely... OSHAReproToxin Arsenic 7440-38-2 and arsenic compounds IARC-1 Arsenic...

69

The modeling of arsenic removal from contaminated water using coagulation and sorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To achieve predictive capability for complex environmental systems with coagulation and arsenic sorption, a unified improved coagulation model coupled with arsenic sorption was developed. A unified coagulation model coupled with arsenic sorption...

Kim, Jin-Wook

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Arsenic Leachability in Water Treatment Adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic Leachability in Water Treatment Adsorbents ... The EXAFS results indicate that As forms inner-sphere bidentate binuclear surface complexes on all five adsorbent surfaces. ... Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) was used for the first time to investigate the bonding structures of adsorbed As(V) ... ...

Chuanyong Jing; Suqin Liu; Manish Patel; Xiaoguang Meng

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Colorado Multi-Hazards Mitigation Plan July 2002 the May 2001 Report to the Governor, Colorado Wildland Urban Interface; Section 2 includes the Hazard the status of the Wildland Urban Interface in Colorado; the hazards that exist; mitigation measures

72

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

73

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Method of recovering hazardous waste from phenolic resin filters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the recovery of hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and radioactive elements from phenolic resin filter by a circulating a solution of 8 to 16 molar nitric acid at a temperature of 110 to 190 degrees F. through the filter. The hot solution dissolves the filter material and releases the hazardous material so that it can be recovered or treated for long term storage in an environmentally safe manner.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); McFee, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Burdge, Bradley G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McConnell, Jr., John W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic rich iron Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Processes conducive to the release and transport of arsenic into aquifers of Bangladesh Summary: then by reductive dissolution of iron and arsenic during the ensuing...

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic exposure area Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Collection: Biology and Medicine 12 Unsaturated Zone Arsenic Distribution and Implications for Summary: ). Health risks of chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic in...

77

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic exposure increases Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Columbia University Collection: Geosciences 23 Unsaturated Zone Arsenic Distribution and Implications for Summary: ). Health risks of chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic in...

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic additions Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USING PTERIS VITTATA L... brake fern (Pteris vittata L.), an arsenic hyperaccumulator, on removal of arsenic ... Source: Ma, Lena - Soil and Water Science Department, University of...

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic compounds Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TO DECREASE ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN BANGLADESH Johanna Louise... have invented ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) a material that effectively and affordably... removes high...

80

Distribution of Arsenic in Presque Isle, PA, Pond Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science Candidate,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution of Arsenic in Presque Isle, PA, Pond Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science........................................................................................ 3 Arsenic in Soil & Sediments......................................................................................... 12 Sediment Digestion and Analysis

Short, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic methylation profiles Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: , urinary arsenic methylation profiles, and urothelial carcinoma susceptibility. Food Chem. Toxicol. 46, 929... and in vitro studies suggest that methylated arsenic...

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic ions Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alnus glutinosa under elevated Summary: ). The presence of other ions also affected arsenic Soil Samplingavailability and phytotoxicity (Fowler, 1983... TU & MA: ARSENIC...

83

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Arsenic-Free, Safe Drinking Water in Bangladesh. ” Worldburden from arsenic in drinking water in Bangladesh. ”Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh:Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water, Dhaka, Bangladesh, Maytechnologies for drinking water treatment. Rev. Environ.

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic skin lesions Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health, Arsenic Health Effects Research Program Collection: Biology and Medicine 46 Problems with low exposure Latency of arsenic caused cancer is 30 years or Summary:...

86

Arsenic Waste Management: A Critical Review of Testing and Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Solid Wastes Generated during Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anthropogenic sources of arsenic in the environment are the smelting of ores, the burning of coal, and the use of arsenic compds. in many products and prodn. ... with iron and lime, were disposed of in-lined sites for 9-16 years (pit C) and 16-23 years (pits A and B). ...

Tara M. Clancy; Kim F. Hayes; Lutgarde Raskin

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

87

Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Removal of arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids (shale oil, SRC, etc.) by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, R.H.

1985-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

89

Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100 C with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, R.H.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

Removal of arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Geochemistry of arsenic and antimony in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as no concentration change in dissolved arsenic or antimony was measured due to adsorption or desorption when river water high in SPM and sea water were mixed over a time period of 72 hours. Though the bulk chemical character of the bayous of Galveston Island.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dissolved arsenic profile for mixing experiment using Brazos River Water. . Data for dissolved arsenic and antimony from mixing experiments using Atchafalaya River Water. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 57 58 59 29. Results of adsorption...

Tripp, Anthony Roy

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Surprise Laboratory guest to make cameo appearance in "Arsenic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tradition of playing a corpse on stage this weekend following the footsteps of Oppenheimer and other Lab scientists in the Los Alamos Little Theater's production of "Arsenic...

93

Investigating the Use of Biosorbents to Remove Arsenic from Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,2,3 ?...........................................................................?36? Table?9?Arsenic?removal?and?its?adsorption?capacity?for?various?adsorbents?.....?37? ? ? ? ? 1? ? ? ? 1. INTRODUCTION 1 ? Arsenic?is?a?colorless?and?odorless?Group?V?element?discovered?in?1250?AD.? Arsenic?has?an?atomic?number?of?33?and?is?the?20...?present?an?oxidant?must?be?added?to?oxidize?As(III)? to?As(V)?and?form?anions?in?solutions?[27].? 1.5.5.?Adsorption?? Arsenic?removal?is?also?achieved?through?adsorption?on?commercial? adsorbents...

Erapalli, Shreyas

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

ARSENIC IN PRIVATE WELLS IN NH YEAR 1 FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performed geospatial analysis of the well water arsenic estimates and survey results and produced the maps .................................................................................................. 7 Well water quality...................................................................................................... 7 Well water testing

Bucci, David J.

95

Method and apparatus for using hazardous waste form non-hazardous aggregate  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an apparatus for converting hazardous waste into non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregate, the apparatus. It comprises: a source of particulate solid materials, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products; oxidizing means comprising at least one refractory-lined, water-cooled, metal-walled vessel; means for introducing the particulate solid material, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products to the oxidizing means; means for inducing combustion in the oxidizing means, the heat of combustion forming molten slag and noncombustible fines from noncombustible material; means for accumulating the slag; means for introducing the noncombustible fines to the molten slag; means for removing the mixture from the apparatus; and means for cooling the mixture to form the non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregates.

Kent, J.M.; Robards, H.L. Jr.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

97

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

98

Hyperaccumulation of arsenic in the shoots of Arabidopsis silenced for arsenate reductase (ACR2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...arsenic below ground. By blocking...and drinking water have been reported...using physical remediation methods such...significantly to the remediation of arsenic pollution...arsenic-contaminated sites and water resources. Methods Bacterial...tissues were ground in liquid nitrogen...arsenic below ground. By blocking...

Om Parkash Dhankher; Barry P. Rosen; Elizabeth C. McKinney; Richard B. Meagher

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Arsenic in Drinking Water and Skin Lesions: Dose-Response Data from West Bengal, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic in Drinking Water and Skin Lesions: Dose-Response Data from West Bengal, India Reina Haque the dose-re- sponse relation between low arsenic concentrations in drinking water and arsenic-induced skin peak arsenic concentration in drinking water was 325 g/liter for cases and 180 g/liter for controls

California at Berkeley, University of

100

Identifying and modeling safety hazards  

SciTech Connect

The hazard model described in this paper is designed to accept data over the Internet from distributed databases. A hazard object template is used to ensure that all necessary descriptors are collected for each object. Three methods for combining the data are compared and contrasted. Three methods are used for handling the three types of interactions between the hazard objects.

DANIELS,JESSE; BAHILL,TERRY; WERNER,PAUL W.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Modeling arsenic partitioning in coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect

Vapor-phase arsenic in coal combustion flue gas causes deactivation of the catalysts used in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NO{sub x} control. A one-dimensional model has been developed to predict the behavior of arsenic in the postcombustion region of a coal-fired boiler as a function of gas residence time. The purpose of the model is to calculate the partitioning of arsenic between the vapor phase from volatilization and arsenic on the ash particles due to surface reaction and/or condensation at temperatures characteristic of SCR systems. The model accounts for heterogeneous condensation of arsenic on the fly ash, as well as surface reaction for two regimes: (1) the free molecular regime (submicrometer ash particles) and (2) the continuum regime (supermicrometer ash particles). All gas properties are computed as functions of gas temperature, pressure, and composition, which are allowed to vary. The arsenic model can be used to calculate the impact of coal composition on vapor-phase arsenic at SCR inlet temperatures, which will help utilities better manage coal quality and increase catalyst lifetimes on units operating with SCR. The arsenic model has been developed and implemented and was tested against experimental data for several coals. (author)

Senior, Constance L.; Lignell, David O.; Sarofim, Adel F. [Reaction Engineering International, 77 West 200 South, Suite 210, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 (United States); Mehta, Arun [EPRI, 3412 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303 (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Abstract 5360: Ethanol enhances arsenic-induced mutagenesis in colon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2014; San Diego, CA Abstract 5360: Ethanol enhances arsenic-induced mutagenesis...one of the common nutritional factors, ethanol is also a well-documented risk factor...effects of co-exposure to arsenic and ethanol in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In...

Lei Wang; Lisha Kuang; Young-Ok Son; John Andrew Hitron; Pratheeshkumar Poyil; Zhuo Zhang; Jia Luo; Zhigang Wang; Xianglin Shi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Chemical Stain for Identifying Arsenic-Treated Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Chemical Stain for Identifying Arsenic-Treated Wood (FINAL) Submitted June 23, 2006 Amy Omae-TREATED WOOD II.1 Applying Phosphate Stains to Arsenate Stains 7 II.2 A Potential Arsenic-Test Kit 14 II.3 Whole Wood Application of the Modified Stannous Chloride Stain 19 II.4 Other Attempted Stain

Florida, University of

104

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron and Heterogeneous Photocatalysis with TiO2 Speaker(s): Marta Litter Date: November 19, 2010 - 11:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Arsenic in groundwater is a dramatic global problem due to the high incidence of arsenicosis or HACRE (Chronic Endemic Regional Hydro-arsenicism, Hidroarsenicismo Crónico Regional Endémico in Spanish), a severe illness causing skin lesions and cancer in extended regions of the world. For this reason, research on low-cost technologies for As removal to be applied in isolated, poor, rural locations is mandatory. This seminar will present a brief overview of arsenic pollution issues and mitigation needs in Latin America. It will also present results on As(V) removal using

105

Assessing the Risk of Arsenic Ingestion | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Electronic Dance of Spins and Orbits An Electronic Dance of Spins and Orbits How a Virus Prepares to Infect Cells Magnetic Switching under Pressure Revealing the Secrets of Chemical Bath Deposition DNA Repair Protein Caught in the Act of Molecular Theft Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Assessing the Risk of Arsenic Ingestion DECEMBER 17, 2010 Bookmark and Share Mineralogy, percent arsenic bioaccessibility and total arsenic concentration of samples from Nova Scotia mine tailings. Detailed mineralogical analyses of individual samples revealed up to seven arsenic species in individual samples (six shown here as major arsenic phases). Results of a physiologically based extraction test are for the < 150 µm

106

Cold Weather Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Cold Weather Hazards June 2010 NSA_cwh_Rev10.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Cold Weather Hazards Winter Conditions at the North Slope of Alaska The North Slope of Alaska is north of the Arctic Circle at latitudes ranging from 69 to 72 degrees. Barrow, the largest town on the North Slope (pop. 4500), is the site of a National Weather Service Station, which has been active for several decades, so the climatology of the Alaska arctic coastal region as represented by Barrow is relatively well known. The North Slope is covered with ice and snow typically eight months of the year (October-May). During part of November, all of December, and most of January, the sun does not come above the horizon; this

107

Safety Hazards of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Hazards of Batteries Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the Lithium-ion battery. Cell phones, laptop computers, GPS systems, iPods, and even cars are now using lithium- ion rechargeable battery technology. In fact, you probably have a lithium-ion battery in your pocket or purse right now! Although lithium-ion batteries are very common there are some inherent dangers when using ANY battery. Lithium cells are like any other technology - if they are abused and not used for their intended purpose catastrophic results may occur, such as: first-, second-, and third-degree burns, respiratory problems, fires, explosions, and even death. Please handle the lithium-ion batteries with care and respect.

108

A Vacuolar Arsenite Transporter Necessary for Arsenic Tolerance in the Arsenic Hyperaccumulating Fern Pteris vittata Is Missing in Flowering Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is found in soils and ground water in many regions of the...both medicine and the remediation of arsenic-contaminated...preference at membrane-water interfaces. Bioinformatics...occurences of arsenic in ground water. Science 296 : 2143-2144...

Emily Indriolo; GunNam Na; Danielle Ellis; David E. Salt; Jo Ann Banks

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

109

A Vacuolar Arsenite Transporter Necessary for Arsenic Tolerance in the Arsenic Hyperaccumulating Fern Pteris vittata Is Missing in Flowering Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thoroughly mixed by inverting 100 times without introducing air bubbles, and phase separation was hastened by centrifugation at 2500g...P.H., and Patrick, W.H. (2003). Soil redox-pH stability of arsenic species and its influence on arsenic uptake by rice...

Emily Indriolo; GunNam Na; Danielle Ellis; David E. Salt; Jo Ann Banks

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

110

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials...

111

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...

112

Azbel'-Kaner Cyclotron Resonance in Arsenic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Azbel'-Kaner cyclotron resonance has been studied in arsenic at a frequency of 134 GHz. Cyclotron effective masses have been measured for magnetic field directions in the three principal crystallographic planes. The results are in general accord with the Fermi surface deduced from other experiments and from band-structure calculations. An attempt to fit the results to an ellipsoid model and direct comparison with de Haasvan Alphen data indicate considerable deviation of the energy bands at the Fermi surface from quadratic behavior. Estimates of the electron and hole Fermi energies and densities are made using the experimental masses and de Haas-van Alphen periods.

C. S. Ih and D. N. Langenberg

1970-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Removal of heavy metals from samples of residual sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitric acid leaching processes were evaluated for removal of heavy metals from samples of residual sludge from an industrial and municipal wastewater plant. The study showed that an acid:water ratio of 1:1 and a nitric acid concentration of 2 mol 1?1 gave efficient removal of 86.7%, 100% and 100% of copper, nickel and arsenic.

Jose Abrego

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

115

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Title Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Kristin Kowolik, and Susan E. Addy Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate-bottom ash from coal fired power plants-is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more thanhalf of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing anarsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages

116

Distribution of hazardous air pollutant trace elements, total sulfur, and ash in coals from five Tertiary basins in the Rocky Mountain Region  

SciTech Connect

Arithmetic mean values of the contents of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) trace elements named in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, and uranium), ash, and total sulfur were statistically compared on a whole-coal basis for Paleocene coals from five Tertiary basins in the Rocky Mountain Region. The study of proximate and elemental analyses indicate a relationship between trace element contents and paleogeography.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hazardous Substances Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture has the authority to promulgate regulations declaring specified substances to be hazardous and establishing labeling, transportation, storage, and...

118

Advances in arsenic biosensor development – A comprehensive review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biosensors are analytical devices having high sensitivity, portability, small sample requirement and ease of use for qualitative and quantitative monitoring of various analytes of human importance. Arsenic (As), owing to its widespread presence in nature and high toxicity to living creatures, requires frequent determination in water, soil, agricultural and food samples. The present review is an effort to highlight the various advancements made so far in the development of arsenic biosensors based either on recombinant whole cells or on certain arsenic-binding oligonucleotides or proteins. The role of futuristic approaches like surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and aptamer technology has also been discussed. The biomethods employed and their general mechanisms, advantages and limitations in relevance to arsenic biosensors developed so far are intended to be discussed in this review.

Hardeep Kaur; Rabindra Kumar; J. Nagendra Babu; Sunil Mittal

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Arsenic and fluoride in the groundwater of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above Mexican drinking water standards have been detected in aquifers of various areas of Mexico. This contamination has been found to be mainly caused by natural sources...

M. A. Armienta; N. Segovia

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Factors influencing the efficiency of arsenic extraction by phosphate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, phosphate concentration, principal counterion, reaction pH, and reaction time. The extraction efficiency was impacted by the influence of these individual factors on reaction kinetics and accessibility of arsenic adsorption sites for ligand exchange...

Yean, Su Jin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Treatment of arsenic-contaminated water using akaganeite adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention comprises a method and composition using akaganeite, an iron oxide, as an ion adsorption medium for the removal of arsenic from water and affixing it onto carrier media so that it can be used in filtration systems.

Cadena C., Fernando (Las Cruces, NM); Johnson, Michael D. (Las Cruces, NM)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

In situ Arsenic Remediation in a fractured, alkaline aquifer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ removal of arsenic from ground water used for water supply has been accomplished in circum-neutral ground water containing high dissolved iron concentrations. In contrast, the ground water at our study...

Alan H. Welch; Kenneth G. Stollenwerk; Douglas K. Maurer…

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

arsenic complexes: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michael N. Bates; Helen M. Goeden; L Irva Hertz; Michael J. Kosnett; Martyn T. Smith 1992-01-01 48 ARSENIC 395 8. REGULATIONS AND ADVISORIES CiteSeer Summary: The...

124

Native arsenic – realgar mineralization in marbles from Saualpe, Carinthia, Austria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The “Geochemical Atlas of Austria” shows a notable positive geochemical arsenic anomaly in stream sediments of the Saualpe, eastern Carinthia, Austria. Detailed investigation has shown that it is caused by an...

R. Göd; J. Zemann

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Containment and stabilization technologies for mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

A prevalent approach to the cleanup of waste sites contaminated with hazardous chemicals and radionuclides is to contain and/or stabilize wastes within the site. Stabilization involves treating the wastes in some fashion, either in situ or above ground after retrieval, to reduce the leachability and release rate of waste constituents to the environment. This approach is generally reserved for radionuclide contaminants, inorganic hazardous contaminants such as heavy metals, and nonvolatile organic contaminants. This paper describes the recent developments in the technical options available for containing and stabilizing wastes. A brief description of each technology is given along with a discussion of the most recent developments and examples of useful applications.

Buelt, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Arsenic in public water supplies and cardiovascular mortality in Spain  

SciTech Connect

Background: High-chronic arsenic exposure in drinking water is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. At low-chronic levels, as those present in Spain, evidence is scarce. In this ecological study, we evaluated the association of municipal drinking water arsenic concentrations during the period 1998-2002 with cardiovascular mortality in the population of Spain. Methods: Arsenic concentrations in drinking water were available for 1721 municipalities, covering 24.8 million people. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for cardiovascular (361,750 deaths), coronary (113,000 deaths), and cerebrovascular (103,590 deaths) disease were analyzed for the period 1999-2003. Two-level hierarchical Poisson models were used to evaluate the association of municipal drinking water arsenic concentrations with mortality adjusting for social determinants, cardiovascular risk factors, diet, and water characteristics at municipal or provincial level in 651 municipalities (200,376 cardiovascular deaths) with complete covariate information. Results: Mean municipal drinking water arsenic concentrations ranged from <1 to 118 {mu}g/L. Compared to the overall Spanish population, sex- and age-adjusted mortality rates for cardiovascular (SMR 1.10), coronary (SMR 1.18), and cerebrovascular (SMR 1.04) disease were increased in municipalities with arsenic concentrations in drinking water >10 {mu}g/L. Compared to municipalities with arsenic concentrations <1 {mu}g/L, fully adjusted cardiovascular mortality rates were increased by 2.2% (-0.9% to 5.5%) and 2.6% (-2.0% to 7.5%) in municipalities with arsenic concentrations between 1-10 and>10 {mu}g/L, respectively (P-value for trend 0.032). The corresponding figures were 5.2% (0.8% to 9.8%) and 1.5% (-4.5% to 7.9%) for coronary heart disease mortality, and 0.3% (-4.1% to 4.9%) and 1.7% (-4.9% to 8.8%) for cerebrovascular disease mortality. Conclusions: In this ecological study, elevated low-to-moderate arsenic concentrations in drinking water were associated with increased cardiovascular mortality at the municipal level. Prospective cohort studies with individual measures of arsenic exposure, standardized cardiovascular outcomes, and adequate adjustment for confounders are needed to confirm these ecological findings. Our study, however, reinforces the need to implement arsenic remediation treatments in water supply systems above the World Health Organization safety standard of 10 {mu}g/L.

Medrano, Ma Jose, E-mail: pmedrano@isciii.es [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Boix, Raquel; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Palau, Margarita [Subdireccion General de Sanidad Ambiental y Salud Laboral, Direccion General de Salud Publica y Sanidad Exterior, Ministerio de Sanidad y Politica Social, Madrid (Spain)] [Subdireccion General de Sanidad Ambiental y Salud Laboral, Direccion General de Salud Publica y Sanidad Exterior, Ministerio de Sanidad y Politica Social, Madrid (Spain); Damian, Javier [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Ramis, Rebeca [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain) [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); Barrio, Jose Luis del [Departamento de Salud Publica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid (Spain)] [Departamento de Salud Publica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid (Spain); Navas-Acien, Ana [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States) [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

128

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

129

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic promotes angiogenesis Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Arsenic in Ground Water of the Willamette... RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 12;U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Arsenic in...

131

Speciation and oxidation kinetics of arsenic in the thermal springs of Wiesbaden spa, Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since 1886 arsenic has been known to be present as a trace component in the Wiesbaden thermal waters at concentrations of over 100 µg L–1. In this study for the first time molecular level speciation of arsenic w...

Susanne P. Schwenzer; Caterina E. Tommaseo…

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Pollution of the territory of Chelyabinsk and the suburbs with arsenic upon coal combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pollution of the territory of Chelyabinsk and the suburbs with arsenic upon coal combustion is evaluated. The found concentrations of arsenic as a carcinogenic substance in the soils of this territory are ...

R. V. Galiulin; R. A. Galiulina

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Characterizing arsenic in preserved hair for assessing exposure potential and discriminating poisoning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic applied in the preservation of taxidermy specimens was shown with imaging X-ray fluorescence to penetrate the hair. This complicates efforts to identify endogenous arsenic in poisoning cases, but reduces potential exposure when handling specimens.

Kempson, I.M.

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

134

The influence of calcium on the inhibition of arsenic desorption from treatment residuals in extreme environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the surface properties of the oxy-hydroxide solid in solution. Results show that calcium enhances the removal by iron oxides and prevents the leaching of arsenic from the residuals. Isotherm experiments show that arsenic adsorption can be described...

Camacho, Julianna G.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

135

Removing arsenic from aqueous solution and long-term product storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The removal of arsenic from hydrometallurgical solutions, waste waters, and acid drainage mine waters has ... and co-precipitation processes; and, on the long-term outdoor storage of the arsenic bearing products.

L. G. Twidwell; J. W. McCloskey

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Arsenic exposure from drinking water and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Bangladesh: prospective cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH Arsenic exposure from drinking water and mortality from cardiovascular disease the association. Design Prospective cohort study with arsenic exposure measured in drinking water from wells was 214.3 per 100 000 person years in people drinking water containing

van Geen, Alexander

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic exposure results Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences ; Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources 64 Arsenic in groundwater in Bangladesh: A geostatistical and epidemiological...

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic affects head Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATION BY Pteris...

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic exposed residents Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Unsaturated Zone Arsenic Distribution...

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic trioxide enhances Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 PHYTOREMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 83 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Arsenic in Bangladesh Decision analysis...

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic induces mitochondria-dependent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 CHRONIC ARSENIC TOXICITY Environmental...

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 81 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 CHRONIC ARSENIC TOXICITY Environmental...

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic detoxification potential Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Characteristics of arsenic accumulation...

145

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic alters vascular Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 CHRONIC ARSENIC TOXICITY Environmental...

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 80 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 3 Arsenic in Bangladesh Decision analysis...

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic trioxide modulates Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufactured. Arsenic trioxide... PHYTOREMEDIATION OF ... Source: Ma, Lena - Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

148

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic trioxide phosphorylates Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remediation of Arsenic Contaminated ... Source: Ma, Lena - Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

149

Arsenic Removal Technologies and the Effect of Source Water Quality on Performance  

SciTech Connect

Arsenic removal technologies that are effective at the tens of ppb level include coagulation, followed by settling/microfiltration, ion exchange by mineral surfaces,and pressure-driven membrane processes (reverse osmosis, nanofiltration and ultrafiltration). This report describes the fundamental mechanisms of operation of the arsenic removal systems and addresses the critical issues of arsenic speciation, source water quality on the performance of the arsenic removal systems and costs associated with the different treatment technology categories.

KHANDAKER, NADIM R.; BRADY, PATRICK V.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Metals in albatross feathers from Midway Atoll: Influence of species, age, and nest location  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors examine the concentrations of metals (heavy metals, mercury, lead, cadmium, chromium, manganese, tin; and metalloids, arsenic and selenium), in the down and contour (body) feathers of half-grown young albatrosses, and contour feathers of one of their parents. They collected feathers from Laysan Diomedea immutabilis and black-footed Diomedea nigripes albatrosses from Midway Atoll in the central Pacific Ocean. The authors test the null hypotheses that there is no difference in metal levels as a function of species, age, feather type, and location on the island. Using linear regression they found significant models accounting for the variation in the concentrations of mercury, lead, cadmium, selenium, chromium, and manganese (but not arsenic or tin) as a function of feather type (all metals), collection location (all metals but lead), species (selenium only), and interactions between these factors. Most metals (except mercury, arsenic, and tin) were significantly higher in down than in the contour feathers of either chicks or adults. Comparing the two species, black-footed albatross chicks had higher levels of most elements (except arsenic) in their feathers and/or down. Black-footed adults had significantly higher levels of mercury and selenium. They also collected down and feathers from Laysan albatross chicks whose nests were close to buildings, including buildings with flaking lead paint and those that had been lead-abated.

Burger, J.; Gochfeld, M.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Global atmospheric transport and source-receptor1 relationships for arsenic2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Our global arsenic15 emission inventory shows a global total anthropogenic arsenic emission of 21.4 Gg1 Global atmospheric transport and source-receptor1 relationships for arsenic2 3 Ka-Ming Wai1 in the global environment.10 They can be transported long distance in the atmosphere but the global source-11

Wu, Shiliang

152

Drinking Water Arsenic in Northern Chile: High Cancer Risks 40 Years after Exposure Cessation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Articles Drinking Water Arsenic in Northern Chile: High Cancer...worldwide are exposed to arsenic-contaminated water. In the largest city in northern Chile...people were exposed to high arsenic drinking water concentrations from 1958 until 1970 when...

Craig M. Steinmaus; Catterina Ferreccio; Johanna Acevedo Romo; Yan Yuan; Sandra Cortes; Guillermo Marshall; Lee E. Moore; John R. Balmes; Jane Liaw; Todd Golden; Allan H. Smith

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Naturally occurring arsenic in the groundwater at the Kansas City Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an investigation concerning the presence of arsenic in concentrations exceeding 0.4 mg/L in the groundwater under the Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The study consisted of four distinct phases: a thorough review of the technical literature, a historical survey of arsenic use at the facility, a laboratory study of existing techniques for determining arsenic speciation, and a field program including water, soil, and sediment sampling. The historical survey and literature review demonstrated that plant activities had not released significant quantities of arsenic to the environment but that similar occurrences of arsenic in alluvial groundwater are widespread in the midwestern United States. Laboratory studies showed that a chromatographic separation technique was necessary to accurately determine arsenic speciation for the KCP groundwater samples. Field studies revealed that naturally occurring reducing conditions prevalent in the subsurface are responsible for dissolving arsenic previously sorbed by iron oxides. Indeed, the data demonstrated that the bulk arsenic concentration of site subsoils and sediments is {approximately}7 mg/kg, whereas the arsenic content of iron oxide subsamples is as high as 84 mg/kg. Literature showed that similar concentrations of arsenic in sediments occur naturally and are capable of producing the levels of arsenic found in groundwater monitoring wells at the KCP. The study concludes, therefore, that the arsenic present in the KCP groundwater is the result of natural phenomena. 44 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

Korte, N.E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Plant and Environment Interactions Arsenic Accumulation in the Hyperaccumulator Chinese Brake and Its Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a greenhouse. At recently, however, has Chinese brake (Pteris vittata L.)harvest, the Chinese brake produced soils (0.47­7.56 mg As kg 1 ),concentration to water-soluble arsenic in soil) of 1450 and a transloca to remediate arsenic contaminated soils. schullat, 2000), soil arsenic concentration (Jiang and Singh, 1994

Ma, Lena

155

Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in Bangladesh Graziano, PhD The present study examined the associations between drinking water and urinary arsenic levels currently drinking water containing concentrations of arsenic 50 g/L. The risk for skin lesions in relation

van Geen, Alexander

156

ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND CURRENT;EPA. National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Arsenic and Clarification to Compliance and New National Occurrence and Exposure to Arsenic in Public Drinking Water Supplies (Revised Draft). Washington

157

Increased Childhood Liver Cancer Mortality and Arsenic in Drinking Water in Northern Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased Childhood Liver Cancer Mortality and Arsenic in Drinking Water in Northern Chile Jane, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, California Abstract Arsenic in drinking water of elevated arsenic levels in drinking water, in particular from 1958 to 1970. This unique exposure scenario

California at Berkeley, University of

158

Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh: a public health emergency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh: a public health emergency Allan H. Smith the history of the discovery of arsenic in drinking-water in Bangladesh and recommends intervention strategies in groundwater indicate that 1 in 10 people who drink water containing 500 mg of arsenic per litre may ultimately

California at Berkeley, University of

159

Decrements in Lung Function Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water in West Bengal, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decrements in Lung Function Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water in West Bengal, India Ondine S­2000, the authors investigated relations between lung function, respiratory symptoms, and arsenic in drinking water. Worldwide, populations have been identified that con- sume drinking water with arsenic concentrations above

California at Berkeley, University of

160

Technical assistance to the Montana Department of Health and Environmental Sciences. Arsenic and lead exposure study of residents living near the Rocker operable unit of the Silver Bow Creek Superfund site, Rocker, Montana. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The ATSDR and the Montana Department of Health and Environmental Sciences conducted a study to assess arsenic and lead exposure among residents of Rocker, Montana, where arsenic had been detected in soil up to 214,000 ppm. No statistically significant difference was found between Rocker residents and a comparison population with respect to the geometric mean of the urine arsenic levels. When data were combined from both groups, recent seafood ingestion was the variable most strongly associated with detectable urine arsenic levels. Although blood lead levels in the target area differed significantly from those in the comparison, a significant association was not detected between blood lead levels > or = 10 microgram/d1 and area of residence. Lead was detected in the blood of two siblings in the target area at levels of 20.7 and 31.3 microgram/d1. A lead based paint hazard and elevated concentrations of soil lead from the children's play area were detected in the household.

Gaventa, S.; Coull, B.; Gedrose, J.; Jones, P.; Dennehy, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rural Driving Hazards Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on unpaved, dirt and gravel, roads. Visitors should be aware of the driving hazards this presents by taking the following precautions: Proceed cautiously: Many rural roads have unmarked and blind intersections. Slow down: Sanded and gravel raods can cause a vehicle to swerve. Maintain a safe following distance: During the dry season, vehicles

162

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification of Hazards Identification of Hazards 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety basis documentation (SARs, ISBs, BIOs, JCOs, HASPs etc) as well as activity level hazards identification via JHAs, AJHAs, JSAs etc.) 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions 2.4 DOE O 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance verifies implementation of guiding principle #5 and core value #2 as specified in 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 (b) (5) and (c) (2) respectively. Additionally, it verifies implementation of

163

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION Huiying Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION by Huiying Sun Ph.D, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 1991 .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1999 c flHuiying Sun, 1999 #12; Abstract We propose using

Heckman, Nancy E.

164

Rapid guide to hazardous air pollutants  

SciTech Connect

Concise and easy to use, this book brings together a wealth of hard-to-gather information in one compact pocket guide. It offers--in alphabetical order--detailed profiles of the 189 elements and compounds determined to be hazardous air pollutants by the 1990 Amendments of the Clean Air Act. The profile for each pollutant includes: fundamental identification data (CAS number, molecular formula, formula weight, synonyms); uses (primarily in the manufacture of chemicals and as a component in the manufacturing process); physical properties (such as boiling point, density, vapor pressures, color); chemical properties (such as air/water reactivity, reactivity with skin or metal, flash point, heat of combustion); health risks, including toxic exposure guidelines, toxicity data, and acute and chronic risks; hazard risks (the substance`s potential for accidents, fires, explosions, corrosion, and chemical incompatibility); exposure routes tracking the activities, environment, sources, and occupations that tend to lead to exposure; regulatory status, listing the primary laws and citations of regulated chemicals; and important additional information on symptoms, first aid, firefighting methods, protective equipment, and safe storage.

Beim, H.J.; Spero, J.; Theodore, L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Arsenic exposure, hyperuricemia, and gout in US adults  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground There is very limited information on the association between arsenic and serum uric acid levels or gout. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of arsenic with hyperuricemia and gout in US adults. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 5632 adults aged 20 years or older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2010 with determinations of serum uric acid and urine total arsenic and dimethylarsinate (DMA). Hyperuricemia was defined as serum uric acid higher than 7.0 mg/dL for men and 6.0 mg/dL for women. Gout was defined based on self-reported physician diagnosis and medication use. Results After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, comorbidities and arsenobetaine levels, the increase in the geometric means of serum uric acid associated with one interquartile range increase in total arsenic and DMA levels was 3% (95% CI 2–5) and 3% (2–5), respectively, in men and 1% (0–3) and 2% (0–4), respectively, in women. In men, the adjusted odds ratio for hyperuricemia comparing the highest to lowest quartiles of total arsenic was 1.84 (95% CI, 1.26–2.68) and for DMA it was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.01–1.96). The corresponding odds ratios in women were 1.26 (0.77, 2.07) and 1.49 (0.96, 2.31), respectively. The odds ratio for gout comparing the highest to lowest tertiles was 5.46 (95% CI, 1.70–17.6) for total arsenic and 1.98 (0.64–6.15) for DMA among women older than 40 years old. Urine arsenic was not associated with gout in men. Conclusion Low level arsenic exposures may be associated with the risk of hyperuricemia in men and with the prevalence of gout in women. Prospective research focusing on establishing the direction of the relationship among arsenic, hyperuricemia, and gout is needed.

Chin-Chi Kuo; Virginia Weaver; Jeffrey J. Fadrowski; Yu-Sheng Lin; Eliseo Guallar; Ana Navas-Acien

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Emerging electromembrane technologies in hazardous management  

SciTech Connect

A new generalized index of ecological estimation of different technological process is suggested. It is the number of salt equivalents which contaminate environment when a production unit is making. The quantity of salt equivalent have been calculated not only as necessary amount for the technological process by itself, but as amount of energy and different materials for an entire technology. The estimation of different methods of water treatment is shown. The electrodialysis is the most ecological method of water desalination in comparison with others. This conclusion was spreaded on other electromembrane technologies in hazardous management. Such as: (1) Brackish water desalination, (2) Acid rain prevention, (3) Recuperation of pure heavy metals from rinse galvanic water.

Grebenyuk, V.D. [Institute of Colloid and Water Chemistry, Kiev (Ukraine); Grebenyuk, O.V. [Dega Enterprises of NY, Inc., Flushing, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Standard test methods for arsenic in uranium hexafluoride  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods are applicable to the determination of total arsenic in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) by atomic absorption spectrometry. Two test methods are given: Test Method A—Arsine Generation-Atomic Absorption (Sections 5-10), and Test Method B—Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption (Appendix X1). 1.2 The test methods are equivalent. The limit of detection for each test method is 0.1 ?g As/g U when using a sample containing 0.5 to 1.0 g U. Test Method B does not have the complete collection details for precision and bias data thus the method appears as an appendix. 1.3 Test Method A covers the measurement of arsenic in uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) solutions by converting arsenic to arsine and measuring the arsine vapor by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. 1.4 Test Method B utilizes a solvent extraction to remove the uranium from the UO2F2 solution prior to measurement of the arsenic by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. 1.5 Both insoluble and soluble arsenic are measured when UF6 is...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July, 2004 Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated Posture Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated it is possible for these injuries to heal themselves when the ergonomic hazard is removed, cases do exist where;PAGE 2 ERGONOMIC HAZARDS of the SEATED POSTURE BULLETIN NO. 233 Ergonomic interventions to reduce

Martin, Jeff

169

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

170

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Chapter 30 - Inorganic Arsenic in Rice and Rice Bran: Health Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rice is a staple food for people in many countries in all parts of the world. Arsenic in food, including rice, is present in several forms that have different toxicities. Inorganic arsenic species (AsIII and AsV) are the most toxic forms of arsenic present in food. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified inorganic arsenic, but not organic arsenic, in Group 1, as carcinogenic to humans. There has been increasing concern about the health implications regarding exposure to inorganic arsenic through rice consumption. An extensive review of published reports has shown that no epidemiological studies have been conducted indicating the health effects associated with the ingestion of inorganic arsenic through consumption of rice. Several studies suggested that drinking water containing high levels of inorganic arsenic plays a major role in the health risk of cancers among people residing in arsenic-contaminated areas. Two leading research groups in this field have concluded that “At present, it is impossible to fully assess the health risk of arsenic in rice,” and “Even if epidemiological studies were to be initiated, it would take decades to understand how elevated arsenic in rice affects lifetime health outcomes”.

Suthep Ruangwises; Piyawat Saipan; Nongluck Ruangwises

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Metal resistance sequences and transgenic plants  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding a metal ion resistance protein, which are expressible in plant cells. The metal resistance protein provides for the enzymatic reduction of metal ions including but not limited to divalent Cu, divalent mercury, trivalent gold, divalent cadmium, lead ions and monovalent silver ions. Transgenic plants which express these coding sequences exhibit increased resistance to metal ions in the environment as compared with plants which have not been so genetically modified. Transgenic plants with improved resistance to organometals including alkylmercury compounds, among others, are provided by the further inclusion of plant-expressible organometal lyase coding sequences, as specifically exemplified by the plant-expressible merB coding sequence. Furthermore, these transgenic plants which have been genetically modified to express the metal resistance coding sequences of the present invention can participate in the bioremediation of metal contamination via the enzymatic reduction of metal ions. Transgenic plants resistant to organometals can further mediate remediation of organic metal compounds, for example, alkylmetal compounds including but not limited to methyl mercury, methyl lead compounds, methyl cadmium and methyl arsenic compounds, in the environment by causing the freeing of mercuric or other metal ions and the reduction of the ionic mercury or other metal ions to the less toxic elemental mercury or other metals.

Meagher, Richard Brian (Athens, GA); Summers, Anne O. (Athens, GA); Rugh, Clayton L. (Athens, GA)

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

NETL: Utilization Projects - Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities The overall objective of this project is to evaluate the impact of key constituents captured from power plant air streams (arsenic, selenium and mercury) on the disposal and utilization of coal combustion by-products. Specific objectives of the project are: 1) to develop a comprehensive database of field leachate concentrations at a wide range of CCB management sites (about 25 sites), including speciation of arsenic and selenium, and low-detection limit analyses for mercury; and 2) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of arsenic and selenium species at 3 CCB sites. The fundamental or mechanistic data to reliably model many of the inorganics in CCB leachate are lacking. There is a large degree of uncertainty in the initial leachate concentrations, long-term leaching characteristics of CCBs, and the attenuation coefficients typically used in groundwater transport models. As a result, the model simulations are either highly conservative, or they can be manipulated to obtain almost any desired result. This research project will develop a coherent field leachate database and soil attenuation coefficients for improved modeling and evaluation of the potential for groundwater impacts at CCB management facilities. The work is focused on speciation of four key constituents at CCB sites: arsenic, selenium, chromium, and mercury. The proposed work will help to narrow the uncertainties in the range of values of these critical inputs and improve the accuracy of the modeling results.

174

Thoughts on Hazard Assessment (Oct)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences J.M. Logue, T.E. McKone, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2010 Funding was provided by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Interagency Agreement I-PHI-01070, and by the California Energy Commission through Contract 500-08-06. LBNL Report Number 3650-E 1 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States

175

Subsurface Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The results from this report are preliminary and cannot be used as input into documents supporting procurement, fabrication, or construction. This technical report identifies fire hazards and proposes their mitigation for the subsurface repository fire protection system. The proposed mitigation establishes the minimum level of fire protection to meet NRC regulations, DOE fire protection orders, that ensure fire containment, adequate life safety provisions, and minimize property loss. Equipment requiring automatic fire suppression systems is identified. The subsurface fire hazards that are identified can be adequately mitigated.

Logan, R.C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

176

An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal...

Bishop, Scott Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Use of human metabolic studies and urinary arsenic speciation is assessing arsenic exposure  

SciTech Connect

The use of hair and nail analyses to assess human exposure to the trace metalloid arsenic (As) is hindered by the possibility of external contamination. Even though urine represents the major excretory route, its use as an indicator of exposure is limited when no distinction is made between the nontoxic organoarsenical (arsenobetaine) excreted following the consumption of seafood and the toxic inorganic forms of As and related metabolites. The development of analytical techniques capable of separating the different chemical species of As in urine have shown that the ingestion of inorganic As (AsV or AsIII) by animals and man triggers an in vivo reduction/methylation process resulting in excretion of the less toxic species, monomethylarsonic acid (MMAA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA). This paper establishes the uptake, bio-transformation and elimination patterns reflected in urinary As following carefully controlled experimental exposure.

Johnson, L.R.; Farmer, J.G. (Memphis State Univ., TN (United States) Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Arsenic pilot plant operation and results:Weatherford, Oklahoma.  

SciTech Connect

Narasimhan Consulting Services, Inc. (NCS), under a contract with the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), designed and operated pilot scale evaluations of the adsorption and coagulation/filtration treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The pilot evaluation was conducted at Well 30 of the City of Weatherford, OK, which supplies drinking water to a population of more than 10,400. Well water contained arsenic in the range of 16 to 29 ppb during the study. Four commercially available adsorption media were evaluated side by side for a period of three months. Both adsorption and coagulation/filtration effectively reduced arsenic from Well No.30. A preliminary economic analysis indicated that adsorption using an iron oxide media was more cost effective than the coagulation/ filtration technology.

Aragon, Malynda Jo; Arora, H. (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Karori, Saqib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Pathan, Sakib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Iron Biomineralization: Implications on the Fate of Arsenic in Landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency lowered the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of arsenic on groundwater, this issue of contamination of groundwater is of particular importance to the state. Groundwater the treatment of ion exchange/membrane processes brine solutions. Sodium arsenate heptahydrate (Na2HAsO4.7H2O

Fay, Noah

180

Methyl arsenic adsorption and desorption behavior on iron oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as competitive ligands. Arsenic was measured by FI-HG-AAS. MMAsV and iAsV were adsorbed in higher amounts than DMAsV on goethite and ferrihydrite at all pH values studied. Although MMAsV and iAsV were adsorbed quantitatively at lower concentrations on goethite...

Lafferty, Brandon James

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Arsenic species separation by IELC-ICP/OES: Arsenocholine behavior  

SciTech Connect

In the literature an increasing interest is observed in developing methods to determine arsenobetaine, arsenocholine and related compounds in sea food and in reference materials. The separation conditions and quantification of As(III), As(V), monomethylarsenate (MMA), dimethylarsinate (DMA), arsenobetaine (AsBet) and arsenocholine (AsChol) are studied by Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled directly to an Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP/OES) system. The separation conditions are optimized to improve the resolution of the six arsenic species. Arsenocholine shows a particular pattern of behavior when phosphate is used as eluent: two peaks are observed in the chromatogram, thus a systematic study assaying different pH and concentration of phosphate is carried out to improve resolution and analysis time when the six arsenic compounds are analyzed in a mixture. Boric acid as mobile phase avoids the splitting of the arsenocholine peak and leads to a good separation of the six arsenic compounds. Detection limits are established for the six arsenic species.

Rubio, R.; Peralta, I.; Alberti, J.; Rauret, G. (Univ. de Barcelona (Spain))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ method is described for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal. 8 figs.

Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.R.; Feng, X.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

Rice consumption contributes to arsenic exposure in US women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...arsenic exposure derived from household tap water intake...two national surveys, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, and those...to consume rice than non-Hispanic whites; members...of water samples from their household (i.e., kitchen) tap...

Diane Gilbert-Diamond; Kathryn L. Cottingham; Joann F. Gruber; Tracy Punshon; Vicki Sayarath; A. Jay Gandolfi; Emily R. Baker; Brian P. Jackson; Carol L. Folt; Margaret R. Karagas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Toxicology 198 (2004) 3944 Arsenic drinking water regulations in developing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toxicology 198 (2004) 39­44 Arsenic drinking water regulations in developing countries identified 10 g/l as a goal which later became the World Health Organization Guideline for drinking water in 1992. Epidemiological studies have shown that about one in 10 people drinking water containing 500 g

California at Berkeley, University of

185

WHC fire hazards analysis policy  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to establish the fire protection policy for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) relative to US Department of Energy (DOE) directives for Fire Hazards Analyses (FHAs) and their relationship to facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) as promulgated by the DOE Richland Operations Office.

Evans, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment Ahmed “Jemie” Dababneh, Ph.D., P.E. and Jeffrey Oskamp, E.I.T. Presentation for U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 22, 2014

188

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

189

CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on or near any system that produces, uses, or stores hazardous energy, a hazardous energy control program by the contractor-managed HECP (e.g., QA's on construction sites, etc.), they shall comply with the contractor and implementation of these activities. Each shall inform the other of their HECPs and Hazardous Energy Control (HEC

US Army Corps of Engineers

190

Heavy metal concentrations in soils of five United States cities, 1972 urban soils monitoring program  

SciTech Connect

Research report:Lead, mercury, cadmium, and arsenic levels detected in soil samples taken from five U.S. cities are reported. Cities studied were: Des Moines, Iowa; Fitchburg, Mass.; Lake Charles, La.; Reading, Pa.; and Pittsburgh. In all cities except Fitchburg, urban soils had higher concentrations of the metals than suburban soils had. Higher metals concentrations in urban soil are attributed to atmospheric fallout of aerosols from industrial processes and fossil fuel burning. (26 references, 2 tables)

Carey, A.E.; Gowen, J.A.; Forehand, T.J.; Tai, H.; Wiersma, G.B.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

192

A Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging an Arsenic-Loving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of an Arsenic-Loving Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of an Arsenic-Loving Fern For many people, arsenic is synonymous with poison, so it is perhaps a surprise that some plants, such as the fern Pteris vittata (Figure 1) seem to quite deliberately accumulate large amounts of it. What is more, the plant converts it to the most toxic inorganic form known. How does it do this? First some background; while there is some evidence that arsenic is required for health [1], this is debatable. On the other hand, the poisonous nature of arsenic compounds was understood by the ancient Greeks and Romans, and it has been used throughout history as a homicidal and suicidal agent. It is found in two environmentally common oxy acids; arsenous acid (H3AsO3), and arsenic acid (H3AsO4), whose salts are known as arsenites and arsenates, respectively. Of these, the trivalent arsenic species are the most toxic. The infamous agent of murder is arsenic trioxide (white arsenic or As2O3), which is simply the (reputedly tasteless) anhydride of arsenous acid.

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic trioxide combined Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ABSTRACT Reduction of iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) and release of its sorbed arsenic load to solution... is an important mechanism by which groundwater worldwide becomes polluted with...

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic induced skin-lesions Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESULTS Arsenic is a natural Source: District of Columbia, University of the - Water Resources Research Institute Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ;...

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic health effects Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of arsenic compounds i.e. the ... Source: Schweik, Charles M. - Department of Natural Resources Conservation, University of Massachusetts at Amherst Collection: Environmental...

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic mouse micronucleus Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences ; Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources 8 Chronic Exposure to Arsenic Causes Increased Cell Survival, DNA Damage, and...

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic family elements Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of arsenic compounds i.e. the ... Source: Schweik, Charles M. - Department of Natural Resources Conservation, University of Massachusetts at Amherst Collection: Environmental...

198

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iron-­? containing   adsorbents   for   arsenic   removal.  arsenate-selective adsorbent. [29] Electrochemical Reactorsof pre-synthesized HFO adsorbent (ps-HFO; i.e. HFO that was

Amrose, Susan E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic groundwater system Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& AGOGINO Design Strategies and Preliminary Prototype for a Low- Summary: - Cost Arsenic Removal System for Rural Bangladesh Johanna L. Mathieu,*,** Ashok J. Gadgil,*,***...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic cadmium lead Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the history of the discovery of arsenic in drinking-water in Bangladesh and recommends intervention strategies Source: California at Berkeley, University of - School of Public...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic isotopes Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 87 Risd-M -1633 Danish Atomic Energy Commission Summary: DEPARTMENT ARSENIC IN STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIAL 1571 (Orchard...

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic lead cadmium Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the history of the discovery of arsenic in drinking-water in Bangladesh and recommends intervention strategies Source: California at Berkeley, University of - School of Public...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic methylation capability Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the discovery of arsenic in drinking-water in Bangladesh and recommends intervention strategies Source: California at Berkeley, University of - School of Public Health,...

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic mitigation efforts Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in...

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 78 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 TU & MA: ARSENIC UPTAKE BY THE...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 72 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Absorption of foliar-applied arsenic by...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 90 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Absorption of foliar-applied arsenic by...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - address arsenic manganese Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 0268-2605C3802?01191'%0150 Arsenic in...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 86 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Absorption of foliar-applied arsenic by...

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 77 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 TU & MA: ARSENIC UPTAKE BY THE...

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic bromides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Evaluation of Two New Arsenic Field Test Kits Capable...

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic trioxide as2o3 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Quantities of Arsenic Within the State...

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 91 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Absorption of foliar-applied arsenic by...

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 84 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Absorption of foliar-applied arsenic by...

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 75 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 TU & MA: ARSENIC UPTAKE BY THE...

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic promotes progressive Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 0268-2605C3802?01191'%0150 Arsenic in...

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 92 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 3 TU & MA: ARSENIC UPTAKE BY THE...

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 79 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 3 TU & MA: ARSENIC UPTAKE BY THE...

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-contaminated pyrite wastes Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies 10 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 96, pp. 34553462, March 1999 Summary: of Thailand result from arsenic contamination of the shallow groundwaters be- cause of...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-related skin lesions Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 | July 2002 729 Family Correlations of Arsenic Methylation Patterns in Children and Parents Summary: various health effects, including can- cers of the bladder, skin, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic alters pulmonary Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as ABSTRACT Reduction of iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) and release of its sorbed arsenic load to solution... is an important mechanism by which groundwater worldwide becomes...

222

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. ” In Arsenic Contaminationarsenic from drinking water: Coal ash coated with ferricwater per day. However, the coal ash required to treat that

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design Strategies and Preliminary Prototype for a Low-Cost Arsenic Removal System for Rural Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using iron-oxide coated coal ash,” in Arsenic Contaminationarsenic from drinking water: Coal ash coated with ferricash is a finely powdered, sterile waste material from coal-

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium nickel arsenic Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and electrothermal Summary: , copper, nickel and palladium nitrates on the arsenic atomic absorption signal magnitude were examined... stabilisation of platform); C, nickel...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic hydrides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(2002) 1080-703902.50 Summary: for arsenic species using hydride generation and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The detec- tion limit for As... by ASP Estimation of...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic iodides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COLUMNARSINE GENERATOR Keywords Methylated arsenic species, zinc column arsinegeneration, atomic absorption... atomic absorption at efficients of variation at the 0.05 gml monome...

227

Treatment and remediation methods for arsenic removal from the ground water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Globally, ground water is contaminating by arsenic continously, which needs economic treatment and remediation technologies. Physical, chemical and biological treatment methods have been developed, that include different kinds of filters, bucket type units, fill and draw, kalshi etc. The remediation methods discussed are air oxidation, reactive barriers, utilisation of deeper aquifers and sanitary protected dug wells. To the best of our knowledge no technology is available capable to remove arsenic from water at efficient, economic and commercial levels. Therefore, fast, efficient and economic arsenic removal technologies are required. Attempts have been made to suggest the future technologies of arsenic removal.

Imran Ali; Tabrez A. Khan; Iqbal Hussain

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic pilot plant Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science Candidate, Summary: conflicting. The Erie wastewater treatment plant sludge incinerator flue gas contains arsenic but pilot tests......

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic cadmium chromium Sample Search...  

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Materials Science 14 STATE OF COLORlOO Bill Ritter, Jr., Governor Summary: . The analysis of arsenic, barium, cadmium chromium, lead, mercury, silver, and vanadium will...

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic exposure induces Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 6 Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in Summary: to the exposure...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic fluorides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(F), selenium (Se), uranium (U), and radium... : arsenic, fluoride, nitrate, selenium, uranium, and ... Source: Scanlon, Bridget R. - Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of...

232

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

233

Questions and Answers - Are nitrogen, arsenic, and tantalum radioactive?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How many neutrons can you add to anatom without it getting unbalanced? How many neutrons can you add to an<br>atom without it getting unbalanced? Previous Question (How many neutrons can you add to an atom without it getting unbalanced?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How long is the life span of an atom?) How long is the life span of an atom? Are nitrogen, arsenic, and tantalum radioactive? The answer is yes and no. Let's see why. When you want to know about elements, you go look in the periodic table. But what you see listed in the periodic table of the elements is only part of the picture. For every element listed, there are different "flavors" called isotopes. All of the elements have at least one isotope that is radioactive. So, we can say that there is such a thing as radioactive nitrogen, arsenic and tantalum. Some

234

Strategies for the Engineered Phytoremediation of Mercury and Arsenic Pollution  

SciTech Connect

Phytoremediation is the use of plants to extract, transport, detoxify and/or sequester pollutants of the land, water or air. Mercury and arsenic are among the worst environmental pollutants, adversely affecting the health of hundreds of millions of people worldwide. We have demonstrated that plants can be engineered to take up and tolerate several times the levels of mercury and arsenic that would kill most plant species. Starting with methylmercury and/or ionic mercury contamination, mercury is detoxified, stored below or above ground, and even volatilized as part of the transpiration process and keeping it out of the food chain. Initial efforts with arsenate demonstrate that it can be taken up, transported aboveground, electrochemically reduced to arsenite in leaves and sequestered in thiol-rich peptide complexes. The transgenic mercury remediation strategies also worked in cultivated and wild plant species like canola, rice and cottonwood.

Dhankher, Om Parkash; Meagher, Richard B.

2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

SciTech Connect

ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

Association between As and Cu renal cortex accumulation and physiological and histological alterations after chronic arsenic intake  

SciTech Connect

Arsenic (As) is one of the most abundant hazards in the environment and it is a human carcinogen. Related to excretory functions, the kidneys in humans, animal models or naturally exposed fauna, are target organs for As accumulation and deleterious effects. Previous studies carried out using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry by synchrotron radiation (SR-{mu}XRF) showed a high concentration of As in the renal cortex of chronically exposed rats, suggesting that this is a suitable model for studies on renal As accumulation. This accumulation was accompanied by a significant increase in copper (Cu) concentration. The present study focused on the localization of these elements in the renal cortex and their correlation with physiological and histological As-related renal effects. Experiments were performed on nine male Wistar rats, divided into three experimental groups. Two groups received 100 {mu}g/ml sodium arsenite in drinking water for 60 and 120 consecutive days, respectively. The control group received water without sodium arsenite (<50 ppb As). For histological analysis, 5-{mu}m-thick sections of kidneys were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Biochemical analyses were used to determine concentrations of plasma urea and creatinine. The As and Cu mapping were carried out by SR-{mu}XRF using a collimated white synchrotron spectrum (300 {mu}mx300 {mu}m) on kidney slices (2 mm thick) showing As and Cu co-distribution in the renal cortex. Then, renal cortical slices (100 {mu}m thick) were scanned with a focused white synchrotron spectrum (30 {mu}mx30 {mu}m). Peri-glomerular accumulation of As and Cu at 60 and 120 days was found. The effects of 60 days of arsenic consumption were seen in a decreased Bowman's space as well as a decreased plasma blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/creatinine ratio. Major deleterious effects; however, were seen on tubules at 120 days of exposition. This study supports the hypothesis that tubular accumulation of As-Cu may have some bearing on the arsenic-associated nephrotoxicological process.

Rubatto Birri, Paolo N. [Instituto de Biologia Celular, Facultad de Ciencias Medicas (FCM), Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (UNC), Ciudad Universitaria, Cordoba (Argentina)] [Instituto de Biologia Celular, Facultad de Ciencias Medicas (FCM), Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (UNC), Ciudad Universitaria, Cordoba (Argentina); Perez, Roberto D. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FAMAF-UNC), Ciudad Universitaria, Cordoba (Argentina) [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FAMAF-UNC), Ciudad Universitaria, Cordoba (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cremonezzi, David [Catedra Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Nacional de Clinicas (FCM-UNC), Cordoba (Argentina)] [Catedra Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Nacional de Clinicas (FCM-UNC), Cordoba (Argentina); Perez, Carlos A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Linha D09B-XRF, Campinas SP (Brazil)] [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Linha D09B-XRF, Campinas SP (Brazil); Rubio, Marcelo [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FAMAF-UNC), Ciudad Universitaria, Cordoba (Argentina) [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FAMAF-UNC), Ciudad Universitaria, Cordoba (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bongiovanni, Guillermina A., E-mail: gbongiovanni@conicet.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Laboratorio de Investigaciones Bioquimicas, Quimicas y de Medio Ambiente (LIBIQUIMA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CONICET), Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires 1400, CP 8300 Neuquen (Argentina)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Brief Original Contribution Case-Control Study of Arsenic in Drinking Water and Kidney Cancer in Uniquely  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brief Original Contribution Case-Control Study of Arsenic in Drinking Water and Kidney Cancer for publication March 11, 2013. Millions of people worldwide are exposed to arsenic in drinking water of dose-response, we believe there is now sufficient evidence in humans that drinking-water arsenic causes

California at Berkeley, University of

238

Determination of welding fume size with time using E7018 electrodes and A131B base metal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Welders are exposed to various hazardous fumes in the course of their work. Health hazard levels from welding fumes range from relatively little or no hazard to death. To incur these hazards the worker must inhale and retain the particulates in the lung...'. s are inhaled. These hazards range from little or no effect, such as metal fume fever, to death. The result depends on the chemical nature of the material, the length of exposure, and the amount and size of the fume particles. Metal fNne fever is a...

Owen, Richard James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Metal Aminoboranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. June 25, 2013 Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit. U.S. Patent No.: 7,713,506 (DOE S-112,798)

240

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Toenail Arsenic Concentrations, GSTT1 Gene Polymorphisms, and Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...respectively]. Generalized additive mixed models using penalized...and smelting of metal ores, manufacturing and application of pesticides...iteration within a generalized additive mixed model framework employing...in the following nonlinear additive mixed model: where Yq represents...

Molly L. Kile; E. Andres Houseman; Ema Rodrigues; Thomas J. Smith; Quazi Quamruzzaman; Mahmuder Rahman; Golam Mahiuddin; Li Su; and David C. Christiani

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging Technology with Sustainable Implementation Title ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging Technology with Sustainable Implementation Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Addy, Susan E., Ashok J. Gadgil, Kristin Kowolik, and Robert Kostecki Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Today, 35-77 million Bangladeshis drink arsenic-contaminated groundwater from shallow tube wells. Arsenic remediation efforts have focused on the development and dissemination of household filters that frequently fall into disuse due to the amount of attention and maintenance that they require. A community scale clean water center has many advantages over household filters and allows for both chemical and electricity-based technologies to be beneficial to rural areas. Full cost recovery would enable the treatment center to be sustainable over time. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) is compatible with community scale water treatment for rural Bangladesh. We demonstrate the ability of ECAR to reduce arsenic levels > 500 ppb to less than 10 ppb in synthetic and real Bangladesh groundwater samples and examine the influence of several operating parameters on arsenic removal effectiveness. Operating cost and waste estimates are provided. Policy implication recommendations that encourage sustainable community treatment centers are discussed.

243

In-Situ Arsenic Remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, West-Central Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Situ Arsenic Remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, West-Central Nevada Scientific in Carson Valley, Douglas County, West-Central Nevada By Angela P. Paul, Douglas K. Maurer, Kenneth G.G., and Welch, A.H., 2010, In-situ arsenic remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, west-central Nevada: U

244

Analytica Chimica Acta 477 (2003) 279291 Measurement of arsenic species in marine sediments by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytica Chimica Acta 477 (2003) 279­291 Measurement of arsenic species in marine sediments 2002 Abstract Extraction of sediments with phosphoric acid (0.5 M) and hydroxylamine hydrochloride (0 to separate arsenic species. Recoveries of sediments spiked with As(V) were quantitative whereas for sediments

Canberra, University of

245

SPECIAL ISSUE: ENVIRONMENTAL NANOMATERIALS Arsenic Removal by Nanoscale Magnetite in Guanajuato, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mining activity. Arsenic concen- trations as high as 33 lg/L in Guanajuato and 266 lg/L in surrounding and as a by-product of industrial activity (Plant et al., 2005). The presence of arsenic in drinking water, skin lesions, and cancer of the bladder, lungs, kidneys, and skin. There is some evidence that elevated

Alvarez, Pedro J.

246

Health risk assessment of mercury and arsenic associated with consumption of fish from the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrations of mercury and arsenic in fish from the Persian Gulf were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption...?1 for mercury and 0.168–0.479 ?g g?1 for arsenic, with means of 0.133 and 0.312 ?g g?1,...

Mehdi Raissy; Mahsa Ansari

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Effect of Cooking Temperatures on Chemical Changes in Species of Organic Arsenic in Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Cooking Temperatures on Chemical Changes in Species of Organic Arsenic in Seafood ... The results obtained showed that, in all of the types of seafood studied, TMA+ appeared after cooking, possibly because heating facilitates decarboxylation of AB to TMA+. ... Keywords: Arsenic; organoarsenical species; seafood; cooking; chemical changes ...

V. Devesa; A. Martínez; M. A. Súñer; D. Vélez; C. Almela; R. Montoro

2001-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

248

ontamination of soils with arsenic, which is both toxic and carcinogenic,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from soils and translocating it into its above-ground biomass. This plant -- which, to our knowledge2 -- has many attributes that recommend it for use in the remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils using a solution of 1:1 methanol:water to speciate arsenic with high-performance liquid chromatography

Ma, Lena

249

Original Contribution Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original Contribution Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions, 2006. Millions of persons around the world are exposed to low doses of arsenic through drinking water from drinking water over a significant period of time. The authors evaluated dose-response relations

van Geen, Alexander

250

BNL | CFN: Transport of Hazardous Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials The following contains guidance for transporting materials to and from BNL and for on-site transfers. All staff and users must adhere to Laboratory guidelines when making plans to move materials either by commercial carrier or in rented or personal vehicles. BNL hazardous material transport guidelines apply for products that meet the definition of hazardous materials according to 49 CFR 171.8 and any nanomaterial that has known hazardous properties (toxic, flammable, reactive). BNL guidelines are also provided for all other nanomaterials even if they have not been identified as hazardous materials. Some materials may be transported in personal vehicles as per "Materials of Trade" (MOT) guidance. The regulations for transporting MOT are much

251

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7-202.) The Hazardous Waste Program is based off of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act set forth in 40 CFR parts 260-279. Due to the great similarity to the

252

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Freeze Concentration Applied to Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steps to remove or destroy the hazardous components prior to discharge. Incineration is widely used to destroy a broad range of these hazardous components. Its disposal efficiency is often used when defining the Best Available Technology for EPA... standards. However, high water content streams are expensive to incinerate since the incinerator must be designed to handle the feed volume even though the water in the feed is in itself harmless. Some hazardous components require operating temperatures...

Ruemekorf, R.

254

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Name: Paul Status: other Grade: 12+ Location: IL Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What is a Computer Virus? What do viruses do? How do viruses Spread? How do I prevent a virus? What are Trojan Horse programs? Malware? Phishing? Replies: Paul From National Institute of Science and Technology Which is the US government office in charge of this problem and should be your reference for this subject At this URL: http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-61-rev1/SP800-61rev1.pdf Please find the following definitions from paragraph 5: 5.1.1 Virus: A virus is designed to self-replicate-make copies of itself-and distribute the copies to other files, programs, or computers. Viruses insert themselves into host programs and propagate when the infected program is executed, generally by user interaction (e.g., opening a file, running a program, clicking on a file attachment). Viruses have many purposes-some are designed to play annoying tricks, whereas others have destructive intent. Some viruses present themselves as jokes while performing secret destructive functions. There two major types of viruses are compiled viruses, which are executed by the operating system, and interpreted viruses, which are executed by an application.

255

Hazard of intermittent noise exposures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chief shortcoming of the “equal energy” hypothesis—the notion that equal products of time and intensity provide equal hazard—is that the recuperative powers of the auditory system are essentially ignored. A single sustained stimulus is regarded as no more dangerous than an intermittent one of the same total energy. A two?year study of the effect of intermittency on the TTS produced in normal young adults by 6? or 8?h exposures to octave bands of noise whose center frequencies ranged from 250 to 4000 Hz indicates that even for the most hazardous noise (the 4000?Hz OB) cutting the cumulative exposure time in half by interjecting regular quiet periods will permit an increase in level of 5 dB for constant TTS at least up to about 100 dB SPL. At 1000 Hz the trading relation is 6–7 dB for halving time and at 250 Hz is even greater. Thus the 5?dBA?per?halving?time relation employed by the present OSHA standard is essentially correct for intermittent noise except perhaps above 100 to 105 dBA where the equal?energy hypothesis may be more appropriate for spectra with high?frequency dominance. A single 5?dBA “correction for intermittency” is an oversimplification. [Research supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Public Health Service.

W. D. Ward

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Environmental Management The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental Management is tasked regulating hazardous waste management facilities and practices. Provisions pertaining to permitting, site approval, construction, reporting, transportation, and remediation practices and fees are discussed in these

257

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

258

Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Anyone who owns or operates a vessel or facility that transports, stores, or otherwise handles hazardous wastes must take reasonable steps to prevent the discharge of those materials.

259

Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

260

Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mission Support Alliance, LLC Volpentest Hazardous Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization (FERO) roles and responsibilities, training requirements and the conduct of operations. Each project is responsible for developing and maintaining EP Hazards...

262

Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

265

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

266

Integrated phytobial remediation for sustainable management of arsenic in soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Arsenic (As), cited as the most hazardous substance by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (ATSDR, 2005), is an ubiquitous metalloid which when ingested for prolonged periods cause extensive health effects leading to ultimate untimely death. Plants and microbes can help mitigate soil and groundwater As problem since they have evolved elaborate detoxification machineries against this toxic metalloid as a result of their coexistence with this since the origin of life on earth. Utilization of the phytoremediation and bioremediation potential of the plants and microbes, respectively, is now regarded as two innovative tools that encompass biology, geology, biotechnology and allied sciences with cutting edge applications for sustainable mitigation of As epidemic. Discovery of As hyperaccumulating plants that uptake and concentrate large amounts of this toxic metalloid in their shoots or roots offered new hope to As phytoremediation, solar power based nature's own green remediation. This review focuses on how phytoremediation and bioremediation can be merged together to form an integrated phytobial remediation which could synergistically achieve the goal of large scale removal of As from soil, sediment and groundwater and overcome the drawbacks of the either processes alone. The review also points to the feasibility of the introduction of transgenic plants and microbes that bring new hope for more efficient treatment of As. The review identifies one critical research gap on the importance of remediation of As contaminated groundwater not only for drinking purpose but also for irrigation purpose and stresses that more research should be conducted on the use of constructed wetland, one of the most suitable areas of application of phytobial remediation. Finally the review has narrowed down on different phytoinvestigation and phytodisposal methods, which constitute the most essential and the most difficult part of pilot scale and field scale applications of phytoremediation programs.

Madhumita Roy; Ashok K. Giri; Sourav Dutta; Pritam Mukherjee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Outcomes of Chronic Arsenic Exposure on Aquatic Insects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanisms of heavy metal pollution from urban runoff inWhitby LM. 1974. Heavy metal pollution in the Sudbury miningas an index of heavy- metal pollution? A test using snails

Mogren, Christina Loraine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

269

Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards For many Americans, working outdoors on the lawn and in the garden is a great way to exercise and relax. However, safety experts warn that, if caution is not employed with lawn and garden tools, you could wind up spending more time indoors, starting with a trip to a hospital emergency room. "The most frequent injuries are from lawn mowers, which are unforgiving machines," cautions John Drengenberg, manager of Consumer Affairs for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., Northbrook, Ill., a not-for-profit product safety testing organization. "Statistics tell us that each year lawn mower accidents send close to 85,000 people to emergency rooms. But that's not all. Nearly 15,000 others need medical treatment for injuries from trimmers and other power garden

270

POTENTIAL HEALTH HAZARDS OF RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas to minimize the risks to the public and environment from exposure to the tailings and the radon gas they produce.

none,

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. · When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

272

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT Offered by The College of Architecture and The Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University #12;2 THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL..................................................................................3 C. Approved Courses in the College of Architecture .............................4 D. Approved

275

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

276

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS Industrial Hygiene Group HazMat Transport/Shipping Home Biological & Infectious Substances Chemicals Compressed Gas Cryogens Dry Ice Engineered Nanomaterials Gasoline Lithium Betteries Radioactive Materials Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Mixed Hazardous Materials Personal/Rental Vehicles HazMat Transport/Shipping Transporting and shipping hazardous materials can be dangerous, but both activities can be done safely - much of it by the researchers themselves. Each of the items below is subject to some transportation or shipping restrictions. Click on the applicable hazardous material icon below to learn how you can safely (and legally) transport that hazardous material and to learn what laboratory resources are available to you for your shipping needs.

277

Arsenic methylation capacity and obesity are associated with insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The goal of the present study was to compare the arsenic methylation capacities in elementary school and junior high school students in an area of Taiwan with low arsenic exposure, and explore the influence of both arsenic methylation capacity and obesity on insulin resistance in these children and adolescents using the HOMA-IR index. We recruited 303 elementary school students and 319 junior high school students in Taipei City from September 2007 to November 2011. Concentrations of inorganic arsenic (arsenite?+?arsenate), monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) were determined by a high-performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Insulin resistance was determined by HOMA-IR. Elementary school students had significantly lower inorganic arsenic percentage and a higher DMAV percentage than junior high school students. It seems that the former had better arsenic methylation capability than the latter. The HOMA-IR value was significantly and positively related to the sum of the urinary inorganic and methylated arsenic (TotalAs) concentrations and also the BMI Z score, with the regression coefficients (?) being 0.058 (p?

Hsiu-Chen Lin; Yung-Kai Huang; Horng-Sheng Shiue; Liang-Sien Chen; Cheuk-Sing Choy; Shiau-Rung Huang; Bor-Cheng Han; Yu-Mei Hsueh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assesment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite Imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31(5) real-time assessments of natural hazards have beenAssessment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite459–470 Assessment and prediction of natural hazards from

Gillespie, Thomas; Chu, Jasmine; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Thomas, Duncan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

SciTech Connect

We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center.

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Author's personal copy Journal of Hazardous Materials 185 (2011) 983989  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), a carcinogenic metalloid, is ubiquitous in the environment. Human activities including mining, smelting, and As to arsenic via drinking con- taminated water (>50 g/L) leads to cancers, birth defects, and other diseases [3

Ma, Lena

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 The objective of this surveillance is to...

282

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Fluorescent are hazardous waste, so take care to ensure the tubes remain intact during removal and storage. Fluorescent

Wilcock, William

283

Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment Permit by Rule | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment by Rule. Authors Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Published...

284

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

285

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar...

286

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

287

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Seismic Hazard Analysis For Nuclear Facilities At The Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook A Probabilistic Approach to...

288

Metal inks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

291

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987  

SciTech Connect

This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J. (eds.)

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

294

Metal Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal oxides are the class of materials having the widest application in gas sensors. This chapter presents information related to the application of various metal oxides in gas sensors designed on different p...

Ghenadii Korotcenkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Title Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Susan E. Addy, and Kristin Kowolik Journal Environmental Science and Health Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, arsenic, bangladesh, coal bottom ash, drinking water, indoor environment department, water contaminants, water treatment Abstract We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6×10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90% (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90% of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2 ≥ 0.99) increase from 2.4×105 to 7.2×105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center

296

A review on sources, toxicity and remediation technologies for removing arsenic from drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic is a natural element found in the environment in organic and inorganic forms. The inorganic form is much more toxic and is found in ground water, surface water and many foods. This form is responsible ...

Ankita Basu; Debabrata Saha; Rumpa Saha; Tuhin Ghosh…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic chlorides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that the chloride anion was responsible for the difference in the effect of CaCO3 and CaCl2 on plant arsenic uptake... depends on plant species and chloride concentration. The...

298

Problems with low exposure Latency of arsenic caused cancer is 30 years or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-MALIGNANT LUNG DISEASE? 150 people without arsenic-caused skin lesions Number with chronic cough 33 (31%) OR = 3 in Drinking Water in West Bengal, India (In press, Epidemiology) Those with chronic cough #12;Figure 2

299

The hydrogeochemistry of pond and rice field recharge : implications for the arsenic contaminated aquifers in Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shallow aquifers in Bangladesh, which provide drinking water for millions and irrigation water for innumerable rice fields, are severely contaminated with geogenic arsenic. Water mass balance calculations show that ...

Neumann, Rebecca B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

An arsenic-tolerant new species of Eleocharis (Cyperaceae) from Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new aquatic, arsenic-tolerant species ofEleocharis (Cyperaceae) endemic to Chihuahua, Mexico, is described and illustrated. It...Eleocharis sect.Eleogenus seriesMaculosae. A key for the species ofEleocharis sec...

M. Socorro González-Elizondo; Jorge A. Tena-Flores; Ma. Teresa Alarcón-Herrera…

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic antimony mercury Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

32. Nickel 7. Tantalum 20. Lead 33. Lithium 8. Arsenic 21... 12. Cesium 25. Mercury 13. Curium 26. Germanium 14. Zinc 27. Boron Short list for anagram element Source: Le Roy,...

302

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationarea to volume ratio of coal ash is 200 times greater than1 mm diameters and spherical coal ash particles with 5 ?m

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic alloys Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D.B. and Dress, W. RMU Summer Research Project Summary: on the subject of arsenic pollution in Pennsylvannia. This work was a combined effort of Dr. Dress and Dr. Short... ....

304

In Situ Groundwater Arsenic Removal Using Iron Oxide-Coated Sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sand filter suggest that both reversible adsorption and irreversible precipitation are responsible for removing arsenic from the water. Unlike conventional excavate-and-fill permeable reactive barriers, the treatment capacity of our in situ created...

Yu, Hongxu

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Transformation of 2-line ferrihydrite and its effect on arsenic adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the impacts of foreign species on aqueous transformations and arsenic adsorption by 2-line ferrihydrite (FH2) have been extensively studied, much less is known about the impact of transformation inhibitors on solid-state transformation...

Her, Namryong

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Transporters of arsenite in rice and their role in arsenic accumulation in rice grain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...epidemiology and drinking water standards . Science 296...occurrences of arsenic in ground water . Science 296 : 2143 – 2145...areas of Bangladesh . Water Sci Technol 42 : 185 – 192 . 6 Ali...Strategies for tolerance and remediation by plants . Trends Biotechnol 25...

Jian Feng Ma; Naoki Yamaji; Namiki Mitani; Xiao-Yan Xu; Yu-Hong Su; Steve P. McGrath; Fang-Jie Zhao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Arsenic tolerance in plants: “Pas de deux” between phytochelatin synthesis and ABCC vacuolar transporters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that As-contaminated water of some Asian regions...staples or use plants for remediation strategies (7, 8...a subclass of the water channel aquaporins (reviewed...occurrences of arsenic in ground water . Science 296 : 2143...

Jean-François Briat

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Use of Orange Peel Waste for Arsenic Remediation of Drinking Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic is a toxic element and is found in natural waters throughout the globe. The purpose of present study is to demonstrate the As (V) uptake by orange peel from real ground water samples through adsorption...

Mazhar I. Khaskheli; Saima Q. Memon; Ali N. Siyal…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Development of a scalable model for predicting arsenic transport coupled with oxidation and adsorption reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Civil Engineering, 238 Harbert Engineering Center, Auburn University, AL, 36849, United States al., 2004). The presence of arsenic in natural waters is controlled by adsorption, ion exchange

Clement, Prabhakar

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic cadmium mercury Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARR,AND H. MILLER. 1972. Total... mercury. (Lond.)254:238-239. 12;LUNDE, G. 1970. Analysis of arsenic and selenium in marine raw materials... MERCURY AND SELENIUM IN BLUE...

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic 82 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unseen Problem in Nebraska Drinking Water Summary: said. Of the 82 public systems affected by the new arsenic rule, some may be able to meet the new... with the specter of...

312

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER — RESULTS OF PROTOTYPE FIELD TESTS IN BANGLADESH  

SciTech Connect

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 50 million people in Bangladesh drink arsenic-laden water, making it the largest case of mass poisoning in human history. Many methods of arsenic removal (mostly using chemical adsorbents) have been studied, but most of these are too expensive and impractical to be implemented in poor countries such as Bangladesh. This project investigates ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) as an affordable means of removing arsenic. Experiments were performed on site in Bangladesh using a prototype termed “sushi”. This device consists of carbon steel sheets that serve as electrodes wrapped into a cylinder, separated by plastic mesh and surrounded by a tube-like container that serves as a holding cell in which the water is treated electrochemically. During the electrochemical process, current is applied to both electrodes causing iron to oxidize to various forms of iron (hydr)oxides. These species bind to arsenic(V) with very high affi nity. ECAR also has the advantage that As(III), the more toxic form of arsenic, oxidizes to As(V) in situ. Only As(V) is known to complex with iron (hydr)oxides. One of the main objectives of this research is to demonstrate the ability of the new prototype to reduce arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh groundwater from >200 ppb to below the WHO limit of 10 ppb. In addition, varying fl ow rate and dosage and the effect on arsenic removal was investigated. Experiments showed that ECAR reduced Bangladeshi water with an initial arsenic concentration as high as 250 ppb to below 10 ppb. ECAR proved to be effective at dosages as high as 810 Coulombs/Liter (C/L) and as low as 386 C/L (current 1 A, voltage 12 V). These results are encouraging and provide great promise that ECAR is an effi cient method in the remediation of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. A preliminary investigation of arsenic removal trends with varying Coulombic dosage, complexation time and fi ltration methods is also presented.

Kowolik, K; Addy, S.E.A.; Gadgil, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Railroad Hazardous g Railroad Hazardous g Materials Transportation Safety Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Radioactive Materials Program Manager H d M t i l Di i i H d M t i l Di i i Hazmat Hazardous Materials Division Hazardous Materials Division Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Presentation for the Presentation for the DOE NTSF Meeting DOE NTSF Meeting May 10 May 10- -12, 2011 12, 2011 Our Regulated Community * More than 550 l d railroads * 170,000 miles of track * 220,000 employees * 1.3 million railcars * 20,000 locomotives Hazmat * 3,500 chemical shippers * Roughly 2 Million Roughly 2 Million annual HM shipments HM-232E Introduction * Notice of Proposed Rulemaking d b * Issued December 21, 2006 * Interim Final Rule

315

All Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide produced by Emergency Services Program For emergencies dial x7911 911 from cell phones berkeley lab Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Emergency Preparedness Response FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Pocket Guide 3 FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Emergency Response Expectations Before an emergency: * Accept personal responsibility for your own safety. * Prepare your personal/family emergency plan. * Review your Building Emergency Plan (BEP) or Emergency Response Guide. * Know the location of all your building's exits and Assembly Areas. * Know the specific hazards in your area and the response procedures for each hazard. * Understand how to report an emergency.

316

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

317

Hazards Control Department 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the Hazards Control Department activities in 1995 is part of the department`s efforts to foster a working environment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where every person desire to work safely.

Campbell, G.W.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

Owning Hazard, A Tragedy Barbara Young Welke*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Minnesota. This play is part of her ongoing research on the history of products liability. In addition in the ownership of hazard from the individuals who suffered injury, to the enterprises involved in manufacturing

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

319

Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security  

SciTech Connect

Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

320

Lab optimizes burning of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new thermal destruction laboratory has gone into operation at Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Mo. The bench-scale facility, which can accommodate gram quantities of hazardous wastes in liquid, slurry, or solid forms, is used to determine ...

WARD WORTHY

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps in term of Modified Mercalli (MM) intensity are derived by applying the ‘Cornell-McGuire’ method to four earthquake source zones in Panama and adjacent areas. The maps contain es...

Aristoteles Vergara Muñoz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Gis Technology in Mapping Landslide Hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the recent years, the ever-increasing diffusion of GIS technology has facilitated the application of quantitative ... potential of such technological advancements, landslide hazard mapping remains a major, lar...

Alberto Carrara; Mauro Cardinali…

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Home insulation may increase radiation hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... pose a potential health hazard, by increasing exposure to low levels of the radioactive gas radon. ... .Radon-222 is produced as part of the decay chain of uranium-238. Both the ...

David Dickson

1978-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-based antineoplastic drugs Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: Occupational Exposures to Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Health Care Settings" (http... Group 1 Carcinogens, Chemotherapy Waste and other Hazardous Drug...

326

In utero and early life arsenic exposure in relation to long-term health and disease  

SciTech Connect

Background: There is a growing body of evidence that prenatal and early childhood exposure to arsenic from drinking water can have serious long-term health implications. Objectives: Our goal was to understand the potential long-term health and disease risks associated with in utero and early life exposure to arsenic, as well as to examine parallels between findings from epidemiological studies with those from experimental animal models. Methods: We examined the current literature and identified relevant studies through PubMed by using combinations of the search terms “arsenic”, “in utero”, “transplacental”, “prenatal” and “fetal”. Discussion: Ecological studies have indicated associations between in utero and/or early life exposure to arsenic at high levels and increases in mortality from cancer, cardiovascular disease and respiratory disease. Additional data from epidemiologic studies suggest intermediate effects in early life that are related to risk of these and other outcomes in adulthood. Experimental animal studies largely support studies in humans, with strong evidence of transplacental carcinogenesis, atherosclerosis and respiratory disease, as well as insight into potential underlying mechanisms of arsenic's health effects. Conclusions: As millions worldwide are exposed to arsenic and evidence continues to support a role for in utero arsenic exposure in the development of a range of later life diseases, there is a need for more prospective studies examining arsenic's relation to early indicators of disease and at lower exposure levels. - Highlights: • We review in utero and early-life As exposure impacts on lifelong disease risks. • Evidence indicates that early-life As increases risks of lung disease, cancer and CVD. • Animal work largely parallels human studies and may lead to new research directions. • Prospective studies and individual exposure assessments with biomarkers are needed. • Assessing intermediary endpoints may aid early intervention and establish causality.

Farzan, Shohreh F.; Karagas, Margaret R. [Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Section of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Community and Family Medicine and Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States); Chen, Yu, E-mail: yu.chen@nyumc.org [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Impact of Two Water Management Systems on Arsenic Speciation and Microbial Populations in Rice Rhizosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPACT OF TWO WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS ON ARSENIC SPECIATION AND MICROBIAL POPULATIONS IN RICE RHIZOSPHERE A Dissertation by ANIL KUMAR C. SOMENAHALLY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2010 Major Subject: Soil Science Impact of Two Water Management Systems on Arsenic Speciation and Microbial...

Somenahally, Anil Kumar C.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Household Sand Filters:? Comparative Field Study, Model Calculations, and Health Benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Household Sand Filters:? Comparative Field Study, Model Calculations, and Health Benefits ... Simultaneously, raw groundwater from the same households and additional 31 tubewells was sampled to investigate arsenic coprecipitation with hydrous ferric iron from solution, i.e., without contact to sand surfaces. ... Concentra tions of total Fe, Mn, Na, K, Mg, and Ca were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy (Shimadzu AA-6800, Kyoto, Japan). ...

Michael Berg; Samuel Luzi; Pham Thi Kim Trang; Pham Hung Viet; Walter Giger; Doris Stüben

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

329

Disruption of canonical TGF?-signaling in murine coronary progenitor cells by low level arsenic  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to arsenic results in several types of cancers as well as heart disease. A major contributor to ischemic heart pathologies is coronary artery disease, however the influences by environmental arsenic in this disease process are not known. Similarly, the impact of toxicants on blood vessel formation and function during development has not been studied. During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types including smooth muscle cells which contribute to the coronary vessels. The TGF? family of ligands and receptors is essential for developmental cardiac epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and differentiation into coronary smooth muscle cells. In this in vitro study, 18 hour exposure to 1.34 ?M arsenite disrupted developmental EMT programming in murine epicardial cells causing a deficit in cardiac mesenchyme. The expression of EMT genes including TGF?2, TGF? receptor-3, Snail, and Has-2 are decreased in a dose-dependent manner following exposure to arsenite. TGF?2 cell signaling is abrogated as detected by decreases in phosphorylated Smad2/3 when cells are exposed to 1.34 ?M arsenite. There is also loss of nuclear accumulation pSmad due to arsenite exposure. These observations coincide with a decrease in vimentin positive mesenchymal cells invading three-dimensional collagen gels. However, arsenite does not block TGF?2 mediated smooth muscle cell differentiation by epicardial cells. Overall these results show that arsenic exposure blocks developmental EMT gene programming in murine coronary progenitor cells by disrupting TGF?2 signals and Smad activation, and that smooth muscle cell differentiation is refractory to this arsenic toxicity. - Highlights: • Arsenic blocks TGF?2 induced expression of EMT genes. • Arsenic blocks TGF?2 triggered Smad2/3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • Arsenic blocks epicardial cell differentiation into cardiac mesenchyme. • Arsenic does not block TGF?2 induced smooth muscle cell differentiation.

Allison, Patrick; Huang, Tianfang; Broka, Derrick; Parker, Patti [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology College of Pharmacy, Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Steele Children's Research Center and Bio5 Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Barnett, Joey V. [Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt Medical University, Nashville, TN (United States); Camenisch, Todd D., E-mail: camenisch@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology College of Pharmacy, Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Steele Children's Research Center and Bio5 Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Design characteristics for facilities which process hazardous particulate  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory is establishing a research and processing capability for beryllium. The unique properties of beryllium, including light weight, rigidity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and nuclear properties make it critical to a number of US defense and aerospace programs. Concomitant with the unique engineering properties are the health hazards associated with processing beryllium in a particulate form and the potential for worker inhalation of aerosolized beryllium. Beryllium has the lowest airborne standard for worker protection compared to all other nonradioactive metals by more than an order of magnitude. This paper describes the design characteristics of the new beryllium facility at Los Alamos as they relate to protection of the workforce. Design characteristics to be reviewed include; facility layout, support systems to minimize aerosol exposure and spread, and detailed review of the ventilation system design for general room air cleanliness and extraction of particulate at the source.

Abeln, S.P.; Creek, K.; Salisbury, S.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Reactions of plutonium and uranium with water: Kinetics and potential hazards  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry and kinetics of reactions between water and the metals and hydrides of plutonium and uranium are described in an effort to consolidate information for assessing potential hazards associated with handling and storage. New experimental results and data from literature sources are presented. Kinetic dependencies on pH, salt concentration, temperature and other parameters are reviewed. Corrosion reactions of the metals in near-neutral solutions produce a fine hydridic powder plus hydrogen. The corrosion rate for plutonium in sea water is a thousand-fold faster than for the metal in distilled water and more than a thousand-fold faster than for uranium in sea water. Reaction rates for immersed hydrides of plutonium and uranium are comparable and slower than the corrosion rates for the respective metals. However, uranium trihydride is reported to react violently if a quantity greater than twenty-five grams is rapidly immersed in water. The possibility of a similar autothermic reaction for large quantities of plutonium hydride cannot be excluded. In addition to producing hydrogen, corrosion reactions convert the massive metals into material forms that are readily suspended in water and that are aerosolizable and potentially pyrophoric when dry. Potential hazards associated with criticality, environmental dispersal, spontaneous ignition and explosive gas mixtures are outlined.

Haschke, J.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk in subjects living in arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in southwestern Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

Background: Cumulative arsenic exposure (CAE) from drinking water has been shown to be associated with hypertension in a dose-response pattern. This study further explored the association between arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk among residents of arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in Taiwan considering the effect of CAE and other potential confounders. Method: There were 871 subjects (488 women and 383 men) and among them 372 were diagnosed as having hypertension based on a positive history or measured systolic blood pressure {>=} 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure {>=} 90 mm Hg. Urinary arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Primary arsenic methylation index [PMI, defined as monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) divided by (As{sup III} + As{sup V})] and secondary arsenic methylation index (SMI, defined as dimethylarsinic acid divided by MMA{sup V}) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capability. Results: The level of urinary arsenic was still significantly correlated with cumulative arsenic exposure (CAE) calculated from a questionnaire interview (p = 0.02) even after the residents stopped drinking the artesian well water for 2-3 decades. Hypertensive subjects had higher percentages of MMA{sup V} and lower SMI than subjects without hypertension. However, subjects having CAE > 0 mg/L-year had higher hypertension risk than those who had CAE = 0 mg/L-year disregard a high or low methylation index. Conclusion: Inefficient arsenic methylation ability may be related with hypertension risk.

Huang, Y.-K. [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tseng, C.-H. [National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Development, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yun-Lin, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y.-L. [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Yang, M.-H. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.-J. [Genomic Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Y.-M. [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers, cabinets

Boynton, Walter R.

337

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers

Boynton, Walter R.

338

Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

339

Characterization and stabilization of arsenic in water treatment residuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O2) + 4H2O #0;?#0;? 3CaO? 2SiO2? 3H2O + 3Ca(OH)2 (2.2) It takes around 1 year to complete 95 to 98% of cement hydration. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) and portlandite (Ca(OH)2) are the two main products of cement hydration. C...). FIGURE 2.2 pE/pH diagram for the As-H2O system at 25? C Source: Welch et al, 1988 8 Figure 2.2 is useful to understand the many complicated reactions related to arsenic, but it does not consider several other important factors. For example...

Wee, Hun Young

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Radionuclides of Arsenic Produced by Deuteron Bombardment of Germanium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The arsenic produced by a deuteron bombardment of germanium has been studied to determine the nuclides present in the mixture. Identification of the isotopes was made by comparing measured values of half-life and maximum ? energy with published values. Counting rates were measured with 4? and coincidence counters, obtaining half-lives which indicated that the nuclidic mixture was made up of As71, As72, As73, As74, and As77. These findings were confirmed by maximum ? energy values obtained by absorption measurements and by ?-energy values found using a ?-ray scintillation spectrometer. Measurements indicated that the 40-hr half-life reported for As77 is in error by a significant amount, and that no As76 was obtained from this bombardment. Thick target yield data were determined for each nuclide from the 4? counter measurements.

H. J. Watters and J. F. Fagan; Jr.

1953-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Experiment Hazard Class 15.2 - USDA Soil Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - USDA Regulated Soil 2 - USDA Regulated Soil Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving soils regulated by the United States Department of Agricultute (USDA). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving this hazard class categorized as low risk experiments unless other hazard classes apply. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - None required. Procedural Controls - All work with regulated soils must be performed in compliance with the APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil and Regulated Domestic Soil. The APS protocols state the requirements for handling, storage, shipment, and disposal of regulated

342

Metals in Albatross Feathers from Midway Atoll: Influence of Species, Age, and Nest Location  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Female birds sequester some heavy metals in their eggs, which are then transferred to the developing embryo. Semiprecocial birds such as albatrosses are fully covered with down at hatching, but are dependent on their parents for food for many weeks. At hatching, levels of metals in the chick's down represent exposure from the female via egg, while levels in fully formed feathers at fledgling, several months later, represent mainly exposure from food provided by their parents. In this paper we examine the concentrations of “metals” (heavy metals, mercury, lead, cadmium, chromium, manganese, tin; and metalloids, arsenic and selenium), in the down and contour (body) feathers of half-grown young albatrosses, and contour feathers of one of their parents. We collected feathers from Laysan Diomedea immutabilis and black-footed Diomedea nigripes albatrosses from Midway Atoll in the central Pacific Ocean. We test the null hypotheses that there is no difference in metal levels as a function of species, age, feather type, and location on the island. Using linear regression we found significant models accounting for the variation in the concentrations of mercury, lead, cadmium, selenium, chromium, and manganese (but not arsenic or tin) as a function of feather type (all metals), collection location (all metals but lead), species (selenium only), and interactions between these factors. Most metals (except mercury, arsenic, and tin) were significantly higher in down than in the contour feathers of either chicks or adults. Comparing the two species, black-footed albatross chicks had higher levels of most elements (except arsenic) in their feathers and/or down. Black-footed adults had significantly higher levels of mercury and selenium. We also collected down and feathers from Laysan albatross chicks whose nests were close to buildings, including buildings with flaking lead paint and those that had been lead-abated. Lead levels in the down and feathers of chicks close to nonabated buildings were 10 times higher than for chicks from other locations. Conversely, levels of cadmium and tin were lower near the buildings. Near lead-abated buildings, lead levels decreased as a function of distance, indicating residual contamination on the soil. Our results indicate that black-footed albatross adults and chicks generally have higher levels of heavy metals in their feathers than Laysans. Chicks of both species have higher levels in their down than in their contour feathers, indicating potentially higher exposure during the early chick phase.

Joanna Burger; Michael Gochfeld

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Arsenic speciation in multiple metal environments II. Micro-spectroscopic investigation of a CCA contaminated soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Precipitates other than copper-based ones, e.g., scorodite, adamite and ojuelaite were also identified

344

Geochemical and hydrodynamic controls on arsenic and trace metal cycling in a seasonally stratified US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.O. Box 1000, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964-8000, USA c Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A, and U, which suggested reductive precipitation in the pond's hypolimnion. Uranium levels, however, were between surface and groundwaters with U- and As-rich geological formations rather than large- scale

Louchouarn, Patrick

345

Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Interactions between trace metals, sodium and sorbents in combustion. Quarterly report No. 3, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The proposed research is directed at an understanding of how to exploit interactions between sodium, toxic metals and sorbents, in order to optimize sorbents injection procedures, which can be used to capture and transform these metals into environmentally benign forms. The research will use a 17kW downflow, laboratory combustor, to yield data that can be interpreted in terms of fundamental kinetic mechanisms. Metals to be considered are lead, cadmium, and arsenic. Sorbents will be kaolinite, bauxite, and limestone. The role of sulfur will also be determined.

Wendt, J.O.L.

1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

347

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Customizable biopolymers for heavy metal remediation Jan Kostal, Giridhar Prabhukumar, U. Loi Lao, Alin Chen, Mark Matsumoto, Ashok Mulchandani and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contamination by heavy metals is prevalent at hazardous waste sites in the United States. Annually, fuel for removing the polymer­metal complexes (Thompson & Jarvinen, 1999). The target metal ions can be recovered be used to remediate contaminated soils and solid surfaces and treat aqueous wastes, it can also

Chen, Wilfred

349

Bioavailability of Arsenic in South Texas.Bioavailability of Arsenic in South Texas. What happens when the Fe Hydroxide ModelWhat happens when the Fe Hydroxide Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Access to Clean Drinking Water Source: The World Resources Institute. Data are based on surveys of national governments in 1980, 1983, 1985, 1988Source: The World Resources Institute. Data are based on surveys in Bangladesh Ground WaterArsenic in Bangladesh Ground Water 10^6 wells developed10^6 wells developed since

Herbert, Bruce

350

Arsenic in an Alkaline AMD Treatment Sludge: Characterization and Stability Under Prolonged Anoxic Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Lime treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) generates large volumes of neutralization sludge that are often stored under water covers. The sludge consists mainly of calcite, gypsum and a widespread ferrihydrite-like Fe phase with several associated species of metal(loid) contaminants. The long-term stability of metal(loid)s in this chemically ill-defined material remains unknown. In this study, the stability and speciation of As in AMD sludge subjected to prolonged anoxic conditions is determined. The total As concentration in the sludge is 300 mg kg{sup -1}. In the laboratory, three distinct water cover treatments were imposed on the sludge to induce different redox conditions (100%N{sub 2}, 100%N{sub 2} + glucose, 95%N{sub 2}:5%H{sub 2}). These treatments were compared against a control of oxidized, water-saturated sludge. Electron micro-probe (EMP) analysis and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) results indicate that As is dominantly associated with Fe in the sludge. In all treatments and throughout the experiment, measured concentrations of dissolved As were less than 5 {micro}g L{sup -1}. Dissolved Mn concentration in the N{sub 2} + glucose treatment increased significantly compared to other treatments. Manganese and As K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses showed that Mn was the redox-active element in the solid-phase, while As was stable. Arsenic(V) was still the dominant species in all water-covered sludges after 9 months of anoxic treatments. In contrast, Mn(IV) in the original sludge was partially reduced into Mn(II) in all water-covered sludges. The effect was most pronounced in the N{sub 2} + glucose treatment, suggesting microbial reduction. Micro-scale SXRF and XANES analysis of the treated sludge showed that Mn(II) accumulated in areas already enriched in Fe and As. Overall, the study shows that AMD sludges remain stable under prolonged anoxic conditions. External sources of chemical reductants or soluble C were needed to induce lower redox state in the systems, and even under these imposed treatments, only weakly reducing conditions (Mn threshold) developed. The results suggest that As(V) in AMD sludge will remain stable under prolonged anoxic conditions as long as Mn(IV) is present and organic matter accumulation is negligible.

Beauchemin, S.; Fiset, J; Poirier, G; Ablett, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Implementing DOE guidance for hazards assessments at Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

Hazards Assessments are performed for a variety of activities and facilities at Rocky Flats Plant. Prior to 1991, there was no guidance for performing Hazards Assessments. Each organization that performed Hazards Assessments used its own methodology with no attempt at standardization. In 1991, DOE published guidelines for the performance of Hazards Assessments for Emergency Planning (DOE-EPG-5500.1, ``Guidance for a Hazards Assessment Methodology``). Subsequently, in 1992, DOE published a standard for the performance of Hazards Assessments (DOE-STD-1027-92, ``Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis, Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports``). Although these documents are a step in the direction of standardization, there remains a great deal of interpretation and subjective implementation in the performance of Hazards Assessments. Rocky Flats Plant has initiated efforts to develop a uniform and standard process to be used for Hazards Assessments.

Zimmerman, G.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

355

Mobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Typically, it comprises residual iron oxides, quartz, sodium aluminosilicates, titanium dioxide, calciumMobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox elements, including arsenic. Aerobic and anaer- obic batch experiments were prepared using soils from near

Burke, Ian

356

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

357

Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Appendix B: Wastes and Potential Hazards for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

muds and other drilling wastes 01 05 05* oil-containing drilling muds and wastes M Oil-containing muds or their compounds and should be considered under the following hazards: H5 to H7, H10, H11, or H14. 01 05 drilling and wastes should be assessed on the basis of the concentration of oil present in the waste. Typically

Siddharthan, Advaith

360

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Herrmann, 1981) and secondary oil recovery in western Colorado at the Rangely oil field (Gibbs et al. 1973COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah

Sheehan, Anne F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout Millersville University - Office Of Environmental Health & Safety Scope & Application The Lockout/Tagout program applies to the control of energy during servicing of this program is to establish procedures for affixing appropriate lockout or tagout devices to energy

Hardy, Christopher R.

363

Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

Not Available

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

364

Metal oxide films on metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: A Case Study from Band Aceh, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thomas. 2007. Assessment and prediction of natural hazardsAssessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: AWorking Paper Series Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and

Gillespie, Thomas; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Braughton, Matt; Cooke, Abigail M.; Armenta, Tiffany; Thomas, Duncan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

E-Print Network 3.0 - agency listed hazardous Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Listing of Hazardous Waste 40 CFR... Hazardous Waste Management Regulations 6 NYCRR 371 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste 6 NYCRR 372... Substance Bulk Storage...

367

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches November 1, 2013 - 8:45am Addthis Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, requires all DOE Federal and contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces to complete new Hazard Communication Standard Training. The major changes to the standard include hazard classification, labeling, Safety Data Sheets, information and training. In order to assist you with meeting this deadline, training materials can be found at: http://orise.orau.gov/ihos/hottopics/training.htm; or http://efcog.org/wg/esh_cslm/index.htm The Hazard Communication Standard can be found at: https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghs-final-rule.html

368

Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Bomb squads compete in timed scenarios at Los...

369

ORISE Resources: Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

partners with CDC to develop Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment to identify gaps in planning efforts The Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment, or HAH, is designed to help...

370

ARM 17-53 - Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: ARM 17-53 - Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract Sets forth rules...

371

EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting...

372

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact SheetLegal Abstract Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet,...

373

6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1007-3: Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract This...

374

ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste HandbookLegal Abstract...

375

EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF GuideLegal Abstract Guidance document prepared by the EPA for hazardous waste...

376

EM Eliminates Potential Safety Hazard at SRS | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Safety Hazard at SRS EM Eliminates Potential Safety Hazard at SRS September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here is H-Canyon, where workers recently dissolved the last...

377

Metal Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems posed to plants by metal toxicity in the soils of the world are basically of two kinds. The first kind are of natural origin. These arise either as a consequence of the nature of the parent material f...

T. McNeilly

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Application of release rate data to hazard load calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The author illustrates methods of applying heat, smoke and toxic gas release rate data to calculating fire hazard loading values.

Edwin E. Smith

1974-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Arsenic species in raw and cooked rice: Implications for human health in rural Bengal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study compares the concentrations of total and different species of arsenic (As) in 29 pairs of raw and cooked rice samples collected from households in an area of West Bengal affected by endemic arsenicism. The aim is to investigate the effects of indigenous cooking practice of the rural villagers on As accumulation and speciation in cooked rice. It is found that inorganic As is the predominant species in both raw (93.8%) and cooked rice (88.1%). Cooking of rice with water low in As (health threat (in terms of chronic As toxicity) to the study population.

Dipti Halder; Ashis Biswas; Zdenka Šlejkovec; Debashis Chatterjee; Jerome Nriagu; Gunnar Jacks; Prosun Bhattacharya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Comparative analysis of methods for determination of arsenic in coal and coal ash  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the comparative analysis of different methods for the preparation and analysis of arsenic content in coal and coal ash have been presented. The suggested method is coal digestion method, i.e., coal ash digestion using the mixture of acids: nitric and sulphuric in presence of vanadium-pentoxide as catalyzer. The comparative analysis of different recording techniques (AAS-GH, AAS-GF and ICP-AES) has also been presented. For arsenic recording the suggested technique is AAS-GF technique. The obtained results show that the method of high precision, high sensitivity and high reproductivity has been obtained.

Vukasinovic-Pesic, V.L.; Blagojevic, N.Z.; Rajakovic, L.V. [University of Montenegro, Podgorica (Montenegro)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A study of the content and phytotoxicity of arsenic in two Texas soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

groups than vermiculites or montmorillonites, which results in a greater affinity for arsenates. Recently Johnson and Hiltbold (25) obtained values wnich represent the clays influence on the adsorption of arsenic by the soil They reported that 85...A STUDY OF TEA CONTENT AiND PHYTOTOXICITY OF ARSENIC IN TWO TEXAS SOILS A Thesis LLOYD ELvuER DEUEL JR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&X University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

Deuel, Lloyd Elmer

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Dendritic metal nanostructures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Mapping future hazards for south east London Dr Stephen Blenkinsop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Vulnerability information Risk maps #12;Heat Outputs · 5km heat wave prediction grids. · 1km pro-rata disaggregated temperature & heat wave projection grids. · 1km relative heat wave hazard grid combining heat wave hazard (relative). · 200m heat wave risk grids combining relative heat wave hazard with predictions

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

384

Hazards and controls at the Sandia National Laboratories microelectronics development laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) contains 3,000 m{sup 2}, Which includes 1,000 m{sup 2}of Class I clean room space. There are 20 laminar flow Class I clean room bays. The MDL supplies several, full-flow process technologies which produce complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits using 150 nun diameter silicon wafers. All gases, chemicals and physical hazards used in the fabrication processes are controlled to levels well below regulatory requirements. Facility engineering controls in the MDL include toxic and pyrophoric gas monitoring, interlocks, ventilation, substitution and chemical segregation. Toxic and pyrophoric gases are monitored continuously inside processing tools as well as through the exhaust lines, gas cabinets, the valve boxes, and in general work areas. The toxic gas monitoring systems are interlocked to gas shutoff valves and have both low and high level alarms. In-use process gases are stored in exhausted cabinets. All chemicals and gases are segregated by chemical type. The processes are organized into eight sector areas that consist of photolithography, wet processes, dry etch, ion implant, metals, diffusion, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical mechanical polishing (CW). Each morning, engineering, safety and facilities personnel meet to review the equipment and wafer lot status and discuss processing issues. Hazards are assessed in the MDL with periodic walkthroughs, continuous toxic and pyrophoric gas monitoring and personal monitoring. All chemicals and gases proposed for use in the MDL are reviewed by the industrial hygienist and must be approved by a manager before they are purchased. All new equipment and processes are reviewed by a hazard and barrier committee and cannot be used in the MDL without the committee`s approval and an IH hazard assessment. Overall risk of operating the MDL has been reduced to a level that is as low as reasonable achievable for this research facility.

Benton, M.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

In situ chemical fixation of arsenic-contaminated soils: Anexperimental study  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports the results of an experimentalstudytesting a low-cost in situ chemical fixation method designed to reclaimarsenic-contaminated subsurface soils. Subsurface soils from severalindustrial sites in southeastern U.S. were contaminated with arsenicthrough heavy application of herbicide containing arsenic trioxide. Themean concentrations of environmentally available arsenic in soilscollected from the two study sites, FW and BH, are 325 mg/kg and 900mg/kg, respectively. The soils are sandy loams with varying mineralogicaland organic contents. The previous study [Yang L, Donahoe RJ. The form,distribution and mobility of arsenic in soils contaminated by arsenictrioxide, at sites in Southeast USA. Appl Geochem 2007;22:320 341]indicated that a large portion of the arsenic in both soils is associatedwith amorphous aluminum and iron oxyhydroxides and shows very slowrelease against leaching by synthetic precipitation. The soil's amorphousaluminum and iron oxyhydroxides content was found to have the mostsignificant effect on its ability to retain arsenic.Based on thisobservation, contaminated soils were reacted with different treatmentsolutions in an effort to promote the formation of insolublearsenic-bearing phases and thereby decrease the leachability of arsenic.Ferrous sulfate, potassium permanganate and calcium carbonate were usedas the reagents for the chemical fixation solutions evaluated in threesets of batch experiments: (1) FeSO4; (2) FeSO4 and KMnO4; (3) FeSO4,KMnO4 and CaCO3. The optimum treatment solutions for each soil wereidentified based on the mobility of arsenic during sequential leaching oftreated and untreated soils using the fluids described in EPA Method 1311[USEPA. Method 1311: toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. Testmethods for evaluating solid waste, physical/chemical methods. 3rd ed.Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of SolidWaste. U.S. Government Printing Office; 1992]toxic characteristicsleaching procedure (TCLP) and EPA Method 1312 [USEPA.Method 1312:synthetic precipitation leaching procedure. Test methods for evaluatingsolid waste, physical/chemical methods. 3rd ed. Washington, DC: U.S.Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste. U.S. GovernmentPrinting Office; 1994]synthetic precipitation leaching procedure(SPLP).Both FW and BH soils showed significant decreases in arsenicleachability for all three treatment solutions, compared to untreatedsoil. While soils treated with solution (3) showed the best results withsubsequent TCLP sequential leaching, SPLP sequential leaching of treatedsoils indicated that lowest arsenic mobility was obtained using treatmentsolution (1). Treatment solution (1) with only FeSO4 is considered thebest choice for remediation of arsenic-contaminated soil because SPLPsequential leaching better simulates natural weathering. Analysis oftreated soils produced no evidence of newly-formed arsenic-bearing phasesin either soil after treatment. Sequential chemical extractions oftreated soils indicate that surface complexation of arsenic on ferrichydroxide is the major mechanism for the fixation process.

Yang, Li; Donahoe, Rona J.; Redwine, James C.

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Identifying Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards For many Americans, working outdoors on the lawn and in the garden is a great way to exercise and relax. However, safety experts warn that, if caution is not employed with lawn and garden tools, you could wind up spending more time indoors, starting with a trip to a hospital emergency room. "The most frequent injuries are from lawn mowers, which are unforgiving machines," cautions John Drengenberg, manager of Consumer Affairs for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., Northbrook, Ill., a not-for-profit product safety testing organization. "Statistics tell us that each year lawn mower accidents send close to 85,000 people to emergency rooms. But that's not all. Nearly 15,000 others need medical treatment for injuries from trimmers and other power garden

387

Experiment Hazard Class 2 - Cryogenic Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - Cryogenic Systems 2 - Cryogenic Systems Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of cryogenic systems. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements General requirements The use of detectors/alarms, warning signs, and adequate ventilation are recommended for areas where release of a cryogen can result in an oxygen-deficient atmosphere. Cryogenic systems and vessels are always insulated to reduce heat exchange and are labeled with the common name of the cryogen. Cryogenic systems are pressure protected and equipment are insptected and maintained. The use of flammable cryogens requires technical consultation. Initial consultation may be obtained from the divisional ESH Coordinator. A written emergency evacuation response plan must be available

388

Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NA-STD-3016-2006 NA-STD-3016-2006 May 2006 DOE LIMITED STANDARD HAZARD ANALYSIS REPORTS FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE OPERATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006 iii FORWARD This Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) technical standard is approved for use by the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application and Stockpile Operations (NA-12), and is available for use to prepare Nuclear Explosive Operation (NEO) Hazard Analysis Reports (HARs) as required by 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management." This Standard is

389

Radioactivity in mushrooms: A health hazard?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mushrooms are a complementary foodstuff and considered to be consumed locally. The demand for mushrooms has increased in recent years, and the mushroom trade is becoming global. Mushroom origin is frequently obscured from the consumer. Mushrooms are considered excellent bioindicators of environmental pollution. The accumulation of radionuclides by mushrooms, which are then consumed by humans or livestock, can pose a radiological hazard. Many studies have addressed the radionuclide content in mushrooms, almost exclusively the radiocaesium content. There is a significant lack of data about their content from some of the main producer countries. An exhaustive review was carried out in order to identify which radionuclide might constitute a health hazard, and the factors conditioning it. Regulatory values for the different radionuclides were used. The worldwide range for radiocaesium, 226Ra, 210Pb, and 210Po surpasses those values. Appropriate radiological protection requires that the content of those radionuclides in mushrooms should be monitored.

J. Guillén; A. Baeza

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The HIT method: A hazard identification technique  

SciTech Connect

This report explains a technique for analyzing systems and operations to identify hazards and needed controls. The HIT method can be used both as a design tool and as a risk analysis tool. As a design tool, this method identifies requirements for design criteria. As part of a risk analysis effort, HIT identifies potential accident sequences that can become part of the safety analysis documentation. Within this report the HIT method is described in detail with emphasis on application of the technique.

Howard, H.H.; Faust, C.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA A ti iti Activities Michael Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Overview * Harmonization with International Regulations * Update on Revisions to International Regulations * Recent Letters of Interpretation * Update on Rulemakings * PHMSA Information Resources - 2 - * PHMSA Information Resources 2 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-230 Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

392

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

393

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Grant Program Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities in order to protect public health and safety, foster economic growth and protect the environment. Pennsylvania law establishes a fund to provide to the Department the

394

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive regulatory program of hazardous waste management, and the South Dakota Department of Environment

395

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

396

Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content  

SciTech Connect

The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

LaNi{sub 5}-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula AB{sub (Z-Y)}X{sub (Y)} is disclosed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of Groups 8, 9, and 10 of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, germanium, tin or bismuth. Z is greater than or equal to 4.8 and less than or equal to 6.0. Y is greater than 0 and less than 1. Ternary or higher-order substitutions to the base AB{sub 5} alloys that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption. 16 figs.

Bugga, R.V.; Fultz, B.; Bowman, R.; Surampudi, S.R.; Witham, C.K.; Hightower, A.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

Unger, Samuel L. (Los Angeles, CA); Telles, Rodney W. (Alhambra, CA); Lubowitz, Hyman R. (Rolling Hills Estates, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials

402

Experiment Hazard Class 10.2 - UV Light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - Ultraviolet Light 2 - Ultraviolet Light Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of ultraviolet radiation generating equipment.Ultraviolet light (UV) is non-ionizing radiation in the 180 to 400-nanometer wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Ultraviolet light poses hazards: Eyes hazards - inflammation, cataracts, retinal damage Skin hazards - sunburn, accelerate wrinkling, increased risk of skin cancer Invisible Possible ozone generation Experiment Category Experiments involving only experiment hazard class 10.2 qualify for medium risk. The addition of other hazard classes may require the experiment to be categorized as high risk and undergo additional reviews. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Shield or contain UV as close to the source as

403

A Mutant of the Arabidopsis Phosphate Transporter PHT1;1 Displays Enhanced Arsenic Accumulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Transformation and Constructs The PHO84pht1;1-3 point mutation was introduced in PHO84 cDNA...5-TCAATTAGCCGAATTCATCATCTTGAC-3 containing the equivalent point mutation found in pht1;1-3 (highlighted...Reduction and coordination of arsenic in Indian mustard. Plant Physiol. 122: 1171-1177...

Pablo Catarecha; Ma Dolores Segura; José Manuel Franco-Zorrilla; Berenice García-Ponce; Mónica Lanza; Roberto Solano; Javier Paz-Ares; Antonio Leyva

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Enhanced Organic Precursor Removals Using "Aged" Filter Media Page 1 Assessing Innovative Arsenic Adsorbents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adsorbents O b j e c t i v e s According to a 1999 study by the National Academy of Sciences, arsenic Numerous adsorbent materials were tested in this study. Some had previously been evaluated by E. Hadnagy modified iron (SMI), activated alumina (AA), zero-valent iron (ZVI) and goethite. All of the adsorbent

405

Drinking Water Arsenic in Northern Chile: High Cancer Risks 40 Years after Exposure Cessation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...water and cancer, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer...adjusted for (e.g., diet, radon) is also possible, but there...cam.ac.uk/research/projects/arsenic/symposium/S1...Vol 84. Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer...

Craig M. Steinmaus; Catterina Ferreccio; Johanna Acevedo Romo; Yan Yuan; Sandra Cortes; Guillermo Marshall; Lee E. Moore; John R. Balmes; Jane Liaw; Todd Golden; and Allan H. Smith

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Sorption of arsenic by surfactant-modified zeolite and kaolinite Zhaohui Li a,*, Ryan Beachner a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption of arsenic by surfactant-modified zeolite and kaolinite Zhaohui Li a,*, Ryan Beachner that a significant increase in arsenate sorption capacity could be achieved as the loading level of hex. At surfactant bilayer coverage, the arsenate sorption capacity reached up to 7 mmol/kg for surfactant

Li, Zhaohui

407

June 20, 2001 Characterization of Arsenic Occurrence in US Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 20, 2001 Characterization of Arsenic Occurrence in US Drinking Water Treatment Facility Source The 1996 amendments to the US Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) mandate revision of current maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for various harmful substances in public drinking water supplies. The determination

408

September 3, 1999 Characterization of Arsenic Occurrence in US Drinking Water Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

September 3, 1999 Characterization of Arsenic Occurrence in US Drinking Water Treatment Facility amendments to the US Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) mandate revision of current maxi­ mum contaminant levels (MCLs) for various harmful substances in public drinking water supplies. The determination of a revised

409

Laboratory Reports for the Development of a Chemical Stain to Identify Arsenic-Treated Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Treated Wood #12;A-2 Testing Shredded Wood Samples DATES OF EXPERIMENT: June 4, 2004 to June 7, 2004 PURPOSE This experiment was performed to determine the possibility of testing shredded wood samples for arsenic molybdate and stannous chloride reagents before adding it to the wood. ADDITIONAL REAGENTS · Combined

Florida, University of

410

Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect

This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis (eds.)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Method for solidification of radioactive and other hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solidification of liquid radioactive waste, and other hazardous wastes, is accomplished by the method of the invention by incorporating the waste into a porous glass crystalline molded block. The porous block is first loaded with the liquid waste and then dehydrated and exposed to thermal treatment at 50-1,000.degree. C. The porous glass crystalline molded block consists of glass crystalline hollow microspheres separated from fly ash (cenospheres), resulting from incineration of fossil plant coals. In a preferred embodiment, the porous glass crystalline blocks are formed from perforated cenospheres of grain size -400+50, wherein the selected cenospheres are consolidated into the porous molded block with a binder, such as liquid silicate glass. The porous blocks are then subjected to repeated cycles of saturating with liquid waste, and drying, and after the last cycle the blocks are subjected to calcination to transform the dried salts to more stable oxides. Radioactive liquid waste can be further stabilized in the porous blocks by coating the internal surface of the block with metal oxides prior to adding the liquid waste, and by coating the outside of the block with a low-melting glass or a ceramic after the waste is loaded into the block.

Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Voskresenskaya, Elena N. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Kostin, Eduard M. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Pavlov, Vyacheslav F. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Natural hazards phenomena mitigation with respect to seismic hazards at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the seismic hazard for design of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), a facility designed for the disposal of wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site aggregate areas. The preferred ERDF site is located south and east of 200 East and 200 West Areas. The Washington State Groundwater Protection Program (WAC 173-303-806 (4)(a)(xxi)) requires that the characteristics of local and regional hydrogeology be defined. A plan for that work has been developed (Weekes and Borghese 1993). In addition, WAC 173-303-282 provides regulatory guidance on siting a dangerous waste facility, and US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.28 requires consideration of natural phenomena hazards mitigation for DOE sites and facilities. This report provides information to evaluate the ERDF site with respect to seismic hazard. The ERDF will be a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) as defined by 40 CFR 260.10.

Reidel, S.P.

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

413

Composite metal membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

Peachey, Nathaniel M. (Espanola, NM); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM); Birdsell, Stephan A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Composite metal membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Emerging technologies in hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

The meeting was divided into two parts: Waste water management technologies and Soils, residues, and recycle techniques. Technologies included: photocatalytic oxidation; water treatment with hydrogen peroxide; ultraviolet destruction of pollutants; biodegradation; adsorption; affinity dialysis; and proton transfer. Other papers described evaluation of land treatment techniques; mobility of toxic metals in landfills; sorptive behavior in soils; artificial reef construction; and treatment and disposal options for radioactive metals (technetium 99, strontium, and plutonium). Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Tedder, D.W.; Pohland, F.G. (eds.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Arsine Evolution-Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Method for the Determination of Nanogram Levels of Total Arsenic in Urine and Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......generator, and an electric-heated absorption...tion; and (d) an electric-heated absorption...arsenic electrodeless discharge lamp and a deuterium arc background corrector...of 20 mm/min. An electric-heated absorption......

Dennis H. Cox

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Evaluation of the KanchanTM Arsenic Filter under various water quality conditions of the Nawalparasi District, Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2002, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering partnered with the Environment and Public Health Organization to develop and disseminate the KanchanTM Arsenic Filter ...

Espinoza, Claudia M. (Claudia Maritza)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Electrical Resistance of Metals.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrical Resistance of Eighteen Elements.—The paper contains a brief summary of an extensive series of measurements which are to be published in detail elsewhere made to determine the effect of pressures up to 12000 kg. per sq. cm. and of temperatures from 0° to 275° C. on the resistance of lithium, sodium, potassium, gallium, bismuth, mercury, calcium, strontium, magnesium, titanium, zirconium, arsenic, tungsten, lanthannum, neodymium, carbon (amorphous and graphitic), silicon, and black phosphorus. The data for tungsten and magnesium are improvements on data previously published; the data for the other substances are new. The first six of these elements were studied in both the liquid and the solid states. The pressure coefficients of solid calcium, solid strontium, and both solid and liquid lithium are positive; the coefficient of bismuth is positive in the solid state, but negative in the liquid.Modified Electron Theory of Metallic Conduction.—A previous theoretical discussion of measurements of the effect of pressure on resistance suggested most strongly that in metallic conduction the electrons pass through the substance of the atoms, and that the mechanism by which resistance is produced is intimately connected with the amplitude of atomic vibration. This view is here given quantitative form. The classical expression for conductivity, ?=(e22m)(nlv), is retained; the number of free electrons is supposed to remain constant, their velocity is taken to be that of a gas particle of the same mass and temperature, and their mean free path is supposed to be many times the distance between atomic centers. The variations of path are then computed in terms of the variations of amplitude, and thus the variations of resistance are obtained and checked with experimental results. It is shown that the theory in this form explains Ohm's law, gives the correct temperature coefficient and the most important part of the pressure coefficient, avoids the difficulty of the classical theory with reference to specific heats, indicates a vanishing resistance at low temperatures, leaving open the possibility of super-conductivity, and retains the classical expression for the Wiedemann-Franz ratio. Besides these quantitative checks, the theory is shown to be entirely consistent qualitatively with all the new data; in fact, many of these new results, particularly the effect of pressure and temperature on the relative resistance of solid and liquid, seem to demand uniquely this conception of metallic conduction.

P. W. Bridgman

1921-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hydrates represent gas source, drilling hazard  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates look like ordinary ice. However, if a piece of such ice is put into warm water its behavior will be different from the ordinary melting of normal ice. In contrast, gas hydrates cause bubbles in the warm water, which indicates the high content of gas in the hydrate crystals. The presence of four components is required: gas itself, water, high pressure, and low temperature. The paper discusses how hydrates form, hydrates stability, South Caspian hydrates, and hydrates hazards for people, ships, pipelines, and drilling platforms.

Bagirov, E. [Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Lerche, I. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Animals as sentinels of environmental health hazards  

SciTech Connect

The Committee on Animals as Monitors of Environmental Hazards was formed when the Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry requested that the National Academy of Sciences gather an NRC committee to review and evaluate the usefulness of animal epidemiologic studies for human risk assessment and recommend the types of data that should be collected. With specific questions in mind, the committee attempted to determine how animals could be used for ecological and human health risk determinations as well as to provide an early-warning system for risk assessment and management.

Glickman, L.T.; Fairbrother, A.; Guarino, A.M.; Bergman, H.L.; Buck, W.B.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors  

SciTech Connect

Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in As induced VaD.

Sharma, Bhupesh, E-mail: drbhupeshresearch@gmail.com; Sharma, P.M.

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Experiment Hazard Class 5.3 High Pressure Vessels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 High Pressure Vessels 3 High Pressure Vessels Applicability This hazard classification applies to working with pressure vessels and systems. Other hazard classifications and associated controls may apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls are catergorized as medium risk experiments. Experiments involving new equipment, processes or materials, or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk experiments. Hazard Control Plan Verification Statements Engineered Controls - The establishment of applicable controls in accordance with the (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME Boiler and Pressure Code, ASME B.31 Piping Code and applicable federal, state, and local codes. Verify vessel is stampled with ASME Code Symbol or allowable

423

Experiment Hazard Class 13.0 - High Voltage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3.0 - High Voltage 3.0 - High Voltage Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of High Voltage Equipment. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The inspection of electric equipment is covered under the APS Policy For User Electric Equipment Inspections. NOTE: Unless required Argonne training has been completed, users are not authorized to perform electrical work. Experiment Category All Hazard Class 13 experiments are categorized as medium risk experiments. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Determined by review and results of a DEEI inspection of the equipment. Procedural Controls - Determined by review and results of a DEEI

424

Experiment Hazard Class 7.2 - BSL - 2 Biohazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - BSL-2 Biohazards 2 - BSL-2 Biohazards Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments requiring Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) precautions. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiments involving human subjects/materials or living animals, even if not biohazardous, are included in this Hazard Class. Biosafety Level 2 is similar to Biosafety Level 1 and is suitable for work involving agents of moderate potential hazard to personnel and the environment. It differs from BSL-1 in that (1) laboratory personnel have specific training in handling pathogenic agents and are directed by competent scientists; (2) access to the laboratory is limited when work is being conducted; (3) extreme precautions are taken with contaminated sharp

425

EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, 688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct the Hazardous Waste Staging Facility that would help to alleviate capacity problems as well as provide a single compliant facility to stage wastes at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Finding of No Significant Impact Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Final Environmental Assessment Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

426

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns hazardous waste into harmless end-products. Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

427

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

REMAIZE, J.A.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

428

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY Project 39GF71024-GPDI21000000 . PANTEX PLANT AMARILLO, TEXAS DOE/EA-0688 JUNE 1993 MASTER DiSTRiBUTiON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITEI) ffrl TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 Need for Action 1 2.0 Description of Proposed Facility Action 3.0 Location of the Action 8 4.0 Alternatives to Proposed Action 9 4.1 No Action 9 4.2 Redesign and Modify Existing staging Facilities 9 4.3 Use Other Existing Space at Pantex Plant 9 4.4 Use Temporary Structures 9 4.5 Stage Waste at Other Sites 10 4.6 Stage Wastes Separately 10 5.0 Environmental Impacts of Proposed Action 10 5.1 Archeology 10 5.2 FloodplainlW etlands 10 5.3 Threatened and Endangered Species 10 5.4 Surrounding La,nd Use 11 5.5 Construction 11 5.6 Air Emissions 11

430

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- October 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On October 25-26, 2011, the DOE Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) hosted a Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) working meeting in Germantown, Maryland. The meeting brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact critical facilities. The meeting was valuable for sharing and discussing research in NPH analysis and mitigation, as well as best practices and lessons learned. Representatives from DOE Headquarters and site offices, four National Laboratories, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and several DOE prime contractors and other private sector firms participated in the meeting. The meeting featured thirty five discussion topics over the two days. Presentation slides from most of these topics are available here, as well as papers on several topics from those speakers who chose to provide them. Questions about the NPH meeting can be directed to Dr. Steve McDuffie of the CNS staff at 509-373-6766, or stephen.mcduffie@rl.doe.gov.

432

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin Project management. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report summarizes accomplishments for the Project examining hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Among the many research areas summarized are the following: assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environment;ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River System; remediation of selected contaminants; rapid on-site immunassay for heavy metal contamination; molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity induced by retinoids and retinoid-like molecules; resuseable synthetic membranes for the removal of aromatic and halogenated organic pollutants from waste water; Effects of steroid receptor activation in neurendocrine cell of the mammalian hypothalamus; modeling and assessment of environmental quality of louisiana bayous and swamps; enhancement of environmental education. The report also contains a summary of publications resulting from this project and an appendix with analytical core protocals and target compounds and metals.

McLachlan, J.; Ide, C.F.; O`Connor, S.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) 8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements for containers, tanks,

434

Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste 2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes procedures to establish the applicable general provisions for generators of hazardous waste. It also

435

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a facility. The statute also

436

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Oil or Hazardous Spills Law requires notice to the Environmental

437

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide

438

Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations [Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Analysis, Hazard Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Bookmark and Share NE Division personnel had a key role in the creation of the FCF Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), FCF Technical Safety Requirements (TSR)

439

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management Act Hazardous Waste Management Act Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a

440

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal restrictions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider District Department of the Environment This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces

442

Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a hazardous waste management program to provide for the reduction of hazardous waste generation, reuse, recovery, and treatment as

443

Thermal radiation hazards associated with marine LNG spills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimates of hazardous distances associated with a vapor cloud resulting from a major LNG ship accident have been based on predictions...

James H. Stannard Jr.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by B&W Technical Services, Pantex and Pro2Serve October, 2011

445

Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities Andrew Maham, Tom Houston, Carl J. Costantino DOE NPH Meeting, Germantown, MD October 2014

446

South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations to prevent exposure of persons, animals, or the environment to hazardous waste. The construction...

447

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Honolulu Port Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Available for Download On March 13, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar...

448

EIS-0286: Hanford Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) analyzes the proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site.

449

Dust: A major environmental hazard on the earth's moon  

SciTech Connect

On the Earth's Moon, obvious hazards to humans and machines are created by extreme temperature fluctuations, low gravity, and the virtual absence of any atmosphere. The most important other environmental factor is ionizing radiation. Less obvious environmental hazards that must be considered before establishing a manned presence on the lunar surface are the hazards from micrometeoroid bombardment, the nuisance of electro-statically-charged lunar dust, and an alien visual environment without familiar clues. Before man can establish lunar bases and lunar mining operations, and continue the exploration of that planet, we must develop a means of mitigating these hazards. 4 refs.

Heiken, G.; Vaniman, D.; Lehnert, B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

for NNSA's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at...

451

Chapter 31 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions necessary for identification and listing of a hazardous waste. The regulation also establishes the criteria for identifying the...

452

Title 40 CFR 261 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste (2014). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTitle40CFR261IdentificationandListingofHazardousWaste&oldid793417" Categories: References...

453

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Download On March 13, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter Sandia developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool...

454

Program Review, Workplace Inspections, Hazards Analysis And Abatement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides guidance information and suggested procedures for performing program review, workplace inspections, hazards analysis, and abatement, successfully at DOE Federal employee worksites.

455

Fees For Disposal Of Hazardous Waste Or Substances (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The article lists annual payments to be made to counties, restrictions on disposal of hazardous waste, additional fees collected by counties and penalties.

456

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems Section 180(c) Ad Hoc Working Group Transportation Plan Ad...

457

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2007 Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30) This Criteria Review and Approach Document (HSS CRAD...

458

EPA Hazardous Waste Generators Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generators Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Hazardous Waste Generators Website Abstract This webpage provides general...

459

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

evidence to suggest that particle aggregation is particularly successful in removing glass shards with high surface areasmass ratios. The primary atmospheric hazard of...

460

Consumer perspectives on household hazardous waste management in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We give an overview of the management systems of household hazardous waste (HHW) in Japan and discuss the management systems and their...

Misuzu Asari; Shin-ichi Sakai

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Title 40 CFR 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal...

462

Process for the encapsulation and stabilization of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for encapsulating and stabilizing radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes in a modified sulfur cement composition. The waste may be incinerator fly ash or bottom ash including radioactive contaminants, toxic metal salts and other wastes commonly found in refuse. The process may use glass fibers mixed into the composition to improve the tensile strength and a low concentration of anhydrous sodium sulfide to reduce toxic metal solubility. The present invention preferably includes a method for encapsulating radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes by combining substantially anhydrous wastes, molten modified sulfur cement, preferably glass fibers, as well as anhydrous sodium sulfide or calcium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide in a heated double-planetary orbital mixer. The modified sulfur cement is preheated to about 135.degree..+-.5.degree. C., then the remaining substantially dry components are added and mixed to homogeneity. The homogeneous molten mixture is poured or extruded into a suitable mold. The mold is allowed to cool, while the mixture hardens, thereby immobilizing and encapsulating the contaminants present in the ash.

Colombo, Peter (Patchogue, NY); Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Heiser, III, John H. (Bayport, NY)

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

463

A perspective of hazardous waste and mixed waste treatment technology at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Treatment technologies for the preparation and treatment of heavy metal mixed wastes, contaminated soils, and mixed mercury wastes are being considered at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a DOE nuclear material processing facility operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The proposed treatment technologies to be included at the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building at SRS are based on the regulatory requirements, projected waste volumes, existing technology, cost effectiveness, and project schedule. Waste sorting and size reduction are the initial step in the treatment process. After sorting/size reduction the wastes would go to the next applicable treatment module. For solid heavy metal mixed wastes the proposed treatment is macroencapsulation using a thermoplastic polymer. This process reduces the leachability of hazardous constituents from the waste and allows easy verification of the coating integrity. Stabilization and solidification in a cement matrix will treat a wide variety of wastes (i.e. soils, decontamination water). Some pretreatments may be required (i.e. Ph adjustment) before stabilization. Other pretreatments such as soil washing can reduce the amount of waste to be stabilized. Radioactive contaminated mercury waste at the SRS comes in numerous forms (i.e. process equipment, soils, and lab waste) with the required treatment of high mercury wastes being roasting/retorting and recovery. Any unrecyclable radioactive contaminated elemental mercury would be amalgamated, utilizing a batch system, before disposal.

England, J.L.; Venkatesh, S.; Bailey, L.L.; Langton, C.A.; Hay, M.S.; Stevens, C.B.; Carroll, S.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

A perspective of hazardous waste and mixed waste treatment technology at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Treatment technologies for the preparation and treatment of heavy metal mixed wastes, contaminated soils, and mixed mercury wastes are being considered at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a DOE nuclear material processing facility operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The proposed treatment technologies to be included at the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building at SRS are based on the regulatory requirements, projected waste volumes, existing technology, cost effectiveness, and project schedule. Waste sorting and size reduction are the initial step in the treatment process. After sorting/size reduction the wastes would go to the next applicable treatment module. For solid heavy metal mixed wastes the proposed treatment is macroencapsulation using a thermoplastic polymer. This process reduces the leachability of hazardous constituents from the waste and allows easy verification of the coating integrity. Stabilization and solidification in a cement matrix will treat a wide variety of wastes (i.e. soils, decontamination water). Some pretreatments may be required (i.e. Ph adjustment) before stabilization. Other pretreatments such as soil washing can reduce the amount of waste to be stabilized. Radioactive contaminated mercury waste at the SRS comes in numerous forms (i.e. process equipment, soils, and lab waste) with the required treatment of high mercury wastes being roasting/retorting and recovery. Any unrecyclable radioactive contaminated elemental mercury would be amalgamated, utilizing a batch system, before disposal.

England, J.L.; Venkatesh, S.; Bailey, L.L.; Langton, C.A.; Hay, M.S.; Stevens, C.B.; Carroll, S.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This progress report covers activities for the period January 1 - March 31, 1995 on project concerning `Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin.` The following activities are each summarized by bullets denoting significant experiments/findings: biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin; assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in quatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: biological uptake and metabolism studies; ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River system; bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin; a sensitive rapid on-sit immunoassay for heavy metal contamination; pore-level flow, transport, agglomeration and reaction kinetics of microorganism; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity in the Mississippi River Basin; natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics and radionuclides in the aquatic environment; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; enhancement of environmental education; and a number of just initiated projects including fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments; photocatalytic remediation; radionuclide fate and modeling from Chernobyl.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Prisbrey, Keith (Moscow, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 400  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 72 Volts DC currents < 450 Amps Lifting < 75 lbs Supplies mounted in NEMA enclosures Rack doors locked Power source signage 120/208 VAC covered Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1,7 31020101-00025 3108-00006 310202-00089 3102-00064 2202-00006 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits 6, 7 NA NA NA A ASD108/400 Hi Power DC Power Supply DC voltages < 72 Volts DC currents < 2600 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Supplies built in NEMA enclosures

468

Mr. James Bearzi, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carlsbad Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 October 12, 2010 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Results of Evaluation of Sampling Line Loss, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088 - TSDF Dear Mr. Bearzi: As required under Permit Condition IV.F.5.e, the Permittees are hereby notifying the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) of the results of the evaluation of the loss of two hydrogen and methane monitoring sampling lines. The sampling lines involved were in Panel 3 Rooms 7 and 6. These lines are identified as 7E (exhaust side) and 61 (inlet side). These line losses were previously reported to the NMED on September 2, 2010 and September 28, 2010, respectively.

469

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 420  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 300 Volts DC currents < 500 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 2202-00006 2402-00002 240201-00002 240202-00003 240204-00003 31020101-00025 2202-00004 2202-00006 2202-00009 220209-00057 31020101-00025 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits

470

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FHWA FHWA R d W h M P FHWA R d W h M P FHWA Road Weather Management Program FHWA Road Weather Management Program " "Weather and the transport of Hazardous Materials" Ray Murphy Office of Technical Services Ray Murphy, Office of Technical Services U.S. DOT - Federal Highway Administration Breako t Session Using Technolog to Dispatch U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Breakout Session: Using Technology to Dispatch and Monitor Shipments During Adverse Conditions Presentation Contents Presentation Contents * * Context Context Cl Cl I iti ti I iti ti * * Clarus Clarus Initiative Initiative * * Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum

471

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 413  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13 13 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 200 Volts DC currents < 200 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 1110-00124 31020101-00025 1110-00125 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits 6, 7 NA NA NA A ASD108/400 GESPAC Power Supply Control Units 120 VAC Fans Fan blades covered 1, 7 Power Supplies Hot Work Permit

472

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 412  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 300 Volts DC currents < 500 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 2502-00005 2502-00006 2502-00007 2502-00008 2502-00010 250201-00028 250202-00001 2502-00006 2502-00007 250206-00007 2202-00006 2202-00009 250203-00006 250204-00002 250205-00004

473

Improving tamper detection for hazardous waste security  

SciTech Connect

After September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide improved levels of security for the hazardous materials in their charge. Many low-level wastes that previously had minimal or no security must now be well protected, while high-level wastes require even greater levels of security than previously employed. This demand for improved security comes, in many cases, without waste managers being provided the necessary additional funding, personnel, or security expertise. Contributing to the problem is the fact that--at least in our experience--waste managers often fail to appreciate certain types of security vulnerabilities. They frequently overlook or underestimate the security risks associated with disgruntled or compromised insiders, or the potential legal and political liabilities associated with nonexistent or ineffective security. Also frequently overlooked are potential threats from waste management critics who could resort to sabotage, vandalism, or civil disobedience for purposes of discrediting a waste management program.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.); Trujillo, S. J. (Sonia J.); Martinez, R. K. (Ronald K.); Martinez, D. D. (Debbie D.); Lopez, L. N. (Leon N.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

327 Building fire hazards analysis implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

In March 1998, the 327 Building Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) (Reference 1) was approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-E) for implementation by B and W Hanford Company (BWC). The purpose of the FHA was to identify gaps in compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A (Reference 2) and Richland Operations Office Implementation Directive (RLID) 5480.7 (Reference 3), especially in regard to loss limitation. The FHA identified compliance gaps in five areas and provided nine recommendations (11 items) to bring the 327 Building into compliance. A status is provided for each recommendation in this document. BWHC will use this Implementation Plan to bring the 327 Building and its operation into compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A and IUD 5480.7.

BARILO, N.F.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

Consider multishaft compressors for hazardous applications  

SciTech Connect

API specifies two types of centrifugal compressors: single-shaft (inline) and integrally geared. The latter are mainly air compressors, and API 672, which specifies the design, manufacturing and testing of these compressors, recommends that they may be used for gas services other than air that are nonhazardous and non-toxic. These compressors offer high efficiency, high control range, lower mechanical losses, lower investment and extremely compact design. Advances in gear making technology and design make API 672 compressors highly competitive in certain applications. The single-shaft compressor is used for general refinery services, is governed by API 617, and applicable for air or gas. There is no restriction on the type of gas. Therefore, this compressor is universally applicable for any gas--hazardous or nonhazardous. A large variety of integrally-geared multishaft compressors are available with respect to the number of stages, type of gas, type of drive and pressure range. These compressors have enormous range in terms of volumetric flows, pressure ratios, allowable inlet and discharge pressures, and attainable drive speeds. API 672 compressors find large applications in process, plant and instrument air service, air separation plants, etc. Apart from air, the gases handled by API 672 compressors had been for other nonhazardous applications such as nitrogen, steam, etc. Contrary to API 672 stipulations, multishaft compressors have been used for along time in hazardous applications like refinery offgas, CH{sub 4}, oxygen, or mixtures of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, CO, HCN, etc., or even dry chlorine.

Roy, G.K. [Pt. Indo-Rama Synthetics, West Java (Indonesia)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

MULTI-HAZARD RESISTANT HIGHWAY BRIDGE PIERS HAVING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California to its main suspension bridges and the detailed shots of the Golden Gate and Brooklyn bridgesMULTI-HAZARD RESISTANT HIGHWAY BRIDGE PIERS HAVING CONCRETE-FILLED STEEL TUBE Shuichi FUJIKURA1 of a multi-hazard bridge pier concept, i.e., a bridge pier system capable of providing an adequate level

Bruneau, Michel

477

The shape of the hazard function for cancer incidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A population-based cohort consisting of 126,141 men and 122,208 women born between 1874 and 1931 and at risk for breast or colorectal cancer after 1965 was identified by linking the Utah Population Data Base and the Utah Cancer Registry. The hazard function ... Keywords: Breast cancer, Colorectal cancer, Hazard function, Survival analysis, Truncation

K. M. Boucher; R. A. Kerber

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Open problem: Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Current weather radar detection and prediction sys- tems primarily rely on numerical models. We proposeOpen problem: Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction Amy McGovern1, #12;Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction Radar velocity Radar

McGovern, Amy

479

Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH REGULATIONS (COSHH) and the DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES AND EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERES Involving the Use of Hazardous Chemicals. COSHH requires health risks to be assessed and controlled by dangerous substances. The sections below correspond approximately to the sections in the form. The major

480

Chemical Applications of Electrohydraulic Cavitation for Hazardous Waste Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the destruction or transformation of hazardous chemical substances such as high-temperature incineration, amended activated sludge digestion, anaerobic digestion and conventional physicochemical treatment. Pulsed-power plasma discharge technology may have.... Current approaches to the treatment of hazardous chemical wastes include high temperature incineration, chemical oxidation with and UV light, membrane separation, activated carbon adsorption, substrate-specific biodegration, electron beam bombardment...

Hoffmann, M. R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous metals arsenic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill Jorge G. Zornberg, M, Inc. OII Superfund landfill in southern California. This cover system constitutes the first ET cover:6 427 CE Database subject headings: Evapotranspiration; Coating; Landfills; Hazardous waste; Design

Zornberg, Jorge G.

482

Pilot test specific test plan for the removal of arsenic Socorro, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative drinking water treatment technologies designed to meet the new arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 {micro}g/L (effective January 2006). As currently envisioned, pilots tests may include multiple phases. Phase I tests will involve side-by-side comparisons of several commercial technologies primarily using design parameters suggested by the Vendors. Subsequent tests (Phase II) may involve repeating some of the original tests, testing the same commercial technologies under different conditions and testing experimental technologies or additional commercial technologies. This Pilot Test Specific Test Plan (PTSTP) was written for Phase I of the Socorro Springs Pilot. The objectives of Phase I include evaluation of the treatment performance of five adsorptive media under ambient pH conditions (approximately 8.0) and assessment of the effect of contact time on the performance of one of the media. Addenda to the PTSTP may be written to cover Phase II studies and supporting laboratory studies. The Phase I demonstration began in the winter of 2004 and will last approximately 9 months. The information from the test will help the City of Socorro choose the best arsenic treatment technology for the Socorro Springs well. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Research Foundation, SNL, and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development).

Collins, Sue S.; Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Marbury, Justin Luke

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

484

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level nuclear waste facilities. This legislation describes the factors considered by the Board in making siting decisions. The Board is authorized to enact rules and regulations pertaining to the siting of hazardous and low-level nuclear

485

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, provides criteria and guidance for the analysis and design of facility structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that are necessary to implement the requirements of DOE Order (O) 420.1C, Facility Safety, and to ensure that the SSCs will be able to effectively perform their intended safety functions under the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPHs). This Standard also provides criteria and guidance for the use of industry building codes and voluntary

486

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 December 4, 2007 Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30) Line management ensures that the requirements for generating, storing, treating, transporting, and disposing of hazardous waste, universal waste, and used oil, established under 40 CFR Subchapter I, applicable permits, and DOE requirements have been effectively implemented for federal and contractor employees, including subcontractors. Written programs and plans are in place and updated when conditions or requirements change. Employees have been properly trained for the wastes they handle. Documentation of waste characterizations, manifests, land disposal restrictions,

487

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The large amount of scientific data collected on the Mount St. Helens eruption has resulted in significant changes in thinking about the atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than previously thought. The Mount St. Helens eruption released much fine ash in the upper atmosphere. These silicates were removed very rapidly due to a process of particle aggregation (Sorem, 1982;

488

Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 November 2012 Protocol for High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight The purpose of this protocol is to establish the requirements and responsibilities for managing and conducting Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) independent oversight of high-hazard nuclear facility projects. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) self regulatory framework for safety and security, DOE Order 227.1, Independent Oversight Program, assigns HSS the responsibility for implementing an independent oversight program. It also requires the HSS Office of Enforcement and Oversight to conduct independent evaluations of safety and security. This

489

Experiment Hazard Class 7.1 - BSL - 1 Biohazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - BSL-1 Biohazards 1 - BSL-1 Biohazards Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring Biosafety Level 1 (BSL-1). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Biosafety Level 1 is suitable for work involving well-characterized agents not known to consistently cause disease in healthy adult humans, and work that is of minimal potential hazard to laboratory personnel and the environment. The laboratory is not necessarily separated from the general traffic patterns in the building. However, laboratories should have doors for access control. A biohazard sign, though not required for BSL1, may be posted at the entrance to the laboratory. Work is generally conducted on open bench tops using standard

490

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop The Energy Department Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop, sponsored by the Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, was held October 25-26, 2011, in Germantown, Maryland. The workshop brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact nuclear facilities. The workshop featured twenty presentations as well as a breakout session devoted to discussing the status of the commonly used structural analysis code SASSI, a System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction. A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings_1.pdf Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs - A Case Study of Probabilistic

491

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop The Energy Department Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop, sponsored by the Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, was held October 25-26, 2011, in Germantown, Maryland. The workshop brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact nuclear facilities. The workshop featured twenty presentations as well as a breakout session devoted to discussing the status of the commonly used structural analysis code SASSI, a System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction. A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings_1.pdf Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs - A Case Study of Probabilistic

492

Microsoft Word - 3.3 Activity Hazard Documents 0913.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activity Activity Hazard Documents Activity Hazard Documents (AHDs) are formal work authorizations, as described in ES&H Manual, Chapter 6, Appendix D, that are required for higher hazard activities, as described in the AFRD Hazards, Equipment, and Authorizations Review form. When planning a new experiment or project, the first step is to contact the AFRD ES&H Coordinator to assist in determining whether an AHD or other type of work authorization is needed. Short-term, moderate hazard work may be eligible for authorizations under the Task-Based JHA. Electrical work requires authorization from the employee's supervisor (see ES&H Manual, Section 8.8.2). Writing an AHD The process of writing and obtaining approvals for a new AHD can typically take several

493

Experiment Hazard Class 12 - Electrical and Electronic Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - Electrical and Electronic Equipment 2 - Electrical and Electronic Equipment Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving electrical and electronic equipment. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The inspection of electric equipment is covered under the APS Policy For User Electric Equipment Inspections. Electrical hazards does not include work involving equipment where ALL of the following apply: (1) equipment use only in accordance with operating instructions AND/OR involves just plugging/unplugging, AND; (2) The equipment is either NRTL-listed or displays an Argonne barcoded ELECTRICAL SAFETY APPROVED sticker, AND; (3) The work involves no attempts to remove covers or panels that might expose energized electrical components.

494

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

495

Hazardous waste research and development in the Pacific Basin  

SciTech Connect

The effective management of hazardous waste is an issue that all countries of the Pacific Basin must address. By very rough estimates, almost 272 million metric tons of hazardous wastes are being generated every year in the region. While the data are not consistently defined and reported, they do indicate the extent of the problem. Increasing development brings along an increase in the rate of hazardous waste generation. On this basis, the developing countries of the region can be expected to experience some of the same problems of the developed countries as their economies become more industrialized. Fundamental problems are involved in the compilation of consistent hazardous-waste generation statistics in the Pacific Basin. One involves the definition of what constitutes hazardous waste.

Cirillo, R.R.; Carpenter, R.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Environment and Policy Inst., Honolulu, HI (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

METAL MEDIA FILTERS, AG-1 SECTION FI  

SciTech Connect

One application of metal media filters is in various nuclear air cleaning processes including applications for protecting workers, the public and the environment from hazardous and radioactive particles. To support this application the development of the ASME AG-1 FI Standard on Metal Media has been under way for more than ten years. Development of the proposed section has required resolving several difficult issues associated with operating conditions (media velocity, pressure drop, etc.), qualification testing, and quality acceptance testing. Performance characteristics of metal media are dramatically different than the glass fiber media with respect to parameters like differential pressures, operating temperatures, media strength, etc. These differences make existing data for a glass fiber media inadequate for qualifying a metal media filter for AG-1. In the past much work has been conducted on metal media filters at facilities such as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to qualify the media as High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters. Particle retention testing has been conducted at Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility and at Air Techniques International (ATI) to prove that the metal media meets or exceeds the 99.97% particle retention required for a HEPA Filter. Even with his testing, data was lacking to complete an AG-1 FI Standard on metal media. With funding secured by Mississippi State University (MSU) from National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a research test stand is being designed and fabricated at MSU's Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) Facility to obtain qualification data on metal media. This in turn will support required data needed for the FI Standard. The paper will discuss in detail how the test stand at MSU will obtain the necessary data to complete the FI Standard.

Adamson, D.

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

497

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 779802, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/779/2006/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-induced hazards that are representative for a whole class of hazards: Accidents due to nuclear power plants (NPP) or air traffic, and terrorism. For the analysis of accidents, risk is measured with respect to getting statistics leading to an expected value of risk. Terrorism risk is assessed by the attraction certain ele

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

498

WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Update  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) was issued on October 27, 1999 [1]. Since that time, the WIPP has sought modifications to clarify the permit language, provide alternative methods for meeting permit requirements and to update permit conditions. Significant advancements have been made in transuranic (TRU) waste management as the result of modifications to the HWFP. Among these advancements is a modification to obtain a drum age criteria (DAC) value to perform headspace gas sampling on drums to be super-compacted and placed in a 100-gallon overpack drum. In addition, the Section 311 permit modification request that would allow for more efficient waste characterization, and the modification to authorize the shipment and disposal of Remote-Handled (RH) TRU waste were merged together and submitted to the regulator as the Consolidated Permit Modification Request (PMR). The submittal of the Consolidated PMR came at the request of the regulator as part of responses to Notices of Deficiency (NODs) for the separate PMRs which had been submitted in previous years. Section 311 of the fiscal year 2004 Energy and Water Developments Appropriations Act (Public Law 108-137) [2] directs the Department of Energy to submit a permit modification that limits waste confirmation to radiography or visual examination of a statistical subpopulation of containers. Section 311 also specifically directs that disposal room performance standards be to be met by monitoring for volatile organic compounds in the underground disposal rooms. This statute translates into the elimination of other waste confirmation methods such as headspace gas sampling and analysis and solids sampling and analysis. These methods, as appropriate, will continue to be used by the generator sites during hazardous waste determinations or characterization activities. This modification is expected to reduce the overall cost of waste analysis by hundreds of millions of dollars [3]. Combining both the chap. 311 and RH TRU waste permit modification requests allows for both the regulator and DOE to expedite action on the modification requests. The Combined PMR reduces costs by having only one administrative process for both modification requests. (authors)

Kehrman, B.; Most, W. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, 4021 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Metal-phosphate binders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

500

Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

none,

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z